CSSP Communities of Practice

Introduction

Communities of practice (CoP) are groups of subject matter experts (SME) who share a common interest in a given area of expertise and work together to facilitate knowledge-sharing and collaboration.

CoPs are an essential element of the Canadian Safety and Security Program (CSSP), providing access to a rich pool of collective knowledge and experience to support the development of new or enhanced science and technology knowledge and capabilities, and to provide advice and guidance in the development of evidence-based policy, decision-making and operational and strategic planning.

For more information or to contact the assigned Portfolio Manager, please email css-info@drdc-rddc.gc.ca.

Members

CoP members are experts who work in public safety, emergency management and security domains, including responders, policy-makers, planners, operators, senior decision-makers, and science and technology experts. They include representatives from federal, provincial and municipal departments and agencies, academic institutions, as well as the private sector, including industry and not-for-profit organizations.

Each CoP is led by a SME who promotes collaboration within his or her community, as well as between the different communities, and coordinates activities to achieve objectives.

Roles and Responsibilities

The Canadian Safety and Security Program (CSSP) creates collaborative forums for CoP members to exchange ideas through meetings, workshops, conferences, and a web portal.

Each CoP determines how it will function and may be involved in any combination of the following activities:

  • exchanging knowledge and information within, and between, CoPs;
  • identifying domain-specific risks, vulnerabilities and capability gaps;
  • identifying and recommending domain-specific priorities;
  • identifying and articulating the problem space;
  • collaborating on science and technology projects and studies to develop new or enhance existing knowledge and capabilities; and
  • contributing to the development of, and participation in exercises.

 

 


Chemical

Chemical

The Chemical Community of Practice (CoP) contributes knowledge and expertise to support advancements in Canada’s ability to:

  • effectively anticipate, prevent, mitigate, detect, identify, and analyze chemical threats;
  • effectively prepare for and respond to disasters involving hazardous chemicals;
  • develop effective medical countermeasures to treat exposure to hazardous chemicals;
  • understand the emerging threat environment;
  • collaborate with national and international partners to establish priorities and identify science and technology (S&T) vulnerabilities; and
  • support the development and transition of new S&T that addresses chemical safety and security issues.

 Members:

The Chemical CoP is co-led by Environment Canada and Transport Canada, and includes representatives from Government of Canada departments and agencies who are engaged in work related to chemical threats as part of their core departmental mandates. These include: Canada Border Services Agency, Defence Research and Development Canada, Department of National Defence, Health Canada, National Research Council Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, Public Safety Canada, and Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

 


Biological

Biological

The Biological Community of Practice (CoP) contributes knowledge and expertise to support advancements in Canada’s ability to:

  • quickly detect and identify biological threats to human and animal health, and to food ;
  • effectively contain biological threats and decontaminate people, animals, and the environment;
  • develop effective medical countermeasures including vaccines and treatments against biological threats and outbreaks;
  • understand the emerging threat environment;
  • collaborate with national and international partners to establish priorities and identify science and technology (S&T) vulnerabilities; and  
  • support the development and transition of new S&T that addresses biological safety and security issues.

 Members:

The Biological CoP is co-led by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Public Health Agency of Canada, and includes representatives from Government of Canada departments and agencies who are engaged in work related to biological threats as part of their core departmental mandates.  These include Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada Border Services Agency, Canadian Armed Forces, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development,Department of National Defence,Environment Canada, Health Canada, National Research Council Canada, Public Safety Canada, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and Transport Canada.

 


Explosives

Explosives

The Explosives Community of Practice (CoP)contributes knowledge and expertise to support advancements in Canada’s ability to:

  • effectively anticipate, prevent, mitigate, detect, identify, respond, and analyze threats and attacks involving explosives;
  • understand the emerging threat environment;
  • collaborate with national and international partners to establish priorities and identify science and technology (S&T) vulnerabilities; and
  • support the development and transition of new S&T that addresses explosives safety and security issues.

Members:

The Explosives CoP is led by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and includes representatives from Government of Canada departments and agencies who are engaged in work related to explosives threats as part of their core departmental mandates. These include: Canada Border Services Agency, Canadian Armed Forces, Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development, Department of National Defence, Natural Resources Canada, Public Safety Canada, and Transport Canada.

 


Radiological-Nuclear

Radiological-Nuclear

The Radiological-Nuclear (RN) Community of Practice (CoP) contributes knowledge and expertise to support advancements in Canada’s ability to:

  • effectively anticipate, prevent, mitigate, detect, identify, recover and analyze hazardous RN-related events;
  • strengthen capabilities for early detection, and identification of RN threat materials;  
  • understand the emerging threat environment;
  • collaborate with national and international partners to establish priorities and identify science and technology (S&T) vulnerabilities; and
  • support the development and transition of new S&T that addresses RN safety and security issues.

Members:

The Radiological-Nuclear CoP includes representatives from across the Canadian federal government, including: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Canadian Armed Forces, Canada Border Services Agency, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Defence Research and Development Canada, Department of National Defence, Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development, Environment Canada, Health Canada,  National Research Council Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, Public Safety Canada, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and Transport Canada.

 


Natural Hazards

The Natural Hazards Community of Practice (CoP) contributes knowledge and expertise to support advancements in Canada’s ability to:

  • effectively prevent, mitigate, prepare for, respond to, and recover from natural hazards, and their associated disasters;
  • strengthen the resilience capabilities of Canadian society to reduce the socioeconomic costs of natural hazards, and their associated disasters; 
  • forecast and model natural hazards, their associated disasters, and the value of risk reduction measures;
  • understand the emerging hazard environment and socio-technological innovations through collaboration with national and international partners, in order to establish priorities and identify science and technology (S&T) requirements; and
  • support the development and transition of new S&T that addresses natural hazards safety and security issues.

Members:

Collaboration and Engagement between members in the Natural Hazards CoP is done mainly through Canada’s Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction, established under the auspices of the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, draws on over 500 members from other Canadian groups including: the Canadian Federal Assistant Deputy Ministers’ Emergency Management Committee; Canadian Federal, Provincial, and Territorial Senior Officials Responsible for Emergency Management; the Canadian Risk and Hazards Network; the Domestic Group on Emergency Management; the National Critical Infrastructure Cross Sector Forum; the Platform’s Resilient Communities Working Group; the Platform’s Voluntary Sector Working Group; and the Platform’s Public Private Sector Working Group.

 


Critical Infrastructure Resilience

Critical Infrastructure Resilience

The Critical Infrastructure Vulnerabilities, Resiliency and Interdependencies Community of Practice (CoP) contributes knowledge and expertise to support advancements in Canada’s ability to:

  • improve and protect the resiliency of its infrastructure;
  • develop common operations in all critical infrastructure (CI) sectors;
  • advise on preventative or responsive action;
  • collaborate with international partner organizations to address areas of mutual concern; and
  • support the development and transition of new S&T that addresses CI safety and security issues.

Members:

Critical Infrastructure CoP included multiple stakeholders who have a shared responsibility including federal, provincial, and municipal governments and CI owner/operators, who come from the private and public sectors. These are: Industry Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Public Safety Canada, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security First Responders Group.

 


E-security

E-security

The E-Security Community of Practice (CoP) contributes knowledge and expertise to support advancements in Canada’s ability to:

  • effectively detect and deter existing and emerging cyber risks and threats, and defend its digital infrastructure;
  • increase public awareness about the severity of e-security attacks;
  • combat cybercrime;
  • work with international partners to promote mutual interests in a cyberspace that is open, interoperable, and reliable; and
  • support the development and transition of new S&T that addresses e-security issues.

Members:

The E-Security CoP consists of representatives from across the Canadian federal and provincial governments, including Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines, Canadian Armed Forces, Canada Border Services Agency, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Department of National Defence, Defence Research and Development Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development, Environment Canada, Health Canada, National Research Council Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Ontario Provincial Police, Public Health Agency of Canada, Public Safety Canada, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Sureté du Quebec, and Transport Canada.

 


Psychosocial and Community Resilience

The Psychosocial and Community Resilience Community of Practice (CoP) contributes knowledge and expertise to support advancements in Canada’s ability to:

  • address the human factors aspects involved in the lead-up and aftermath of emergencies;
  • mitigate the psychological and sociological impacts of major events (e.g. natural disasters, terrorist attacks, etc.) on survivors and responders;
  • develop effective educational measures to improve the understanding of psychosocial elements for community resilience; and
  • develop effective means of countering violent extremism.

Members:

The Psychosocial and Community Resilience CoP consists of representatives across the federal government. These include: Correctional Service Canada, Health Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, Public Safety Canada, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

 


Fire Services

Fire Services

The Fire Services Community of Practice (CoP) contributes knowledge and expertise to support advancements in Canada’s ability to:

  • identify and assess risks and capability gaps that affect communities, fire services and the fire domain, including industry;
  • enable communities to mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from all sizes of natural or manmade incidents;
  • ensure the continued and increased safety of communities, including firefighters and residents; and
  • support the development and transition of new S&T that addresses fire services issues.

Members:

The Fire Services CoP consists of representatives from a number of organizations. These include:

Canadian Association of Fire Chiefs, Canadian Interagency Forest Fire Centre, Canadian Volunteer Fire Services Association, Council of Canadian Fire Marshals and Fire Commissioners, First Nations Emergency Services Society, International Association of Firefighters, Mine & Industry Firefighting (Vale), Ministère de la Sécurité publique Québec, National Fire Protection Association, National Research Council Canada, and Underwriters Laboratories Canada. The Fire Services CoP also engages with other firefighters and fire experts from fire services & related communities across Canada as needed.

 


Paramedic Services

The Paramedic Services Community of Practice (CoP) contributes knowledge and expertise to support advancements in Canada’s ability to:

  • ensure the safety of paramedics while maintaining the highest patient care;
  • understand new and existing technologies and standards for human health and paramedicine;
  • make informed decisions around community health and safety issues; and
  • support the development and transition of new S&T that addresses paramedic services issues.

Members:

The Paramedic Services CoP consists of representatives from a number of organizations. These include:

Association of Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives Events Technicians, Canadian Armed Forces, Canadian Standards Association, Department of National Defence, Defence Research and Development Canada, Paramedic Association of Canada, Paramedic Chiefs of Canada, Paramedic Researchers, and the Society for Prehospital Educators in Canada.

 


Police and Law Enforcement Services

The Police and Law Enforcement Services Community of Practice (CoP) contributes knowledge and expertise to support advancements in Canada’s ability to:

  • adopt collaborative problem-solving and community mobilization models in order to reduce crime and disorder, and improve overall community wellness and safety;
  • improve the physical security and mental readiness of responders;
  • understand how emerging modeling and simulation, and decision-support tools contribute to service delivery approaches that are more effective and accountable to Canadians; and
  • support the development and transition of new S&T that addresses police and law enforcement issues.

Members:

The Police and Law Enforcement Services CoP consists of representatives from a number of organizations. These include: Canadian Armed Forces, Department of National Defence, Canadian Interoperability Technology Interest Group, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, representatives of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, federal, provincial and municipal law enforcement training institutions, municipal police services, and universities and colleges.

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