Report on Results 2010–2011
Implementation of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act

PDF version

Contents

  1. Awareness
  2. Consultations
  3. Communications
  4. Coordination and Liaison
  5. Funding and Program Delivery
  6. Accountability

Message from the Departmental Champion for Official Languages

As Industry Canada's Champion for Official Languages, I am pleased to submit to you the Department's Report on Results 2010–2011 on implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act. The report provides information on Industry Canada's achievements, highlighting the efforts of departmental sectors and regional offices.

Section 41 applies to all federal institutions and embodies the federal government's commitment to promoting the development of official language minority communities (OLMCs) and fostering linguistic duality in Canadian society.

Through a variety of activities ranging from awareness raising to the delivery of programs and services, the Department works to support OLMCs and their development in accordance with their needs. The vitality of our country's Anglophone and Francophone minority communities reflects our commitment to upgrading the workforce and supporting the capacity building of communities, with a view to enhancing Canada's competitiveness and productivity.

Mitch Davies
Acting Assistant Deputy Minister,
Regional Operations


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General Information

General Information
Federal institution Industry Canada
www.ic.gc.ca
Minister responsible The Honourable Christian Paradis
Senior official responsible for implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act Mitch Davies
Acting Assistant Deputy Minister, Regional Operations, and Champion for Official Languages
Department's mandate Industry Canada's mandate is to help make Canadians more productive and competitive in the knowledge-based economy, thus improving the standard of living and quality of life in Canada.
National coordinator responsible for implementation of section 41 Roda Muse
Full Title Manager, Economic Development
Telephone Number 613-954-2783
Email roda.muse@canada.ca

Distribution

Industry Canada will advise the following committees and organizations when its Report on Results 2010–2011 is published on the Department's website:

  • national associations representing OLMCs, the Réseau de développement économique et d'employabilité and its members, the Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne du Canada and its members, the Community Economic Development and Employability Corporation and its member committees, and the Quebec Community Groups Network and its members
  • Canadian Heritage
  • the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages
  • the Standing Senate Committee on Official Languages
  • the Standing Committee on Official Languages

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Summary

Industry Canada continues to find new opportunities for dialogue with official language minority communities (OLMCs). Under the Economic Development Initiative (EDI), for example, in September and October 2010 it organized OLMC Dialogue Days, which led to the creation of follow up committees. These joint committees bring together government and communities. They promote cooperation, partnership building and networking, as well as sharing of information and best practices in preparation for the completion of the Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008–2013: Acting for the Future.

FedNor had more than 175 discussions with Francophone community organizations in Northern Ontario, with the result that a number of projects were carried out and partnerships created. FedNor's financial support also enabled business people from Hearst, Timmins, Kapuskasing and Earlton to participate in the 16th Futurallia forum.

Within minority language communities, Industry Canada used a variety of programs to invest in the infrastructure of several post-secondary institutions (notably McGill University and Cité Collégiale). It also funded the placement of computers in schools as well as internships in small businesses, and supported the Festival du Voyageur in Winnipeg through its Marquee Tourism Events Program.

The analyses and research conducted by Industry Canada under the EDI have made it possible to better appreciate the economic development needs of OLMCs. The creation of a partnership with the Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada) is helping to improve understanding of the challenges of entrepreneurial succession.

To promote its services to Francophone entrepreneurs, Industry Canada's Ontario Regional Office organized nine outreach activities. One of the participants was ECO Canada, an industry-run human resources agency. Activities were held in Kingston, Cornwall, Ottawa, Timmins, Sudbury, North Bay, Kenora, Thunder Bay and Kapuskasing.

Concerning accountability, Industry Canada modified its Official Languages Filter to include the concept of substantive equality. A collaborative effort has enabled the Comptrollership and Administration Sector, the Regional Operations Sector, and the Audit and Evaluation Branch to better exercise due diligence in implementing section 41 of the Official Languages Act.

Finally, Industry Canada's senior management has committed to applying section 41 of the Official Languages Act within the Department. The result has been a series of major initiatives, including:

  • the launch of a Department-wide awareness campaign (personalized information sessions to provide program and sector managers and employees with the tools best suited to meet obligations under Part VII of the Official Languages Act)
  • a review of certain funding programs to integrate the concept of substantive equality, in compliance with the CALDECH decision (steps to ensure greater consideration for OLMC needs)
  • a review by FedNor of its official languages policy

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A. Awareness

Expected result

Creation of lasting changes in the Department's organizational culture. Employees and management are aware of and understand their responsibilities regarding section 41 of the Official Languages Act and official language minority communities (OLMCs).

Awareness: Expected result
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs Progress made in achieving the expected result
Activities of the Departmental Champion for Official Languages to make staff and senior management aware of the benefits of linguistic duality and the Department's obligations under the Official Languages Act.

Regional Operations Sector

In May 2010, the Departmental Champion for Official Languages appeared before the Standing Senate Committee on Official Languages, and met with the Deputy Minister to report on progress made on this file.

On September 24, 2010, the Departmental Champion for Official Languages met with the Departmental Management Committee to discuss the impact of the CALDECH decision, handed down by the Supreme Court of Canada in February 2009. The discussion also dealt with the obligation of federal departments and agencies to apply the principle of substantive equality.

Senior management is more aware of the impact of the CALDECH decision on departmental activities. It better understands the concept of positive measures and the departmental obligations associated with Part VII of the Official Languages Act, as well as the need to consider the provisions of section 41 when developing policies and initiatives.

Staff and senior management are generally aware of the availability of information sessions and personalized training on official languages.

 

It was decided that a risk management approach would be adopted to identify programs that should be subjected to the Official Languages Filter (considered to be a prime example of a government-wide positive measure), thus ensuring that the principle of substantive equality is properly applied. The filter was also modified to integrate certain elements of the analytical grid proposed by the Chief Human Resources Officer of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Shortly after starting their jobs, new employees are informed of the Department's official language obligations and their individual responsibilities under the Official Languages Act, including Part VII.

Employees better understand and are more knowledgeable about their obligations and responsibilities under the Official Languages Act.

 

On November 19, 2010, the Champion met once again with the Departmental Management Committee to present the list of departmental grants and contributions programs, and identify those that are most likely to be affected by the CALDECH decision. The Departmental Management Committee is also planning to launch an integrated official languages awareness campaign.

Departmental program managers are equipped to take into account the CALDECH decision when they develop, implement, modify or delegate programs.

General awareness-building activities (workshops, special events, articles in This Week @ IC) carried out in partnership with the Communications and Marketing Branch, Human Resources Branch and other units.

The Regional Operations and Human Resources Branch official languages teams worked together on planning and implementing the integrated official languages awareness campaign.

 
 

FedNor

FedNor amended its internal official languages policy to ensure that the principle of substantive equality is applied to projects and activities.

As they become more familiar with the requirements of the Official Languages Act, employees are increasingly likely to take OLMCs into account when reviewing projects.

 

At the RendezVous days (staff meetings), FedNor made a presentation on official languages, the CALDECH decision and the concept of substantive equality.

Since the announcement of the CALDECH decision, employees have become more aware of the official languages file and more concerned about it.

 

Members of the agency's Economic Development Initiative (EDI) committee met on several occasions to discuss OLMC needs and proposed projects.

The meetings provide an opportunity to give updates on the EDI and discuss matters related to official languages.

 

The FedNor Champion for Official Languages marked Linguistic Duality Day by issuing a commemorative message, and employees in the Sudbury office participated in an exchange of idiomatic expressions. This awareness activity was intended to show that learning a new language and a new culture is both interesting and enjoyable.

Employees are more aware of bilingualism and linguistic duality, important elements of Canada's heritage.

 

Atlantic Region

The Atlantic Region subscribes to several French-language newspapers and magazines, which are made available to employees.

Employees have daily access to a media monitoring service that highlights relevant issues related to the Industry Canada–Atlantic Region mandate. All French-language community and regional publications are monitored.

Relevant information highlighted by the media monitoring service is forwarded to the Communications Unit and the Official Languages Committee to ensure that it is distributed as widely as possible within the regional office.

 

Regional employees participated in the network of regional coordinators, as well as the Day of Reflection marking 40 years of linguistic duality in New Brunswick. Attending the event were Graham Fraser, Commissioner of Official Languages; Daphne Meredith, Chief Human Resources Officer of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat; and Monique Collette, President of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency.

Participants better understand section 41 of the Official Languages Act and the challenges posed by linguistic duality in New Brunswick.

Employees have greater awareness and understanding of departmental official language obligations.

 

Prairies and Northern Region

A communications advisor in Manitoba regularly forwards to all staff newsletters from local Francophone organizations.

Employees better understand the situation of OLMCs.

 

Pacific Region

The Regional Executive Director has made all employees in the Pacific Region aware of their responsibilities under section 41 of the Official Languages Act to ensure that they better understand and comply with official language obligations.

Employees better understand their responsibilities under the Official Languages Act and are therefore more aware of the services that OLMCs are entitled to receive when approaching the Government of Canada.

 

Quebec Region

Two new managers from the Regional Management Committee attended a presentation on implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act and the region's role in implementation.

Managers have greater awareness and understanding of official language obligations.

 

Small Business, Tourism and Marketplace Services

 
 

Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy Canada

Official language awareness sessions were organized in May 2010 for employees at headquarters.

Employees better understand section 41 of the Official Languages Act and make more use of both official languages in the workplace.

 

Small Business and Tourism Branch

Branch employees participated in official language awareness sessions.

Employees better understand section 41 of the Official Languages Act.


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B. Consultations

Expected result

Creation of lasting relationships between the Department and official language minority communities (OLMCs). The Department and OLMCs understand each other's needs and mandates.

Consultations: Expected result
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs Progress made in achieving the expected result

Annual consultations with representatives of OLMCs.

Participation in the work of consultative bodies organized by central agencies and other departments through government and representatives of OLMCs to discuss priorities and needs. These include the National Committee of Economic Development and Employability, and the National Human Resources Development Committee for the English Linguistic Minority in Quebec.

Regional Operations Sector

As coordinator of the Economic Development Initiative (EDI), described in the Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008–2013: Acting for the Future, and in cooperation with the EDI's federal partners, the Official Languages Unit organized Dialogue Days for minority Anglophone and Francophone communities. The Dialogue Day with the Francophone community took place on , in Ottawa, while that with Quebec's Anglophone community was held on October 6, 2010, in Montréal.

Communities were informed about achievements under the EDI, and indicated their economic development needs and priorities. The federal partners will take into account these needs and priorities in work to be performed between now and completion of the roadmap.

At the Dialogue Day in Montréal, one community participant suggested setting up a permanent federal community consultation mechanism. In response, Industry Canada and Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions worked with community representatives to establish a follow-up committee. They drafted a discussion paper describing the objectives and approach of such a committee, and the document was approved by all members. Government and community representatives also held four conference calls to define the scope and mandate of the follow up committee.

Industry Canada proposed that the Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne du Canada (FCFA) establish a similar committee for the Francophone community. The parties met twice to explore the various possibilities, begin drafting a strategic document, and select federal and community representatives to sit on the committee, scheduled to begin work in 2011–12. The FCFA agreed to lead the initiative.

 

FedNor

FedNor participated in more than 175 meetings with OLMC organizations to discuss specific projects. It has established close ties with the following organizations:

  • the Réseau de développement économique et d'employabilité de l'Ontario (RDÉE Ontario)
  • Collège Boréal;
  • Community Futures Development Corporations in Northern Ontario providing bilingual service
  • the Association française des municipalités de l'Ontario
  • Direction Ontario (a Francophone organization focusing on development and promotion of Francophone tourism and culture in Ontario)
  • the Union des cultivateurs franco-ontariens
  • the Association canadienne-française de l'Ontario
  • the Regroupement des gens d'affaires francophones de Sudbury
  • the PARO Centre for Women's Enterprise
  • the Northern Ontario School of Medicine
  • the Association des francophones du Nord-Ouest de l'Ontario

Les rencontres fréquentes avec les organismes des CLOSM permettent aux parties d'entretenir des relations harmonieuses et d'avoir des échanges ouverts sur des projets.

 

OLMC organizations join with each other or with other stakeholders and organizations to build partnerships. Among other things, these partnerships have helped to carry out the following activities:

  • creation of a regional centre for economic and community development research and action (Francophone research centre affiliated with the Université de Hearst)
  • holding of the 21st conference of the Association française des municipalités de l'Ontario, under the theme "Municipal Governance," bringing together leaders, partners and stakeholders from the Francophone community
  • founding of a Francophone student newspaper by the Conseil scolaire catholique Franco-Nord in partnership with La Tribune (public-private partnership)
  • creation of an Ontario-Quebec tourism product through the participation of several stakeholders from the Temiskaming region, particularly the municipality of Temagami (public-private partnership in the Ontario and Quebec border regions of Témiscamingue)

FedNor project officers participated in numerous gatherings in OLMCs, notably:

 

FedNor project officers participated in numerous gatherings in OLMCs, notably:

  • the 16th brunch of the Association canadienne-française de l'Ontario, Temiskaming region ()
  • the Symposium sur les langues officielles de l'Ontario and the annual conference of the Assemblée de la francophonie de l'Ontario ( and , 2010)
  • the Dialogue Day organized by EDI partners ()
  • the Chapleau funding forum
  • the Francophonie luncheons of the Association canadienne-française de l'Ontario, Greater Sudbury region (monthly meeting)
  • the provincial conference of the Association française des municipalités de l'Ontario ( to , 2010)
  • quarterly conference calls and the annual conference of the Ontario Association of Community Futures Development Corporations for corporations providing bilingual service
  • the "Business, Government Services and You" information meeting held in French in Timmins
  • the annual general meeting of the Conseil de la coopération de l'Ontario
  • the annual meeting of the États généraux de Sudbury ;
  • the Club Canadien Français de Thunder Bay movie nights ( and )
  • a commemorative day organized by the Centre des Femmes Francophones du Nord-Ouest de l'Ontario
  • the Compagnons des francs loisirs luncheon (
  • the regional symposium of the Northern Ontario School of Medicine ( to , 2010)

FedNor project officers are getting to know private- and public-sector Francophone organizations and their members. OLMC stakeholders are learning about the programs and services available to them, and how to negotiate with FedNor staff.

 

FedNor representatives met informally with stakeholders from several organizations to identify their needs and promote FedNor's programs and services. The organizations included:

  • Direction Nord—discussion about government and community programs and services
  • Collège Boréal—discussion with Quebec stakeholders on the possible creation of a Francophone farming issue table ( and )
  • the Francophone communities of Kenora and Dryden, in cooperation with the Association des francophones du Nord-Ouest de l'Ontario—presentation of FedNor programs and services, and discussion on the communities' needs and challenges ( and , 2010)
  • the Fondation franco-ontarienne—presentation and discussions on economic development in OLMCs
  • the Union culturelle des Franco-Ontariennes—discussion on the strategic priorities of businesswomen ( and , 2010)
  • the Association des francophones du Nord-Ouest de l'Ontario—strategic planning day ()
  • the Regroupement des organismes francophones de Thunder Bay—discussion on needs and priorities, as well as FedNor's EDI

The meetings enable FedNor representatives to acquire new knowledge about Francophone organizations and OLMCs. They also are excellent opportunities for promoting FedNor programs and services, finding out about activities held in the communities and meeting key stakeholders.

 

Atlantic Region

During Official Languages Week 2011, Industry Canada participated in the Dialogue Day with the community. Organized by the New Brunswick Federal Council, this activity focused on the roles and responsibilities of public service employees.

Through its participation in the Dialogue Day with the community, the regional office had an opportunity to promote networking between federal and community representatives.

 

Prairies and Northern Region

A communications advisor in Manitoba regularly forwards to staff and members of the Regional Management Committee newsletters from local Francophone organizations, and informs them about any activity likely to have an impact on the region.

Information sharing helps keep management and staff informed about the activities of the Francophone community.

 

Ontario Region

Together with the Réseau de développement économique et d'employabilité de l'Ontario (RDÉE Ontario), the regional office participated in a series of meetings organized by Canada Business Ontario under the theme "Business, Government Services and You." The meetings took place in Sudbury, North Bay, Kapuskasing and Ottawa. Each featured an average of 20 bilingual presenters.

The meetings were better attended than in past years. Canada Business Ontario used the meetings to build partnerships with more than 220 Francophone entrepreneurs from Ontario.

 

The regional office took part in a networking event organized by RDÉE Ontario. Network members received information in French about Canada Business Ontario programs and services.

Canada Business Ontario strengthened its relations with Francophone entrepreneurs.

 

Quebec Region

Under the EDI, the Quebec regional office participated in planning the Dialogue Day, which took place on October 6, 2010, for Quebec's Anglophone community. The Director of Policy, Analysis and Intelligence attended.

The Dialogue Day enabled regional office employees to enhance their knowledge of the Quebec Anglophone community's priorities and challenges. The day provided an ideal opportunity to reconnect with federal partners and representatives of various community groups.


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C. Communications

Expected result

The culture of official language minority communities (OLMCs) reflects a broad understanding of the Department's mandate. OLMCs receive up-to-date and relevant information about the Department's programs and services.

Communications: Expected result
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs Progress made in achieving the expected result

Targeted communications and marketing activities regarding the implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act.

Creation of a comprehensive Industry Canada communications and marketing plan.

Updating of the Industry Canada CommunAction website.

Regional Operations Sector

In the lead-up to the Dialogue Days held under the Economic Development Initiative (EDI), Industry Canada contacted national OLMC organizations to draw up a list of participants. It also prepared binders with information on the initiative itself as well as the results of studies and research conducted on behalf of EDI partners. The Department's various sectors were invited to provide documentation on programs and initiatives likely to be of interest to OLMC representatives.

The report on the two Dialogue Days was forwarded to all government and community participants.

The community partners were informed that from now on they will be consulted about EDI research plans.

Employees from various departmental sectors and other federal participants learned the importance of informing OLMCs, not only about the existence of programs and initiatives likely to interest them but also about progress made in implementing them.

The discussions with OLMC stakeholders helped ensure the strongest possible representation of the community sector. The OLMC representatives who attended the Dialogue Days consider Industry Canada to be a useful information source and a credible interlocutor. As a result of relationships created at and since the Dialogue Days, federal and community stakeholders have consulted with each other regularly to obtain information, provide updates, or propose the participation of federal or community representatives in other forums. The OLMCs consider Industry Canada to be a key partner in community economic development and the promotion of linguistic duality. They better understand the Department's role in the EDI and are more familiar with the federal government's programs and services.

 

Industry Canada is continuing with implementation of the 2008–13 communications and marketing plan.

At the Dialogue Days, Industry Canada provided OLMC representatives with information on its programs and services. It also presented to participants the results of studies and research conducted on behalf of EDI partners.

 

Work began on redesigning the CommunAction site and should be completed in 2011–12.

The EDI partners agreed to modify the CommunAction site to better meet the needs of federal departments/agencies and OLMCs. Industry Canada committed to consulting with OLMCs on how to make the site more user-friendly.

 

FedNor

FedNor representatives participated informally in individual meetings to promote FedNor's programs and services. They met with the following organizations:

  • 48e Nord international, a not-for-profit organization that focuses on promoting exports in the Abitibi- Témiscamingue region (January 10, 2011)
  • the Community Futures Development Corporation of North Claybelt (January 19, 2011)
  • the Centre de santé communautaire du Temiskaming (January 16, 2011)
  • Le Phénix (October 22, 2010)
  • Les Anciens de Franco-Cité (March 2 and 16, 2011)
  • the Assemblée de la francophonie de l'Ontario (March 26, 2011)
  • the Geraldton Chamber of Commerce (May 13, 2010)
  • the Superior North Community Futures Development Corporation (August 30, 2010)

OLMCs and the organizations representing them are more familiar with FedNor's programs and services, and are therefore able to submit better-targeted funding applications.

Individual meetings enable FedNor representatives to provide OLMCs and the organizations representing them with information on the programs and services available to them.

 

FedNor representatives made formal presentations to several organizations, including:

  • the Association française des municipalités de l'Ontario—provincial conference (September 15 to 17,2010)
  • the Federation of Northern Ontario Municipalities (May 5 and 6, 2010)
  • the Greenstone Community Futures Development Corporation—annual general meeting (April 21, 2010)
  • the Association des francophones du Nord-Ouest de l'Ontario—annual general meeting (May 29, 2010)
  • the PARO Centre for Women's Enterprise—meeting of management and the board of directors (June 4, 2010)

OLMCs and the organizations representing them are more familiar with FedNor's programs and services, and their funding applications are better tailored to program guidelines.

FedNor is perceived by some OLMC members as a potential source of economic information.

 

A group of 13 Francophone women participated in eight workshops on the economy.

Workshop participants were given advice about women's contribution to the economy of Northern Ontario. The workshops were also an opportunity to learn about FedNor's programs and services.

 

News releases and media advisories are sent to the 14 Francophone media outlets in Northern Ontario.

OLMCs have access to information through the media targeting them.

 

Two articles promoting FedNor's success in the area of official languages were published in Volume 16 of Canadian Heritage's Bulletin 41–42. The articles were entitled "Today, Vancouver…Tomorrow, Canada!" and "Foire gourmande de l'Abitibi-Témiscamingue et du nordest ontarien—A must-see!"

FedNor's success stories and best practices are shared with the community.

 

Ontario Region

The Ontario regional office organized nine outreach activities with OLMCs. Canada Business Ontario took the opportunity to promote its services to Francophone entrepreneurs. Activities were held in Kingston (College Deans, May 2010); Cornwall ("Business, Government Services and You," September 2010); Ottawa ("Business, Government Services and You," October 2010); Timmins, Sudbury and North Bay ("Business, Government Services and You," November 2010); Kenora and Thunder Bay ("Business, Government Services and You," March 2011); and Kapuskasing (Association française des municipalités de l'Ontario, September 2010).

More than 460 Francophone entrepreneurs took part in the outreach activities. Canada Business Ontario distributed more than 200 information guides in French.

Participants in the activities received documentation in French and English. Each activity featured an average of 20 bilingual presenters.

The relationships established with OLMCs and other community partners promote greater awareness of programs and services.

 

The regional office mailed 19,550 bilingual brochures to OLMC community partners.

The bilingual brochures provide OLMCs with information on the services provided by Canada Business Ontario.

 

The regional office used Business Canada's bilingual website to provide OLMCs with information for small and medium-sized enterprises.

In all, 122,615 pages of business-related information were consulted in French on the Business Canada website.

 

Through News Canada, the regional office published four articles about business. The articles were intended for Anglophone and Francophone media, and focused on the communities of Chapleau, North Bay, Chicoutimi and Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu.

The articles published by the regional office enable OLMCs to learn more about the services provided by Canada Business Ontario and Business Canada.

 

The regional office wrote four articles and produced five videos on the development of a business, in support of outreach activities with small and medium-sized enterprises and future entrepreneurs. The promotional material was produced in English and French.

More than 63 community partners, including 20 designated Francophone partners, received relevant and up-to-date information in English and French about ServiceOntario's service location finder.

 

The regional office published four issues of Ontario Economic Overview, as well as a supplement on small business in Ontario. These documents were produced in both official languages and distributed to 460 targeted members of OLMCs. Upcoming issues of Ontario Economic Overview will also be available in English and French.

OLMCs have better access to information about the economic situation in Ontario. This fosters closer ties between OLMCs and Industry Canada.

 

Pacific Region

The Pacific Region purchased advertising space from the Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique to publish the Department's contact information in the directory La Colombie-Britannique, à votre service en français.

Information on Industry Canada programs and services is made available to OLMCs.

 

Computers for Schools

The Computers for Schools program website is updated on an ongoing basis.

OLMCs are better informed about the Computers for Schools program.

 

Canadian Intellectual Property Office

The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) led case study sessions on intellectual property and made presentations in French at Université Sainte-Anne, Université de Moncton, various campuses of the New Brunswick Community College, Cité Collégiale and the University of Ottawa.

As a result of these sessions, 151 students at Frenchlanguage post-secondary institutions located in OLMCs have a better understanding of intellectual property.

 

Case study sessions on intellectual property were offered in English at McGill University and Dawson College in Montréal.

As a result of these sessions, 85 students at English-language post-secondary institutions located in OLMCs have a better understanding of intellectual property.

 

A French-language presentation on the basics of intellectual property was offered to students at two high schools in Nova Scotia, as well as students from different regions of Canada during a national event held in Ottawa.

As a result of this presentation, 130 students at French-language secondary institutions located in OLMCs have a better understanding of intellectual property.

 

English-language presentations on the basics of intellectual property were provided to business people at the National Franchise and Business Opportunities Show.

As a result of these presentations, 80 Anglophone business people in the Montréal area have a better understanding of intellectual property.

 

CIPO held information meetings at universities, colleges and other organizations located in OLMCs to promote its products and services.

As a result of these meetings, Francophone economic development officers (Conseil de développement économique de l'Alberta) and representatives of Frenchlanguage post-secondary institutions (New Brunswick Community College, Cité Collégiale and Université de Hearst) located in OLMCs are more familiar with the products and services provided by CIPO.

 

Since August 17, 2010, the abstracts of newly issued patents, the titles of industrial designs and trademarks are available in both official languages, and are posted in CIPO databases.

OLMCs can consult the abstracts of patents newly issued by CIPO, as well as the titles of industrial designs and trademarks, in the language of their choice.

 

CIPO has proposed to translate the abstracts of all patents issued before August 17, 2010, so that they can be accessed in both official languages. It will take about four years to translate the approximately 69,000 abstracts.

The recommendations regarding implementation of Part VII of the Official Languages Act continue to be applied, in compliance with the Federal Court decision in Picard.


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D. Coordination and Liaison

Expected Result

Cooperation with multiple partners to enhance the development and vitality of official language minority communities (OLMCs) and to share best practices.

Coordination and Liaison: Expected result
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs Progress made in achieving the expected result

Maintenance of existing partnerships with other Government of Canada departments and agencies.

Participation in interdepartmental committees and intergovernmental mechanisms on official languages issues (e.g., the Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages, the Council of the Network of Departmental Official Languages Champions and the Network of National Section 41 Coordinators).

Regional Operations Sector

To fulfill its obligations under Part VII of the Official Languages Act, Industry Canada sits on various interdepartmental and federal-community committees:

  • the National Committee of Economic Development and Employability for Francophone Minority Communities
  • the Network of National Section 41 Coordinators
  • the Francophone Committee Community Table
  • the Anglophone Committee Community Table

Through its activities, the Regional Operations Sector enriches its information regarding OLMCs and encourages the sharing of information about them.

 

As part of its responsibilities under the Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008–2013: Acting for the Future, the Official Languages Unit actively participated in various forums, including:

  • the Interdepartmental Research Committee on Community Economic Development of OLMCs (IRCCED)
  • the Coordinating Committee on Official Languages Research
  • the steering committee for the 2011 Symposium on Official Languages Research
  • the Interdepartmental Policy Committee of the Official Languages Secretariat
  • the Interdepartmental Management Committee for the Official Languages Program
  • the Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages

As a result of numerous discussions held with community partners, Industry Canada is more aware that excessive use is being made of consultations as a way to hold dialogues with OLMCs. The Regional Operations Sector, in cooperation with its federal partners on the roadmap, is looking for ways to reduce the consequences of this excessive use. The Official Languages Unit suggested using forums to discuss research results, for example, as part of action research projects conducted by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC).

The Official Languages Unit participates in joint projects to put its expertise to good use and make the most of research funding allocated for EDI implementation. The projects in which it has participated include:

  • the cooperative model and entrepreneurial succession in OLMCs (partner: Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada)
  • action research on the economic integration of immigrants (partner: HRSDC)
  • action research on youth and entrepreneurial succession in OLMCs (partner: HRSDC)
  • preparation of an economic workshop as part of the 2011 Symposium on Official Languages Research (partners: HRSDC and the Rural and Cooperatives Secretariat)
  • preparation of an interdepartmental workshop on the economy and official languages, held June 28, 2011 (partners: HRSDC and Canadian Heritage)
 

In its role as coordinator of the Economic Development Initiative (EDI), the Official Languages Unit invited representatives of other federal departments and agencies, including the Official Languages Secretariat of Canadian Heritage and the Rural and Cooperatives Secretariat, to participate in meetings of EDI partners as observers or presenters.

The participation of other federal roadmap partners facilitates more official, broader discussions. This gives EDI partners an opportunity to express their viewpoints and discuss issues likely to influence future official language policies and initiatives. In particular, Industry Canada suggested, on behalf of EDI partners, that the Rural and Cooperatives Secretariat be included as a partner should the EDI be renewed.

 

The Official Languages Unit also conducted consultations with EDI partners in preparation for the creation of Dialogue Day follow up committees. A result of these consultations is that Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions will actively participate in the deliberations of the Anglophone follow up committee. The Official Languages Unit informed federal partners outside Quebec of the possible creation of a similar Francophone committee.

Industry Canada actively pushed for the participation of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions as a federal partner on the Anglophone follow-up committee. Together, they prepared a document describing the committee's objectives and mandate. The document was approved by all partners.

 

FedNor

FedNor participated in the work of the following committees:

  • the federal EDI partners committee (monthly meetings)
  • the Committee of National Section 41 Coordinators (quarterly meetings)
  • the Ontario Region Interdepartmental Official Languages Committee (currently being established)
  • the Interdepartmental Management Committee for the Official Languages Program (April 16 and June 14, 2010, and March 24, 2011)
  • the committee of Northern Ontario departments and agencies (four to six meetings a year)
  • the Interdepartmental Research Committee on Community Economic Development of OLMCs (IRCCED) (February 7, 2011)

Through regular cooperation with other committees and agencies, FedNor is better able to understand common issues, propose solutions and share best practices. The meetings facilitate networking and cooperation.

 

FedNor employees also met with representatives of the following organizations:

  • the Agence nationale et internationale du Manitoba (January 6, 2011)
  • Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (September 7, 2010; October 7, 2010; and January 4, 10, 13, 18 and 20, 2011)
  • the Timiskaming Regional County Municipality (January 14, 2011)
  • agricultural stakeholders from Ontario and Quebec (August 27, 2010)
  • Tourisme Abitibi-Témiscamingue (September 7, 2010)
  • the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (January 12, 2011)
  • Western Economic Diversification Canada (July 5 and September 28, 2010)
  • the Ontario ministries of Northern Development, Mines and Forestry; Tourism and Culture; and Health Promotion and Sport; as well as Citizenship and Immigration Canada (June 8, 2010)
  • the Centre de la francophonie des Amériques (October 4, 2010)
  • the Office of Francophone Affairs (March 26, 2011)
  • the Language Rights Support Program (November 19, 2010)
  • the Good Practices Forum (December 2, 2010)

The meetings enable FedNor to share information, forge ties with potential partners, discuss joint projects and collaborate in the preparation of presentations.

 

Atlantic Region

The Department supported Avancement pédagogique des technologies de l'information et de la communication en Atlantique (APTICA). APTICA is a not-for-profit organization. Its mission is to encourage and facilitate the integration of information and communications technologies into teaching by the Francophone education community of Atlantic Canada. Regional office employees participated in activities and meetings organized by APTICA.

The regional office established ties with industry stakeholders associated with APTICA, OLMCs and various levels of government that work with the organization. These links promote information sharing and discussions on Industry Canada programs and services.

 

The Atlantic Region sits on the Nova Scotia Official Languages Committee and has an official languages representative on the New Brunswick Federal Council.

Regional office representatives share the information they collect with their work colleagues. This enables staff to better understand OLMC needs and challenges.

 

Members of the regional office actively participated in the work of the Conseil économique du Nouveau-Brunswick, an organization focusing on the economic development of Francophone businesses in that province.

Participation in the work of the Conseil économique du Nouveau-Brunswick enables the regional office to better understand the challenges faced by Francophone business people in New Brunswick.

 

Ontario Region

The Ontario Region participated in coordination and liaison activities in preparation for seven information meetings for OLMCs entitled "Business, Government Services and You." The planning for these meetings involved up to 22 federal, provincial, municipal and not-for-profit agencies. The meetings took place in Cornwall (September 2010), Ottawa (October 2010), Timmins, Sudbury and North Bay (November 2010), and Kenora and Thunder Bay (March 2011).

Information about services for small and medium-sized enterprises was provided to OLMCs in both official languages.

Canada Business Ontario shared best practices with other government partners and formed new partnerships.

The meetings were better attended than in previous years.

Ontario Francophone entrepreneurs are better informed about government programs and services available to businesses.

 

Prairies and Northern Region

A human resources representative sits on the Manitoba Interdepartmental Network of Official Language Coordinators.

The regional office regularly collaborates with the Interdepartmental Network to draft reports on activities associated with the Official Languages Act.

Participation in these tasks and activities enables the regional office to learn more about best practices and promotes information sharing on implementation of the Official Languages Act.


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E. Funding and Program Delivery

Expected Result

Official language minority communities (OLMCs) are part of the Department's regular clientele and have adequate access to its programs and services. OLMC needs (e.g., geographic dispersion and development opportunities) are taken into account.

Funding and Program Delivery: Expected result
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs Progress made in achieving the expected result

Provision of information, services and funding to OLMCs through Industry Canada programs.

Community Access Program

Industry Canada's Community Access Program (CAP) provides thousands of Canadians with affordable access to the Internet from public locations such as schools, community centres and libraries. The program has invested approximately $2.5 million in projects targeting OLMCs.

CAP has enabled 694 sites to provide Internet access to 748 OLMCs in Canada.

CAP has 80 networks across the country. In addition to providing information on CAP services, the networks contribute to the economic development of communities throughout Canada, including OLMCs, through their many projects and research activities as well as opportunities for training and employment.

CAP provides bilingual service throughout the country.

 

Computers for Schools

The Computers for Schools (CFS) program provides financial assistance to not-for-profit organizations, which in turn assist with program delivery across the country on behalf of Industry Canada.

The CFS program invested $7,954,585 in 2010–11.

The CFS program provided 3,741 computers to OLMCs throughout Canada.

CAP and the CFS program provide financial support to OLMCs.

 

Regional Operations Sector

Industry Canada led the following research projects on behalf of federal partners of the Economic Development Initiative (EDI):

  • a report on federal investments in OLMCs (Industry Canada and regional development agencies)
  • a review of provincial and territorial economic development policies
  • an assessment of the Town of Témiscaming Business Vitality Index
  • the cooperative model and entrepreneurial succession in OLMCs (in partnership with the Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada)

The research work contributes to a better understanding of the economic development of OLMCs and is used to guide future initiatives of federal EDI partners.

 

FedNor

FedNor has implemented the following programs:

  • the Northern Ontario Development Program
  • the EDI, set up under the Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008–2013: Acting for the Future
  • Community Futures Development Corporations

Five projects aimed at Francophone communities were approved under the Northern Ontario Development Program, representing an investment of $341,500. OLMCs benefit from other projects conducted in both official languages that were also given program approval.

Under the EDI, FedNor signed 14 contribution agreements, representing a total investment of $1.66 million.

FedNor continues to support OLMCs in Northern Ontario.

 

Twelve of the 24 Northern Ontario Community Futures Development Corporations provide bilingual service. They therefore receive an additional $20,000 to help them meet their official language obligations. While use of these funds is left to their discretion, the corporations nevertheless submit to FedNor a report on spending. The report shows that the money is generally used to cover translation costs, purchase French-language materials, prepare French content for the corporation's website or pay a portion of a bilingual employee's salary. When their contribution agreements are renewed, the corporations must use a template to set out an action plan on official languages. The plan must specify how they meet their obligations under Part IV of the Official Languages Act. (For example, are their websites, announcements, posters and business cards available in both official languages? Do they provide a bilingual greeting?) They must also indicate any consulting, awareness and partnership activities they conduct with OLMCs.

OLMCs in Northern Ontario are better served by Community Futures Development Corporations that provide bilingual service.

 

Small Business and Marketplace Services

 
 

Small Business and Tourism Branch

Under the Small Business Internship Program, Industry Canada contributed $100,000 to the Community Futures Development Corporation of Eastern Ontario (Prescott-Russell Community Development Corporation).

The contribution enabled an OLMC to participate in the Small Business Internship Program.

 

The Conseil de développement économique de l'Alberta received a contribution of $250,000 to provide financial assistance to small businesses in Alberta.

The contribution encourages Francophone businesses to participate in the Small Business Internship Program.

 

Marquee Tourism Events Program

Fiscal year 2010–11 is the second year of the Marquee Tourism Events Program, a two-year program under Canada's Economic Action Plan. The Festival du Voyageur is one of 47 tourism events to have received funding from the program in 2010–11. The festival received a contribution of $438,174. It took place in Winnipeg, a minority language community.

The program enabled the Festival du Voyageur to improve the visitor experience and provide world-class programming in order to maintain and even increase attendance by Canadian and foreign tourists.


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F. Accountability

Expected Result

Full integration of the perspective of official language minority communities (OLMCs) and section 41 of the Official Languages Act into the Department's policies, programs and services. The reporting structure, internal evaluations and policy reviews determine how to better integrate OLMCs' perspective.

Accountability: Expected Result
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs Progress made in achieving the expected result

Presentation of key achievements related to the implementation of section 41 in annual reporting documents.

Assessment of the impact of Industry Canada's performance in meeting the requirements of section 41.

Audit and Evaluation Branch

The Branch guided the process of evaluating the Economic Development Initiative (EDI) to better meet OLMC needs. It also liaised with the main program managers to foster a consistent approach by the different teams.

The evaluation results will be used to guide future initiatives undertaken in OLMCs.

 

Regional Operations Sector

The Regional Operations Sector integrated the concept of substantive equality into the Official Languages Filter to comply with the decision handed down by the Supreme Court of Canada in CALDECH, as well as to incorporate certain elements of the analytical grid proposed by the Chief Human Resources Officer of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

The modified filter is used by program managers to apply the decision handed down in CALDECH. It also enables them to identify program weaknesses and areas needing improvement to better meet OLMC needs.

 

The Official Languages Unit provided Department-wide coordination for the preparation of this Report on Results.

Information on the implementation of section 41 throughout the Department is forwarded to senior management and outside stakeholders.

 

FedNor

FedNor applied the Official Languages Filter to the process for renewing the Northern Ontario Development Program to ensure that OLMC needs are taken into account.

FedNor looks for innovative ways to meet OLMC needs. Taking into account the OLMC viewpoint becomes more natural as employees and senior management better understand the issues involved. Recent questions and discussions demonstrate improved understanding.

 

FedNor continues to collect information from target groups on activities taking place in Northern Ontario Francophone communities. This information enables FedNor to identify funded projects and activities that meet the specific needs of Francophone communities.

The information collected from target groups helps ensure a better understanding of OLMC needs and activities.

 

The official languages action plan developed by Community Futures Development Corporations was reworked and is awaiting approval.

The action plan was changed to address obligations under Part VII of the Official Languages Act. It should, moreover, enable Community Futures Development Corporations to better target their activities according to OLMC needs.

 

FedNor created an internal committee mandated to review the principle of substantive equality, assess its repercussions for FedNor programs and identify potential gaps.

A review plan is currently being developed.

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