Agreement on Internal Trade: One Canada, One National Economy

Transcript: Agreement on Internal Trade: One Canada, One National Economy

Onscreen text:
One Canada
One National Economy
Modernizing Internal Trade in Canada

(Government of Canada signature and Canada wordmark)
(Illustration of a map of Canada that is free of detail except for the clearly demarcated provincial and territorial borders.)

So, what is the Agreement on Internal Trade?

(Illustration of a map of Canada with superimposed text that says, "What is the Agreement on Internal Trade?")

It may come as a surprise that while you can easily cross borders between provinces and territories, some goods—like beer and wine—and even some workers—like apprentices—can't always do the same.

(Illustration of a map of Canada with two airplane graphics moving across it. Various circled icons then appear in different locations on the map. The icons represent a wine bottle and glass, a gas pump, a creamer being emptied into a cup of coffee and a silhouette of two workers or apprentices, among others.)

Barriers exist that prevent some Canadian products and services from being sold right here in Canada.

(Illustration of a map of Canada with superimposed text that says, "Canadian Product." The text looks like it was created by a rubber stamp. Directly beneath appears a smaller sign that says, "Sorry, we're closed.")

Have you ever taken a trip to a different province, found a product you love—like a new wine —and then later discovered that you can't buy it back home?

Well, one reason is Canada's internal trade rules.

The current rules hinder the flow of some goods and services across the country, limiting consumer choice.

(Illustration of a map showing lower British Columbia and Alberta. A smiley face emoticon jumps between Alberta and British Columbia. An icon of a wine bottle and glass appears directly above the smiley face emoticon in British Columbia. The smiley face emoticon and wine bottle and glass icon move to Alberta. The smiley face emoticon turns into a frown as a red diagonal line appears over the wine bottle and glass icon to indicate prohibited.)

It's the same story for business.

Over time, governments have introduced different standards and regulations that create red tape and additional costs for business.

(Illustration of male and female co-workers behind a desk. Paperwork drops from above and lands on the desk, forming three large stacks. Red tape unfurls across the screen to form an "X" across the whole image.)

Barriers also prevent some workers from easily moving across the country.

Apprentices looking to find work in other parts of Canada are often unable to because of varying requirements for training programs.

And some professionals still face red tape and high costs when they try to get their credentials recognized across Canada.

So, jobs go unfilled and workers miss out on opportunities.

(Illustration of a map showing the lower portion of the provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. A graphic representing a "worker" appears in each province. The workers are shown as having limited movement, unable to cross provincial borders.)

That's why the government feels that it is time to update the Agreement on Internal Trade.

More effective trade rules will mean jobs, growth and a healthier economy for all Canadians.

Having trouble selling your products or services across the country?

Want more choice of Canadian products at home?

Looking for a job in another province?

(Illustration of a map of Canada with various circled icons appearing in different locations on the map. The icons represent a wine bottle and glass, a gas pump, a creamer being emptied into a cup of coffee and a silhouette of two workers or apprentices, among others. The provincial and territorial borders on the map change from solid lines to dotted lines, and the icons begin to move easily among the provinces and territories.)

Tell us about it on Twitter using hash tag "internaltrade."

(Illustration of a map of Canada with superimposed text that says, "#internaltrade." The Twitter bird logo flies across the map diagonally from the left.)

We'll share your stories as we continue to work with our provincial and territorial counterparts and discuss ways to achieve one Canada, one national economy.

(Zoom out from illustration of map of Canada, reducing its size. Various circled icons appear in different locations on the map. The icons represent a wine bottle and glass, a gas pump, a creamer being emptied into a cup of coffee and a silhouette of two workers or apprentices, among others. All of the icons are linked. Representations of various means of transport connect them, showing cross-border trading.)

Onscreen text:
One Canada
One National Economy
Modernizing Internal Trade in Canada

(Government of Canada signature and Canada wordmark)

(End of transcript)

Find out more about internal trade.

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