Archived — Industry Canada Business Plan 2011–2012

Contents

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Message from the Deputy Ministers

The Industry Canada Business Plan 2011–12 outlines how the Department will further the government's priorities of economic growth and job creation through measures to increase Canada's productivity and competitiveness. This, in turn, will contribute to the economic and social well-being of all Canadians.

In 2011–12, the Department will strengthen economic framework policies that instill consumer, investor and business confidence and promote innovation. To advance Canada's marketplace internationally, the Department will work toward more clear and transparent rules governing foreign investment, strengthen trade measurement legislation and bring Canada's copyright regime in line with international standards. Securing Canada's place in the digital economy, through the enacting of anti-spam legislation and becoming a leader in the creation, adoption and use of digital technologies, continues to be a priority for the Department.

Industry Canada will continue to support science, technology and innovation to help Canadians obtain the skills and training required to compete in the global economy. Developing, attracting and retaining world-class researchers, providing them with the necessary research tools and infrastructure, and fostering research and development partnerships with industry will promote scientific excellence, accelerate commercialization outcomes, and grow Canada's capacity for innovation.

As the economy continues to gain momentum, the Department's policies, programs and services will centre on promoting the growth and competitiveness of small business by encouraging entrepreneurship, supporting community economic development and helping Canadian industries adapt to risk and compete in domestic and global markets.

In the coming year, Industry Canada will upgrade its web presence and strengthen its communications channels to improve client service and to better communicate these key priorities to Canadians.

Ensuring that the Department is able to deliver on its mandate requires a talented and dedicated workforce that brings its best to bear on improving Canada's prosperity. Industry Canada places a priority on the professional growth of its people. Our designation as one of Canada's Top 100 Employers for 2011 recognizes this commitment.

At Industry Canada we are proud of the work we do in promoting prosperity, providing quality services and programs to Canadians, and ensuring the solid stewardship and efficient management of financial resources. In 2011–12, we will meet the challenges ahead with confidence and help to strengthen the fundamentals of an economy based on knowledge, entrepreneurship and global competitiveness.

 

Richard Dicerni
Deputy Minister

Simon Kennedy
Senior Associate Deputy Minister

 

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Introduction

Industry Canada's annual business plan communicates the Department's key strategies, priorities and management expectations for the coming fiscal year to employees, Canadians and other stakeholders. The plan links key activities to departmental and Government of Canada priorities and sets out, in concrete terms, what Industry Canada intends to achieve and the contribution of sectors and branches within the Department to those achievements. By integrating business and human resources considerations, identifying resource requirements and linking to enabling functions—people management, stewardship, management of information and technology, and communications and engagement—Industry Canada's business plan sets out how the Department fulfills its mandate to help make Canadian industry more productive and competitive in the global economy, thus improving the economic and social well-being of Canadians.

The business plan is one component of a broader departmental planning exercise, which includes the Report on Plans and Priorities, sector and branch business plans, and a variety of corporate plans and reports in areas such as human resources and information technology. Together, these products provide a complete picture of the Department's work, priorities and plans, and explain how Industry Canada will seek to fulfill its mandate in the year ahead.

Industry Canada will monitor its progress against the business objectives set out in this business plan and will publish a report on the Department's website concurrently with the Departmental Performance Report.

Visit the Industry Canada website for more information about the Department.

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About Industry Canada

Mandate and Resources

Industry Canada has a broad and diverse mandate to help make Canadian industry more productive and competitive in the global economy, thus improving the economic and social well-being of Canadians.

In support of this mandate, Industry Canada uses its financial and human resources to develop, implement and oversee a wide variety of programs and activities related to industry, science, technology and innovation, commerce, telecommunications, consumer affairs, corporations, competition and restraint of trade, weights and measures, bankruptcy and insolvency, intellectual property, investment, small business and tourism. In addition to its ongoing activities, the Department is often called upon to undertake initiatives related to government priorities. Recently this has included implementation of parts of Canada's Economic Action Plan, including the Knowledge Infrastructure Program, as well as leading negotiations with General Motors Canada Limited and Chrysler Canada Inc. to facilitate their restructuring.

Total Departmental Human Resources for 2011–12 by Key StrategyFootnote * (5649 full-time equivalents)

Total Departmental Human Resources for 2011–2012 Graph (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure

This pie chart shows that total departmental human resources are distributed among Industry Canada's three key strategies and the strategic enablers: 53 percent for advancing the marketplace (2928 full-time equivalents); 9 percent for fostering the knowledge-based economy (534 full-time equivalents); 10 percent for supporting business (592 full-time equivalents); and 28 percent for strategic enablers (1595 full-time equivalents).

Total Planned Departmental Spending for 2011–12 by Key StrategyFootnote * ($1407.5 million)

Total Planned Departmental Spending for 2011–2012 Graph (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure

This pie chart shows that total planned departmental spending is distributed among Industry Canada's three key strategies and the strategic enablers: 14 percent for advancing the marketplace ($198.3 million); 53 percent for fostering the knowledge-based economy ($735.8 million); 23 percent for supporting business ($329.8 million); and 10 percent for strategic enablers ($143.6 million).

Organization

Industry Canada comprises 15 sectors and branches with unique responsibilities and expertise that collectively help promote growth in employment and income, advance sustainable development practices and make Canadians more productive and competitive in the knowledge-based economy. In addition, Industry Canada works closely with the 10 federal departments and agencies that make up the Industry Portfolio to further the Government of Canada's goal of building a knowledge-based economy in all regions of Canada and to advance the Government's jobs and growth agenda. Specific information about each sector and Industry Portfolio partner can be found on the Industry Canada website.

Industry Canada has its headquarters in Ottawa and has several offices in the National Capital Region. The Department also has five regional offices, in Vancouver, Edmonton, Toronto, Montréal and Halifax, as well as 10 sub-offices and numerous district offices. Regional offices allow the Department to benefit from local contacts and networks and serve as the point of integration for Industry Canada's business in the regions. In addition, a number of programs have a regional presence, including those delivered by the Competition Bureau; Measurement Canada; the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy; the Spectrum, Information Technologies and Telecommunications Sector; and the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario.

The map below shows the locations of Industry Canada's regional offices, sub-offices and district offices.

Industry Canada's regional offices, sub-offices and district offices

Map of Canada (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure

Map of Canada showing Industry Canada's regional offices, sub-offices and district offices

This map shows the locations of major regional offices, sub-offices and district offices.

In the Yukon, there is an office in:

  • Whitehorse

In the Northwest Territories, there is an office in:

  • Yellowknife

In Nunavut, there is an office in:

  • Iqaluit

In British Columbia, there are offices in:

  • Kelowna
  • Penticton
  • Prince George
  • Surrey
  • Vancouver
  • Victoria

In Alberta, there are offices in:

  • Calgary
  • Edmonton
  • Lethbridge

In Saskatchewan, there are offices in:

  • Regina
  • Saskatoon

In Manitoba, there is an office in:

  • Winnipeg

In Ontario, there are offices in:

  • Acton
  • Belleville
  • Burlington
  • Hamilton
  • Kenora
  • Kitchener
  • London
  • Mississauga
  • North Bay
  • Ottawa
  • Parry Sound
  • Peterborough
  • Stratford
  • Thunder Bay
  • Timmins
  • Toronto
  • Sault Ste. Marie
  • Sudbury
  • Windsor

In Quebec, there are offices in:

  • Chicoutimi
  • Gatineau
  • Montréal
  • Québec
  • Saint-Rémi
  • Sherbrooke
  • Trois-Rivières

In New Brunswick, there are offices in:

  • Fredericton
  • Moncton
  • Saint John

In Newfoundland and Labrador, there is an office in:

  • St John's

In Nova Scotia, there are offices in:

  • Dartmouth
  • Halifax
  • Sydney

In Prince Edward Island, there is an office in:

  • Charlottetown

Did you know?

Industry Canada has been recognized as one of Canada's top 100 employers for 2011.

The editors of Canada's Top 100 Employers evaluated Industry Canada on a number of factors: physical workplace; work atmosphere and communications; health, financial and family benefits; vacation and time off; employee communications; performance management; training and skills development; and community involvement.

More information on this competition can be found at the Canada's Top 100 Employers website.

People

On December 31, 2010, Industry Canada employed approximately 5600 full-time equivalents across the country, including economists, lawyers, engineers, scientists, commerce officers, inspectors, metrologists and accountants. These employees are supported by specialists in areas such as human resources, financial management, communications, information management and information technology.

The Department's vision for people management is guided by the Values and Ethics Code for the Public Service and by Industry Canada's three-year People Management Strategy for Renewal and Results. This strategy supports long-term departmental priorities and objectives by fostering employee growth and development, encouraging ongoing feedback on performance and promoting leadership at all levels.

Industry Canada is committed to being an organization for which people are proud to work and to do work that really matters. The Department supports professional growth and offers balance for personal and professional pursuits. The result is a talented and collegial workforce that brings its best to improving the economic prosperity and well-being of Canadians.

Industry Canada: Work That Matters

Every day, thousands of talented people come to work at Industry Canada. They come for the challenge and because they know that they are making a real difference in the lives of Canadians.

We are proud of our work, which is about advancing Canada's marketplace, supporting business and fostering the knowledge-based economy.

Industry Canada experts continuously offer innovative ideas and solutions. They bring a mix of unique talents and valuable experience to addressing many of Canada's technical, economic and industrial policy issues. The nature of our work and our high-calibre staff make working at Industry Canada a fascinating and rewarding experience.

Respect

We value diversity among our employees and the range of perspectives they bring to the work we do. That's why we strive to ensure that our workplaces are equitable, supportive and respectful and that our workforce is representative of Canada's social and ethnic diversity. In this same way, we are creating an environment that is conducive to working in either official language and encouraging and supporting employees to increase their capacity to work in their second official language. We are also striving to ensure that Industry Canada's services are offered equally in both official languages.

Development

Continuous learning is an important part of our work. Industry Canada supports the professional and personal growth of its employees. Each employee is encouraged to develop a tailored personal learning plan with his or her manager that may include opportunities for career development, progression, mentoring and training. In addition, networking events and community-building exercises are just some of the ways that Industry Canada's Young Professionals Networks (YPN) are helping to shape our workplaces.

Engagement

Making Industry Canada a great place to work is not just a management exercise. It depends on the engagement and commitment of each employee and of managers at all levels across the organization. It is about building on the ideas of individuals and providing excellent advice and service as a result. It is about finding and developing great employees who want to make a real difference in their jobs. Industry Canada is working to foster workplaces and a culture that support today's knowledge workers and are sufficiently flexible to ensure we can meet the challenges ahead with confidence.

More information about the Department and its work can be found on the Careers page of Industry Canada's website.

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Operating Context

Industry Canada's work is influenced by a wide variety of external and internal factors. The programs and services the Department delivers are driven by the policies and priorities of the Government of Canada and must adapt to economic, social and technological trends. At the same time, the management of these programs and services relies on personnel, budgets, processes and business tools. All these factors form Industry Canada's operating context and play a critical role in shaping the Department's key strategies and business objectives.

The following factors will influence Industry Canada's work in 2011–12:

  • government policies and priorities;
  • partner and stakeholder relations;
  • the domestic and global economic environment; and
  • demographic and labour force trends.

Government Policies and Priorities

Measures Affecting the Operating Budgets of Departments and Agencies

Budget 2011
Budget 2011 introduced a number of measures that directly impact Industry Canada's programs and services. The Budget included new investments in science and technology, as well as the commercialization and demonstration of new technologies in the marketplace, which will help Industry Canada to succeed in its strategy to foster Canada's knowledge-based economy. In addition, Budget 2011 reaffirmed the Government of Canada's commitment to developing a digital economy strategy to encourage the development of a world-class digital economy in Canada, driven by innovation and enhanced productivity, by 2020. Advancing this strategy will involve sectors within Industry Canada, including the Spectrum, Information and Telecommunications Sector and the Strategic Policy Sector, and has also contributed to the renewal of the Department's Community Access Program for 2011–12. Budget 2011 also introduced a review of all policies and programs related to the aerospace/space industry to maximize the competitiveness of this sector.

Budget 2011 builds on the actions taken in Budget 2010 to return the Government of Canada to balanced budgets. By delivering on the 2010 round of strategic reviews as well as launching a comprehensive one-year Strategic and Operating Review, the Government of Canada plans to move towards balanced budgets while providing fiscal room to continue paying down debt and investing in the priorities of Canadians. Industry Canada, along with all other federal departments, will undergo a Strategic and Operating Review in 2011–12 to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of government operations and programs and to ensure value for taxpayer money.

Industry Canada already has in place a number of processes and controls to ensure the efficiency and effectiveness of its operations. Budget 2010 introduced cost containment measures to reduce the rate of growth in operating spending across the government and to realize savings of $6.8 billion over five years. For Industry Canada, these measures consist of absorbing increases resulting from new collective bargaining agreements. The cumulative impact as of 2011–12 is estimated at $8.4 million.

Industry Canada continues to scrutinize spending to ensure good stewardship and efficient management of financial resources. Over the last few years the Department has implemented appropriate processes to enhance its financial governance model and internal controls to ensure the integrity of its financial information. As a result, the Department has been recognized by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, through the Management Accountability Framework assessment, for its continuous improvement and commitment to sound management practices and strong stewardship.

As part of its planning and oversight activities, Industry Canada conducts comprehensive monthly analysis of trends and forecasting in employee headcount, salary expenditures and non-salary expenditures at both the departmental and sector level. These analyses inform monthly discussions of the Industry Canada Management Committee, chaired by the deputy minister, and are a key component in shaping the Department's management priorities and plans. In order to address the constraint targets for 2011–12, Industry Canada will further tighten management oversight of staffing, travel and reduction in external consultants.

In addition, Industry Canada's integrated risk management and integrated human resource and business planning processes provide the Department with the forward-looking analysis necessary to identify and mitigate potential risks and resource gaps resulting from a changing fiscal environment. Through its annual risk management process, Industry Canada identifies corporate risks pertaining to programs and operational priorities as well as people and financial management. These risks are detailed in the Department's Corporate Risk Profile (CRP) and integrated into the report on plans and priorities to establish direct linkages with Industry Canada's strategic outcomes and program activities. The 2011–12 CRP identifies organizational adaptability—including recruitment, development and retention of people—as a key corporate risk that ensures that people management will remain a priority in the coming year.

The Department's strong governance structure also provides support to executives while they manage change. For example, in addition to the oversight of internal operations provided by the Industry Canada Management Committee, the Department benefits from an Information Technology Strategic Management Committee responsible for IT business and investment allocation and a Programs and Services Board, which assesses new financial assistance proposals and provides oversight of procurement and contracting activities. This governance structure ensures that Industry Canada remains responsive and efficient in the reallocation of resources as required by the current fiscal reality.

Over 2011–12, Industry Canada will continue to assess the effects of constraint measures and deploy resources in an optimal way. The Department will plan based on the best information available and adjust as circumstances change to ensure that costs are contained while maintaining the quality of programs and services and delivering on departmental and government priorities.

Strategic Review

In 2010, Industry Canada was part of the fourth round of strategic reviews, with reductions totalling $15.75 million through 2013–14 announced in Budget 2011. Through its strategic review, the Department has identified opportunities to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of its activities while continuing to respond to the changing nature of the Canadian economic landscape. As a result, Industry Canada is better positioned to promote innovation, help Canadians acquire the skills needed to compete in a knowledge-based economy and improve the competitiveness of businesses and communities. Additional information on the strategic review reductions will be provided as an addendum to this plan once the information is released.

Canada's Economic Action Plan

In the 2009 budget, the Government of Canada announced Canada's Economic Action Plan. This stimulus plan consisted of a set of initiatives to be implemented over two years and completed by March 31, 2011. The Plan aimed to support a quick recovery from the economic downturn and ensure long-term economic growth and prosperity for Canadian businesses and individuals. This resulted in a temporary increase in Industry Canada's spending in 2009–10 and 2010–11.

On December 2, 2010, the Government of Canada extended the deadline for organizations to complete Economic Action Plan infrastructure projects from March 31, 2011, to October 31, 2011. The Knowledge Infrastructure Program, which provides funding to support infrastructure enhancement at universities and colleges, is the only Industry Canada program affected by this announcement.

Partner and Stakeholder Relations

Sound, productive relationships with partners and stakeholders are essential to Industry Canada being able to fulfill its mandate. The Department maintains close, collaborative relationships with federal departments and agencies; provincial, territorial and international governments; industry and consumer representatives; and academic and not-for-profit institutions.

Portfolio partners Organizations associated with the Industry Portfolio (examples)
Business Development Bank of Canada Canada Foundation for Innovation
Canadian Space Agency Council of Canadian Academies
Canadian Tourism Commission Genome Canada
Copyright Board of Canada Trudeau Foundation
National Research Council Canada Review of Federal Support to Research and Development
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Science, Technology and Innovation Council
Registry of the Competition Tribunal  
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada  
Standards Council of Canada  
Statistics Canada  

 

Canadian Economic Forecasts

  2010 2011
Real growth in gross domestic product 3.0% 2.5%
Consumer Price Index inflation 1.7% 2.2%
Unemployment rate 8.0% 7.7%

Source: Finance Canada surveys of private sector forecasters, Update of Economic and Fiscal Projections, October 2010.

Domestic and Global Economic Environment

Over the past year, Canada has recovered rapidly from the recession. The Canadian economy has created close to 400 000 jobs since July 2009—the strongest job growth in the G7—and the economy has grown for five straight quarters. The unemployment rate has declined as economic growth and job creation are being buoyed by strong commodity prices, more sustained private sector demand, rising exports, increased business investment and timely and strategic investments under Canada's Economic Action Plan. While Canada's medium-term growth prospects are healthy, there remains some uncertainty about the trajectory of the broader global economic recovery, which may lead to a moderation in Canada's growth outlook.

Various indicators have improved in the last year. The Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy Canada reports that from October 2009 to October 2010 consumer insolvencies decreased by 8.1 percent, while business insolvencies decreased by 31.7 percent. The unemployment rate declined to 7.6 percent in December 2010.

Rising commodity prices are supporting several resource-based industries, while the improved U.S. economic outlook is benefitting various export sectors. Private business investment is growing rapidly as firms take advantage of the strong dollar to import more productivity-enhancing machinery and equipment.

Canada's Economic Action Plan has helped to protect and create jobs over the last two years by reducing the tax burden, investing in infrastructure, supporting industries and communities, improving access to financing and investing in science, technology and research. Many of these initiatives will have long-term benefits that will enhance Canada's future prosperity.

In response to the moderation in economic growth in the second half of 2010, private sector economists are expecting slower GDP growth in 2011. Data from Statistics Canada indicate that Canadian household debt reached a record high of 150 percent of disposable income in the third quarter of 2010, which may constrain consumption going forward. Lending conditions remain tighter than they were before the financial crisis, although the situation has improved more quickly in Canada than in other countries, particularly the U.S.

As noted by the Minister of Finance and the Governor of the Bank of Canada, the Canadian economy faces several risks. The strong Canadian dollar and high household debt could constrain the growth of non-resource-related industries and private consumption, respectively. The Canadian dollar is expected to remain high over the next year in relation to most major currencies due to the second round of quantitative easing in the U.S., the stability of Canada's financial system and the expectation of sustained high commodity prices.

The global recovery also poses risks, including weak domestic demand in most advanced economies, inflation risks in emerging economies, global trade imbalances and uncertainty in European sovereign debt markets. Risks related to barriers to global trade and currency manipulation by governments or other marketplace participants persist despite progress by some countries in reducing investment restrictions and advancing trade negotiations.

Over the medium to long term, the Canadian economy will face pressures from an aging population and the changing global economic environment. Rising worldwide demand for skilled workers and the impending demographic crunch will affect growth prospects unless productivity improvements can make up for Canada's slowing labour force growth.

In addition, Canadian industries will be challenged to respond to intensifying global competition, demand for new goods and services, environmental and sustainability considerations, and evolving global markets. Industries will face pressure to expand their global reach, integrate into global supply chains and adopt cutting-edge new technologies.

Overall, Industry Canada is well positioned to continue supporting Canadian businesses and industries by helping them understand and exploit the changing global economic landscape; by promoting skills development and sector-specific knowledge growth; and by fostering business innovation, competitiveness and productivity.

Demographic and Labour Force Trends

Public service renewal remains a priority for the Clerk of the Privy Council. While anticipated budget tightening suggests the public service is unlikely to continue to grow at previous rates, and lower than expected retirement rates will mean hiring fewer new employees, there will continue to be opportunities for highly skilled and talented workers. As the only growing segment of the increasingly competitive professional and highly skilled labour market, new Canadians along with visible minority and Aboriginal communities will continue to play an important role in the labour market. As such, the ability to attract and retain employees from these communities will be essential to the sustainability and effectiveness of Industry Canada's workforce.

Given the current context, the Department will place greater focus on planning, managing internal resources and setting priorities to ensure that it is able to deliver its mandate in 2011–12. Also, as a result of the ongoing movement of employees within the public service, Industry Canada will be challenged to effectively manage its staff complement to account for turnover and potential loss of corporate memory as employees relocate within the Department and transfer to other departments and agencies. In addition, some sectors within Industry Canada will continue to see a shift in the type of work they do and skills they require, moving from operational and program activities toward policy and analytical work, thus creating greater competition with the private sector and other government departments for individuals with specialized skill sets.

Overall, however, Industry Canada is well positioned to respond to current demographic and labour force challenges. In 2011–12, the Department will work to recruit, develop and retain the talent needed to maintain a productive, sustainable, adaptable, competent and diverse workforce capable of meeting the Department's strategic outcomes.

Demographic Profile of Industry Canada

(as of March 31, 2011)*

Employees:
As of March 31, 2011, Industry Canada had 5871 employees, comprising 5578 indeterminate,111 casual and 182 term employees. The Department also employed 122 students, for an overall total of 5993 employees.
Major Occupational Groups:
Of the 29 groups at Industry Canada, the CO, AS, CR and CS groups accounted for 50.1 percent of the workforce, with the CO group remaining the Department's largest single occupational group (15.9 percent). The CO population has decreased by 5.1 percent over the previous three years. The EC population increased by 7 percent over the same period.**

Average Age:
43.5 years. 30 percent of new appointees were younger than 28; 56 percent were younger than 35.

Primary Official Language:
English, 61.3 percent; French, 38.7 percent.

Bilingualism:
59 percent of positions were designated bilingual. In March, 2011, 92.9 percent of employees had met their linguistic profiles, 1.6 percent had not and 5.5 percent had incomplete results.

Employment Equity:
As of March 31, 2011: women, 48.9 percent; visible minorities, 14 percent; persons with disabilities, 4.5 percent; Aboriginal people, 2.4 percent. The representation of persons with disabilities exceeded workforce availability by 0.5 percent, that of Aboriginal people by 0.6 percent, that of women by 1.5 percent and that of visible minorities by 0.8 percent. The rate of recruitment of visible minorities did not exceed workforce availability. In March 2011, there were no overall gaps in representation, although gaps existed in key occupational groups.

Turnover **:
The largest share of inflows (80.3 percent) came from hires of indeterminate employees from other departments or from outside the public service. Slightly more than half (47.3 percent) of departures were the result of movement to other departments and agencies. Voluntary departures accounted for the greatest share of outflows (approximately 54 percent), followed by retirements (43.2 percent).* The occupational groups with the highest total departure rates were EX (15.4 percent), PE (15.3 percent), AS (11.7 percent) and EC (11.6 percent). Since last year, departure rates for the PE and EC groups decreased by 13.4 percent and 5.1 percent respectively. The departure rates from 2010–11 are lower than the overall rates for the last five years.
Position Tenure:
37.7 percent of employees had been in their current positions fewer than two years, including at least half of the employees in the PE, FI and EX groups.

Retirement **:
In 2010–11, 211 employees, representing 3.7 percent of Industry Canada's indeterminate workforce, retired at an average age of 57.4 and with 28 years of pensionable service. Since 2008–09, there has been a flattening of the retirement rate and this trend is expected to continue. 25 percent of TIs and 20.5 percent of EXs will be eligible to retire without penalty within three years. In general, 53 percent of employees retire prior to, or at, the time of eligibility. By March 2014, it is projected that 11.3 percent of employees will retire.

Source: Industry Canada, Human Resources Annual Performance Report 2009–2010.

* There is a significant variance between the employee head count in this paragraph and the figures for full-time equivalents (FTE) elsewhere in this document. The figures in this paragraph represent a head count of people employed by Industry Canada on a specific date, whether or not they are being paid by the Industry Canada salary envelope at that time. It therefore includes, for example, employees on assignment outside the Department and employees on leave. This distinction accounts for 25 percent of the variance. Conversely, the FTE count focuses on the active workforce, which draws expenditures against the salary envelope over the period of a year. It excludes any employee paid by activities for IC which users pay fees. This accounts for the remaining 75 percent of the variance.

** These statistics are based on fiscal year data.

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How Industry Canada Fulfills its Mandate

The many and varied activities Industry Canada carries out to deliver its mandate are organized around three interdependent and mutually reinforcing key strategies:

Three Key Strategies

Three Key Strategies Graph (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure

This graphic illustrates that Industry Canada delivers its mandate through three interdependent and mutually reinforcing key strategies: advancing the marketplace; fostering the knowledge-based economy; and supporting business.

Fostering the knowledge-based economy:

Industry Canada invests in science and technology to generate knowledge and equip Canadians with the skills and training they need to compete in the global, knowledge-based economy. These investments help ensure that discoveries and breakthroughs happen here in Canada, and that Canadians can realize the social and economic benefits.

Supporting business:

Industry Canada encourages business innovation and productivity because businesses are the organizations that generate jobs and wealth. Promoting economic development in communities encourages the development of skills, knowledge and opportunities across the country.

Advancing the marketplace:

Industry Canada fosters competitiveness by developing and administering economic framework policies that promote competition and innovation; support investment and entrepreneurial activity; and instill consumer, investor and business confidence.

These three key strategies describe how Industry Canada achieves its strategic outcomes and supports the Government of Canada's outcomes. The Department implements each strategy through a number of program activities that are managed by sectors and branches. Strategic enablers—people management, stewardship, management of information and technology, and communications and engagement—support all program activities and are the foundation for the Department's work to achieve its strategic outcomes.

The following diagram illustrates how Industry Canada's three key strategies connect the Department's strategic outcomes and the Government of Canada's outcomes to the Department's program activities and strategic enablers.

Government of Canada Outcomes

Government of Canada Outcomes (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure

Chart showing relationship between Government of Canada Outcomes and Industry Canada strategic outcomes, key strategies, program activities and strategic enablers

This chart illustrates the relationship between Government of Canada outcomes and Industry Canada's three strategic outcomes, three key strategies, various program activities and strategic enablers. Industry Canada has established three strategic outcomes — the Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive; Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy; and Canadian businesses and communities are competitive  — which are driven by and contribute to the Government of Canada's outcomes in the areas of economic and international affairs such as a fair and secure marketplace; an innovative and knowledge-based economy; and strong economic growth. Industry Canada uses three key strategies — advancing the marketplace; fostering the knowledge-based economy; and supporting business — to achieve its strategic outcomes, which enable the Department to fulfill its mandate to help make Canadian industry more productive and competitive in the global economy, thus improving the economic and social well-being of Canadians. Industry Canada undertakes a variety of program activities to deliver its key strategies and contribute to achieving the Department's strategic outcomes. Industry Canada's strategic enablers — people management, stewardship, management of information and technology, and communications and engagement — support delivery of the Department's program activities and key strategies, and serve as the foundation for achieving its strategic outcomes.

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Key Strategies and Business Objectives for 2011–12

Strategy 1: Advancing the Marketplace Through Economic Framework Policies

Linkage Between Government of Canada Outcome and Industry Canada's Strategic Outcome

Strategy 1 Graph (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure

Linkage Between Government of Canada Outcome and Industry Canada's Strategic Outcome

This chart illustrates the linkage between the Government of Canada outcome "A fair and secure marketplace" and Industry Canada's strategic outcome "The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive". The chart also shows that Industry Canada's key strategy "Advancing the Marketplace Through Economic Framework Policies"—which states that Industry Canada develops and administers economic framework policies that promote competition and innovation, and instill confidence among consumers, investors and business—helps to achieve the Department's strategic outcome and, in turn, advances the Government of Canada outcome.

Planned Human Resources and Departmental Spending for 2011–12

Human Resources by Program Activity Footnote 1 Footnote 2 (2928 full-time equivalents)

Human Resources by Program Activity Graph (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure

Program Activity(2928 full-time equivalents)

This pie chart shows that, in 2011–2012, human resources allocated to the key strategy "Advancing the marketplace" are distributed among four program activities: 60 percent for marketplace frameworks and regulations (1770 full-time equivalents); 24 percent for spectrum, telecommunications and the online economy (703 full-time equivalents); 1 percent for the consumer affairs program (23 full-time equivalents); and 15 percent for competition law enforcement and advocacy (432 full-time equivalents).

Departmental Spending by Program ActivityFootnote 1 Footnote 2 ($198.3 million)

Departmental Spending by Program Activity Graph (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure

Departmental Spending by Program Activity ($198.3 million)

This pie chart shows that, in 2011–2012, departmental spending under the key strategy "Advancing the marketplace" is distributed among four program activities: 29 percent for marketplace frameworks and regulations ($58.3 million); 45 percent for spectrum, telecommunications and the online economy ($87.7 million); 2 percent for the consumer affairs ($4.6 million); and 24 percent for competition law enforcement ($47.7 million).

Overview

Under this strategy, Industry Canada develops and administers laws, regulations, standards and policies—collectively known as economic framework policies—governing fundamental aspects of the Canadian economy. The Department is responsible for ensuring that these economic framework policies promote innovation, competition and productivity, and instill consumer, investor and business confidence.

Program Activities and Business Objectives for 2011–12

This strategy will be implemented through the following program activities:

Marketplace Frameworks and Regulations

Industry Canada is responsible for the oversight and regulation of a number of aspects of the Canadian marketplace, including bankruptcy, foreign direct investment, federal incorporation, intellectual property and trade measurement. To deliver on its mandate, this program administers framework statutes, regulations, policies and procedures; it develops, sets and assures compliance with standards; performs reviews; and holds meetings with a variety of stakeholders. Overall, the program benefits Canadians by ensuring the integrity of the marketplace.

Expected Result

  • Legislation, regulations and policy are in place and are administered for Canadian markets.

2011–12 Business Objectives

In support of this program activity, Industry Canada will work to achieve the following business objectives during 2011–12:

  • Measurement Canada will pursue regulatory amendments to introduce mandatory inspection frequencies (in the retail petroleum, retail food, dairy, mining, forestry, fishing, wholesale petroleum and grain and field crop sectors) and administrative monetary penalties. These amendments, required in order to administer the Fairness at the Pumps Act, will align Canada with international practices for fair and accurate trade measurement and strengthen consumer and business protection against loss from inaccurate measurement.
  • Corporations Canada will seek Governor-in-Council approval of the regulations and develop the necessary policies and changes to the IT system in order to prepare to administer the new Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Act, should the Act come into force. The Act would replace the Canada Corporations Act, Part II, which currently governs federally incorporated not-for-profit corporations. It establishes a modern governance framework and allows not-for-profit corporations to be more efficient and effective in the competitive marketplace.
  • The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) will pursue improvements to regulations and practices to promote good governance of the intellectual property system.
  • CIPO will also promote the effective use of intellectual property assets and information with a focus on the post-secondary education sector and intermediaries that support small and medium-sized enterprises in the export sector.
  • The Competition Bureau will continue to increase the transparency and predictability in administering and enforcing the amendments to the Competition Act of 2009.
  • The Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy (OSB) will start to establish a revised compliance framework.
  • The OSB will continue the process to revise and, as needed, implement its new trustee licensing policy to maintain an efficient and effective regulatory framework.
  • The OSB will work with the Communications and Marketing Branch to implement a strategy to promote awareness of the rights and responsibilities of the stakeholders in the insolvency system and to encourage compliance with the legislative framework.
  • The Strategic Policy Sector (SPS) will work with stakeholders and other agencies in Industry Canada to deepen its understanding of marketplace changes in order to develop and maintain an internationally competitive marketplace that supports economic growth in Canada.
  • SPS will advance work aimed at modernizing intellectual property (IP) legislation to better facilitate innovation and ensure effective rights enforcement, decrease uncertainty for businesses and inventors, support the commercialization of ideas, and support inventors who operate on a global scale by aligning Canada's laws with international IP administrative systems and treaties. Work will include support for the introduction and passage of copyright legislation that balances the needs of creators and users. In the last parliamentary session, the government introduced Bill C-32, the Copyright Modernization Act, to align Canada's copyright regime with international standards and promote homegrown creativity and consumer interests. This Bill, however, died on the Order Paper due to the General Election in May 2011.
  • SPS will work with the Standards Council of Canada to strengthen Canada's standards system in order to encourage innovation, enable commercialization and boost productivity in strategic sectors.
  • SPS will monitor domestic and international developments and ensure that Canada has modern and internationally competitive marketplace frameworks and regulations, thereby promoting competition and innovation conducive to productivity growth and prosperity in Canada.
Spectrum, Telecommunications and the On-line Economy

This program maximizes the public benefits of radio spectrum by allocating it efficiently and contributing to the orderly evolution of information and communications technologies, telecommunications networks and the online economy. This ensures that Canadians develop, use and benefit from them domestically and internationally. It achieves this by developing and administering domestic regulations, economic framework policies, procedures and standards that govern Canada's radiocommunication and telecommunications industries, and online economy. This program also promotes global telecommunications through the development of international treaties and agreements and helps facilitate international online trade and commerce through participation in international bilateral and multilateral forums.

Expected Result

  • Canada's radiocommunication and telecommunications infrastructure and online economy are governed by an effective policy and regulatory framework.

2011–12 Business Objectives

In support of this program activity, Industry Canada will work to achieve the following business objectives during 2011–12:

  • The Strategic Policy Sector (SPS) will work with public and private sector stakeholders to advance the network infrastructure element of Canada's digital economy strategy.
  • SPS will work with all public and private sector stakeholders to enhance accountability and transparency at the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers and ensure that the organization's governance and Internet Domain Name System policies remain responsive to the needs of Canadians and Internet users.
  • SPS will develop advice for the minister about the powers the Governor in Council (the Governor General acting on the advice of Cabinet) has under the Telecommunications Act, including the power to vary, rescind or refer back decisions of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission.
  • The Spectrum, Information Technologies and Telecommunications Sector (SITT) will advance next-generation networks by implementing and monitoring Broadband Canada projects, updating coverage maps and supporting the development of policy options for next steps.
  • In collaboration with Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, and private sector stakeholders, SITT and SPS will advance Canadian interests at the 2012 World Radiocommunication Conference.
  • SITT will work with telecommunications service providers and other government departments to improve the security of telecommunications infrastructure, develop mitigation strategies to address emerging threats and provide a support function during times of emergency.
  • SITT will convene an intradepartmental network to respond to Public Safety Canada's initiatives for critical infrastructure and cyber security to work toward an all-hazards risk assessment methodology.
  • SITT will work with regulators from the European Union and the U.S. to develop a memorandum of understanding establishing the framework for future collaboration in the area of market surveillance. SITT will also work to expand collaboration in this area with regulators in the member states of the Organization of American States and Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation.
  • SITT will conduct consultations with relevant stakeholders to determine if there is a need to update the treaty with the U.S. to facilitate sharing of the digital television spectrum along the Canada-U.S. border.
  • As part of its effort to improve spectrum management, SITT will conduct a study to assess future demand for radio spectrum by major radiocommunication services.
  • In preparation for auctions of both the 2500 MHz and 700 MHz bands, SITT will complete consultation processes for technical rules and will publish the results. The auctioning of these bands will help support new mobile technologies and services in the Canadian marketplace.
  • SITT will work with the Competition Bureau, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and the Office of the Privacy Commissioner to implement Canada's anti-spam legislation and to establish a Spam Reporting Centre. SITT will also work with the Office of Consumer Affairs on consumer and business public education and awareness initiatives. Regulations will be finalized so that the legislation can come into force.
  • SITT will support the passage of a bill to amend the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) to more effectively protect Canadians' information online.
Consumer Affairs

This program gives consumers a voice in the development of government policies and enables them to be effective marketplace participants. It is an element of the Department's consumer affairs role under the Department of Industry Act, which directs the Minister to promote the interests and protection of consumers. The program provides research and analysis on marketplace issues in support of both policy development and the intergovernmental harmonization of consumer protection rules and measures. It contributes to effective consumer protection through collaboration with provincial and territorial consumer protection agencies under Chapter 8 of the Agreement on Internal Trade, and with other governments through the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's Committee on Consumer Policy. Industry Canada, through this program, identifies important consumer issues, and develops and disseminates consumer information and awareness tools. These consumer protection information products and tools are developed either by the program itself or in collaboration with other consumer protection agencies. Finally, the program provides financial support to not-for-profit consumer and voluntary organizations through the Contributions Program for Non-Profit Consumer and Voluntary Organizations. The purpose of the financial support is to encourage them to reach financial self-sufficiency and assist them in providing meaningful, evidence-based input to public policy in the consumer interest.

Expected Result

  • Citizens and policy-makers are aware of consumer issues in the Canadian marketplace.

2011–12 Business Objectives

In support of this program activity, Industry Canada will work to achieve the following business objectives during 2011–12:

  • The Office of Consumer Affairs (OCA), in conjunction with SITT and the Competition Bureau (CB), will implement a communications strategy for Canada's anti-spam legislation to educate consumers and business about spam and other online threats. By creating the knowledge base, information and tools that lead to independent, safe and productive use of the Internet, OCA will help increase consumer confidence in the online marketplace.
  • In conjunction with the Consumer Measures Committee, OCA will continue to explore measures to protect consumer interests through joint analysis of current consumer pressures in priority sectors, sharing best practices for regulatory compliance, and dissemination of consumer information and outreach tools with federal, provincial and territorial consumer protection authorities.
  • OCA will offer consumers information on areas where they may be particularly vulnerable and equip them with tools from the Canadian Consumer Handbook to help them make informed decisions, thereby contributing to a more efficient and competitive marketplace.
  • OCA will work with partners, including the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's Committee on Consumer Policy and various technical committees of the International Organization for Standardization, on a variety of consumer policy projects. Topics will include modernizing consumer protections in e-commerce, ensuring environmental claims are meaningful and accurate, enhancing consumer product safety, improving the readability of consumer utility bills, and encouraging social responsibility in organizations.
Competition Law Enforcement

This program is in place to maintain and encourage competition in order to achieve a number of objectives, including promoting the efficiency and adaptability of the Canadian economy and protecting competitive markets. This program also ensures that all businesses have equitable opportunities to participate in the Canadian economy in order to provide consumers with competitive prices and product choices. The Competition Bureau, an independent law enforcement agency, is responsible for the administration and enforcement of the Competition Act, the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act, the Textile Labelling Act and the Precious Metals Marking Act. It seeks to ensure that businesses and individuals conform with the legislation under its jurisdiction through negotiated settlements, consent agreements and, where appropriate, prosecuting anti-competitive conduct through litigated proceedings. It protects competitive markets by detecting, disrupting and deterring anti-competitive conduct. The Competition Bureau also encourages reliance on market forces. It conducts market studies, provides advice to government legislators and policy-makers and intervenes and/or makes representations before federal and provincial boards, commissions and tribunals to encourage competition as a means of achieving policy or regulatory objectives.

Expected Results

  • Canadian markets are competitive.
  • Businesses/individuals change their anti-competitive conduct following compliance interventions conducted by the Competition Bureau.

2011–12 Business Objectives

In support of this program activity, the Competition Bureau will work to achieve the following business objectives during 2011–12:

  • The Competition Bureau will continue to increase the transparency and predictability in administering and enforcing the amendments to the Competition Act of 2009 and engage in more effective enforcement using the full range of tools on the enforcement continuum, including litigation, where necessary.
  • The Bureau will engage in targeted enforcement actions in the areas of abuse of dominance and domestic cartels, and timely and effective merger reviews, including negotiated settlements before the Competition Tribunal.
  • The Bureau will target fraud and misleading representations, in particular in the digital economy, targeting the most egregious conduct.
  • The Bureau will improve its enforcement capacity by ensuring that it has staff with the right mix of experience and expertise required to advance enforcement strategies. In addition, the Bureau will realign resources to meet priorities, including the implementation of recent amendments.
  • The Competition Bureau will continue to lead Canada's participation in a number of international competition forums, support the government in the negotiation and implementation of competition provisions in free trade agreements, and establish and enhance networks and agreements among competition authorities, to facilitate cooperation and coordination of enforcement efforts for the promotion of competitive markets and more effective competition law enforcement worldwide.
  • The Bureau will work closely with SITT and Canada's other anti-spam enforcement partners on implementation issues, including establishing the Spam Reporting Centre, and will continue to ramp up its enforcement capacity to effectively deliver on its new responsibilities upon entry into force.

Strategy 2: Fostering the Knowledge-Based Economy Through Enhanced Research, Innovation, Training and Skills

Linkage Between Government of Canada Outcome and Industry Canada's Strategic Outcome

Strategy 2 Graph (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure

Linkage Between Government of Canada Outcome and Industry Canada's Strategic Outcome.

This chart illustrates the linkage between the Government of Canada Outcome "An innovative and knowledge-based economy" and Industry Canada's Strategic Outcome "Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy". The chart also shows that Industry Canada's key strategy "Fostering the Knowledge-Based Economy Through Enhanced Research, Innovation, Training and Skills" — which advocates strategic investment in science and technology to create new knowledge and equip Canadians with the skills and training they need to compete in the global knowledge-based economy — helps to achieve the Department's strategic outcome and, in turn, advances the Government of Canada outcome.

Planned Human Resources and Departmental Spending for 2011–12

Human Resources by Program ActivityFootnote 1 Footnote 2 (534 full-time equivalents)

Human Resources by Program Activity Graph (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure

Human Resources by Program Activity (534 full-time equivalents)

This pie chart shows that human resources allocated to the key strategy "Fostering the knowledge-based economy" are distributed among three program activities: 13 percent for Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity (69 full-time equivalents); 71 percent for Information and Communication Technologies Research and Innovation (377 full-time equivalents); and 16 percent for research and development financing (88 full-time equivalents).

Departmental Spending by Program ActivityFootnote 1 Footnote 2 ($735.8 million)

Departmental Spending by Program Activity Graph (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure

Departmental Spending by Program Activity ($735.8 million)

This pie chart shows that departmental spending under the key strategy "Fostering the knowledge-based economy" is distributed among three program activities: 36 percent for Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity ($265.7 million); 5 percent for Information and Communication Technologies Research and Innovation ($38.2 million); and 59 percent for research and development financing ($431.9 million).

Program Activity Leads for This Strategy

Overview

Under this strategy, Industry Canada manages science, technology and innovation policies and programs aimed at improving Canada's research, development and innovation capacity. By investing in programs that support research, research infrastructure, collaboration, commercialization and talent, Industry Canada promotes knowledge creation and mobilization and helps equip Canadians with the skills and training they need to compete in the global knowledge-based economy.

Program Activities and Business Objectives for 2011–12

This strategy will be implemented through the following program activities:

Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

This program supports the Minister of Industry and the Minister of State (Science and Technology) in their responsibilities related to science, technology and innovation. It sets the strategic direction of policies and programs to support and stimulate research, development and innovation in Canada. It works with Portfolio partners, other government departments and external stakeholders from the private and public sectors to foster an environment that is conducive to innovation and to promote scientific excellence.

Expected Results

  • Canada's S&T capacity is developed.
  • Canada invests in skilled workers to drive innovation.
  • Knowledge Infrastructure Program: Provide economic stimulus in local economies across Canada through infrastructure investments at post-secondary institutions.

2011–12 Business Objectives

In support of this program activity, Industry Canada will work to achieve the following business objectives during 2011–12:

  • Through the Science, Technology and Innovation Council (STIC), the Science and Innovation Sector (SIS) produced, published and officially launched the State of the Nation 2010 report on Canada's science, technology and innovation system. The report assessed the state of Canada's research and innovation, and benchmarked the country's science, technology and innovation performance against international standards of excellence.
  • Through STIC, SIS will provide the Government of Canada with confidential, evidence-based and timely advice on science, technology and innovation issues critical to Canada's economic development and social well-being.
  • SIS will improve Canada's ability to develop, attract and retain world-class students and researchers by working with the granting councils to ensure the effectiveness of tri-council scholarship, fellowship and research chairs programs targeted at attracting the world's best and brightest S&T talent. This will contribute to the People Advantage of the government's S&T strategy.
  • SIS will ensure that the government's S&T programs support excellence in research and provide the necessary research tools and infrastructure to keep Canada at the leading edge of scientific discoveries. This will contribute to the Knowledge Advantage of the government's S&T strategy.
  • SIS will improve Canada's ability to translate publicly funded research into social and economic benefits by working with the granting councils to enhance the linkages between academia and industry. The focus will be on ensuring the effectiveness of tri-council programs aimed at increasing research collaboration between higher-education institutions and companies, improving commercialization of academic research, and facilitating technology transfer to the private sector. This will contribute to the Entrepreneurial Advantage of the government's S&T strategy.
  • SIS will work with 14 arms-length organizations, including the Canada Foundation for Innovation and Genome Canada, to contribute to achieving the objectives set out in their funding agreements with the Government of Canada.
  • SIS will work with science-based departments and agencies to identify innovation-related topics of national importance for scientific assessment by the Council of Canadian Academies in order to inform program and policy decision making.
  • SIS will work to support the government's response to the Expert Review Panel on Research and Development, which is charged to report to the Minister of State (Science and Technology) in October 2011.
  • Through collaboration with the federal science, technology and innovation community, as well as with provinces and territories and related stakeholders, SIS will encourage greater horizontal coordination of and strategic focus on the development of science, technology and innovation policies and programs.
  • Through participation in international multilateral forums (including committees of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and the Carnegie Group responsible for science and technology), SIS will promote the government's science, technology and innovation interests abroad, and leverage international collaborative arrangements to inform domestic policy development.
  • SIS, working with the Regional Operations Sector, will manage the delivery of the Knowledge Infrastructure Program, a $2-billion initiative created under Budget 2009 as an economic stimulus measure supporting research and training infrastructure projects at post-secondary institutions.
Information and Communication Technologies Research and Innovation

This program conducts research on advanced telecommunications and information technologies through the Communications Research Centre Canada (CRC) to ensure an independent source of advice for public policy and to support the development of new products and services for the information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. Research projects are carried out through a combination of in-house activities, tasks performed for other government departments on a cost-recovery basis and partnerships with industrial and academic organizations. This work is undertaken to provide an insight into future technologies to assist Industry Canada in developing telecommunications policies, regulations and program delivery; to improve decision making related to ICT by other government departments; and to close the innovation gap by transferring new technologies to Canadian industry.

Expected Results

  • Industry Canada policy-making and program development sectors are made aware of new and emerging communication technologies and are provided with the technical information they need to make well-informed decisions.
  • Canadian government departments and agencies (National Defence, Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, Canadian Space Agency) are provided with the information they need to make well-informed decisions on new communication technologies.
  • Canadian telecommunications companies realize industrial and economic benefits from CRC intellectual property (IP) and technology transfer.

2011–12 Business Objectives

In support of this program activity, Industry Canada will work to achieve the following business objectives during 2011–12:

  • The Spectrum, Information Technologies and Telecommunications Sector (SITT) will work with National Defence, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, the Canadian Space Agency and numerous Canadian universities to improve spectrum efficiency by developing technology for intelligent radio, prediction of ultra-high frequency, environment and white space interference, propagation analysis and wireless network convergence.
  • SITT will enhance public safety communications by improving the third generation of search and rescue technology and the interoperability of first-responder communication devices and by exploring flexible satellite communication systems for regional access.
  • SITT will improve Internet security by enhancing attack detection and screening verification technologies to make networks in Canada and around the world more secure for Canadians.
  • SITT will contribute to the development of northern access to ICT networks and explore and assess new technologies for mobile multimedia wireless distribution.
  • SITT will support development in the area of energy efficiency and greenhouse gas reduction by developing technologies that contribute to reducing operational costs and the carbon footprint associated with ICT.
Research and Development Financing

This program helps Canadian businesses increase research and development (R&D) by supplementing private sector investment for R&D and innovation projects with additional funds through means such as repayable contributions. Agreements normally specify which funding will come from the federal government and from other sources. Projects are chosen based on their impact on the Canadian economy, their potential for maximizing innovation capacity and expertise, and their creation and retention of jobs in Canada.

Expected Results

  • Investment in leading-edge R&D in targeted Canadian industries.
  • Development and commercialization of new and improved products, processes and services.

2011–12 Business Objectives

In support of this program activity, Industry Canada will work to achieve the following business objectives during 2011–12:

  • The five-year, $250-million Automotive Innovation Fund (AIF) supports strategic research and development projects in the automotive sector to develop innovative, greener and more fuel-efficient vehicles. The Industry Sector will assess applications as received and, as appropriate, conduct due diligence and negotiate contribution agreements with applicants. The Industry Sector will also monitor existing AIF contribution agreements.
  • The Industry Sector will continue to manage an aerospace innovation program to enhance the capacity for R&D, and commercialization of new technologies in the Canadian aerospace industry.
  • The Industrial Technologies Office (ITO) will support strategic research and development projects in the aerospace and defence sector, implement a performance management strategy to monitor, measure and report on outcomes and benefits, improve client services, and enhance collaboration between the private sector and academia, including universities, colleges and research institutes.

Strategy 3: Supporting Businesses Through Policies and Programs That Promote Competitiveness and Productivity

Linkage Between Government of Canada Outcome and Industry Canada's Strategic Outcome

Strategy 3 Graph (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure

Linkage Between Government of Canada Outcome and Industry Canada's Strategic Outcome.

This chart illustrates the linkage between the Government of Canada Outcome "Strong economic growth" and Industry Canada's Strategic Outcome "Canadian businesses and communities are competitive". The chart also shows that Industry Canada's key strategy "Supporting Businesses Through Policies and Program that Promote Competitiveness and Productivity" — which advocates promotion of business innovation and productivity to create wealth and generate jobs — helps to achieve the Department's strategic outcome and, in turn, advances the Government of Canada outcome.

Planned Human Resources and Departmental Spending for 2011–12

Human Resources by Program ActivityFootnote 1 Footnote 2 (592 full-time equivalents)

Strategy 3 Graph (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure

Human Resources by Program Activity (592 full-time equivalents)

This pie chart shows that human resources allocated to the key strategy "Supporting business" are distributed among three program activities: 21 percent for small business research, advocacy and services (123 full-time equivalents); 51 percent for industrial competitiveness and capacity (305 full-time equivalents); and 28 percent for community economic development (164 full-time equivalents).

Departmental Spending by Program Activity Footnote 1 Footnote 2 ($329.8 million)

Departmental Spending by Program Activity Graph (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure

Departmental Spending by Program Activity ($329.8 million)

This pie chart shows that departmental spending under the key strategy "Supporting business" is distributed among three program activities: 39 percent for small business research, advocacy and services ($128.6 million); 14 percent for industrial competitiveness and capacity ($47.1 million); and 47 percent for community economic development ($154 million).

Program Activity Leads for This Strategy

Overview

The Department supports competitiveness and productivity by encouraging businesses to invest strategically and ensuring that the Government of Canada takes industry views into consideration when developing trade, economic, environmental and social policies that may affect the business climate. To achieve this, Industry Canada uses a variety of legislative frameworks, policies, partnerships, and programs and services.

Program Activities and Business Objectives for 2011–12

This strategy will be implemented through the following program activities:

Small Business Research, Advocacy and Services

The Department's work in the field of small business research, advocacy and services is aimed at enhancing the growth and competitiveness of small business and encouraging entrepreneurship. To support this program activity, Industry Canada raises awareness across government of the challenges facing small businesses; provides knowledge and expertise on small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) in a number of areas, including statistics, entrepreneurship, financing, innovation and growth firms; recommends policy options; delivers programs that help support SMEs and entrepreneurial activity across Canada; and provides advice and support related to the Business Development Bank of Canada.

Expected Result

  • Small businesses use government programs, tools and information.

2011–12 Business Objectives

In support of this program activity, Industry Canada will work to achieve the following business objectives during 2011–12:

Did you know?

98 percent of businesses in Canada are considered "small."

The Key Small Business Statistics report, produced semi-annually by Industry Canada, notes that 98 percent of businesses in Canada are considered small (fewer than 100 employees). These businesses accounted for 48 percent of the total labour force in the private sector and spent more than $4 billion on R&D in 2005 (most recent data).

  • Through the Canada Business Network (CBN), the Regional Operations Sector will collaborate with the Government of Ontario to align and deliver integrated business information services for Ontario entrepreneurs.
  • The Small Business, Tourism and Marketplace Services Sector (SBTMS) will work with other departments and agencies, other levels of government, and national associations serving small business to build awareness of the CBN and identify areas for collaboration on delivering service to business.
  • SBTMS will continue to use research, usability testing and performance measurement to ensure the Canada Business national website is results-oriented and responsive to client needs.
  • Based on the results and recommendations of the comprehensive review of the Canada Small Business Financing Program, SBTMS will work to improve the structure, delivery and awareness of the program, which helps Canadian SMEs gain access to debt financing to start up, grow, enhance their productivity and innovate.
  • SBTMS will work with the Department of Finance Canada to complete the report of the Business Development Bank of Canada Legislative Review for tabling in Parliament by July 2011. SBTMS will subsequently lead the legislative and policy work required to implement any recommendations arising from the report.
  • Through the Small Business Internship Program, SBTMS will continue to help small and medium-sized businesses adopt e-business strategies through student internships and will implement 400 e-business projects with these businesses.
Industrial Competitiveness and Capacity

This program was put in place to help Canadian industries develop the capacity to adapt to the ever-changing economic landscape, respond appropriately to external shocks, and innovate and compete internationally. It uses research and analysis to develop expertise on Canadian industries and Canada's position in the global economy. The overall goal is to strengthen Canada's industrial capacity by applying this expertise to develop and contribute to policy, legislation and regulations, and to engage various public and private stakeholders. Departmental officials engage with associations, governments and leading firms to help Canadian industries become more innovative and enter into global value chains, strengthen partnerships both domestically and internationally, attract investment and promote Canadian expertise. Through this program, the Department also invests in private sector initiatives that are aimed at maximizing productivity and facilitating access to capital.

Expected Results

  • Canadian industries have the capacity to prepare for and respond to risks and opportunities in domestic and global markets.
  • Industry perspective is considered in policy, legislation, regulations and agreements.

2011–12 Business Objectives

In support of this program activity, Industry Canada will work to achieve the following business objectives during 2011–12:

  • The Spectrum, Information Technologies and Telecommunications Sector (SITT) will work with Canadian Heritage and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada to communicate and implement the government's upcoming digital economy strategy.
  • SITT and the Industry Sector will conduct impartial research and analysis related to industries such as information and communications technologies, automotive, manufacturing and aerospace to provide recommendations to internal government stakeholders in support of policy formulation and business development.
  • The Industry Sector will work to deepen the Department's engagement with industry on trends and business issues related to the transition to a lower carbon economy and to build awareness and understanding of the risks and opportunities for innovation and competitiveness during this transition.
  • The Industry Sector will engage with key stakeholders from industry, academia and government to assess near-term opportunities, challenges and industry-specific policy issues associated with the maintenance and development of a competitive supply base in Canada.
  • The Industry Sector will improve the competitiveness of Canada's clinical trial environment by working with Health Canada and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research to streamline some of the procedures for clinical trials that lead to costly delays for industry.
  • The Industry Sector and SITT will continue to engage with industry associations, private sector stakeholders, other federal government departments and other levels of government to enhance its understanding of issues related to competitiveness in order to better align policies and leverage programs to create an environment that fosters business innovation and encourages investment in key industries.
  • Under the Industrial and Regional Benefits Policy, the Industry Sector will work with partners to ensure that Canadian companies can become part of, or enhance their position in, global value chains associated with major defence contracts. This policy provides the framework for using federal defence procurement to leverage long-term industrial and regional development in Canada.
  • The Small Business, Tourism and Marketplace Services Sector is responsible for leading the development of the Federal Tourism Strategy. The Strategy aims to further articulate the federal government's approach to supporting tourism, building on the four priorities the Prime Minister announced in June 2009: encouraging product development and investments in Canadian tourism assets and products; facilitating ease of access and movement for travellers, while ensuring the safety and integrity of Canada's borders; increasing awareness of Canada, including federal tourism assets, as a premier tourist destination; and fostering an adequate supply of skills and labour to enhance visitor experiences through quality service and hospitality.
  • The Strategic Policy Sector will conduct research on the business case for sustainability and corporate social responsibility (CSR), particularly on the benefits for business productivity, innovation and competitiveness, and the role of government in enabling such practices. The Sector will also continue to promote the business case for CSR and sustainability practices to the corporate sector and small and medium-sized enterprises. In addition, the Sector will develop and promote online management tools and other supports to help integrate good CSR practices and standards.
  • The Industry Sector will continue to monitor the implementation of covenants made by General Motors Canada Limited and Chrysler Canada Inc. in their 2009 restructuring with a view of maximizing long-term benefit to Canada.
Community Economic Development

This program advances the economic development of northern Ontario communities in the same manner that regional development agencies support similar activities in other regions of Canada. Its main goal is to strengthen the northern Ontario economy by providing financial support, through contribution agreements, to economic and community development projects led by the private, not-for-profit and public sectors. This program also helps to increase public access to the Internet, increase computer access opportunities in schools, and improve information technology skills and learning in community groups and communities across Canada.

Expected Results

  • Targeted businesses and organizations in northern Ontario create economic growth.
  • The Broadband Canada: Connecting Rural Canadians program is expected to expand broadband coverage to as many unserved and underserved households in Canada as possible, beginning in 2009–10.

2011–12 Business Objectives

In support of this program activity, Industry Canada will work to achieve the following business objectives during 2011–12:

  • Through the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario (FedNor), the Regional Operations Sector (ROS) will renew the terms and conditions of the Northern Ontario Development Program (NODP) and implement NODP's priorities to achieve short- to medium-term measurable results supporting the economic growth and development of northern Ontario communities and businesses.
  • Through Computers for Schools, and in collaboration with other departments, private sector donors and licensed Canadian distributors, ROS will manage the distribution of up to 65 000 refurbished computers to schools, libraries and not-for-profit organizations across Canada and engage up to 300 youth interns to refurbish computers, with the goal of enhancing information and communications technologies skills among young Canadians while reducing Government of Canada e-waste.
  • ROS will also develop and implement a long-term marketing, communications and outreach strategy to increase awareness and productivity of the Computers for Schools program.
  • ROS will continue to implement section 41 of the Official Languages Act, which sets out requirements for the advancement of linguistic duality and the development of official language minority communities. Through FedNor, ROS will implement the action plan resulting from the evaluation of the Economic Development Initiative under the Government of Canada's Roadmap to Linguistic Duality 2008–2013: Acting for the Future.

Regional Operations Sector

Industry Canada's capacity to provide sound policy advice depends in large part on the Department's ability to be in regular contact with industry and universities across the country and to maintain a dialogue with provincial and territorial governments, the private sector, our partners and stakeholders. In this regard, Industry Canada's Regional Operations Sector (ROS) undertakes regional outreach activities and assists in advancing ministerial priorities by ensuring stakeholder awareness and understanding of Industry Canada goals, programs and services, and managing a network of relationships in support of departmental priorities.

With offices across Canada, ROS plays a number of complementary roles, including carrying out economic and policy analysis, client and regional liaison and coordination, communications and operational support to other branches and sectors within Industry Canada as well as support to ministers and senior officials related to visits across Canada. By collecting, coordinating, analyzing and disseminating strategic intelligence (e.g., intelligence reports, network mapping, issues tracking, regional economic analysis and evergreen regional profiles), ROS provides strategic support to departmental sectors with regard to policy, governance, information and regional leadership.

ROS provides sectors and branches across Industry Canada with regional, provincial and territorial insights, access to local networks, and the capacity to work with and encourage a horizontal perspective, and actively engages and reaches out to the Department's diverse stakeholder base. In addition to maintaining its extensive network of local contacts, ROS will continue in 2011–12 to liaise and consult with key stakeholders to solicit input on a range of policy development initiatives, through one-on-one meetings, participation in local industry events, and regional stakeholder round tables.

 

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Governance Structure and Accountabilities

Industry Canada has implemented an effective governance structure with clear accountabilities, which provides regular and comprehensive oversight of programs, policies and initiatives. This governance regime supports the Department's senior management and executives to set priorities, manage change, make decisions about programs, policies, investments and resources, and ensure the management and stewardship of resources and internal services.

Senior management committees meet on a regular basis to make informed, proactive and timely decisions in support of departmental priorities and results. Performance and resource allocations for program activities are reviewed at various committees, including the Programs and Services Board for transfer payment programs and the Director General Policy Committee for policy issues. Significant management, policy and strategic issues arising at the sector or program level are raised at Management Committee, the Deputy Minister Policy Table or Executive Committee, depending on the issue.

The Department also benefits from the presence of the external Departmental Audit Committee, a strategic resource for the Deputy Minister that provides objective and independent advice and recommendations about the sufficiency, quality and results of assurance activities carried out on the Department's risk management, control and governance frameworks and processes. The committee oversees core areas of departmental management, control and accountability in an integrated, risk-focused and systematic way. The committee also provides advice and recommendations to the Deputy Minister, as requested, on emerging priorities, concerns, risks and opportunities, and on accountability reporting. The Audit and Evaluation Branch further strengthens departmental oversight by helping senior management make informed decisions, increase the efficiency, effectiveness and economy of departmental operations, and enhance performance and accountability across the Department.

In line with the Treasury Board's Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structures, Industry Canada's Program Activity Architecture, which has been updated for 2011–12, articulates common strategic outcomes and groups the Department's work into logical program activities. It is through this structure that the Department meets its business objectives and delivers on its mandate to Canadians.

Industry Canada's Committee Structure

Industry Canada's Committee Structure Diagram (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure

Industry Canada's Committee Structure

This diagram depicts Industry Canada's Committee Structure consisting of thirteen senior management committees, including eight committees at the Deputy Minister and Senior Associate Deputy Minister levels. 

The committees at the Deputy Minister and Senior Associate Deputy Minister levels include:

  • Departmental Audit Committee
  • Executive Committee
  • Deputy Minister Policy Table
  • Departmental Evaluation Committee
  • Management Committee

The remaining senior management committees include:

  • Information Technology Strategic Management Committee
  • Information Technology Standards and Architecture Committee
  • Project Oversight Committee
  • Comptrollership and Administration Sector Advisory Committee
  • Programs and Services Board
  • Business Continuity Steering Committee
  • Strategic Human Resources Management Committee
  • Director General Policy Committee

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Strategic Enablers

Consistent with Industry Canada's management priorities, strategic enablers provide the Department's sectors and branches with the support they require to deliver programs and services, and to achieve the Department's strategic outcomes. Encompassing a range of corporate management functions, strategic enablers promote sound long-term management of human, financial and material resources. They also enable the effective, efficient delivery of programs and services across Industry Canada, while ensuring the Department remains accountable to Parliament and Canadians.

People Management

The effective management of human resources is central to Industry Canada's ability to attract and retain competent, committed and engaged employees. A sound human resources plan is at the heart of effective people management and helps the Department establish the knowledge and conditions needed to secure the right people, build a supportive work environment and achieve its strategic objectives.

The People Management Strategy for Renewal and Results (PMSRR) is Industry Canada's three-year strategy for achieving the desired state of people management in the Department. Implemented first in 2009–10, this strategy supports long-term departmental priorities and objectives by fostering employee growth and development, encouraging ongoing feedback on performance and promoting leadership at all levels. Based on demographic trends and issues, the Strategy sets a direction and vision for managing Industry Canada's people and talent, and for human resources management activities across the Department.

For 2011–12, Industry Canada will focus on activities within each of the key strategy components to address issues raised in Industry Canada's Human Resources Annual Performance Report and the PMSRR Year 3 Action Plan as well as those raised by sectors through Industry Canada's integrated planning process.

Management Objectives for 2011–12

The PMSRR Year 3 Action Plan will work to achieve the following management objectives during 2011–12:

Employee Engagement and Renewal

Recruitment and Staffing
  • A focus on targeted recruitment activities (e.g., the University Speakers series) will ensure that Industry Canada is able to compete with the private sector and other government departments for people with specialized skills. While the number of new hires may be moderate compared to previous years because of anticipated financial restraints, the Department will continue to target key groups through post-secondary recruitment and the database of names of students who qualify for the bridging program, and bridging mechanisms for groups such as AS and EC. For the coming year, Industry Canada will seek to hire new staff for various occupational groups and levels, such as CO-01 (entry level), EC and AS. As always, the Department will continue to hire students using the Federal Student Work Experience Program and co-op programs.
  • Industry Canada will also make more strategic use of staffing options such as collective staffing initiatives run by central agencies, collective in-house staffing for levels such as AS-01 and AS-02, and internal progression through development programs for auditors, human resources officers, economists and competition law officers, among others.
  • IC will increasingly focus on internal resourcing options to maintain capacity in key functions while using attrition to facilitate the reallocation of existing resources to key priorities.
Learning and Development
  • As part of efforts to attract new recruits and build the competencies and skills of all employees, Industry Canada will continue to focus on career development and talent management strategies as well as personal learning plans. Examples of learning and development activities include in-house training, orientation sessions, job shadowing and mentoring.
  • The Department will also continue using existing development programs (e.g., Spectrum Management Officer Development Program, Patent Examiners Development Program, PE Development Program and Competition Law Officer's Development Program), while creating a career progression framework and development program for the ENG group.
  • To promote employee development, Industry Canada will explore the possibility of holding events with various sectors across the Department to recruit talented employees looking for developmental opportunities. These would include interchange agreements, rotation programs, assignments and deployment opportunities to address specific operational gaps and provide employees with opportunities to develop skills.
Succession Planning
  • Building skills through learning and knowledge transfer initiatives will be key in the coming year for certain occupational groups at Industry Canada (e.g., CO, EC, PE and FI), in order to mitigate anticipated knowledge loss due to projected retirements and to develop a workforce made up of new recruits with limited experience.
Official Languages
  • Industry Canada will continue to provide a variety of support mechanisms for second-language learning and to promote the use of both official languages in the workplace through the implementation of the new IC Official Languages Action Plan. This will allow the Department to continue to provide services to the public and help employees fulfill their career aspirations.
Employment Equity
  • While, overall, Industry Canada is representative of designated employment equity groups, it will address gaps in several key occupational groups by specifying employment equity as an organizational need in statements of merit criteria and by conducting targeted recruitment of designated groups (such as internal non-advertised processes to bring visible minorities into the CO group and women into the CS group). The Department will also promote awareness of employment equity and diversity issues, participate in multicultural events and encourage voluntary self-identification in the employee profile that is part of the new Human Resources Management System self-service web application.

Leadership Development

  • Industry Canada will continue to implement the three-stream Executive Talent Management process in support of succession planning and career progression for executives at the EX-01 to EX-03 levels. The process includes executive learning initiatives such as the EX Orientation Guide, the Business Knowledge Initiative and the "Fellows" pilot program to develop future leaders through coaching and mentoring.
  • Industry Canada will continue to support learning for employees in the EX minus 1 and 2 categories, in line with the new IC Leadership Development Self-Directed Roadmap and for sector-specific succession plans.

Human Resources Service Excellence and Performance Improvement

  • To support departmental initiatives, Industry Canada will implement efficiencies in human resources processes. This will include finalizing the rollout of HR Express staffing services, continuing to create staffing pools, drafting generic work descriptions, implementing pay consolidation and reviewing service standards.

Integrity and Accountability

  • Industry Canada will continue to address the areas of improvement identified in the Management Accountability Framework and Staffing Management Accountability Framework and to assess progress on the people management results that are part of EX performance management agreements.
  • The results of the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey brought several areas for improvement to light. Industry Canada has developed action plans to address these issues and will continue to implement the plans as part of departmental and sector human resources plans and activities (e.g., focus on leadership competencies and employee career development, harassment prevention, and promotion of employment equity and official languages activities).
  • A healthy and productive workforce is the key to having committed and engaged employees. The next Public Service Employee Survey, which is expected to be conducted in the fall of 2011, will give Industry Canada a measure of the progress on the action plans and provide insight into recent employee perceptions.
  • Finally, since 2011–12 is the last year of the PMSRR's three-year time frame, Industry Canada will develop a new strategy for people management to cover the three years beginning in 2012–13. This strategy will identify people management measures and indicators in alignment with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's People Management Framework and the Management Accountability Framework. The new strategy will also contain an assessment of progress to date against the objectives of the PMSRR and will incorporate the results of discussions at the senior management level on how to move forward to meet those objectives.

Investment Planning at Industry Canada: Building on our Strengths

Industry Canada is implementing the Treasury Board's new Policy on Investment Planning—Assets and Acquired Services and Policy on the Management of Projects in 2011–12. As part of this effort, the Department will develop a five-year investment plan covering all spending, except for salaries, and grants and contributions.

As part of this process, Industry Canada is taking steps to review and enhance its overall investment planning regime. The Department is building on its recognized expertise in managing information technology assets to ensure the following:

  • integrated, risk-based investment planning and project management; and
  • effective management of assets and acquired services throughout their life cycle (i.e., planning, acquisition, use and disposal).

This renewal will help ensure the Department's diverse assets and acquired services are targeted strategically, resourced appropriately and managed systematically over the long term to support Industry Canada's business.

Stewardship

Industry Canada's capacity to achieve its strategic outcomes depends on how well it manages its resources. Sound stewardship is the foundation of sound decision making. Industry Canada's managers and executives rely on meaningful data on performance and risk as well as on appropriate control and oversight mechanisms to make informed decisions about the Department's strategic direction and day-to-day operations. In order to effectively and efficiently deliver its mandate, Industry Canada must allocate resources, analyze exposure to risk, including determining appropriate countermeasures, and ensure the prudent use of public resources through the sound management of departmental finances, investments, infrastructure, capital assets and procurement. In addition, the Department must ensure that appropriate internal audit coverage and evaluation frameworks are in place and consistent with departmental and central agency policies. The Department must also monitor and report progress on implementing recommendations stemming from audit and evaluation activities.

Management Objectives for 2011–12

In support of sound stewardship, Industry Canada will work to achieve the following management objectives during 2011–12:

  • The Audit and Evaluation Branch (AEB) will evaluate the performance and effectiveness of departmental programs, policies and initiatives in accordance with the 2011–12 audit and evaluation plans.
  • AEB will provide assurance services for the Department's risk management strategy and practices, management control frameworks and practices and governance processes.
  • The Comptrollership and Administration Sector (CAS) will improve forecasting accuracy at Industry Canada as part of the evolution toward stronger financial stewardship.
  • CAS will implement the Treasury Board's Policy on Investment Planning and obtain Treasury Board approval of the Department's first five-year investment plan.
  • CAS will implement the Procurement Functional Model. This will be a formal delegation instrument outlining clear procurement authorities at all levels of Industry Canada.
  • CAS will implement quarterly financial reporting.
  • CAS will update the Performance Measurement Framework by reviewing and revising expected results, indicators, targets, outputs and methodologies.
  • CAS will continue to advance the work on the Business Continuity Plan and to develop the inaugural Departmental Security Plan, which will include information about risks, strategies, priorities and program improvements, and align with the Treasury Board's new Policy on Government Security.
  • CAS will work with sectors to renew the Corporate Risk Profile for 2011–12 and better integrate it with program performance information.

Management of Information and Technology

Information management (IM) and information technology (IT) are important strategic enablers of the Department's business. Effective stewardship of information and technology involves both fiscal responsibility and meeting client needs and expectations for high-quality, authoritative information. The value of information is enhanced when it can be accessed and applied to accelerate decision making, and IT tools play a crucial role in providing the means to do this. The growth in the volume and complexity of electronic information has made clear the need for integrating IM requirements and technology planning to ensure that information is accessible for business needs and allows the Department to provide excellent service to Canadians.

To address these needs, the Department's multi-year Information Management Agenda identifies three outcomes: Industry Canada has the requisite IM governance structure in place, employees are aware of their IM responsibilities and know how to execute them, and employees have the tools to help them do so.

Management Objectives for 2011–12

In support of effective management of information and technology, Industry Canada will work to achieve the following management objectives during 2011–12:

  • The Information Management Branch (IMB) will work to consistently identify and capture resources spent on IM in order to improve the Department's capacity to effectively manage information.
  • IMB will prepare and communicate guidelines on IM roles and responsibilities.
  • IMB will develop and implement an integrated IM service delivery model and an integrated IM communications and training strategy.
  • IMB will support sectors in implementing the Business-Based Classification Structure.
  • The Chief Informatics Office (CIO) will implement the Printer Optimization Project to establish a new and cost-effective contractual approach to managing printers, copiers, fax machines and scanners. This approach will be in line with the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy.
  • The CIO will work on refining IT services and costing to bring them into better alignment with the profile of Government of Canada IT services and performance indicators.
  • In accordance with the Treasury Board's Policy on Investment Planning, the CIO will continue to work with the Comptrollership and Administration Sector to align IT and non-IT projects within investment planning.
  • The CIO will focus on enhancing core IT services and IT continuity capability as part of its continuous service improvement program.
  • The CIO will respond to the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's Aging IT Initiative to ensure that replacement and upgrade plans for the Department's business-critical systems are considered along with other departmental priorities through both the integrated IT and departmental planning and investment planning processes.
  • The CIO will continue to support the IT community to ensure that employees have the necessary skills to plan, deliver and support advanced technology systems and services.

Communications and Marketing Branch

The Communications and Marketing Branch (CMB) leads communications and engagement activities at Industry Canada, augmented by communications professionals in the sectors, agencies and regions. CMB's Director General has functional authority for all employees who provide communications support and are classified in the IS category.

CMB is responsible for media relations support and services to the Department and to the offices of the Minister and ministers of state. CMB develops, in collaboration with communications professionals across the Department, communications plans for Memoranda to Cabinet and Treasury Board submissions, as well as all departmental communications strategies and plans. CMB also manages several departmental programs (advertising, Internet presence, publishing, corporate marketing, internal communications and public opinion research).

Communications and Engagement

Communications and engagement are essential parts of Industry Canada's work, and are integral to the sound management of departmental policies, programs and services. Open and proactive communications help ensure that Canadian consumers, businesses and communities are aware of and have access to the information and services they need, and that Industry Canada always takes their views and concerns into account.

Communications professionals across Industry Canada are responsible for ensuring that all departmental communications activities follow the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada. These professionals provide strategic communications and issues management advice and support for communications activities carried out by the Minister and ministers of State, the deputy ministers, the Department and its agencies, and Industry Portfolio partners—developing annual communications plans, publication plans, activities and products.

Management Objectives for 2011–12

In support of effective communications and engagement, Industry Canada will work to achieve the following management objectives during 2011–12:

  • The Communications and Marketing Branch (CMB) will maintain the Departmental Strategic Communications Framework to guide and enhance integrated and operational communications planning in Industry Canada's sectors, agencies and regions.
  • To facilitate engagement with stakeholders, CMB will assess integrating Web 2.0 technologies that allow users to interact and collaborate online with established methods of electronic communications at Industry Canada.
  • CMB will lead the Department in improving its web presence and making the web more accessible.
  • The Regional Operations Sector will engage with key stakeholders, including provincial governments, regional organizations and local firms, to advance departmental priorities and identify shared priorities.

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Management Priorities for 2011–12

Industry Canada has identified five management priorities for 2011–12 that contribute to effective delivery of departmental programs and policies. These priorities act as a framework for management discussions and provide focus to the work of strategic enablers as they support program and service delivery and the achievement of the Department's business objectives.

The following management priorities are core elements of Industry Canada's approach to sound stewardship and management, and will continue to be areas of focus in 2011–12:

People Management

  • Similar to the rest of the federal public service, Industry Canada faces major human resources pressures, such as competition for skilled workers in a highly mobile labour market, retention of staff, impending retirements and development of new hires. Industry Canada must be in a position to recruit, develop and retain the talent needed to create and maintain a productive, sustainable, adaptable, competent and diverse workforce to be able to deliver on the Department's strategic outcomes.
  • In 2011–12, management will focus on planning and management of internal resources aligned with identified business priorities through talent management strategies, succession planning, development of EX and EX feeder groups; more targeted recruitment in priority areas; improvement of efficiencies in human resources processes.

Financial Management

  • Financial management at Industry Canada provides assurance on, as well as supports departmental managers in ensuring, the sound stewardship of public resources and compliance with legislation, regulations and policies.
  • In 2011–12, management will focus on strengthening processes and the quality of information to ensure investments in assets and acquired services are well targeted, appropriately resourced and managed strategically to support the business of the Department. Management will also ensure sound analysis and develop strategies for meeting governmental expenditure priorities.

Internal Audit

  • Industry Canada has an effective internal audit function that is founded on rigorous planning, robust reporting and appropriate governance, including the fully operational and independent Departmental Audit Committee.
  • In 2011–12, management will support the internal audit function as it provides added assurance, independent from line management, on risk management, control and governance of current and new programs and initiatives.

Industry Canada will also focus particular attention on the following management priorities in 2011–12:

Management of Business Communication Tools

  • Updating Industry Canada's business communication tools will allow the Department to better communicate its programs, key messages and achievements to various stakeholders.
  • In 2011–12, as mandated by the Government of Canada's communications policy, Industry Canada will review its web presence, update its design and offerings, and adopt the new communications channels required to improve client service and engage Canadians.

Asset and Materiel Management

  • Addressing Industry Canada's asset and materiel management processes will produce long-term strategic and operational benefits throughout the Department.
  • In 2011–12, management will focus on implementing a comprehensive framework to provide adequate oversight of Industry Canada's materiel resources.
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