2018–19 Departmental Results Report – Supplementary Information

Operating context and key risks

Supplementary information tables

Operating context and key risks

Operating context

Canada has excellent economic fundamentals and is among the strongest economies in the G7. Yet our country faces stiff competition on the international stage. Many nations are increasing support for their innovation systems and making large investments to unlock the benefits of the data-driven digital economy. Canada's success lies in its ability to innovate for improved economic, social and environmental outcomes.

In 2018–19, ISED continued work to advance Canada's Innovation and Skills Plan, recognizing that innovation is fundamental to promoting sustainable and inclusive growth, and generating jobs that raise Canadians' living standards. The Innovation and Skills Plan is a whole-of-government, multi-year approach meant to establish Canada as one of the most innovative countries in the world and to foster a culture of innovation from coast to coast to coast. Developed in consultation with Canadians, the Innovation and Skills Plan supports the entire innovation continuum, focusing on four interconnected pillars to spark innovation through partnerships and targeted actions.

Through the Innovation and Skills Plan and the Department's suite of initiatives and programs, ISED is working with Canadian businesses in order to respond to today's challenges and opportunities, strengthen our competitiveness on the global stage, and create a culture of innovation. ISED is putting these inclusive growth policies into action to ensure everyone has the jobs, skills and learning to participate in the innovation economy.

The following challenges continue to shape Canada's future as it becomes more open and interconnected within the global community.

Key risks

Across the world, in all sectors of the economy and in all types of institutions, management is taking the pulse on risk. The implications of being disconnected from risks are too significant. From reputational risks that can lead to a withdrawal of stakeholder confidence, to legal risks that can lead to massive financial payouts, there is a vast range of risks capturing management's attention. While uncertainty creates risk, risk can be managed. Managing risks effectively can spell the difference between inspiring a positive impact for Canadians, or failing to deliver.

In its 2018–19 Departmental Plan, ISED identified three key risk areas relating to its ability to deliver results for Canadians. The risks, as well as highlights of the strategies to manage them, are provided below.

Key risks
Risks Mitigating strategy and effectiveness Link to the Department's Core Responsibilities Link to mandate letter commitments and any government-wide or Departmental priorities

Innovation and Skills Plan implementation

There is a risk that the implementation of Canada's Innovation and Skills Plan may not meet the expectations of stakeholders in terms of speed of delivery and expected benefits, given the complexity of the programs and the limitations of ISED's policy and program levers, as well as the Department's capacity to execute the Plan.

In 2018–19, ISED supported the development of the Building a Nation of Innovators report, to help communicate to stakeholders how Canada's Innovation and Skills Plan (ISP) is putting people first and making sure Canadians and Canadian businesses benefit from economic opportunities today and tomorrow. ISED also tracked progress and success across a number of headline indicators identified under the Plan through regular updates to ISP Results Portal, launched in February 2018.

We supported a round of Canada-wide engagement and consultation on digital and data transformation to inform the next phase of the Innovation and Skills plan. The consultation resulted in the launch of Canada's new Digital Charter in May 2019.

  • People, Skills and Communities
  • Science, Technology, Research and Commercialization
  • Companies, Investment and Growth

Develop an Innovation Agenda

NAFTA negotiations

There is a risk that ISED's current activities and policies will be insufficient to support Canadian business in the event of negative repercussions following the NAFTA negotiations.

In 2018–19, ISED completed significant work in terms of business intelligence and analysis to support NAFTA renegotiation and ensure alignment with Canadian sectors' needs. The new Canada-U.S.-Mexico Agreement (CUSMA) was signed on November 30, 2018, preserving preferential U.S. market access for Canadian firms, modernizing elements of the agreement and increasing business certainty. Until the new agreement has been ratified by the U.S., NAFTA continues to apply.

The Department also continued to deliver programming that supports diversification through exporting and scaling-up globally competitive companies across all sectors of the economy and encouraging them to take advantage of Canada's valuable new free trade agreements including Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) and Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA). This included launching the Women Entrepreneurship Fund to help women-owned and women-led businesses grow and reach export markets, enrolling additional high-potential firms under the Accelerated Growth Service, and launching the Mobilizing SMEs to Export Initiative to better support high-capacity small and medium sized businesses (SMEs) in realizing their export potential.

  • Companies, Investment and Growth

Develop programs to support Canadian businesses to increase their exports, expand the range of their trading partners, and adjust to, take advantage of, and prepare for, the implementation of new trade agreements.

Digital services

There is a risk that availability and quality of digital services will not meet the expectations of Canadian businesses and could negatively impact ISED's ability to serve its clients and deliver on its operational commitments.

In 2018–19, ISED continued efforts to accelerate digital services for businesses and innovators, in keeping with the Government's commitment to ensure that Canadian businesses are able to access modern digital services that are secure and simple to use. A prime example of ISED's work on enhancements to client-centric digital services is the "one-stop-shop" for Canadian innovators; the Innovation Canada Platform. ISED is also advancing modernization initiatives, such as the development of innovative services enabling clients to conduct business transactions with the Canadian Intellectual Property Office through digital channels.

ISED has put in place a 5-year departmental Digital Service Transformation Strategy, called "Going Digital," with a roadmap to transform digital services for business. The roadmap is based on three pillars: 1) Building ISED's Digital Foundation (completed in June 2019); 2) Integrating Digital Services for Business (July 2019-December 2020); and 3) Government that Runs at the Pace of Business (January 2021-June 2022).

  • Companies, Investment and Growth

Engage provincial, territorial, and municipal governments to create as much alignment as possible with complementary programs delivered by other governments to support SMEs.

Reduce the administrative burden on small business.

Supplementary information tables

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Context for the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2016–2019 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS):

In keeping with the objectives of the act to make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) supports reporting on the implementation of the FSDS and its Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy, or equivalent document, through the activities described in this supplementary information table.

2. Sustainable development in ISED

ISED's Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy for 2017 to 2020 describes the department's actions in support of achieving clean growth, effective action on climate change, low carbon government, clean energy, sustainable managed lands and forests, sustainable food, and safe and healthy communities. This supplementary information table presents available results for the departmental actions pertinent to these goals. Last year's supplementary information table is posted on the department's website. ISED is also noting which UN SDG target each departmental action contributes to achieving.

3. Departmental performance by FSDS goal

The following tables provide performance information on departmental actions in support of the FSDS goals listed in section 2.

FSDS goal: clean growth

The 2016–2019 FSDS is the first time that the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada is responsible for an FSDS goal and target. In co-operation with the Minister of Natural Resources Canada, the minister is responsible for making progress on the FSDS clean growth goal, i.e. a growing clean technology industry in Canada that contributes to clean growth and the transition to a low-carbon economy.

FSDS goal: clean growth
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Invest in technologies to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Establish a Clean Growth Hub.

SDG 9

Starting Point:

New program established in 2018.

Target Indicator:

Engagement, collaboration, and consultation activities

Publications of policy intelligence, program analytics and other materials in support of evidence-based decision-making

Active GoC departmental Clean Technology program websites linked to the Hub clean technology program inventory

Unique page views

Users satisfied they were able to access information they were seeking from the website

Participating (in the Hub) federal departments and agencies indicating that clean tech priorities are more aligned than they were before the Hub

Clean Technology program components noting more efficient access to federal clean technology programming

Clean Technology programs that track technology advancement through the Hub using a technology readiness scale

Over the course of 2018–19, the Hub has served over 953 clients by leveraging and coordinating the knowledge and expertise of over 16 federal departments and agencies.

Between April 2018 and March 2019, the Hub website had over 29,000 unique page views.

The Clean Growth Hub has also enhanced coordination between federal and provincial partners in order to streamline client service, identify gaps in clean tech programs and policies, and enhance information sharing in support of innovation and clean growth outcomes. For example, the Hub has developed formal partnerships with British Columbia and Western Economic Diversification Canada to identify programs and services that can best support Canadian clean technology producers and users.

To increase awareness and stakeholder engagement, the Hub participated in over 55 presentations including sector-specific, national and regional events, connecting with stakeholders across Canada.

In 2018–19 the Hub also developed a Client Satisfaction Survey to capture the experiences of Hub clients that launched in April 2019, and initiated the development of guidelines to enable consistent collection of federal clean technology programs' administrative data across more than 20 federal programs.

Note: The Clean Growth Hub Has developed new performance metrics to reflect its activities. Updated targets and indicators will be included in ISED's 2020–2023 DSDS, to be tabled in June 2020.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Invest in technologies to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Implement the new Strategic Innovation Fund (SIF) which retools existing direct business innovation programs which have been part of the SD Strategy in the past: the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative, the Technology Demonstration Program, the Automotive Innovation Fund and the Automotive Supplier Innovation Program.

SDG 9

Starting point:

Government investments in energy R&D: $387M

(2014–15)

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

Percentage of projects demonstrating environmental benefits to Canada (e.g. increase in energy efficiency, conservation of renewable and non-renewable natural resources, increase in production efficiencies and/or reduce material usage).

As of March 31, 2019, 32% of signed SIF projects demonstrate environmental benefits to Canada in line with Mission Innovation objectives.

Number of projects: 12

Authorized assistance: $201,463,168

Disbursements: $71,030,835

Repayments: $0 (SIF has repayable projects, but repayments have not started yet).

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Invest in technologies to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Support projects across Canada to develop and demonstrate new clean technologies that promote sustainable development, including those that address environmental issues such as climate change, air quality, clean water and clean soil through Sustainable Development Technology Canada's (SDTC) SD Tech Fund.

Implement the SD Tech Fund, which invests in the pre-commercial development and demonstration of clean technology innovation that addresses climate change, air quality, clean water and clean soil. See www.sdtc.ca.

SDG 9

Starting point:

Average of 20 projects approved and contracted per year over past 5 years.

Average of 80% of projects completed within five years.

6.3 megatonnes of CO2e emissions reductions in 2015 attributable to SD Tech Fund supported technologies.

20 SDTC projects per year on average between 2011 and 2015

75% of SDTC funded projects' Technical Readiness Level (TRL) of contracted projects increased by 2 levels

2 dollars leveraged by private and other public funders per dollar from the SD Tech Fund

Revenues of $1.4 billion in 2015 for SDTC-funded technologies

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

80 SDTC projects

75% of SDTC funded projects' TRL of contracted projects increased by 2 levels

Revenue growth from SDTC funded technologies reported by companies entering the global market

Incremental reductions in GHG emissions attributable to SDTC-funded projects

Increase of 1 megatonne reduction per annum through 2025

Maintain current level of approving and contracting 20 projects per year

Average of 85% of projects completing within five years

$2.6 leveraged in total for every $1 from SDTC for the entire portfolio.

100% of the projects completed in 2018-19 advanced at least 2 TRL levels (Total of 7 projects).

Revenues of $3.05 billion for SDTC-funded technologies.

18.1 megatonnes estimated reduction in GHG emissions.

38 projects were approved.

80% of projects completed within the last 5 years.

Note: Sustainable Development Technology Canada updated its Performance Management Strategy Framework in June 2019 to better represent results from its activities. Updated targets and indicators reflecting SDTC's new Performance Framework will be reflected in ISED's 2020–2023 DSDS, to be tabled in June 2020.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Invest in technologies to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Continue to implement the National Research Council's Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) on Clean Technology

SDG 9

Performance indicator(s):

Client growth

Number of new products and processes

Economic impact, e.g. program return on investment

In 2018-19, NRC IRAP funded 434 clean technology projects. To support these projects, IRAP provided $48.16M in funding.

Over the same period, IRAP funded firms had a revenue growth of 27 percent including those firms in clean technology. All IRAP funded firms had an overall employment growth rate of 18 percent.

The IRAP 2017 Evaluation demonstrated that the positive economic benefits of the program far outweighed the cost at a ratio of almost 5 to 1.

Note: IRAP Clean Technology investments relate to project funding in air, water and energy, in addition to technologies to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Work with partners on developing and adopting new technologies to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Implement Innovation Superclusters Initiative (ISI), a new program which aims to invest in the research, development and commercialization of innovative platform technologies and business processes that will have the potential to improve productivity and competitiveness.

SDG 9

Performance indicator(s):

Number of collaborative projects funded or launched

Increased expenditures on BERD (Business Expenditures on Research and Development)

All five Superclusters have successfully negotiated the terms of their contribution agreements, and are now completing supporting strategic documentation.

In March 2019, Digital Technology Supercluster became the first Supercluster to announce projects. In total, seven collaborative projects have been announced by the Supercluster, involving 33 stakeholders.

All seven projects will have collaborative R&D benefits, targeting areas such as manufacturing efficiencies, data analysis capabilities, and healthcare innovation.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Work with partners on developing and adopting new technologies to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Implement Innovative Solutions Canada (ISC), a new innovation procurement program which will develop a domestic market for early-stage, pre-commercial innovations

SDG 9

Starting Point:

New program launched in December 2017.

ISC will support the federal government to act as a first customer—to test and validate Canadian technologies, including those related to clean technology that support sustainable growth.

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

ISC will encourage participating federal departments to consider posting challenges that promote clean technology development.

ISC will track the outcomes of clean technology challenges that pass through the program and will report on their outcomes.

ISC released seven challenges sponsored by five federal departments designed to incentivize technology development to address plastic waste.

To date no federal departments mandated to use ISC have sponsored challenges related to GHG reduction and air pollutant emissions.

The ISC Secretariat continues its efforts to encourage departments and agencies to release clean technology challenges.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Work with partners on developing and adopting new technologies to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Continue to Implement FedDev Ontario's core program, the Southern Ontario Prosperity Program (SOPP), which includes the following:

Advanced Manufacturing Fund (AMF),

Investing in Business Innovation (IBI),

Investing in Business Growth and Productivity (IBGP),

Investing in Commercialization Partnerships (ICP),

Investing in Regional Diversification (IRD), and Eastern Ontario Development Program (EOPD).

The Agency will also continue its delivery of national programs and initiatives, such as the Community Futures Program, in southern Ontario.

SDG 9

Starting point:

Further to the Budget 2016 announcement that regional development agencies (RDAs) will increase their collective annual support for clean technology to $100 million, FedDev Ontario invested $25 million in clean technology projects in 2016–17. The Agency is on track to invest approximately $22 million annually in 2017–18 and 2018–19 in clean technology products, processes and services that improve environmental performance in support of sustainable development and clean economic growth

Performance Indicators:

Number and value of FedDev Ontario investments in clean technology projects in southern Ontario

Clean technology employment

Further to the Budget 2016 announcement that RDAs will increase their collective annual support for clean technology to $100 million, FedDev Ontario invested $35.6 million in 36 clean technology projects in 2018–19. This exceeded the annual target of $22.7 million.

Note: As per the Federal Sustainable Development Act (2008), Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions, and Western Economic Diversification Canada table their own Departmental Sustainable Development Strategies. Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario, and Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario are not bound by the act and are contributing to ISED's 2017–20 DSDS on a voluntary basis.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Work with partners on developing and adopting new technologies to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Create two additional Canada Excellence Research Chairs (CERC) in fields related to clean and sustainable technology

SDG 9

Starting point:

CERC starting point—0

Performance indicator(s):

Number of clean technology CERCs appointed by October 2020

On April 17, 2019, eight new Chairs were announced, three of which are in fields related to clean and sustainable technology: Dr. Ursula Eicker at Concordia University (Smart, Sustainable and Resilient Communities and Cities), Dr. Orlando Rojas at the University of British Columbia (Forest Bioproducts) and Dr. Dorthe Dahl-Jensen at the University of Manitoba (Arctic Sea Ice, Freshwater-Marine Coupling, and Climate Change).

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Support voluntary action to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Continue to implement the Expedited Examination of Patent Applications Related to Green Technology through the Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO)

SDG 9

Starting point:

From March 3, 2011 to March 31, 2018, a total of 349 patent applications received designation under this legislation and 262 patents were granted.

In 2016–17, 58 patent applications received the designation and 48 patents were granted.

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

As this is a responsive program, there are no targets or performance measures associated with Green Technology for CIPO.

A performance indicator is the number of patents that received designation.

In 2018–19, 48 patent applications received the designation and 45 patents were granted.

From March 3, 2011, to March 31, 2019, a total of 453 patent applications received designation under this legislation and 380 patents were granted.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Support voluntary action to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Continue to Implement FedNor's Northern Ontario Development Program

SDG 9

Starting point:

Through the Northern Ontario Development Program (NODP), FedNor has invested $2.1 million in support of 14 clean tech projects since 2011–12.

Further to Budget 2016 announcement that regional development agencies (RDAs) will increase their annual support for clean technology to $100M, the NODP expended $401,094 in support of 4 clean tech projects in 2016–17.

Performance indicator(s):

Number and value of FedNor's investments in clean technology projects.

Clean technology employment

The NODP expended $638,026 towards eight projects in 2018–19.

Three projects noted above have been completed with final results of 10 full-time equivalent (FTE) jobs created and 13 FTE jobs maintained. The other projects are not yet complete with anticipated results of 39 FTE jobs created and another 48 FTE jobs maintained.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels. Support voluntary action to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions Continue to implement the Computers for Schools Program. SDG 9

Starting Point:

Number of refurbished computers distributed 74,896 (2016–17)

Target Indicator:

Number of refurbished computers distributed 81,965 (2017–18)

Amount of toxic waste diverted from landfill: 2,5 million pounds (2016–17)

Number of partner organizations receiving computers: 3,364

(2016–17)

Number of refurbished computers distributed: 73,043 (2018–19)

Amount of toxic waste diverted from landfill: 1,600,576 lbs or 800 tons (2018–19)

Number of partner organizations receiving computers: approx. 4,102 (2018–19)

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels. Support voluntary action to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions Continue to support the creation of green jobs, the Technical Work Experience Program (TWEP) as part of the Youth Employment Strategy (YES) SDG 9

Starting point:

Number of green jobs created (TWEP 2016–17) 270

Performance Indicator:

Number of new green jobs created

Number of green jobs created (TWEP* 2018–19): 276.

*Note TWEP was renamed Computers for Schools Intern (CFSI) program in 2018.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels. Strengthen skills development in support of the transition to a low-carbon economy Implement the Youth Employment Strategy through the National Research Council's Industrial Research Assistance Program SDG 9

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

Youth Employment Program (YEP) Target: $5,000,000

YEP — Green Target: $10,000,000; 1,000 Jobs

In 2018–19, NRC IRAP supported 1,294 youth jobs in Canadian companies through the Youth Employment Strategy. Internships that focused directly on green economy jobs totaled 1,102 internships.

IRAP provided $17.5M in funding to youth internships. This was comprised of $10.5M to support Youth Green internships and $7M to support regular youth internships.

56% of youth who participated in a Youth Green internship were employed or self-employed at the end of the internship; and 78% of those employed in a regular internship were either employed or self-employed at the end of the internship.

Additional departmental sustainable development activities and initiatives related to clean growth
Additional departmental activities and initiatives Support for United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (UN SDG) target Starting points, targets and performance indicators Results achieved

Establish a Clean Technology Data Strategy in order to foster innovation, improve knowledge in the private sector and stakeholder communities, and help inform future government decision-making.

SDG 9

Performance Indicators:

Data from the Survey on Environmental Goods and Services (SEGS) pilot (reference year 2015) available to the public

Clean Technology Satellite Account (CTSA) dataset (reference year 2014), and the baseline clean technology macroeconomic indicators generated from this dataset (e.g. GDP, employment, income, trade) available to the public

CTSA dataset (reference years 2015 and 2016) and the baseline clean technology macroeconomic indicators generated from this dataset (e.g. GDP, employment, income, trade) available to the public

Industry and administrative data sets aligned with Statistics Canada's statistical framework

Government departments using SEGS, CTSA and industry/administrative clean technology sector data and/or renewable energy data in their reporting

Frequency of SEGS, CTSA, industry/administrative and/or renewable energy data citations in government reports, speeches, etc.

Frequency of SEGS, CTSA, industry and/or renewable energy data in industry association and think tank reports

Government departments using clean technology data in their reporting

Clean technology data citations in reports by governments, industry association and think tank

ISED worked with Statistics Canada, NRCan and other government departments to update and refine the clean technology taxonomy, which is the detailed inventory of products and services considered to meet the definition of clean technology. The latest results from the SEGS were released in March 2019. Survey results provided ISED with estimates of gross revenues, export revenues and employment levels for clean technology companies at the regional and national levels.

To expand ISED's clean technology data analysis, ISED collaborated with Statistics Canada to add questions on clean technology company-level investments for the next iteration of SEGS (March 2020).

Statistics Canada released the latest version of the Environmental and Clean Technology Products Economic Account (ECTPEA) in December 2018, which is ISED's main source of clean technology data. To better understand Canada's trade in clean technology, ISED worked with Statistics Canada and NRCan to release the International Trade in Environmental and Clean Technology Products by Origin and Destination (2007 to 2017) in February 2019.

ISED also worked with NRCan in the collection of federal clean technology programs' administrative data and in the development of guidelines to ensure data collection consistency across more than 20 federal programs.

For 2018-19, ISED leveraged opportunities to disseminate and communicate clean technology data to stakeholders, the public, and other government departments. ISED presented clean technology data and analysis at the Statistics Canada Workshop on a Low Carbon Economy on October 10 and 11, 2018 and NRCan's Symposium on Advancing Data Collaboration between Government, Industry and Academic Institutions to Strengthen Industry Competitiveness on March 7, 2019.

On March 21, 2019, ISED hosted the federal-provincial-territorial Working Group on Clean Growth's Communities of Interest meeting on clean technology data, in which clean technology data and analysis was shared and opportunities for collaboration with provinces, territories, and stakeholders were discussed.

Continue to implement the Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund (PSI-SIF) which aims at improving environmental sustainability of research and innovation related infrastructure at post-secondary institutions and college training infrastructure. PSI-SIF provides up to $2 billion for infrastructure projects at post-secondary institutions to enhance and modernize research and commercialization facilities, as well as industry-relevant training facilities at colleges and polytechnic institutions in Canada.

SDG 13 and SDG 4

Performance indicator(s):

Number of projects certified under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) and at what level.

Description and estimate of direct energy savings as a result of renovation, repair and maintenance projects.

Description and estimate of greenhouse gas emissions reductions in the following areas as a result of renovation, repair and maintenance projects:

Direct emissions reductions from equipment upgrades

Indirect emissions reductions associated with generation of electricity

To date, 198 projects (out of 297) have identified that they would be benefiting the environment through energy savings and or through green building certification.

20 projects had Green Building certification with some having more than one designation (2- Boma Fest; 3 Green Globes, 37- LEED; 8- Other).

Note: Estimates of energy savings and emissions reductions are not available at this time.

Continue to support and promote the integration of corporate social responsibility (CSR) policies and practices into the operations, core business strategies, and global supply chains of Canadian businesses; corporate accountability and transparency practices; and, CSR standards in the Canadian marketplace. The integration of CSR practices can make a positive contribution to the realization of sustainable consumption and production, innovation

and competitiveness.

SDG 12 and SDG 9

Number of firms in Canada that have a green/sustainability strategy in place.

Number of Canadian firms producing CSR reports using the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Standard.

Not available.

Continue to implement the Prime Minister Awards (PMA) which advances goal on ensuring a quality education for all. The Prime Minister's Awards program honours Canada's pre-eminent ICT teachers and early childhood educators every year through a national competition. The nomination criteria honours educators who encourage youth to become conscious global citizens and to critically consider real world issues. The program promotes and shares the PMA recipient's exemplary teaching practices in order to replicate excellence in education across the country and help students develop skills needed to excel in a 21st century society and economy.

SDG 4

Number of PMA recipients that teach in areas related to the environment, climate change and clean growth.

67 educators honored and recognized as PMA Recipients in 2018–19.

17 National PMA Recipient best practices shared and promoted in 2018–19.

FSDS goal: effective action on climate change
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved

By 2030, reduce Canada's total GHG emissions by 30%, relative to 2005 emission levels

Work with partners on climate change

The Standards Council of Canada, a crown corporation member of the ISED portfolio, will continue to work with partners to develop standards for infrastructure to adapt to the effects of climate change.

SDG 9

Starting point:

5 National Standards of Canada developed as of March 2018

Completed an inventory of infrastructure standards

Short Term Targets
(2017–18):

Develop 2 new Climate Change standards focusing on extreme precipitation

Update 2 Critical Infrastructure standards

Develop 2 new Northern Infrastructure standards

Development of one new climate change standardization solution has been published.

Four additional climate change standardization solutions are under development (contracts signed and work initiated).

Eight critical infrastructure standardization solutions are currently under development (contracts signed and work initiated) and one additional standardization solution is pending contract signature.

Two Northern Infrastructure standards are also currently under development (contracts signed and work initiated).

Support voluntary action to reduce GHG emissions and adapt to climate change

Support development of Building Codes for effective action on climate change adaptation and resilience.

SDG 9

Performance targets for the Energy Code will be a tiered reduction in 2020 to a Net Zero energy consumption by 2025 for new buildings and homes in provinces that adopt the new Codes.

Proposed changes to the National Model Codes will define four performance tiers for buildings and five performance tiers for houses, with the first tier for each application defined as the current energy requirement, and the top tier as Net Zero Energy Ready. These changes will be submitted for public review in winter 2020 for publication in the 2020 edition of the National Model Codes.

Additional departmental sustainable development activities and initiatives related to effective action on climate change
Additional departmental activities and initiatives Support for United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (UN SDG) target Starting points, targets and performance indicators Results achieved

Canada's co-operative sector has a track record of success in providing social, economic and environmental benefits to Canadians. While government programming does not target co-operatives directly, it aims to ensure that co-operatives have equitable access to business supports, and are well-positioned to contribute to economic, social and environmental needs in Canadian communities. As such, the ISED portfolio provides a range of programs and services that support co-ops through start-up, growth and expansion.

ISED will continue to advance environmental sustainability through support to co-operatives including those with socio-economic and environmental benefits. This will include identifying and addressing opportunities related to co-operatives and more broadly social innovation. The growth of the co-operative sector across Canada has the potential to have a positive impact on all of the environmental goals of the FSDS, including effective action on climate change and advancing clean growth.

SDG 8 and SDG 13

Starting point:

In 2016, there were a total of 7,791 non-financial co-operatives in Canada. Of that, there are an estimated 89 active Renewable Energy Co-operatives across Canada.

ISED published the What We Heard: Motion-100 Consultations on April 5, 2019, which summarized the Motion-100 consultations with the co-operative sector. The consultations focused on:

  • accessing federal programs and services;
  • raising awareness of the co-operative business model;
  • modernizing co-operative sector data; and,
  • emerging opportunities, including clean technology and renewable energy co-operatives.

Stakeholders noted support for cooperative model, yet flagged limited awareness of the model in renewable energy and clean technology. Supporting the development of a national renewable energy cooperative federation would help in this regard.

Promote sustainable consumption practices by continuing to work with key partners to ensure that consumers have the information and tools needed to protect their interests.

SDG 12

Starting point:

Data is available starting in 2014–15 on a yearly basis.

Performance indicator:

Number of visitors accessing consumer information on sustainable consumption on Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada's website and other websites ISED maintains.

Through the Office of Consumer Affairs (OCA) web offerings, ISED hosted web content encouraging consumers to use sustainable consumption practices. Popular topics included tips for green living, e-waste, product disposal and environmental labels/claims, which accounted for 2.81% of all OCA web visits.

FSDS goal: low carbon government
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved

Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025

Improve the energy efficiency of our buildings / operations

The Communications Research Centre (CRC), as the steward of the Shirley's Bay Campus, has undertaken a number of health and safety upgrades to campus infrastructure, which include efforts to "green" campus operations, such as:

Reducing energy usage with the installation of energy efficient LED lighting and motion sensors;

Migrating off a central heating plant in favour of energy efficient stand-alone units for each building;

Procuring an advanced software suite that monitors and manages energy usage;

Reducing building footprint by 37%

Eliminating nonessential equipment and replacing aging infrastructure.

SDG 9

Data from previous years are unavailable. Measures will be taken to begin tracking for reporting on FY 2017–18.

Not applicable — all deliverables were achieved in 2017–18.

Modernize our fleet

While supporting Canada's commercial automotive sector, support the reduction of carbon intensity generated from ISED's motor vehicles by continuing to enforce the department's mandatory right sizing exercise, rationalization and leveraging new technology where possible; purchasing more low-emission vehicle options, including zero-emission vehicles, where operationally appropriate; and aligning with government-wide efforts on zero-emission vehicle targets for future fleet acquisitions.

SDG 9

Starting point:

ISED fleet emissions reported in the baseline year 2005–06 are 1.911 kt CO2e.

Performance Indicator: By March 31, 2030 ISED will reduce its Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHGs) from its motor vehicle fleet by 40% below 2005 baseline.

Performance Indicator: By March 31, 2018 ISED will implement mandatory oversight of vehicle planning and acquisition prior to vehicle selection and purchase execution.

Performance Indicator: By March 31, 2019 ISED will analyze its fleet operations and examine if there are opportunities to reduce the fleet size through pooling / sharing of vehicles between Sectors to determine if new requirements can be satisfied with existing fleet, (further rationalization).

Performance Indicator:

Starting in 2019–20, 100% of ISED's new light-duty administrative fleet purchases will be zero-emission vehicles (where vehicles are available and where operational needs permit). Where ZEVs are not available or suitable for operational needs, new light-duty administrative fleet purchases will be the lower-emissions option. ISED will also examine if there are opportunities to broaden this approach to other ISED fleet purchases.

The GHG emissions results achieved for fiscal year 2018–19 is 1.075 kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent. Percentage change in GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005-06 to 2018-19 is a 42.85% reduction. ISED remains on track to meet the target.

Note: The Centre of Greening Government issued updated GHG inventory accounting templates. As a result, the 2005–06 baseline year was recalculated to 1.881 kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent.

Work on the purchase of ZEVs is ongoing. As of March 31, 2018, the department's fleet contains four plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

ISED has completed a fleet utilization analysis and will continue to examine fleet performance to determine if the fleet size can be reduced and/or if car pooling and sharing can be implemented.

ISED has communicated the target with key stakeholders across the department. Starting 2019–20, all new vehicle acquisitions within the administrative category will be ZEV.

Support the transition to a low-carbon economy through green procurement

Promote environmental sustainability by launching the Procurement Process Modernization Initiative. ISED will take action to automate the department's procurement and accounts payable process.

SDG 12.7

Starting Point:

Performance Indicator: By March 31, 2018, ISED will develop the Financial Signature Approval (FSA) Automation and workflow portal.

Performance Indicators:

By March 31, 2019, ISED will develop the Accounts Payable Invoice and Procurement Automation.

By March 31, 2020, ISED will implement the modernized procurement to payment tool.

Starting Point:

Since 2014–15, ISED established environmental SMART targets for Audio Visual Equipment, Vehicles, Computers and Monitors. ISED will continue to leverage common use of procurement instruments where available and feasible.

Since 2014–15, ISED has implemented mandatory green procurement training for procurement and materiel management specialists.

Performance Indicator:

ISED will take action to ensure 100% of specialists in procurement and/or materiel management will have completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course, or equivalent, in the given fiscal year.

Starting Point:

Since 2014–15 ISED has included environmental considerations in performance management agreements (PMAs) for managers and functional heads.

Performance Indicator:

ISED will take action to ensure 100% of managers and functional heads in procurement and materiel include environmental considerations in their PMAs.

FSA automation is complete and functionality was released into production in March 2019. A new user interface was developed for FSA allowing the functionality to work on tablets and phones.

As part of ongoing work:

  • ISED continues to make use of the procurement instruments established by Public Services and Procurement Canada;
  • 100% of procurement specialist in procurement and materiel management must complete the green procurement training; and,
  • 100% of managers and functional heads in procurement and materiel management include environmental considerations in their PMA.

Demonstrate innovative technologies

Utilize the new Innovative Solutions Canada (ISC) program as an avenue for Government departments to issue challenges around developing a novel technology or service that reduces greenhouse gas emissions from federal government buildings and fleets.

SDG 9

Performance Indicators:

Number of challenge statements developed by ISED

Number of proposals evaluated

Number of new innovative technologies demonstrated

The ISC Secretariat continues its efforts to work with the 20 departments mandated to use ISC to identify and articulate challenge topics related to reducing GHG emissions by liaising with Treasury Board Secretariat's Greening Government Committee and continued discussions with Public Services and Procurement Canada who manage the majority of federal real property holdings.

The Canadian Coast Guard launched an ISC challenge in 2018 seeking solutions to harness kinetic energy from the roll, pitch and yaw of marine vessels with the goal of reducing energy consumption and reliance on externally-sourced and stored energy. This represents the program's first challenge around reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Understand climate change impacts and build resilience

Use the integrated planning and reporting process to ensure programs consider climate change impacts in their planning.

Where appropriate, integrate climate change considerations into ISED's corporate risk profile and investment plan (both documents are part of the annual Corporate Plan).

Ensure service disruptions are avoided by incorporating climate change considerations and adaptation measures into business continuity planning.

SDG 9

Where appropriate, the Corporate Plan (which includes the investment plan and corporate risk profile) incorporates consideration of climate change mitigation and adaptation measures

Business continuity plans integrate considerations of climate change mitigation and adaptation.

ISED's 2018–19 Corporate Risk Profile identified the following risk related to climate change, "There is a risk that the effects of climate change could impact the Department's ability to deliver its policy and program commitments."

ISED's Business Continuity Management Program has an all hazards approach focused on the availability of resources to mitigate the impact of incidents including climate change.

Improve transparency and accountability

Not applicable.

Not applicable.

Not applicable.

Not applicable.

Develop policy for low-carbon government

Not applicable.

Not applicable.

Not applicable.

Not applicable.

Additional departmental sustainable development activities and initiatives related to low carbon government
Additional departmental activities and initiatives Support for United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (UN SDG) target Starting points, targets and performance indicators Results achieved

Project Re-Use Reduce Recycle: Take action to expand the Project Re-Use program across the department where feasible.

Not applicable

Starting point(s): Since 2015, ISED implemented Project Re-Use Reduce Recycle in in one facility.

Performance Indicators:

By March 31, 2018, ISED will conduct a surplus analysis of all major centres across the department; and establish a process where Asset Management is notified of facility closures, moves, retrofits and construction projects.

By March 31, 2019, ISED will implement Project Re-Use in at least one other facility.

By March 31, 2020, ISED will implement Project Re-Use in one additional facility.

The Re-Use program has been implemented in two additional facilities within the NCR and one in the Montreal Office.

The Asset Management Section has been added to the departure process so as to be informed of office moves, thereby enabling them to ensure employees are aware of the Re-Use program when vacating their office.

eLearning: Take action to implement a modernized eLearning tool into the workplace environment in order to reduce the need for travel to training venues and therefore also reduce GHG emissions.

Not applicable

Performance Indicators:

By March 31, 2018, ISED will introduce and pilot the eLearning concept and develop 1 eLearning product.

By March 31, 2019, ISED will develop 1 additional eLearning products

By March 31, 2020, ISED will develop 1 additional eLearning products.

The eLearning Acquisition Card Policy Training was completed. The course is available on ISED's Corporate Finance Intranet.

In addition, ISED is currently developing four other eLearning packages: Acquisition Card: Financial Operations, Purchase Requisitions, Financial Signing Authority for Card Creators and Financial Signing Authority for Incumbents and Superiors.

ISED leads a GConnex group, Public Servants Promoting a Greener Environment, that is open to federal government employees. The GCConnex group serves as a platform for interdepartmental colleagues to share ideas, discuss and collaborate on activities, best practices and initiatives that promote a greener environment and support sustainable workplace operations.

Not applicable

 

Led by ISED, the GCconnex group Public Servants Promoting a Greener Environment has grown to 6,008 members. This group has maintained its spot and is ranked the 5th most popular since 2013.

Video Conferencing: ISED has implemented a video conference solution in 12 regional offices across Canada and 6 sites in the NCR. The service allows employees to host/participate in meetings with their peers and also collaborate on projects without having to travel from site to site.

Not applicable

More NCR and regional sites (up to 9 sites) are being considered for new VC installation

ISED has implemented Office 365 to all of ISED employees while maintaining current video conference solutions. The service allows employees to host/participate in meetings with their peers, and collaborate on projects without having to travel from site to site. 77 boardrooms and collaboration spaces have been equipped with Surface Hubs to enable collaboration and video calling capabilities across ISED, including all main regional sites. Skype for Business is also now available across ISED to enable collaboration and avoid travel.

FSDS goal: clean energy
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved

By 2025, contribute to the North American goal of 50% clean power generation

Invest in clean energy technologies

Support voluntary action to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions through clean energy generation and consumption

Support the development of technologies through SD Tech Fund that:

Enable the development of renewable energies;

Enable energy storage;

Enable the tie-in of alternate sources of energy into the conventional energy grid

Support the development of technologies that enable energy efficiency and decreased environmental footprint in the oil-and-gas sector through SD Tech Fund.

SDG 9

Starting point:

Average of 20 cleantech projects (including some relating to clean energy) approved and contracted per year over past 5 years.

Average of 80% of projects completed within five years.

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

Maintain current level of approving and contracting 20 projects per year Average of 85% of projects completing within five years.

38 projects were approved.

80% of projects completed within the last five years.

Note: Sustainable Development Technology Canada updated its Performance Management Strategy Framework in June 2019 to better represent results from its activities. Updated targets and indicators reflecting SDTC's new Performance Framework will be reflected in ISED's 2020-2023 DSDS, to be tabled in June 2020.

FSDS goal: sustainable managed lands and forests
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved

Between now and 2020, maintain Canada's annual timber harvest at or below sustainable wood supply levels

Build capacity and provide support

Implement the SD Tech Fund

SDG 15

Starting point:

Average of 20 clean tech projects (including some relating to sustainable forestry) approved and contracted per year over past 5 years.

Average of 80% of projects completed within five years.

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

Maintain current level of approving and contracting 20 projects per year

Average of 85% of projects completing within five years.

38 projects were approved.

80% of projects completed within the last 5 years.

Note: Sustainable Development Technology Canada updated its Performance Management Strategy Framework in June 2019 to better represent results from its activities. Updated targets and indicators reflecting SDTC's new Performance Framework will be reflected in ISED's 2020-2023 DSDS, to be tabled in June 2020.

FSDS goal: sustainable food
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved

By 2030, agricultural working landscapes provide a stable or improved level of biodiversity and efficient management towards water and soil quality for food production

Promote innovation and sustainable practices

Support the development of technologies through the SD Tech Fund that:

Enable sustainable use of marginal agricultural lands

Enable the efficient use of water and other materials such as fertilizer in the agricultural sector

Enable the remediation of soil as it pertains to the agricultural industry

SDG 15

Starting point:

Average of 20 clean tech projects (including some relating to agriculture) approved and contracted per year over past 5 years.

Average of 80% of projects completed within five years.

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

Maintain current level of approving and contracting 20 projects per year.

Average of 85% of projects completing within five years.

38 projects were approved.

80% of projects completed within the last 5 years.

Note: Sustainable Development Technology Canada updated its Performance Management Strategy Framework in June 2019 to better represent results from its activities. Updated targets and indicators reflecting SDTC's new Performance Framework will be reflected in ISED's 2020-2023 DSDS, to be tabled in June 2020.

FSDS goal: safe and healthy communities
Additional departmental sustainable development activities and initiatives related to safe and healthy communities
Additional departmental activities and initiatives Support for United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (UN SDG) target Starting points, targets and performance indicators Results achieved

The National Research Council (NRC) will continue to implement the activities for which it is responsible under the Air Quality Management System with respect to indoor air quality. The NRC's work serves to reduce harmful emissions from building materials; improve indoor air quality; control and mitigate radon; and improve ventilation. The NRC also works with the Canadian Committee on Indoor Air Quality and Buildings.

Not applicable

Improving the indoor air quality and health of Canadians by evaluating building-related systems, generating and supporting guides, establishing validated methods

NRC is generating science and conducting evaluations on technologies to reducing indoor air contaminants and improve the health of Canadians, especially vulnerable populations. Results include:

1) Field study to ensure radon solutions work in a range of Canadian climates;

2) Evaluation of a non-destructive method to identify key formaldehyde emitters amongst building materials;

3) Field study evaluation of a tracer gas method to determine air flows and ventilation rates in buildings;

4) Laboratory study of ceiling tiles to reduce formaldehyde concentrations;

5) Laboratory study of insulation panels to control radon and improve building energy efficiency; and,

6) Full-scale study of balanced ventilation on indoor air quality

NRC is also supporting market uptake of radon control solutions. Certified radon mitigators are now using passive stack solutions after NRC's evaluations in several provinces. Two Canadian companies and their industry association are marketing the radon-preventing features of certain spray foam products

4. Report on integrating sustainable development

The 2010 Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals requires all departments to align their Strategic Environmental Assessments with the goals and targets of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. ISED's Strategic Environmental Assessment policy complies with requirements of the 2010 Cabinet Directive and the related 2010 Guidelines to the Cabinet Directive. The policy requires that the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy goals and targets be taken into consideration in the ISED decision-making process.

ISED's SEA Policy defines a proposal as a Memorandum to Cabinet, a Treasury Board Submission, a regulatory proposal, a budget proposal or any other strategic document seeking Ministerial or Cabinet approval. To support the implementation of the SEA policy, ISED has a questionnaire to guide the analysis of environmental considerations for a proposal and a SEA Network comprised of representatives nominated across all sectors at ISED.

In 2018–19, ISED strengthened the implementation of SEA at the department with the strengthening of SEA Public Statement tracking tools and an update of the SEA questionnaire to incorporate new questions and to ensure its early and proactive use.

In 2019–20, ISED will incorporate best practices when reporting information on Strategic Environmental Assessments and linking results to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy to ensure that decision-making is transparent and in keeping with the 2010 Cabinet Directive.

ISED will continue to ensure that its decision-making process includes consideration of FSDS goals and targets through its SEA process. An SEA for policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the given proposal on the environment, including on FSDS goals and targets. Public statements on the results of ISED's assessments are made public. The purpose of the public statement is to demonstrate that the environmental effects, including the impacts on achieving the FSDS goals and targets, of the approved policy, plan or program have been considered during proposal development and decision-making.

Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more

General information
Name of transfer payment program CanCode
Start date June 1, 2017
End date March 31, 2021
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2018–19
Link to the department's Program Inventory Talent Development
Description CanCode supports the development of skills that Canada's youth and their teachers will need to participate in a digital economy by providing them access to coding education and experiences.
Results achieved In 2018–19, more than 1.6 million students participated in CanCode activities—reaching 1.9 million students since CanCode's launch, more than three times the program's initial target of 500,000 students by 2019. CanCode also provided access to coding and digital skills training and tools to close to 82,000  teachers in 2018–19.
The original round of CanCode ended on March 31, 2019. On March 26, 2019, ISED launched a call for proposals to implement the two-year extension announced in Budget 2019, which will provide CanCode an additional $60 million over two years starting in 2019–20.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
None completed or planned.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation is planned in 2021–22.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Recipients are engaged through quarterly monitoring and reporting. Based on feedback received during this process, procedures were adapted resulting in more streamlined claim and risk analysis processes.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 17,899,923  29,009,135  30,169,897  30,166,993  1,157,858 
Total program 17,899,923  29,009,135  30,169,897  30,166,993  1,157,858 
Explanation of variances 1.16 million was reprofiled from 2017–18 to 2018–19 due to the timelines of agreements signed near the end of the 2017–18 fiscal year.
General information
Name of transfer payment program Digital Skills for Youth
Start date December 11, 2017
End date March 31, 2022
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2017–18
Link to the department's Program Inventory Talent Development
Description Digital Skills for Youth is a program under the Career Focus stream of the Youth Employment Strategy, intended to support recent underemployed post-secondary graduates with valuable and practical work experience and additional training that will help them improve their employability and use their talent to their full potential so that they can succeed in the digital economy.
Results achieved The program delivered 34 internships in 2018–19 despite a late start due to delays in signing contribution agreements.
Findings of audits completed in 2018–19 None completed or planned.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation is planned in 2019–20.
Note: Part of ESDC Horizontal-led evaluation of the Youth Employment Strategy.
Engagement of applicants and recipients All recipients are engaged through quarterly monitoring and reporting. Based on feedback received during this process, updates were made to improve program delivery.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 9,479,500 8,624,500 1,866,233 (7,613,267)
Total program 9,479,500 8,624,500 1,866,233 (7,613,267)
Explanation of variances The variance was due to the timelines and delays in signing contribution agreements with recipients.
General information
Name of transfer payment program Computers for Schools
Start date 1993
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2018–19
Link to the department's Program Inventory Bridging Digital Divides
Description Through the Computers for Schools (CFS) program, donated surplus computer equipment and devices are refurbished by national, provincial and territorial program partners. Once refurbished, they are distributed to schools, libraries, non-profit organizations, Indigenous communities and eligible low-income Canadians across Canada. Through this national partnership-based network, the program ensures improved access for Canadians to technology. The Technical Work Experience Program, now known as the CFS Intern (CFSI) program, is also delivered by CFS recipients. Results stemming from CFSI are reported by Employment and Social Development Canada under the Youth Employment Strategy. CFSI is the in-house workforce for the refurbishment workshops.
Results achieved In 2018–19, the CFS program delivered just over 58,000 refurbished computers to schools, libraries, non-profit organizations, Indigenous communities and eligible low income Canadians, providing greater access to the digital economy. ISED renewed its agreement with the program and implemented the ongoing funding announced in Budget 2018, and expanded the terms and conditions to include both the CFSI program and the Connecting Families initiative. In the last five months of 2018–19, following the completion of new contribution agreements with 14 recipients, affiliates of the CFS program refurbished almost 15,000 additional computers for the Connecting Families initiative.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
None completed or planned.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation was completed in 2016–17: Evaluation of Computers for Schools.
An evaluation on Skills and Access to the Digital Economy is planned in 2021–22 and will include CFS.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Recipients are engaged through regular monitoring and reporting. All recipients participate in bi-monthly teleconferences, site visits and an annual meeting to discuss issues, trends and the future of the program.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions (Computers for Schools) 5,684,811 5,503,898 5,825,433 5,799,208 5,799,208
Total contributions (Technical Work Experience Program) 4,008,678 4,596,442 6,162,085 6,265,085  5,012,004  (1,150,081)
Total program 9,693,489 10,100,340 6,162,085 12,090,518 10,811,212 4,649,127
Explanation of variances The CFS program was approved for renewal in 2018-19; therefore, there was no planned spending until approval was obtained. Funding was received in Budget 2018-19. Unused funding for the CFSI program has been reprofiled into 2019-20 due to delays in signing agreements.
General information
Name of transfer payment program Connect to Innovate Program
Start date December 15, 2016
End date March 31, 2021
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Link to the department's Program Inventory Bridging Digital Divides
Description A $500 million program announced in Budget 2016 that focuses on extending and enhancing high-capacity backbone infrastructure and high-speed internet to rural and remote communities across Canada, with flexibility to fund some last-mile infrastructure for underserved households, institutions and businesses.
Results achieved As of March 31, 2019, Connect to Innovate (CTI) funding had been announced for 174 projects in 11 provinces and territories, including 64 recipients, for a total of $454 million in announced federal funding and more than $1 billion in overall investments when considering private sector and other government funding.
CTI will bring new or improved high-speed Internet connectivity to more than 900 communities, including 190 Indigenous communities—more than tripling the initial target of 300 communities by 2021. An estimated 1,100 anchor institutions will benefit with new access to high capacity networks, and more than 19,500 km of fibre network will be installed.
Further project announcements are forthcoming to reflect the full CTI funding.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
None completed or planned.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation on Broadband Programming is planned in 2019-20 and will include CTI.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Engagement activities include: regular outreach with applicants on project development; coordination with provincial/territorial and First Nations groups, partners and other government departments and agencies to leverage funding available for broadband; a website with interactive mapping tool; sustained social media presence; and ongoing interaction and monitoring of project recipients.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 7,224,000 249,025,199 249,025,199 68,230,221 (180,794,978)
Total program 7,224,000 249,025,199 249,025,199 68,230,221 (180,794,978)
Explanation of variances The variance was due to delays in negotiating contribution agreements, as well as project delays experienced by recipients. Unused funding was re-profiled to future years to align with project needs.
General information
Name of transfer payment program Connecting Canadians Program
Start date June 5, 2014
End date March 31, 2020
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2014–15
Link to the department's Program Inventory Bridging Digital Divides
Description This program funds the extension and enhancement of high-speed broadband networks to reach previously underserved communities in rural and northern Canada. It is also responsible for maintaining current maps of broadband coverage across Canada and for working with other government partners to coordinate support for broadband infrastructure.
Results achieved In total, 86 projects are being funded under the Connecting Canadians Program (CCP), with projects in all provinces and territories. As of March 2019, 45 of the 86 CCP projects are fully completed. Many more projects have completed building their networks and will be closed in 2019. About a dozen projects require additional time to be completed and will now end prior to March 31, 2020. Once all projects are completed, CCP will connect 300,000 households exceeding the program target of 280,000 households.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
None completed or planned.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation on Broadband Programming is planned in 2019–20 and will include CCP.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Engagement activities include: outreach, as required, with recipients on project development; a website with interactive mapping tool; sustained social media presence; and site visits and recipient audits, as required.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 69,975,122 44,220,537 14,738,395 26,470,186 13,595,966 (1,142,429)
Total program 69,975,122 44,220,537 14,738,395 26,470,186 13,595,966 (1,142,429)
Explanation of variances The variance was due to unforeseen project delays encountered by recipients. Unused funding was re-profiled to 2019–20 to allow recipients to complete their projects.
General information
Name of transfer payment program Community Futures Program
Start date 1986
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2010–11
Link to the department's Program Inventory Economic Development in Northern Ontario
Description The Community Futures Program (CFP) is a national program administered by ISED in Northern Ontario and the regional development agencies in the rest of Canada. The ultimate objectives of the program are to foster economic stability, growth and job creation; help create diversified and competitive local rural economies; and help build sustainable communities. ISED provides financial support to 24 Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) in Northern Ontario that are incorporated, non-profit, community-based development organizations, each governed by a local volunteer board of directors. They offer a variety of products and services to support small business growth and community economic development, including access to capital, strategic community planning and socio-economic development; support for community-based projects and special initiatives; and business information, planning and support services. ISED provides financial contributions to support the ongoing operations of individual CFDCs through either one, three or five-year agreements.
Results achieved Through the CFP, the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario (FedNor) engaged the 24 CFDCs to foster economic stability, growth and job creation, help create diversified and competitive local rural economies and build economically sustainable communities in Northern Ontario. In 2018–19, Northern Ontario CFDCs invested $28.0 million in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), leveraging $25.7 million. As a result of this lending activity, 919 businesses were assisted, started, expanded and/or maintained, creating and/or maintaining 1,639 jobs.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
An audit was completed in 2014–15: Audit Report—Community Futures Program.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation was completed in 2018–19: Horizontal Evaluation of the Community Futures Program.
An evaluation is planned in 2023–24.
Engagement of applicants and recipients FedNor continued to engage Community Futures Organizations (CFOs), including CFDCs, and their regional networks and provincial associations through various activities, including outreach/liaison, capacity building, program and policy development, referrals, compliance monitoring in regard to contribution agreements, and other collaborative activities, including the Prosperity and Growth Strategy for Northern Ontario.
In 2018–19, a national horizontal evaluation of the CFP was conducted. Northern Ontario CFDCs and their clients were engaged through a variety of data collection methods, including key informant interviews, case studies, CFO surveys, and client surveys.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 8,360,008 8,360,008 8,360,008 8,360,008  8,360,008 
Total program 8,360,008 8,360,008 8,360,008 8,360,008  8,360,008 
Explanation of variances N/A
General information
Name of transfer payment program Northern Ontario Development Program
Start date April 1, 1996
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2011–12
Link to the department's Program Inventory Economic Development in Northern Ontario
Description The Northern Ontario Development Program (NODP) is administered by FedNor. The NODP's objective is to promote economic development, economic diversification, job creation and sustainable, self-reliant communities in Northern Ontario. This is achieved by providing financial support, through transfer payments, to SMEs and non-profit organizations, including municipalities, municipal organizations, community development organizations and research institutions, in three priority areas: community economic development, business growth and competitiveness, and innovation.
Results achieved In 2018–19, through the NODP, FedNor authorized $52.8 million towards 110 projects, which leveraged an additional investment of $103.9 million. During this period, 2,103 jobs were created and maintained and 2,079 businesses were created, expanded or maintained.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
An audit was completed in 2013–14: Audit of the Northern Ontario Development Program.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation was completed in 2016–17: Evaluation of Northern Ontario Development Program.
An evaluation is planned in 2020–21.
Engagement of applicants and recipients FedNor continues to work collaboratively with Northern Ontario stakeholders by attending regional economic development conferences like the Federation of Northern Ontario Municipalities (FONOM), Northwestern Ontario Municipal Association (NOMA) and Association française des municipalités de l'Ontario to provide feedback on project development. FedNor continues to engage applicants, recipients and partners through outreach/liaison activities with communities and provides assistance with project development and referrals, as well as compliance monitoring in regard to contribution agreements, and other collaborative activities with other federal departments and Ontario provincial ministries.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 31,540,000 30,640,000 36,440,000 38,440,000 38,440,000 2,000,000
Total program 31,540,000 30,640,000 36,440,000 38,440,000 38,440,000 2,000,000
Explanation of variances N/A
General information
Name of transfer payment program Growth Through Regional Innovation Program (known as Regional Economic Growth Through Innovation (REGI))
This program includes Women Entrepreneurship Strategy (WES) initiatives in two streams: Pilot Contribution Program (known as the Women Entrepreneurship Fund [WEF]) and WES Ecosystem Fund.
Start date October 18, 2018
End date REGI — ongoing
WES Women Entrepreneurship Fund — March 31, 2020
WES Ecosystem Fund — March 31, 2023
Type of transfer payment REGI — Grant and Contribution
WES — Contribution
Type of appropriation Annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2018–19
Link to the department's Program Inventory Economic Development in Northern Ontario
Description ISED through FedNor and in collaboration with other regional development agencies, delivers the REGI initiative, which builds on the objectives of the Innovation and Skills Plan. The goal of REGI is to provide streamlined, nationally consistent and yet regionally tailored support for business productivity and scale-up, particularly for SMEs and women entrepreneurs and other underrepresented groups, and assist the enhancement of regional industrial and technology clusters and regional innovation ecosystems.
The program will provide assistance through two new program streams:
  • Business Scale-up and Productivity Stream (BSP): Invest in and support businesses at various stages of development, including high-growth firms to accelerate their growth and assist them in scaling up, enhance their productivity and competitiveness in both domestic and global markets.
  • Regional Innovation Ecosystems Stream (RIE): Create, grow and nurture inclusive regional ecosystems that support business needs and foster an entrepreneurial environment conducive to innovation, growth and competitiveness.

The WES provides nationally coordinated, regionally tailored investments to help women entrepreneurs and support regional innovation ecosystems through two program streams:

  • WES Ecosystem Fund: A five-year program to help non-profit, third-party organizations deliver support for women entrepreneurs and address gaps in the ecosystem.
  • Pilot Contribution Program (Women Entrepreneurship Fund): A two-year program that invests directly in women-owned or women-led businesses to help them grow and reach new markets.

Contributions issued under REGI may be unconditionally or conditionally repayable, or non-repayable. Contributions issued under the WES are non-repayable only.

Results achieved In 2018–19, through the REGI program, FedNor authorized $7.9 million towards 11 multi-year projects, which leveraged an additional investment of $19.5 million.
Through the WES initiative, FedNor approved 13 Pilot Contribution Program (Women Entrepreneurship Fund) projects in 2018–19 for a total assistance of $1.1 million over 2018–19 to 2019–20, which leveraged an additional investment of $0.5 million.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
None completed or planned.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation on Growth through Regional Innovation Program is planned in 2023–24. A separate evaluation on Women Entrepreneurship Strategy is planned in 2023–24.
Engagement of applicants and recipients REGI
FedNor continues to work collaboratively with Northern Ontario stakeholders such as the CFDCs, applicants, recipients and partners through outreach/liaison activities with communities and SMEs. FedNor provides assistance with project development and referrals, compliance monitoring in regard to contribution agreements, and other collaborative activities with other federal departments and Ontario provincial ministries. FedNor strengthened outreach to the private sector with the launch of REGI and the Steel and Aluminum initiative through a series of outreach activities, including information sharing sessions to community economic development organizations, as well as presentations at economic development conferences held by regional organizations like the FONOM and NOMA.
WES
FedNor engaged stakeholders through a direct emailing campaign that outlined the WES programs to prospective clients. FedNor continues to engage with WES recipients with regards to the development and management of their contribution agreements to ensure timely completion of projects prior to the end of the program.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 4,988,630  1,741,951  1,741,951
Total program 4,988,630  1,741,951  1,741,951 
Explanation of variances The difference in planned spending and actual spending was due to new funding for REGI and WES received in-year from Budget 2018. Both REGI and WES lapsed funding and WES funding was reprofiled due to delays in approval timelines.
General information
Name of transfer payment program International Telecommunication Union, Geneva, Switzerland
Start date 1932–33
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Grant
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2010–11
Link to the department's Program Inventory Spectrum and Telecommunications
Description The grant allows ISED to achieve results internationally across a broad range of issues affecting radiocommunication, telecommunications standardization and development.
Results achieved ISED leads the Government of Canada engagement at the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) to ensure the continued growth, innovation and international competitiveness of Canada's telecommunication sector.
ISED participated in the 2018 ITU Plenipotentiary Conference (PP-18) held Oct. 27 — Nov. 16, 2018. This is the highest decision-making body of the organization and every four years this body meets to adopt its four-year Strategic, Financial and Operational Plans, as well as elect the five (5) senior officials of the Union, the 48 members of Council and 12 members of the Radio Regulations Board (RRB). Canadian priorities and positions, including telecommunications, Internet policy and technology issues, were advanced in the form of Inter-American Telecommunication Commission (CITEL) Inter-American Proposals (IAPs), and verbally during the Conference. In regard to the 54 IAPs Canada supported, 50 were either adopted in full, or the substantive content reflected in the final outcome of the Conference.
The overall results of PP-18 were positive for Canada. In particular, they reflect the successful strengthening of the multistakeholder model of Internet governance by: adopting the Strategic and Financial Plans 2020–2023 consistent with Canadian priorities of results-based budgeting; adopting resolutions that promote gender equality and gender parity; the re-election of Canada to the ITU Council and the election of an ISED representative to the RRB; and addressing the ITU's role in cybersecurity. Canada was also successful in countering proposals from other administrations on issues such as ITU's involvement in Artificial Intelligence; Big Data and the Internet-of-Things (IoT) which are beyond the ITU's clearly defined mandates.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
None completed or planned.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation was completed in 2015–16: Evaluation of Industry Canada's Involvement in the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).
An evaluation is planned in 2019–20.
Engagement of applicants and recipients The sole recipient of the grant is the ITU, the United Nations specialized agency for telecommunications. Engagement is outlined in the 'Results achieved' section.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total grants 5,608,000 5,633,000 4,808,000 5,483,000 5,483,000 675,000
Total program 5,608,000 5,633,000 4,808,000 5,483,000 5,483,000 675,000
Explanation of variances Actual spending was higher than originally planned due to higher exchange rates. There is no change in value of the payment to ITU in Swiss Francs.
General information
Name of transfer payment program Innovation Superclusters Initiative
Start date May 24, 2017
End date March 31, 2023
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2017–18
Link to the department's Program Inventory Innovation Superclusters Initiative
Description The Innovation Superclusters Initiative (ISI) supports the acceleration of world-leading innovation superclusters in Canada that translate the country's strengths into new commercial opportunities for Canadian firms.
Results achieved In 2018–19, the ISI successfully negotiated the terms of Supercluster contribution agreements allowing for operational funding to flow. In addition, ISI and the Superclusters made great progress towards finalizing governance documents, the last major step required for Superclusters to start their projects. Once agreements have been finalized and Superclusters complete their first member intake activities, there will be an uptake in projects started.
Digital Technology Supercluster announced the first seven industry-led projects of ISI in March 2019. These projects involve a collection of 33 organizations, a collection of SMEs, large corporations, and educational institutions. These organizations will be collaborating to provide ecosystem benefits such as manufacturing efficiencies, data analysis capabilities, and healthcare innovation.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
An audit is planned in 2020–21.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation is planned in 2021–22.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Superclusters are finalizing governance documents, which includes their membership agreement. The program will be able to report on results once the agreements are finalized and Superclusters complete their first member intake activities. Supercluster entities will submit annual reports to ISED.
Following its launch, the ISI has had success in generating enthusiasm from industry. Clusters now boast participation from more than 1,300 unique member organizations across the country. This participation has not been limited to large enterprises with the majority of members being small or medium-sized. Early feedback has been positive, with firms reporting that they have been able to take on more customers and lines of business as a result of the ISI.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 243,903,341 243,903,341  5,576,368 (238,326,973)
Total program 243,903,341 243,903,341  5,576,368 (238,326,973)
Explanation of variances As the first Supercluster projects were announced in March 2019, $182 million has been reprofiled to future fiscal years.
General information
Name of transfer payment program Strategic Innovation Fund
Start date July 5, 2017
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2017–18
Link to the department's Program Inventory Innovation in Business
Description The Strategic Innovation Fund (SIF) attracts and supports high-quality business investments in Canada's most dynamic and innovative sectors. This fund helps innovative businesses scale up, while supporting research and development, technology demonstration and high-growth industries.
Results achieved For 2018–19, 23 contribution agreements were signed, representing a total of 39 contribution agreements signed since the program's inception, which will result in tangible benefits to Canadians such as maintaining and creating jobs and leveraging further investments in the Canadian economy. These projects represent a variety of sectors across Canada, including digital industries, advanced manufacturing, aerospace, automotive and clean resources. Through these projects, companies will advance inclusive business and hiring practices.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
An audit of SIF is planned in 2019–20 and in 2021–22.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation is planned in 2020–21.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Information about SIF and the application processes are available on the SIF website. Officials engage with potential applicants and engage with applicants throughout the application process. The launch of the two Stream 4 competitions included information sessions and ongoing communication with applicants. The "soft launch" of Stream 5 (in March 2019) included content on the SIF website and webinars for both stakeholders and the broader public.
There is ongoing engagement with recipients after projects have been funded. For projects that do not fit within the program's parameters, SIF works with other departments to identify programs that could be a better fit for applicants. Since the program's launch, nearly 300 applications have been redirected and connected with other federal programs or services.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 35,451,558 294,042,835 501,538,914 316,748,009 22,705,174
Total program 35,451,558 294,042,835 501,538,914 316,748,009 22,705,174
Explanation of variances N/A
General information
Name of transfer payment program Automotive Innovation Fund
Start date May 9, 2008
End date March 31, 2021; Consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Link to the department's Program Inventory Innovation in Business
Description The Automotive Innovation Fund (AIF) supports strategic, large-scale research and development projects to develop innovative, greener and more fuel-efficient vehicles.
Results achieved Consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017. See SIF program for results.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
None completed or planned.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 Evaluation completed in 2017–18: Evaluation of the Automotive Innovation Fund.
An evaluation of SIF is planned in 2020–21 and will scope in elements of the consolidated AIF.
Engagement of applicants and recipients SIF maintains extensive engagement with program recipients including the monitoring of project expenditure and results and providing opportunities for queries and feedback.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 22,127,500 42,572,741 46,833,300 46,990,478 46,990,478 157,178
Total program 22,127,500 42,572,741 46,833,300 46,990,478 46,990,478 157,178
Explanation of variances N/A
General information
Name of transfer payment program Automotive Supplier Innovation Program
Start date June 3, 2015
End date March 31, 2020; consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2015–16
Link to department's Program Inventory Innovation in Business
Description The Automotive Supplier Innovation Program (ASIP) is a five-year, $100 million program that provides non-repayable contributions to support technology demonstration and prototyping activities of Canadian-based suppliers developing innovative products and/or processes in the automotive sector.
Results achieved Consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017. See SIF program for results.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
None completed or planned.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation of SIF is planned in 2020–21 and will scope in elements of the consolidated ASIP.
Engagement of applicants and recipients SIF maintains extensive engagement with program recipients including the monitoring of project expenditure and results and providing opportunities for queries and feedback.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 14,631,036 7,171,364 7,233,910 5,100,514 5,100,514 (2,133,396)
Total program 14,631,036 7,171,364 7,233,910 5,100,514 5,100,514 (2,133,396)
Explanation of variances The variance between planned and actual spending reflects slower than anticipated disbursements at the request of recipient organizations.
General information
Name of transfer payment program Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative
Start date April 2, 2007
End date March 31, 2023; consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Link to department's Program Inventory Innovation in Business
Description The Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI) encourages the development of innovative products, processes and services; enhances the competitiveness of Canadian aerospace, defence, space and security (A&D) firms; and fosters collaboration among research institutes, universities, colleges and the private sector. SADI is a component of the government's strategy to mobilize science and technology to Canada's competitive advantage. SADI acts as a catalyst for new A&D investments by providing repayable contributions to Canadian A&D companies for strategic industrial research and pre-competitive development.
Results achieved Consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017. See SIF program for results.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
None completed or planned.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 Evaluation completed in 2016–17: Evaluation of the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative.
An evaluation of SIF is planned in 2020–21 and will scope in elements of the consolidated SADI.
Engagement of applicants and recipients SIF maintains extensive engagement with program recipients including the monitoring of project expenditure and results and providing opportunities for queries and feedback.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 152,757,470 247,504,760 168,300,957 101,788,783 101,788,783 (66,512,174)
Total program 152,757,470 247,504,760 168,300,957 101,788,783 101,788,783 (66,512,174)
Explanation of variances The variance between planned and actual spending is primarily due to consolidation of funds into SIF and variations in cash flow requirements of projects.
General information
Name of transfer payment program Technology Demonstration Program
Start date September 4, 2013
End date March 31, 2024; consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Link to department's Program Inventory Innovation in Business
Description The Technology Demonstration Program (TDP) provides non-repayable contributions in support of large-scale research and development technology demonstration projects in the aerospace, defence, space and security sectors. Projects are led by an Original Equipment Manufacturer or Tier 1 integrator, collaborating with SMEs and post-secondary institutions. Projects funded through this program are expected to be the basis for next-generation manufacturing and services in Canada. The program supports technological development in areas that have significant potential for broad based and long-term economic benefits for Canada.
Results achieved Consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017. See SIF program for results.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
None completed or planned.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation was completed in 2018–19: Evaluation of Aerospace Programming.
An evaluation of SIF is planned for 2020–21 and will scope in TDP.
Engagement of applicants and recipients SIF maintains extensive engagement with program recipients including the monitoring of project expenditure and results and providing opportunities for queries and feedback.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 28,397,628 25,209,647 41,201,155 40,804,614 40,804,614 (396,541)
Total program 28,397,628 25,209,647 41,201,155 40,804,614 40,804,614 (396,541)
Explanation of variances N/A
General information
Name of transfer payment program Bombardier C Series
Start date September 2008
End date 2034; Contribution provided over four years (to 2021)
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Link to department's Program Inventory Innovation in Business
Description On February 7, 2017, the Government of Canada announced that it would provide $372.5 million in repayable contributions to Bombardier Inc. $120 million is allocated to ongoing activities related to the development of the company's C Series aircraft, while the remaining amount funds research and development for the Global 7000 business jet. This funding is provided over four years and will support middle-class jobs, strengthen the long-term competitiveness of Bombardier and help build the aircraft of the future.
Results achieved The program supports the successful development and launch of new fixed-wing commercial aircraft in the 100 to 160-seat segment.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
An audit was completed in 2014–15: Audit of the Bombardier CSeries Contribution Agreements.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation was completed in 2018–19: Evaluation of Aerospace Programming.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains extensive engagements with industries and businesses, providing opportunities for feedback.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 55,447,443 29,725,449 15,517,520 23,570,628 23,570,628 8,053,108
Total program 55,447,443 29,725,449 15,517,520 23,570,628 23,570,628 8,053,108
Explanation of variances The variance between planned and actual spending reflects higher than anticipated disbursements at the request of recipient due to already-incurred expenditures.
General information
Name of transfer payment program Canada Small Business Financing Program
Start date 1999
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Statutory — Canada Small Business Financing Act
Fiscal year for terms and conditions Ongoing (Statutory program)
Link to the department's Program Inventory Support and Financing for Small Business
Description The Canada Small Business Financing Program (CSBFP) helps Canadian small businesses access financing that would not otherwise be available or would be available only under less favourable terms. It is a loan loss-sharing program involving partnerships with financial institutions. To be eligible, borrowers must be for-profit businesses with revenues of up to $10 million per year. Under the program, financial institutions can make term loans on real property, leasehold improvements and equipment. In the event that a registered loan defaults, the government pays 85 percent of net eligible losses. The CSBFP is a national program that operates in all provinces and territories.
Results achieved

In 2018–19, the CSBFP:

  • Facilitated access to 6,071 loans worth $1.32 billion in debt financing to small businesses;
  • Continued communicating with financial institutions to improve program delivery; and
  • Conducted training sessions and webinars, and provided promotional and educational tools and products.

For additional information on the administration of the CSBFP, including historical data tables, please visit Canada.ca/csbfp.

Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
An internal audit was completed in 2013–14: Audit of the Canada Small Business Financing Program.
An IT General Computer Controls audit and an Expense Payment Cycle audit were completed in March 2018.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation was completed in 2014–15: Evaluation of the Canada Small Business Financing Program.
An evaluation is planned in 2019–20.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED continued to collaborate with lenders, other federal/provincial government departments, and business support organizations to improve their knowledge of the CSBFP.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 63,079,578 51,300,219 64,946,634 46,227,424  46,227,424  (18,719,210)
Total program 63,079,578  51,300,219  64,946,634  46,227,424  46,227,424  (18,719,210)
Explanation of variances The variance between planned and actual spending reflects a drop in claims received and payments made for defaulted loans, primarily driven by a reduction in loans made and a stronger Canadian economy.
General information
Name of transfer payment program Futurpreneur Canada
Start date April 1, 2017
End date March 31, 2019
Type of transfer payment Non-repayable Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2018–19
Link to the department's Program Inventory Entrepreneurship Policy
Description Futurpreneur Canada supports young Canadian entrepreneurs aged 18–39 who see entrepreneurship as a viable career option and want to start their own businesses but who would not typically be supported by traditional lending institutions. Futurpreneur provides loans of up to $20,000 and up two years of mandatory mentoring. Futurpreneur also provides business-planning support.
Results achieved In 2018–19, 804 new businesses were supported by Futurpreneur clients. There were 804 loans issued directly by Futurpreneur for a total value of $10.6 million. Of these totals, 44.5 percent of the loan recipients were female entrepreneurs with $4.7 million in loans issued.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
None completed or planned.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation was completed in 2018–19: Evaluation of Futurpreneur Canada.
An evaluation is planned in 2023–24.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Futurpreneur Canada is the sole eligible recipient of the funding. The organization met reporting requirements by providing four quarterly reports and a final annual report to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 7,000,000 7,000,000 7,000,000 7,000,000 7,000,000
Total program 7,000,000 7,000,000 7,000,000 7,000,000 7,000,000
Explanation of variances N/A
General information
Name of transfer payment program Mitacs Inc.
Start date April 1, 2012
End date March 31, 2022
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2012–13
Link to the department's Program Inventory Talent Development
Description Mitacs Inc. (Mitacs) is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting high-quality research and innovation by building linkages between academia and industry, and strengthening linkages between researchers and students in Canada and abroad across all academic disciplines. This is done by providing postsecondary students and postdoctoral fellows with work-integrated learning opportunities to develop their professional skills and apply their expertise to business-related research challenges.
Results achieved In 2018–19, ISED contributions through Mitacs supported 9,081 work-integrated learning placements, exceeding the target of 8,190 placements by 11%. This included:
  • 6,752 Accelerate internships;
  • 219 Elevate fellowships with postdocs; and
  • 2,110 Globalink internships, including 663 Canadian students travelling to partner countries and 1,295 international students travelling to Canada, and 152 Globalink Graduate Fellowships.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
None completed or planned.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation was completed in 2016–17: Evaluation of ISED's contribution to Mitacs.
An evaluation is planned in 2021–22.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains an ongoing dialogue with Mitacs and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that Mitacs submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the funding agreements. An ISED official attends Mitacs Board of Directors meetings as an observer.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 38,900,000 51,000,000 66,000,000 64,950,000 64,950,000 (1,050,000)
Total program 38,900,000 51,000,000 66,000,000 64,950,000 64,950,000 (1,050,000)
Explanation of variances N/A
General information
Name of transfer payment program Canada Foundation for Innovation
Start date April 25, 1998
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2018–19
Link to the department's Program Inventory Higher Education Sector Science and Research
Description The Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) is an independent corporation created by the Government of Canada to fund research infrastructure. The CFI's mandate is to strengthen the capacity of Canadian universities, colleges, research hospitals and non-profit research institutions to carry out world-class research and technology development that benefits Canadians.
Results achieved The CFI continued to support world-class research through funding for infrastructure and associated operating costs.
Results from 2018–19 include:
  • Signing a Contribution Agreement with ISED implementing the Government's Budget 2018 commitments: $763 million over 5 years starting in 2018–19, followed by permanent, ongoing funding of up to $462 million per year starting in 2023–24;
  • Release of the 2018–2023 Strategic Roadmap for CFI;
  • Three rounds of funding decisions for the John R. Evans Leaders Fund;
  • Funding decisions for the College-Industry Innovation Fund, Streams 1 and 2; and
  • Funding decisions to provide increased support to seven facilities funded under the Major Science Initiatives (MSI) Fund, through Budget 2018's MSI Fund supplement.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
A compliance audit was conducted in 2017–18.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation was completed in 2015–16: Evaluation of Industry Canada's Contribution to the Canada Foundation for Innovation.
An evaluation is planned in 2019–20.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains an ongoing dialogue with the CFI and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that CFI submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of its funding/contribution agreements. Government officials also attend CFI Board of Directors meetings as observers. In 2018–19, CFI held a pan-Canadian consultation on the role of CFI in the future of research and research infrastructure in Canada.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 198,550,000 250,900,000 330,700,000 362,700,000 362,700,000 32,000,000
Total program 198,550,000 250,900,000 330,700,000 362,700,000 362,700,000 32,000,000
Explanation of variances The difference in planned spending and actual spending was due to new funding for CFI received in-year from Budget 2018.
General information
Name of transfer payment program Canadian Institute for Advanced Research
Start date 1986
End date March 31, 2022
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates for funding for CIFAR's core activities; Statutory for funding that CIFAR receives for the Pan-Canadian Artificial Intelligence Strategy
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2018–19
Link to the department's Program Inventory Higher Education Sector Science and Research
Description The Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) is a non-profit organization that supports networks of Canadian and international researchers who conduct long-term research on important scientific, social and economic issues. Promoting world-class research partnerships on these issues helps build research capacity in Canada. At present, CIFAR supports 12 research programs that engage over 300 researchers in a range of areas, including experience-based brain and biological development, nanoelectronics, and quantum information processing. CIFAR is also responsible for implementing the federal government's Pan-Canadian Artificial Intelligence (AI) Strategy announced in Budget 2017, with aim to cement Canada's position as a world leader.
Results achieved In 2018–19, CIFAR:
  • Completed a major renewal of its portfolio of programs, with four new programs approved and four existing programs renewed and updated, for a portfolio which now includes 13 programs;
  • Engaged 373 researchers at different career stages and from different disciplines, 19 countries, and representing 23 Canadian and 111 international institutions across its programs;
  • Welcomed 15 new early-career researchers in its Azrieli Global Scholars program focused on research and leadership skills development, and engaged 174 graduate students in its program activities;
  • Fostered knowledge mobilization by holding 9 major events and activities, engaging 476 new knowledge users and developing 20 online resources;
  • Concluded funding agreements with three AI institutes in Edmonton, Toronto, and Montreal, which are now operational and ramping up their research and training activities;
  • Appointed 46 Canada-CIFAR AI Chairs based at the AI institutes; and
  • Held the inaugural annual meeting of the Pan-Canadian AI Strategy, ran or sponsored successful AI training programs, and implemented a series of AI & society workshops.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
A recipient audit was completed in 2014–15.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation was completed in 2016–17: Evaluation of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.
An evaluation is planned in 2021–22.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains an ongoing dialogue with CIFAR and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that CIFAR submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the funding agreements. An ISED official attends CIFAR Board of Directors meetings as an observer for the portion of the meetings that directly relates to ISED's contributions.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 5,000,000 14,500,000 32,000,000 28,000,000 28,000,000 (4,000,000)
Total program 5,000,000  14,500,000  32,000,000  28,000,000 28,000,000 (4,000,000)
Explanation of variances Disbursements are paid by ISED based on cash flow requirements; the disbursement of the remaining amount is planned in 2020–21.
General information
Name of transfer payment program CANARIE Inc.
Start date 1993
End date March 31, 2020
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2014–15
Link to the department's Program Inventory Higher Education Sector Science and Research
Description CANARIE is a non-profit organization established in 1993 to deliver Canada's only research and education network, allowing Canadians to engage in leading-edge research. CANARIE operates and develops the backbone of Canada's advanced, high-speed research network, and facilitates and supports publicly funded research and innovation. In partnership with regional advanced networks, the CANARIE network connects Canadian research facilities, universities, educational institutions, hospitals and other science facilities, as well as links them to their international peers. It is an essential tool for researchers, innovators and educators.
Results achieved In 2018–19:
  • CANARIE network data traffic grew at approximately 37% from 2018 to 2019.
  • Use of the education roaming (eduroam) service continued to grow rapidly, with an increase of 23% from 224.6 million inter-institutional sign-ons to the service in 2017–18 to 276 million in 2018–19.
  • Participation in the Canadian Access Federation increased from 157 to 167 organizations and participants continue to benefit from the eduroam service, as more than half a million users were able to seamlessly log on to campus Wi-Fi networks in Canada and around the world.
  • In anticipation of traffic growth for the coming years, CANARIE approved a project to add an additional 100G path along the southern route of the network from Seattle via Victoria to Montreal, an addition that results in a 200G capacity that maintains uncongested high-speed access across the country and to the rest of the world.
  • CANARIE launched a community consultation and subsequent targeted funding call for software components and tools supporting the research data management (RDM) workflow. CANARIE announced that it was awarding up to $3.2M in funding to nine (9) research teams to develop RDM software and tools.
  • CANARIE's Digital Accelerator for Innovation and Research (DAIR) program, which offers cloud computing resources to SMEs to accelerate product development timelines, saw an increase in the total number of users. The aggregate number of DAIR users as of April 1, 2019, was 1,232, up from 1,080 in the prior year and ahead of the 2019-20 target of 1,211 aggregate users.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
A compliance audit was conducted in 2016–17.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation was completed in 2018–19: Evaluation of CANARIE.
An evaluation is planned in 2023–24.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains ongoing dialogue with CANARIE and reviews the Annual Business Plan and Annual Report that CANARIE submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement. A government official also attends CANARIE Board of Directors meetings as an observer. In 2018–19, ISED and CANARIE began discussions regarding funding for CANARIE's mandate renewal set to begin in 2020–21. As part of the ongoing Digital Research Infrastructure (DRI) Strategy announced in Budget 2018, ISED has also engaged with CANARIE to identify areas for collaboration with the planned recipient of the new DRI contribution program that was launched in April 2019.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 20,000,000 22,300,000 20,848,727 21,598,727  20,400,000 (448,727)
Total program 20,000,000 22,300,000 20,848,727 21,598,727 20,400,000 (448,727)
Explanation of variances N/A
General information
Name of transfer payment program Centre for Drug Research and Development
Start date April 1, 2017
End date March 31, 2022
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2017–18
Link to the department's Program Inventory Higher Education Sector Science and Research
Description The Centre for Drug Research and Development (CDRD) is a non-profit organization established in 2007 that works in partnership with academia, industry, government and foundations, to identify and de-risk promising discoveries in drug technology to stimulate increased private sector investment in the development and commercialization of related technologies. The CDRD links researchers from institutions across Canada and internationally, and provides researchers and entrepreneurs access to mentors, state-of-the-art expertise and infrastructure to facilitate drug discovery and development activities.
Results achieved In 2018–19, CDRD:
  • Undertook 31 research and development projects;
  • Reached 25 project milestones;
  • Generated $14.21 million in commercial/other revenues;
  • Advanced 15 projects towards commercialization;
  • Generated six new patents; and
  • Trained 54 new drug developers and bio-entrepreneurs.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
None completed or planned.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation is planned in 2020–21.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains an ongoing dialogue with CDRD and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that CDRD submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the funding agreements.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 16,000,000 16,000,000 16,000,000 16,000,000
Total program 16,000,000 16,000,000 16,000,000 16,000,000
Explanation of variances N/A
General information
Name of transfer payment program Genome Canada
Start date March 27, 2000
End date March 31, 2024
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Contribution, Statutory Contribution, Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Link to the department's Program Inventory Higher Education Sector Science and Research
Description Genome Canada is a non-profit corporation that supports six independently incorporated regional Genome Centres across Canada. With the Genome Centres and other partners, Genome Canada invests in large-scale research projects, leading-edge technology platforms, and translation of research into applications, in key areas such as health, agriculture, the environment, fisheries, aquaculture, forestry, mining, and energy. Genome Canada also supports research projects aimed at studying and analyzing the ethical, environmental, economic, legal, and social issues related to genomics.
Results achieved In 2018–19, Genome Canada:
  • Launched the large-scale research competition applied to the agriculture and agri-food sector, and the fisheries and aquaculture sector and received 73 pre-applications, for which results are expected to be announced in 2019–20;
  • Continued supporting 10 technology platforms to support the development of improved technologies to support genomics research;
  • Awarded funding to 13 research translation projects aimed at advancing the application of genomics to real-life challenges;
  • Continued supporting national and international strategic partnerships in genomics research, including the Structural Genomics Consortium, the Joint Translational Research Project on Rare Diseases and E-Rare 3; and
  • Provided ongoing management and monitoring of funded research projects and technology platforms.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
None completed or planned.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation was completed in 2015–16: Evaluation of Industry Canada's Contribution to Genome Canada.
An evaluation is planned in 2019–20.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains an ongoing dialogue with Genome Canada and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that Genome Canada submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the funding agreements. An ISED official attends Genome Canada Board of Directors meetings as an observer.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total grants 4,500,000  1,700,000
Total contributions 62,400,000 57,400,000 73,100,000 68,700,000 68,700,000 (4,400,000)
Total program 66,900,000 59,100,000 73,100,000 68,700,000 68,700,000 (4,400,000)
Explanation of variances N/A
General information
Name of transfer payment program Institute for Quantum Computing
Start date April 1, 2014
End date March 31, 2022
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2017–18
Link to the department's Program Inventory Higher Education Sector Science and Research
Description The Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) is a research institute based at the University of Waterloo. The IQC's mission is to be the world leader in the development of quantum technologies, and its objective is to create a supportive environment for physicists, mathematicians, engineers and computer scientists to advance the fields of quantum information science.
Results achieved In 2018–19, the IQC:
  • Published 136 papers in prominent scientific publications that were cited by other researchers a total of 39,710 times (as of March 31, 2019);
  • IQC researchers collectively hosted 157 scientific visits representing 149 unique visitors from 122 unique institutions;
  • Hosted three conferences, two workshops, 43 seminars and 21 colloquia to foster collaboration and promote idea exchange;
  • Recruited 41 new graduate students from 268 applications and granted degrees to 18 students — eight with PhDs and 10 with Master's degrees;
  • Recruited one new faculty member to support research, bringing the total of full-time faculty to 30 members;
  • Recruited 25 postdoctoral fellows, bringing the current total to 48;
  • Reached over 300,000 Canadians through exhibitions, science fairs, lab tours and public lectures; and
  • Was granted three patents.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
A compliance audit was conducted in 2016–17.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation was completed in 2013–14: Evaluation of Industry Canada's Grant to the Institute for Quantum Computing.
An evaluation is planned in 2020–21.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains ongoing dialogue with the IQC and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that the IQC submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the funding agreement.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000  5,000,000 
Total program 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000  5,000,000 
Explanation of variances N/A
General information
Name of transfer payment program Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics
Start date April 1, 2007
End date July 31, 2022
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2017–18
Link to the department's Program Inventory Higher Education Sector Science and Research
Description The Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics (Perimeter Institute) is a non-profit, research institute devoted to foundational issues in theoretical physics. The Perimeter Institute pursues scientific research and engages in educational outreach activities, bringing together international scientists to push the limits of understanding of physical laws and develop new ideas about the essence of space, time, matter and information. The Perimeter Institute provides a multi-disciplinary environment to foster research in cosmology, particle physics, quantum foundations, quantum gravity, quantum information, superstring theory and related areas.
Results achieved In 2018–19*, the Perimeter Institute:
  • Established the Perimeter Institute Quantum Intelligence Lab to conduct world-leading research at the intersection of artificial intelligence and quantum systems;
  • Welcomed 27 new postdoctoral fellows and recruited 24 more for 2019–20;
  • Provided advanced training to 34 master's students in the Perimeter Scholars International (PSI) program and 55 PhD students in residence;
  • Recruited 27 new PSI students from 688 applications;
  • Led the theoretical analysis required for the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) to achieve the world's first image of a black hole;
  • Hosted more than 500 scientific visits, including 14 from Distinguished Visiting Research Chairs, 39 from Visiting Fellows, and 12 from Simons Emmy Noether Fellows;
  • Hosted 11 conferences and workshops focused on leading-edge topics, and presented more than 300 scientific talks; and
  • Reached approximately 500,000 people on site and online through eight talks and events in the Perimeter Public Lecture Series.

*Perimeter Institute's 2018–19 fiscal year ran from August 1, 2018, to July 31, 2019.

Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
A compliance audit was completed in 2014.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation was completed in 2016–17: Evaluation of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics.
An evaluation is planned in 2020–21.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains ongoing dialogue with the Perimeter Institute and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that the Perimeter Institute submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the funding agreement. Site visits and ISED attendance at Perimeter events are used to provide direct experience of the Perimeter Institute's performance and activities for ISED employees engaged in providing oversight.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000  10,000,000 
Total program 10,000,000  10,000,000  10,000,000  10,000,000  10,000,000 
Explanation of variances N/A
General information
Name of transfer payment program Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund
Start date April 14, 2016
End date March 31, 2021
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Link to the department's Program Inventory Higher Education Science and Research
Description The Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund's (PSI-SIF) objective is the acceleration of strategic construction, repair and maintenance activities at universities and colleges across Canada to generate direct economic activity and to enhance the research infrastructure at post-secondary institutions to strengthen capacity for research and innovation and industry-related training and to support environmental sustainability.
Results achieved As of March 31, 2019, over 95% of the projects have been completed and close to $1.8 billion has been disbursed to ultimate recipients. The remaining projects will be completed by December 31, 2020.
As of 2018–19:
  • Over $1.9 billion in funding commitment to 297 projects at Post-Secondary Institutions across Canada;
  • Approximately $1.8 billion disbursed to date to support the implementation of the approved projects; and
  • Over 95% of the projects have been completed.

Based on project close-out reports received to date and as a result of these investments, an additional 4,000 staff and approximately 43,000 students will be accommodated at post-secondary institutions.

Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
None completed or planned.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation was completed in 2018–19: Evaluation of Post-secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains ongoing dialogue with provinces and territories for delivery of the PSI-SIF program. Quarterly Reports are provided to ISED for each project funded under PSI-SIF to monitor progress and develop payment recommendations. Site visits are used to gather direct feedback and to monitor progress.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 740,926,765 731,759,904 510,334,830 510,334,830 337,870,606 (172,164,224)
Total program 740,926,765 731,759,904 510,334,830 510,334,830 337,870,606 (172,164,224)
Explanation of variances Consistent with the program extension to complete projects by December 2020, an amount of $168.6 million was reprofiled to 2019–20 and 2020–21.
General information
Name of transfer payment program Stem Cell Network
Start date July 22, 2016
End date March 31, 2019
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Link to the department's Program Inventory Higher Education Sector Science and Research
Description The Stem Cell Network (SCN) is a national non-profit corporation dedicated to enabling the translation of stem cell research into clinical applications, commercial products and public policy. It was first established in 2001 as one of the Networks of Centres of Excellence. SCN links to 27 Canadian universities and hospitals, and international collaborators from 39 institutions in eight (8) countries. The contribution to SCN is non-repayable.
Results achieved In 2018–19, SCN:
  • Completed 24 research projects, including three that were part of clinical trials;
  • Hosted the 2018 Till and McCulloch Meetings (a stem cell research event, bringing together stem cell scientists, clinicians, ethicists, industry experts and policy-makers from Canada and abroad) in Ottawa, Ontario, November 12–14, 2018; and
  • Supported 205 individual highly qualified personnel participating in one of 11 different skill development opportunities related to stem cell research.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
None completed or planned.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation is planned in 2020–21.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains an ongoing dialogue with SCN and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that SCN submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 6,794,535 5,205,468 6,000,000 6,000,000 6,000,000
Total program 6,794,535 5,205,468 6,000,000 6,000,000 6,000,000
Explanation of variances N/A
General information
Name of transfer payment program Sustainable Development Technology Canada — SD Tech Fund™
Start date March 26, 2001
End date 2025–26
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2017–18
Link to the department's Program Inventory Clean Technology and Clean Growth
Description Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) supports the development and demonstration of innovative Canadian technological solutions that address climate change, clean air, clean water and clean soil. This transfer payment program provides non-repayable contributions.
Results achieved In 2018–19:
  • SDTC allocated $144 million to 38 promising pre-commercial clean technologies and disbursed $93 million to support the development and demonstration of clean technology solutions across Canada;
  • SDTC was able to increase investments and disbursements to clean technology companies by more than 50% from 2017–18;
  • Over 2,100 new jobs (direct and indirect) were created by SDTC-funded companies. This is a 14% increase over the previous year;
  • SDTC-supported cleantech companies were delivering an estimated 18.1 Megatonnes CO2e of annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions, representing an increase in GHG emissions reductions by 4.3 Megatonnes CO2e over 2017–18; and
  • SDTC-funded projects in the market realized technology-related revenues of $3.05 billion.
Findings of audits completed in
2018–19
The Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development conducted a performance audit of three federal funds for clean energy technologies, including SDTC, which was tabled in Parliament on October 3, 2017.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19 An evaluation was completed in 2017–18: Evaluation of the Sustainable Development Technology Fund.
An evaluation is planned in 2022–23.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains ongoing dialogue with SDTC and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that SDTC submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the funding agreement.
SDTC also undertakes outreach activities to attract more eligible recipients and to improve the quality and viability of project proposals. During 2016 and going forward, SDTC has adopted a continuous intake model, enabling applicants to apply for funding throughout the year instead of periodic funding rounds. SDTC also established partnerships with certain provinces including Alberta, Ontario and British Columbia. More recently, in May 2019, SDTC also announced seed funding to four (4) clean technologies in collaboration with regional accelerators and incubators.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Actual
spending
2018–19 Planned
spending
2018–19 Total
authorities available for use
2018–19 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total contributions 85,235,002 101,540,514 87,691,000 87,691,000 55,375,327 (32,315,673)
Total program 85,235,002 101,540,514 87,691,000 87,691,000 55,375,327 (32,315,673)
Explanation of variances Funding of $32.3 million was reprofiled to 2019–20 to align with SDTC's funding requirements and allow the organization to deliver on its commitments and agreements with recipients.

Gender-based analysis plus

General information
Governance structures

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) recognizes the value that gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) provides in the development and implementation of effective policies and programs that meet the needs of diverse groups of Canadians.

At ISED, we consider GBA+ as a policy innovation tool that supports innovation in policy development and program design as it helps identify opportunities to do new and creative activities that address needs across various population groups and regions. At ISED we recognize that GBA+ makes just good policy sense and supports good due diligence practices.

ISED has a departmental GBA+ advisor, housed with the Strategy and Innovation Policy Sector, to review and approve all GBAs completed with the department and portfolio. Since the launch of a new GBA+ questionnaire at ISED in February 2015, it has become mandatory for the GBA+ advisor to review and approve all GBA+ questionnaires completed at the department and portfolio. Responsible programs must also attest that the GBA+ is complete and the results have been integrated into the proposal, as well as monitor implementation. In addition, the Director General responsible for the proposal must attest that the GBA+ is complete and the results have been integrated in the proposal prior to delivery to the Minister.

The Cabinet Affairs unit at ISED also serves as a check point to ensure that all required steps are completed before a document is sent to PCO. ISED also has a GBA+ sector advisors network to help increase awareness about the value of GBA+ at the departmental sector level.

Together, this governance system ensures:

  • GBA+ systems and processes are fully integrated into policy development and decision making processes at ISED, and GBA analysis must be conducted for all Memoranda to Cabinet and Treasury Board Submissions;
  • GBA+ indicators consider results and delivery to facilitate monitoring and reporting to ensure that policies and programs are assessed; and,
  • The GBA+ Champion plays a role in providing leadership and coordination in the implementation and monitoring of GBA+ activities at ISED.
Human resources

ISED has a Director General level GBA Champion who is responsible for leading many GBA activities across the portfolio. ISED's Champion is also active in the GBA Champions community to share best practices and set common goals.

ISED launched a GBA+ sector advisors network to help increase awareness about the value of GBA+ at the departmental sector level. There are 20 GBA+ sector advisors who are responsible for providing guidance on the GBA process.

The Gender Focal Point in the Strategy and Innovation Policy Sector is dedicated to reviewing and approving all GBA+ documents as well as training and supporting ISED members.

Major initiatives: results achieved

Announced in Budget 2017, the Innovation and Skills Plan is an ambitious effort to make Canada a world-leading centre for innovation, to create well-paying jobs and to help strengthen and grow the middle class. The Plan supports Canadians and the entire innovation continuum. It will help establish Canada as one of the most innovative countries in the world and foster a culture of innovation from coast to coast to coast.

A great deal of work still needs to be done to narrow the gaps that exist not only between women and men, but also among historically underrepresented groups, such as Indigenous Peoples, visible minorities, and persons with disabilities. The diversity in Canadian society is a source of strength and a key driver of economic growth. Making policy decisions that help vulnerable Canadians learn new skills, participate in the economy, or improve their health and well-being leads to positive outcomes for everyone.

The programs that make up the Innovation and Skills Plan were developed in a way to ensure diversity and inclusion. This diversity and inclusion was not just in terms of gender, but also Indigenous, youth, Canadians with disabilities, rural and remote communities and income.
Some examples include:

CanCode aims to equip Canadian youth, including traditionally underrepresented groups, with the skills they need to be prepared for further studies, including advanced digital skills and science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) courses, leading to the jobs of the future. Canada's success in the digital economy depends on leveraging our diverse talent and providing opportunity for all to participate. CanCode has a focus on reaching girls, Indigenous youth, youth with disabilities, and youth living in rural, remote and northern communities to increase their representation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics training. Additionally, by ensuring that all CanCode programs are free to participants, CanCode helps to reduce income-based barriers to participation.

Digital Skills for Youth (DS4Y) connects underemployed post-secondary graduates with small to medium-sized businesses and not-for-profit organizations where they can gain meaningful work experience to help them transition to career-oriented employment. Program participants are able to use the skills acquired during their studies and apply them in a professional setting. Moreover, they will be able to upskill if required to better meet the demands of the labour market. DS4Y is part of the Youth Employment and Skills Strategy (YESS), a horizontal initiative involving 11 federal departments and agencies. The YESS program provides funding to organizations to deliver a range of activities that help youth overcome barriers to employment and develop a broad range of skills and knowledge in order to participate in the current and future labour market. Support will be tailored to the needs of youth that are facing barriers to employments.

The Connect to Innovate program is bringing high-speed Internet to over 900 rural and remote communities in Canada, including 190 Indigenous communities. In these communities, challenging geography and smaller populations present barriers to private sector investment in building, operating and maintaining infrastructure. This program supports new "backbone" infrastructure to connect institutions like schools and hospitals with a portion of funding for upgrades and "last-mile" infrastructure to households and businesses. Canadians will have the opportunity to innovate and participate in our economy, democracy and way of life using new digital tools and cutting-edge services like tele-health and tele-learning.

The Accessible Technology Program is investing in hardware and software solutions that help Canadians with disabilities overcome barriers that come in the way of their full participation in the digital economy. The program co-funds innovative projects led by research institutes, private sector companies and not-for-profit organizations to develop innovative assistive and adaptive digital devices and technologies for persons with disabilities.

The Digital Literacy Exchange program supports the Government of Canada's Innovation and Skills Plan. Part of this plan aims to facilitate and encourage the participation of underrepresented groups in the digital economy by investing in initiatives that provide them with the necessary digital tools, access and skills development opportunities. While 91% of Canadians use the internet (Canadian Internet Use Survey 2018), there are still groups who are newly involved with, or haven't fully discovered the benefits of being online. It is important to support these groups to ensure no one is left behind in the digital economy.

The Connecting Families initiative (CFi) aims to help bridge the digital divide by connecting low-income Canadian families with participating Internet Service Providers (ISPs) offering low-cost home Internet services in their area. CFi also leverages the Computers for School (CFS) program's network of affiliates and its infrastructure to deliver up to 50,000 refurbished computers to eligible families at no cost. These efforts will ensure that more Canadian families and youth have access to the valuable resources available on the Internet and give them access to the tools they need to be successful and thrive.

Women Entrepreneurship Strategy (WES) is a whole-of-government approach to helping women grow their businesses through access to financing, talent, networks and expertise. The WES provides nationally coordinated, regionally tailored investments to help women entrepreneurs and support regional innovation ecosystems through two program streams. The Women Entrepreneurship Fund is a two-year program that invests directly in women-owned or women-led businesses to help them grow and reach new markets. The WES Ecosystem Fund is a five-year program to help non-profit, third-party organizations deliver support for women entrepreneurs and address gaps in the ecosystem.

Venture Capital Catalyst Initiative (VCCI) aims to improve financing opportunities for women and under-represented groups. A portion of the funds made available under this initiative are dedicated to enhancing diversity and increasing women's participation in the venture capital ecosystem. One of the objectives of VCCI is to improve gender balance among Canadian VC fund managers and companies. As part of their submissions, applicants under all streams were required to submit gender balance strategies demonstrating how they will enhance diversity and increase the participation of women across the VC ecosystem. All recipients will be required to report on statistics relating to the number of women fund managers and entrepreneurs supported.

The Strategic Innovation Fund supports innovation projects in Canada, while also ensuring that the funded projects generate not only innovation and economic benefits, but also social benefits. Contribution agreements contain commitments by recipients to develop and implement gender and diversity plans that reflect the specific context of projects and companies. SIF tracks the progress against these commitments including through its Annual Projects Benefits Report.

Innovative Solutions Canada is a new program with over $100 million dedicated to supporting the scale up and growth of Canada's innovators and entrepreneurs by having the federal government act as a first customer. Twenty participating federal departments and agencies will set aside a portion of funding to support the creation of innovative solutions by Canadian small businesses. One of its objectives is to encourage procurement from companies led by under-represented groups, such as women, Indigenous, youth, and others.

Regional Development Agencies are helping to create a culture of innovation, with a strong foundation for sustained and inclusive regional economic growth. The Innovation and Skills Plan takes into account regional priorities and needs through $511 million allocated over five years for the six RDAs, located across the country. The RDAs are adopting a simplified program structure by channelling support through the Regional Economic Growth Through Innovation (REGI) program, and the development of new regional growth strategies. The RDAs are a mechanism for delivering tailored support to women- and Indigenous-owned firms. In 2017–2018, RDAs approved approximately $94 million in funding for Indigenous economic development projects. RDAs are also developing regional growth strategies that reflect their unique regional circumstances and context while aligning with the targets and goals of the Innovation and Skills Plan. This includes adopting a whole-of-government approach to achieve outcomes in priority areas, such as economic development and job creation for Indigenous people.

The BDC's Indigenous Banking Unit provides financing and consulting services, including the Aboriginal Business Development Funds, in partnership with community organizations, to increase access to capital for Indigenous entrepreneurs who may not normally qualify for a loan; and Indigenous Entrepreneur Loans of up to $250,000 for both businesses and start-ups. Through the BDC's alliance with Canadian Executive Service Organization Aboriginal Services, loans come with ongoing mentoring and business management advice for the first two years following loan approval.

Reporting capacity and data

Bridging Digital Divides

1. Computers for Schools

DATA FORMAT: Captures population-level data. Delivery partners report on the type of organizations (school, library, not-for-profit) and population groups (youth, senior, official languages, disabilities, indigenous, new Canadians) that received computers.

2. Connecting Canadians

DATA FORMAT: Captures data on households in rural and remote regions, including Indigenous communities.

3. Connect to Innovate

DATA FORMAT: Captures data on rural and remote regions, including Indigenous communities.

4. Connecting Families initiative

DATA FORMAT: Connecting Families captures the number of families currently benefitting from $10/month Internet or that have received a free computer through the initiative (by province).

5. Digital Literacy Exchange

DATA FORMAT: Delivery partners provide demographic data: senior, new Canadians, Indigenous peoples, people with disabilities, income (targeting low-income Canadians), language minority groups and geographic locations (northern and rural communities).

6. Accessible Technology

DATA FORMAT: Captures demographic data on people with disabilities.
REPORTS: Statistics Canada 2017 Survey on Disability.

Talent Development

1. CanCode

DATA FORMAT: Delivery partners provide demographic data: gender, persons with disabilities, Indigenous youth.

2. Digital Skills for Youth (DS4Y)

DATA FORMAT: Captures the demographic data including age, languages spoken, gender, disabilities, visible minorities, Indigenous status, education, and employment status.

3. Computers for Schools Interns (CFSi)

DATA FORMAT: Captures the demographic data on Canadian youth including age, languages spoken, gender, disabilities, visible minorities, Indigenous status, education, and employment status.

4. Prime Minister's Awards

DATA FORMAT: Captures data on gender and Indigenous peoples.

5. Support for the Business/Higher Education Roundtable (BHER)

DATA FORMAT:

  1. Student Data: Captures demographic data including: gender, disabilities, visible minorities, Indigenous status, language, geographic data, and new Canadians.
  2. Business Ownership Data: Captures demographic ownership data including: gender, disabilities, visible minorities, Indigenous status, language, and geographic data.

Innovation Superclusters Initiative

DATA FORMAT: Applicants submit Gender and Diversity Plans including gender of board members.

Innovation in Business

1. Innovative Solutions Canada (ISC)

DATA FORMAT: Captures demographic data including gender, age, gender, disabilities, visible minorities, Indigenous status.

2. Strategic Innovation Fund

DATA FORMAT: Contribution Agreements Contain gender and diversity commitments; Annual Project Benefits Report.

Insolvency (estate administration)

DATA FORMAT: Collects gender data.

REPORTS: Annual Insolvency Statistics, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018.

Insolvency (Licensing)

DATA FORMAT: Collects gender data.

Entrepreneurship Policy

DATA FORMAT: Futurpreneur Canada captures gender data, Indigenous status and new Canadian.

REPORTS: Annual Report, 2018-19

Economic Development in Northern Ontario (EDNO)

1. Economic Development in Northern Ontario: Northern Ontario Development Program (NODP)

DATA FORMAT: Captures project identifiers (projects which specifically target Indigenous, Francophone, women, and/or youth populations). Where a youth internship is supported the intern may choose to self-identify as being Indigenous, Francophone and/or woman.

REPORTS: Evaluation of the Northern Ontario Development Program, 2016

2. Economic Development in Northern Ontario: Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI)

DATA FORMAT: Captures project identifiers (projects which specifically target Indigenous, Francophone, women, and/or youth populations). Where a youth internship is supported the intern may choose to self-identify as being Indigenous, Francophone and/or Woman.

3. Economic Development in Northern Ontario: Economic Development Initiative for Official Language Minority Communities (EDI)

DATA FORMAT: Captures project identifiers (projects which specifically target Indigenous, Francophone, women, and/or youth populations). Where a youth internship is supported the intern may choose to self-identify as being Indigenous, Francophone and/or woman.

REPORT: Horizontal Evaluation of the Economic Development Initiative, 2017

4. Economic Development in Northern Ontario: Community Futures Program (CFP)

DATA FORMAT: Captures designated bilingual or Indigenous organization;

REPORT: Evaluation of the Community Futures Program, 2019; Evaluation of the Community Futures Program, 2014

5. Economic Development in Northern Ontario: Women Entrepreneurship Strategy — Contribution Pilot

DATA FORMAT: Captures self-identification if the women leader/owner is a member of a diverse group (Indigenous, recent immigrant, visible minority, rural or remote region, woman with disabilities)

6. Economic Development in Northern Ontario: Women Entrepreneurship Strategy — Ecosystem Fund
DATA FORMAT: Captures project identifiers (projects which specifically target Indigenous, Francophone, women, and/or youth populations).

7. Economic Development in Northern Ontario: REGI Steel and Aluminum Initiative

DATA FORMAT: Captures project identifiers (projects which specifically target Indigenous, Francophone, women, and/or youth populations).

8. Economic Development in Northern Ontario: Canadian Experiences Fund (CEF)

DATA FORMAT: Captures project identifiers (projects which specifically target Indigenous, Francophone, women, and/or youth populations).

Response to parliamentary committees and external audits

Response to parliamentary committees

There were no parliamentary committee reports requiring a response in 2018-19.

Response to audits conducted by the Auditor General (including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

2018 Fall Reports of the Auditor General of Canada

Report 1 — Connectivity in Rural and Remote Areas

http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_oag_201811_01_e_43199.html

The audit focused on whether Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, according to their respective roles and responsibilities, monitored the state of connectivity, and developed and implemented a strategy to meet the connectivity needs of Canadians in rural and remote areas.

The audit led to six recommendations, which have all been agreed to by Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission.

Response to audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

Public Service Commission

System-Wide Staffing Audit

https://www.canada.ca/en/public-service-commission/services/publications/results-system-wide-staffing-audit.html

The objectives of the System-Wide Staffing Audit were:

The audit led to four recommendations directed at the Public Service Commission. There were no recommendations for Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada.

Up-front multi-year funding

General information
Name of recipient Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation
Start date March 31, 2002
End date Ongoing endowment in perpetuity
Link to the department's Program Inventory Higher Education Sector Science and Technology Research
Description

The Pierre Elliot Trudeau Foundation supports a non-profit organization that supports research and disseminates research findings in the following humanities and social sciences: Canadian studies, history, international relations, journalism, law, peace and conflict studies, philosophy, political economy, political science, sociology, and urban and community studies.

Using a peer review process, the Foundation offers three types of awards: scholarships awarded to doctoral candidates, fellowships awarded to established researchers at Canadian universities, and mentorships awarded to seasoned professionals who are able to counsel the scholars. The Foundation also holds conferences, lectures and symposia.

Significant audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan N/A
Significant evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan N/A
Summary of results achieved by the recipient

In 2018–19, the Trudeau Foundation:

  • Selected 20 new 2019 scholars;
  • Appointed seven 2019 mentors;
  • Appointed five 2019 fellows; and
  • Hosted 24 public interaction events, hosted two community events and supported three other public events.
Financial information (dollars)
2016–17
Actual
spending
2017–18
Actual
spending
2018–19
Planned
spending
2018–19
Total
authorities available for use
2018–19
Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Explanation of variances N/A
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