Archived — Co-operatives in Canada in 2010

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This report was prepared by the Co-operatives Policy Unit, Strategic Policy Branch of Industry Canada.

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Cat. Iu170-1E-PDF
ISBN 1928-3458

Aussi offert en français sous le titre Les Coopératives au Canada 2010

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Table of Contents

Table of Figures

List of Figures
Figure Title
Figure 1 Reporting Co-operatives by Volume of Business, Assets and Size, 2010
Figure 2 Reporting Co-operatives by Membership, Employment and Size, 2010
Figure 3 Co-operatives by Type, 2010
Figure 4 Distribution of Reporting Co-operatives by Age, 2010
Figure 5 Co-operative Jobs, 2001 - 2010
Figure 6 Total Membership, 2001 - 2010
Figure 7 Volume of Business and Assets, 2001 - 2010
Figure 8 Patronage Paid Versus Net Patronage, 2001 - 2010
Figure 9 Total Number of Reporting Co-operatives by Industry Codes, 2010
Figure 10 Agriculture and Resources by Number of Reporting Co-operatives, 2010
Figure 11 Agriculture and Resources by Volume of Business, 2010
Figure 12 Utilities by volume of Business, 2010
Figure 13 Construction & Manufacturing by Volume of Business, 2010
Figure 14 Top Wholesale and Retail Sub-sectors by Number of Reporting Co-operatives, 2010
Figure 15 Wholesale and Retail Trade by Volume of Business, 2010
Figure 16 Transportation and Warehousing by Volume of Business, 2010
Figure 17 Information and Cultural Industries by Number of Reporting Co-operatives, 2010
Figure 18 Finance and Insurance by Volume of Business, 2010
Figure 19 Real Estate and Rental and Leasing by Volume of Business, 2010
Figure 20 Professional and Educational Services by Volume of Business, 2010
Figure 21 Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation by Volume of Business, 2010
Figure 22 Health Care and Social Assistance by Volume of Business, 2010
Figure 23 Arts, Entertainment and Recreation by Number of Reporting Co-ops, 2010
Figure 24 Other Services & Public Administration by Number of Reporting Co-ops, 2010

Foreword

Co-operatives in Canada in 2010 is an annual publication that provides baseline data on the co-operative sector in Canada. The Government of Canada has been collecting and publishing this data since the 1930s.

The 2010 publication is the 77th edition and has been prepared by Industry Canada's Co-operatives Policy Unit. The Unit provides analysis, advice and support to promote co-operative business innovation and growth in Canada. Industry Canada provides a single focal point for non-financial co-operatives, including administration of the Canada Cooperatives Act and co-operative incorporation. Responsibility for financial co-operatives rests with Finance Canada.

The report is based on unweighted data gathered from the 2010 Annual Survey of Canadian Co-operatives. The 2010 survey response rate is 65% (5,904 reporting co-operatives out of 7,865 incorporated co-operatives), a decrease from the 2009 response rate of 70%.

Unless otherwise indicated, the present publication has been prepared with data from the reporting co-operatives who responded to the annual survey. This report would not be possible without the data contributions from the Ministry of the Economy, Innovation and Exportation, Government of Quebec, and Service Nova Scotia, Government of Nova Scotia. If the 2010 information was not available, estimates were used if data from the previous year was available and if the co-operative was still in operation.

The 77th edition updates data from previous publications and introduces some new sections. New additions include a section on the reporting co-operative's characteristics, which includes the size, type, and age of co-operatives, as well as employment and membership. Detailed data tables are included in Annex A.

In previous publications of the report, analyses were based on an activity code classification system specifically developed by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. The 2010 edition classifies co-operatives using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). This enables direct comparison of the co-operative sector with other sectors across the Canadian economy. The shift to NAICS resulted in the re-categorization of a number of co-operatives sectors (see Annex B for details). For instance, dairy co-operatives were previously categorized under Agriculture, and are now classified under Manufacturing. This is consistent with the classification of other dairy corporations under NAICS. Additionally, co-operatives in the Public Utilities, Transportation, Construction and Information and Cultural Industries were previously subsumed under other sectors are now listed as their own sector under NAICS. The 19 distinct NAICS codes used in this report were re-categorized into 14 sectors to facilitate the analysis and protect the confidentiality of co-operatives where few co-operatives were present in the sector.

Revised data tables now provide 2010 data by the NAICS industry codes by province and territory and from 2001 to 2010 on key variables (volume of business, assets, membership and employment). To assist in comparability from 2009 to 2010, new tables comparing average output of co-operatives between 2009 and 2010 have been added.

A Note on Financial and Non-Financial Co-operatives

In Canada, co-operatives are generally categorized as financial or non-financial co-operatives. Financial co-operatives consist of deposit-taking credit unions and caisses populaires, as well as mutuals involved in life, property and casualty insurance. At the federal level, these co-operatives are subject to the Co-operative Credit Associations Act, the Bank Act and the Insurance Companies Act, under the authority of the Minister of Finance. Since 1986, statistics on these co-operatives has been collected by Statistics Canada, and they have not been included in the Annual Survey of Canadian Co-operatives.

Non-financial co-operatives are provincially or federally regulated and are subject to their specific co-operative acts in their respective province and territory (e.g., Canada Cooperatives Act for federally incorporated co-ops). The exception to this categorization has been The Co-operators Group Ltd (CGL), a federally incorporated co-operative that acts as a holding company for a group of related stock companies active in the insurance and financial sector. Due to its financial lines of business, CGL has been considered a financial co-operative and has traditionally not been included in the Annual Survey of Co-operatives, which focuses on non-financial co-operatives.

As part of the transition to NAICS, a number of Canada's "non-financial" co-operatives have been coded as "Finance and Insurance" co-operatives. These co-operatives are used by groups of people or businesses to serve as financial intermediaries. This reclassification assists in clarifying the role that co-operatives play in enabling business development and does suggest that the historical classification of financial and non-financial co-operatives needs to be re-examined.

A Note on Comparability

For the purposes of this report, baseline statistics on co-operatives have been presented and no comparisons are made with other forms of corporations. Because the co-operative business model overlaps with other models, further analysis is needed to enable comparisons. For example, some co-operatives are also considered small and medium enterprises (SMEs) because they fit the definition of having 1 to 499 paid employees and less than $50 million in annual revenues. Similarly, an additional grouping of co-operatives also operate on a non-profit basis or have registered charity status with the Canada Revenue Agency and so could further be compared to not-for-profit corporations and registered charities.

Abbreviations – Provinces and Territories
Province or Territory Abbreviation
British Columbia BC
Alberta AB
Saskatchewan SK
Manitoba MB
Ontario ON
Quebec QC
New Brunswick NB
Nova Scotia NS
Prince Edward Island PE
Newfoundland and Labrador NL
Northwest Territories NT
Nunavut NY
Yukon YT
Territories (NT+NU+YT)Footnote a TE

Highlights

Number of Co-operatives

  • In 2010, there were 7,865 co-operatives in Canada, spanning all provinces and territories. Of these, 5,094 (or 65%) responded to the Annual Survey of Canadian Co-operatives.

Size of Co-operatives

  • In 2010, 48% of reporting co-operatives had no paid employees and were operating using volunteer resources. These co-operatives generated the smallest share of volume of business (1%), assets (12%) and membership (2%) of the reporting co-operatives.
  • Conversely, less than 1% (.35%) of the reporting co-operatives were large enterprises with over 500 employees. These co-operatives generated the largest volume of business ($20 billion or 59%), owned the most assets ($8.9 billion or 43%) and employed the most workers (33,600 or 38%).
  • Of the remaining reporting co-operatives, 49% had 1 to 99 employees and less than 3% had 100 to 499 employees.

Types of Co-operatives

  • In 2010, 70% of reporting co-operatives were classified as consumer co-operatives and 16% were producer co-operatives.

Age of Co-operatives

  • In 2010, the majority (64%) of reporting co-operatives were older than 20 years. Of these, 15% of all reporting co-operatives were incorporated over 40 years ago.

Employment

  • Reporting co-operatives contributed over 87,900 full-time and part-time jobs to the Canadian labour market. This represented a modest increase of less than 1% from 2009.
  • In 2010, almost 80% of co-operative jobs were held within three sectors: Wholesale and Retail (41%), Agriculture and Resources (23%), and, Construction and Manufacturing (15%).
  • From 2001 to 2010, the total number of employees fluctuated from year to year with an overall increase of 1000 new co-operative jobs since 2001. This increase was despite the conversion of a number of large co-operatives to private-owned companies between 2002 and 2005. From 2005 to 2010, 363 new jobs were added to the sector.

Memberships

  • Reporting co-operatives had a total of 7.4 million memberships, an increase of approximately 3% from 2009. The overwhelming majority (6.4 million or 86%) of these memberships were within the Wholesale and Retail sectors.
  • From 2001 to 2010, there was a steady gain in memberships with a total of 2.3 million or 45% more memberships added since 2001.

Financial Performance

  • Non-financial co-operatives reported a total volume of business of $33.9 billion in 2010. Three sectors generated 94% of the business: Wholesale and Retail ($20 billion), Construction and Manufacturing ($6.2 billion), and Agriculture and Resources ($5.5 billion).
  • Co-operatives held $20.7 billion in assets in 2010. The top three sectors owned 80% of all assets: Wholesale and Retail ($9.5 billion), Real Estate ($4.6 billion) Construction and Manufacturing ($2.5 billion).
  • In 2010, co-operatives returned $746 million in patronage dividends to their members. Co-operatives in the Wholesale and Retail industry paid out $593.8 or 80% of all patronage dividends returned.

How We Define Co-operatives

A co-operative is a legally incorporated corporation that is owned by an association of persons seeking to satisfy common needs such as access to products or services, sale of their products or services, or employment.

In Canada, a co-operative must incorporate pursuant to a specific statute law at the provincial, territorial or federal level. These Acts govern all types of co-operatives, with the exception of financial co-operatives, which are governed by separate legislation. The nature of the co-operative business model and how they operate is largely defined by these Acts.

Whatever the governing Act may be, co-operatives share three common characteristics in areas of ownership, governance and distribution of profits.

Ownership: A co-operative is a business jointly owned by its members who use its products or services. In some cases, co-operatives can have members who do not use its services or products (e.g. support members, investor members).

Governance: Co-operatives are democratically controlled businesses with the governing principle "one-member, one-vote". This right is exercised at the co-operative's annual general meeting (AGM), where members can vote directly for the board of directors. This democratic governance structure is reinforced by the co-operative's by-laws and the legislation under which the co-operative is incorporated (provincial, territorial or federal).

Distribution of Profits: Any surplus of a co-operative is owned by the member-owners who can decide how to distribute the profits at the AGM, which can include the decisions to allocate either part or all of the surplus to the general reserve for future investments and, the decision to distribute the profits to all the members in the form of patronage dividends based on the individual member's usage of the co-operative over the past fiscal year.

Depending on the governing legislation, a co-operative may choose to operate on a non-profit basis; an additional small number of co-operatives are registered charities. In both instances, these co-operatives do not provide members with a patronage dividend, and all surpluses are directed eventually into their general reserve.

An Overview of 2010 Reporting Co-operatives

Distribution by Geography

In 2010, there were 7,865 incorporated co-operatives registered under a federal, provincial or territorial co-operative Act. Quebec had the highest share of incorporated co-operatives (37%), followed by Ontario (21%) and Saskatchewan (12%). Of the incorporated co-operatives, 65% (or 5,094) completed the annual survey.

Distribution of Co-ops by Geography in Canada

Map of Distribution of Coops by Geography in Canada (the long description is located below the image)

Legend

  • I: Incorporated co-operativesFootnote 1
  • R: Reporting co-operatives

Canada

  • I: 7,865
  • R: 5,094
Description of the Map of Distribution
Distribution of Co-ops by Geography in Canada
Provinces Incorporated Reporting
BC 566 301
AB 684 411
SK 975 579
MB 369 224
ON 1,689 708
QC 2,881 2,379
NL 69 19
PE 105 54
NS 314 284
NB 166 101
YT 8 1
NT 15 9
NU 24 24
Total 7,865 5,094

Size of Co-operatives

In addition to total revenue, assets and sales, the number of employees is commonly used to determine the size of a business. In 2010, 48% of reporting co-operatives had no paid employees and were operating using volunteer resources. These co-operatives generated approximately $0.5 million (or 1%) in volume of business, owned 12% of all assets, and had approximately 150,000 (2%) memberships.

Almost half of small co-operatives employed between 1 to 99 employees (49%). Together, these co-operatives accounted for 34% of all employment by the reporting co-operatives (30,300 employees), 18% of the total volume of business ($6.2 billion), 30% of the assets ($6.2 billion), and 26% of the memberships (approximately 2 million).

Less than 3% of the reporting co-operatives were medium size co-operatives (100 to 499 employees). Together they accounted for 27% of all employment by the reporting co-operatives, 21% of the volume of business ($7 billion), 15% of the assets ($3 billion), and 15% of the memberships (approximately 1.1 million).

Less than 1% (0.35%) of co-operatives were large enterprises (over 500 employees). Together, they generated $20 billion (59%) in volume of business, owned assets of $8.9 million (43%) and employed approximately 33,600 (38%) workers. While membership of the group stood at approximately 4 million (56%), this figure included Mountain Equipment Co-op's 3.4 million members.

Figure 1: Reporting Co-operatives by Volume of Business, Assets and Size, 2010

Bar chart of Reporting Co-operatives by Volume of Business, Assets and Size, 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 1
Reporting Co-operatives by Volume of Business, Assets and Size, 2010
Size
(Number of Employees)
Reporting Co-operatives
%
Volume of Business
%
Assets
%
0
(n=2,450)
48% 1% 12%
1 to 99
(n=2,495)
49% 18% 30%
100 to 499
(n=130)
3% 21% 15%
Over 500
(n=18)
0% 59% 43%

Figure 2: Reporting Co-operatives by Membership, Employment and Size, 2010

Bar chart of Reporting Co-operatives by Membership, Employment and Size, 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 2
Reporting Co-operatives by Membership, Employment and Size, 2010
Number of Employees Reporting Co-operatives
%
Membership
%
Employment
%
0
(n=2,450)
48% 2% 0%
1 to 99
(n=2,495)
49% 26% 34%
100 to 499
(n=130)
3% 15% 27%
Over 500
(n=18)
0% 56% 38%

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Types of Co-operatives

While co-operatives exist in a broad array of sectors and serve a wide variety of functions, they are generally categorized based on their relationship and benefit to the member: consumer, producer, work, multi-stakeholder and federations.

Figure 3: Co-operatives by Type, 2010

Pie chart of Co-operatives by Type, 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 3
Co-operatives by Type, 2010
Co-operatives Reporting Co-operatives
Consumer 3,577
Producer 827
Multi-stakeholder 336
Worker 301
Federation 53

In 2010, 70% of the reporting co-operatives (3,577) were consumer co-operatives. These co-operatives provided products or services to their members (e.g., housing, health care and social services, utilities, agriculture). As the largest sector of co-operatives, housing co-operatives were the most common type of consumer co-operative (57% of all consumer co-operatives).

Sixteen percent of reporting co-operatives were producer co-operatives. They processed and marketed the goods or services produced by their members, and/or supplied products or services necessary to the members' professional activities (such as independent entrepreneurs, artisans, or farmers).

Consumer and producer co-operatives demonstrate the beneficial economies of scale for which co-operatives are known; member-owners band together to purchase large quantities of inputs, or to sell large quantities of outputs jointly. Members benefit from lower prices (for consumer co-operatives) or higher prices (for producer co-operatives). Members also benefit from the infrastructure put in place by their co-operative (e.g., physical facilities for agricultural co-operatives handle commodities, store inputs, and dispense fuel).

Seven percent of reporting co-operatives were multi-stakeholder co-operatives created to serve the needs of different stakeholder groups, such as employees, producers, consumers, clients, service providers, community residents and other interested individuals and organizations. Generally, common forms of multi-stakeholder co-operatives include health care, home care and social co-operatives.

Six percent of reporting co-operatives were worker co-operatives. They provided employment for their members. In this type of co-operative, the employees are the members and the owners of the enterprise. Common forms include arts and entertainment, manufacture and sale of clothing, education and home care services.

Approximately 1% of the reporting co-operatives were a federation, a co-operative whose membership is composed substantially of other co-operatives generally operating within the same sector. For example, the Fédération des coopératives d'habitation montérégiennes is a housing federation consisting of 90 co-operatives representing 1,950 homes in Montérégie, Quebec. Established in 1983, its lines of service include advocacy, training and provision of management support to its members, and among its key goals is to promote the advancement, stability and autonomy of Montérégie housing co-operatives.

Age of Co-operatives

The co-operative model allows members to share both the risks and benefits of the business and has proven its resilience and stability over time.

Figure 4: Distribution of Reporting Co-operatives by Age, 2010

Pie chart of Distribution of Reporting Co-operatives by Age, 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 4
Distribution of Reporting Co-operatives by Age, 2010
Co-operatives Reporting Co-operatives
2 years or less 4%
3 to 10 years 15%
11 to 20 years 17%
21 to 40 years 49%
41 years or more 15%

The majority (64%) of all reporting co-operatives in Canada in 2010 were incorporated over 20 years ago. Of these, almost half (2,498 or 49%) were established between 21 and 40 years ago, and 15% (or 745) were established 40 or more years ago.. The older co-operatives established over 40 years ago included 90% of the co-operatives from the Arctic Co-operative system, 29% of agriculture co-operatives in Quebec, as well as a large number of housing co-operatives. The majority (65%) of co-operatives between 21 and 40 years were housing co-operatives.

A smaller proportion (15% or 783) of reporting co-operatives were established between 3 to 10 years ago and 4% (or 208) were incorporated within 2 years or lessFootnote 2. Wholesale and Retail made up the highest share (16%) of new co-operatives, followed by Agriculture and Resources (15%), Arts and Culture (14%) and Health and Social services (11%).

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Employment

Reporting co-operatives employed 87,963 Canadians in 2010 in both part and full-time positions and received $1.4 billion in salaries and wages. The Wholesale and Retail sectors employed the largest number of Canadians by contributing over 36,000 jobs to the labour market. Agriculture and Resource co-operatives were the second largest employers with close to 20,400 jobs, followed by Construction and Manufacturing co-operatives with 13,586 jobs. These sectors combined provided employment to 80% of the co-operative sector.

Over the last 10 years, the total number of Canadians employed by co-operatives fluctuated with an increase of over 1,000 employees. This small increase occurred despite the conversion of a number of large co-operatives to private owned companies in 2002-2005 and the resulting drop in employmentFootnote 3 and despite lower annual survey sample sizes. Since 2005, 363 new jobs have been added by the sector.

Figure 5: Co-operative Jobs, 2001-2010

Bar chart of Co-operative Jobs, 2001-2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 5
Co-operative Jobs, 2001-2010
Year Employment
2001 86,921
2002 84,952
2003 84,097
2004 85,147
2005 87,600
2006 87,172
2007 87,620
2008 87,918
2009 87,735
2010 87,963

MembershipsFootnote 4

Co-operatives reported total memberships of 7.4 million in 2010. Of these, the overwhelming majority (6.4 million or 86%) were found within the Wholesale and Retail sectors. With 3.4 million members, Mountain Equipment Co-op alone reported almost half (46%) of the total co-operative memberships in Canada. The multi-faceted Other Services had 4.2% of the total membership of reporting co-operatives (funeral, personal and laundry services, firefighters), and the Heath Care and Social Assistance had 2% of all memberships.

Co-operative memberships have increased steadily since 2001, making gains of 45% or 2.3 million memberships. This steady growth continued despite a decrease in the number of reporting co-operatives.

Figure 6: Total Membership, 2001-2010

Bar chart of Total Membership, 2001-2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 6
Total Membership, 2001-2010
Year Membership
(in millions)
2001 5.1
2002 5.1
2003 5.3
2004 5.6
2005 5.9
2006 6.3
2007 6.6
2008 6.9
2009 7.2
2010 7.4

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Financial Performance

Reporting co-operatives generated a total of $33.9 billion in volume of business. Wholesale and Retail co-operatives reported the largest volume of business ($20 billion) followed by Construction and Manufacturing ($6.2 billion). In Manufacturing, a few large co-operatives active in producing dairy products on behalf of their farmer-members generated the bulk of this volume of business. Agriculture and Resource co-operatives were the third largest revenue generating industries ($5.5 billion) for co-operatives. These sectors combined reported $31.7 billion or 94% of the total volume of business of co-operatives.

Co-operatives also held over $20.7 billion in assets in the form of cash, real estate, equipment, trademarks and copyrights, among others. Almost half (46%) or approximately $9.5 billion of these assets were held within the Wholesale and Retail sector. The Real Estate industry held 22% or $4.6 billion of the co-operative assets, the bulk of which is the result of Housing co-operatives ownership or leasing of property in many of Canada's municipalities. Co-operatives also reported significant assets in Construction and Manufacturing ($2.5 billion), and in Agriculture and Resources ($2.2 billion). These four sectors combined reported $18.8 billion or 91% of the total assets of co-operatives.

From 2001 to 2010, total volume of business and assets tended to move in tandem. Decreases were in part due to the demutualization of a number of co-operatives in 2002 to 2005 and decreased petroleum product sales in 2009.Footnote 5.

Figure 7: Volume of Business and Assets, 2001-2010

Line graph of Volume of Business and Assets, 2001-2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 7
Volume of Business and Assets, 2001-2010
Year Assets
(millions $)
Volume of Business
(millions $)
2001 $17,864 $29,332
2002 $16,808 $26,088
2003 $16,727 $26,067
2004 $17,574 $27,561
2005 $17,699 $27,686
2006 $18,417 $28,794
2007 $19,256 $30,804
2008 $20,653 $35,728
2009 $21,117 $33,853
2010 $20,685 $33,925

Patronage Dividends

Patronage dividends represent the portion of income paid annually by a co-operative to its members and provides direct benefits to members and to communities where co-operative businesses operate. In 2010, reporting co-operatives paid out $746 million in patronage dividends back to their members. This represented an 8% decrease from 2009 that saw $811 million returned to members.

Co-operatives in the Wholesale and Retail industry returned over $593.8 million or 80% of the total amount of co-operative dividends to their members. Construction and Manufacturing co-operatives (primarily dairy co-operatives) provided the second largest amount of paid dividends returning $124 million or almost 17%.

From 2001 to 2010, the amount of patronage paid by Canadian co-operatives to their members steadily increased. The $746 million in patronage dividends paid to members in 2010 represented an increase of $284 million or 61% from 2001.

Co-operatives that are members of a federation or another co-operative may receive patronage dividends from that federation. The difference between what a co-operative receives in patronage dividends and what it pays out to its own members as patronage dividends is net patronage dividends. Net patronage increased from $272 million in 2001 to $418 millionFootnote 6 in 2010, an increase of approximately 54% over the period. While patronage paid declined by 8% between 2009 and 2010, net patronage rose by 6%.

Figure 8: Patronage Paid versus Net Patronage, 2001-2010

Line graph of Patronage Paid versus Net Patronage, 2001-2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 8
Patronage Paid versus Net Patronage, 2001-2010
Year Patronage Paid
(millions $)
Net Patroange
(millions $)
2001 $462 $272
2002 $485 $268
2003 $566 $344
2004 $608 $377
2005 $666 $408
2006 $735 $412
2007 $874 $459
2008 $1,044 $561
2009 $811 $396
2010 $746 $418

Distribution by Industry

Total Number of Co-operatives by Industry CodesFootnote 7

Co-operatives in Canada are involved in a wide range of activities—oil refinery, housing, daycare, senior centres, entire wholesale and retailing systems— providing a plethora of goods from specialty foods to gasoline.

In 2010, 42% (or 2,156) of all reporting co-operatives were classified under the Real Estate sector. Wholesale and Retail were second (13%) followed by Agriculture and Resources (8%) and Health Care and Social Assistance sectors (8%).

Figure 9: Total Number of Reporting Co-operatives by Industry Codes, 2010

Bar chart of Total Number of Reporting Co-operatives by Industry Codes, 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 9
Total Number of Reporting Co-operatives by Industry Codes, 2010
NAICS Sector Number of Reporting Co-operatives
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting (11) & Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction (21) 416
Utilities (22) 257
Construction (23) & Manufacturing (31-33) 122
Wholesale Trade (41) & Retail Trade (44-45) 671
Transportation and Warehousing (48-49) 50
Information and Cultural Industries (51) 93
Finance and Insurance (52) 185
Real Estate and Rental and Leasing (53) 2,156
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services (54) & Educational Services (61) 127
Administrative and Support, Waste Management and Remediation  Services (56) 75
Health Care and Social Assistance (62) 399
Arts, Entertainment and Recreation (71) 290
Accommodation and Food Services (72)  57
Other Services (81) & Public Administration (91) 196

Overview of Co-operatives by Industry Codes

Agriculture and Resources

In 2010, reporting co-operatives in the Agriculture and Resources sector (consisting of agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting sector, combined with the mining, quarrying and oil and gas extraction sector) contributed $5.5 billion in volume of business to the economy. The sectors reported assets of $2.2 billion, and had a membership of over 60,400. With 20,393 employees, the two combined sectors were the second largest employers after Wholesale and Retail.

Figure 10: Agriculture and Resources by Number of Reporting Co-operatives, 2010
Bar chart of Agriculture and Resources by Number of Reporting Co-operatives, 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 10
Agriculture and Resources by Number of Reporting Co-operatives, 2010
NAICS Sector Number of Reporting Co-operatives
Support Activities for Agriculture and Forestry  143
Animal Production and Aquaculture  118
Crop Production  77
Forestry and Logging & Mining, Quarrying and Oil and Gas Extraction 43
Fishing, Hunting and Trapping  29
Figure 11: Agriculture and Resources by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Bar chart of Agriculture and Resources by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 11
Agriculture and Resources by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Province Volume of Business
(millions $)
BC $114.9
AB $68.3
SK $19.6
MB $303.3
ON $455.5
QC $4,283.2
NB $9.4
NS $173.2
PE $52.6
NL $16.6

Agriculture and Resources can be further distributed into five subsectors. Agriculture and Forestry Support is the largest sub-sector accounting for 34% of co-operatives in this industry. It primarily provides farmers with seed cleaning services.

Animal production and aquaculture is the second largest sub-sector and primarily includes collective grazing management activities, as well as poultry and egg production, and livestock-rearing accounts. Crop production includes fruits and vegetables, honey and maple products, as well as grains and oilseeds accounts. The last two sub-sectors include forestry, logging and mining, quarrying and the oil and gas extraction subsectors, and, finally, fishing, hunting and trapping.

Quebec's 129 co-operatives contributed $4.3 billion or 78% to the total volume of business of the Agriculture and Resources sector. La Coop Fédérée, with its multiple business lines in agri-business, retail, food processing, energy and research and innovation, alone contributed $4 billion in total volume of business, $1.3 million in assets and over 10,400 jobs.

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Utilities

The Utilities sector consists of co-operatives that are involved in providing gas, electricity, other forms of energy and water supply services. In 2010, reporting co-operatives within the sector contributed a volume of business of $268.3 million and owned $589.7 million in assets. The sector had a membership of over 126,000, and employed a total of 782 persons.

In 2010, 166 or 65% of the 257 co-operatives operating within the utilities sector were located in Alberta. These co-operatives are all incorporated under the Rural Utilities Act and include Rural Electrification Associations (REAs), natural gas and water co-operatives. They generated $188 million or 70% of the sector's volume of business. They owned assets of $495 million or 84% of all assets within the sector. Their membership was almost 114,500, and they employed nearly 590 workers.

Figure 12: Utilities by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Bar chart of Utilities by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 12
Utilities by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Province Volume of Business
(millions $)
BC $0.02
AB $188.2
SK $0.2
MB $8.2
ON $42.1
QC $14.5
NB $15.0
NS $0.05
PE $0.02

The REAs originated from the 1940s and were created when farmers in Alberta united to set up co-operatives in order to supply rural Alberta with electricity. The REAs were set up as non-profit entities and were created to provide low-costs services to members. Natural gas co-operatives operate their own distribution system and provide natural gas to their members in rural areas. Presently, 81 incorporated natural gas providers service more than 119,000 members that consume approximately 25 million gigajoules of natural gas per year.Footnote 8 Alberta's water co-operatives are generally involved in providing farmers with a reliable source of water for irrigation purposes.

Of the 91 utility co-operatives operating outside of Alberta, 68 were involved in water supply activities. Canada's water co-operatives play an important role in agricultural water management, ensuring equitable and sufficient access by the agriculture sector and rural communities to high quality water. The remainder of reporting utility co-operatives in 2010 were a mixture of electricity co-operatives and renewable energy co-operatives. Numerous environmentally-mandated co-operatives (including wind, solar, tidal, hydro, biofuel and biomass co-operatives) have formed in the last decade to seize new opportunities and offer sustainable and profitable energy alternatives.

Construction and Manufacturing

In 2010, reporting co-operatives in Construction and Manufacturing generated a combined volume of business of $6.2 billion. The sectors owned assets valued at $2.5 billion, and had a membership of over 35,000. More than 13,500 people were employed in the two sectors.

The co-operative model is used in the Construction industry generally by construction workers or trades to pool resources and technical skills to secure contracts. Furthermore, the model is used to provide a variety of services such as green and eco-renovations.

Most of the 10 co-operatives operating in the Construction Sector were primarily focused on non-residential building construction. The remainder dealt with construction projects such as highways and bridges, and specialties such as painting and masonry.

Manufacturing consists of co-operatives mainly engaged in using their producer members' commodities to manufacture a product with a higher market value. The output may be ready for consumption or further used as input in the production of other goods. The co-operatives further provide research and innovation support, and trademarks and patents.

Figure 13: Construction & Manufacturing by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Bar chart of Construction & Manufacturing by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 13
Construction & Manufacturing by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Province Volume of Business
(millions $)
AB $29.3
SK $15.6
ON $573.2
QC $4,886.4
NB $79.9
NS $466.7
PE $137.3

Fifty-seven percent of the 112 reporting co-operatives in the Manufacturing sector operated within food manufacturing. These co-operatives engaged in dairy product manufacturing, animal food manufacturing, grain and oilseed milling, and meat production. The second largest sub-sector was wood product manufacturing with 8% of co-operatives. The remaining 35% of co-operatives were distributed among 11 other sub-sectors (e.g., beverage and tobacco products and fabricated metal product).

Nova Scotia was the main contributor to the Construction sector with $9.2 million in volume of business and $2.4 million in assets. Out of the 112 reporting co-operatives in the Manufacturing sector, more than half (70%) were located in Quebec. Of these, Agropur Coopérative, engaged in dairy product manufacturing, reported a volume of business of $3.3 billion. It owned assets of $1.2 billion, had a membership of 3,459, and employed close to 5,500 employees.

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Wholesale and Retail Trade

Wholesale co-operatives mainly sell goods and provide services in bulk in order to reduce the overall costs to their members. Co-operatives in this sector play a large role in providing inputs such as fertilizer, gas, seeds, hardware and other bulk items to farmers. The Retail sector operates retail outlets to provide their consumer members with groceries, hardware, petroleum and other general merchandise. In 2010, reporting co-operatives operating in the two sectors generated the highest volume of business of the co-operatives sectors at $20 billion, and the highest assets at $9.5 billion. Their combined membership, the most of any other sectors, stood at $6.4 million. The high membership is explained by the large number of retail enterprises that offer memberships to individual consumers. Together, the sectors employed the most people, providing over 36,000 jobs.

Figure 14: Top Wholesale and Retail Sub-sectors by Number of Reporting Co-operatives, 2010
Bar chart of Top Wholesale and Retail Sub-sectors by Number of Reporting Co-operatives, 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 14
Top Wholesale and Retail Sub-sectors by Number of Reporting Co-operatives, 2010
NAICS Sector Number of Reporting Co-operatives
Food and Beverage Stores 286
General Merchandise Stores 157
Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book and Music Stores 77
Miscellaneous Merchant Wholesalers 50
Gasoline Stations 30
Figure 15: Wholesale and Retail Trade by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Bar chart of Wholesale and Retail Trade by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 15
Wholesale and Retail Trade by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Province Volume of Business
(millions $)
BC $994.7
AB $3,961.1
SK $9,633.2
MB $1,585.4
ON $741.6
QC $1,865.6
NB $835.1
NS $99.3
PE $31.9
NL $54.2
TE $181.9

The largest sub-sector within Wholesale and Retail was food and beverage stores. These consisted of specialty food stores including bakeries, organic food stores and farmers' markets, as well as grocery stores. Together, they made up 43% of all co-operatives within Wholesale and Retail. General merchandise stores consisted of retail outlets trading in a wide range of goods from auto to home merchandise. The majority of these stores (75) were located in Saskatchewan, while 74 of the 77 sporting goods, hobby, book and music stores were found in Quebec. Miscellaneous merchant wholesalers were spread out across Canada and were mostly engaged in farm supplies. Twenty-five of the 30 gasoline stations were found in British Columbia and the Prairies.

Of the 74 Wholesale co-operatives, close to half (34) were from Quebec. Although Alberta had only five reporting co-operatives in this sector, the province contributed $1.9 billion to the sector's volume of business, mainly due to the $1.7 billion generated by United Farmers of Alberta Co-operatives Limited.

Saskatchewan contributed the highest volume of business ($9.4 billion) to Retail Trade with Federated Co-operatives Limited (FCL) contributing $7.1 billion in volume of business and holding assets amounting to $4.1 billion. With a membership of 254 retail co-operatives across western Canada, FCL employed 3,098 people. The Calgary Co-operative Association Ltd. in turn made significant contributions to Alberta's economy contributing $1.1 billion in volume of business, $413.4 million in assets, employing 3,340 workers and 440,643 memberships.

Transportation and Warehousing

Figure 16: Transportation and Warehousing by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Bar chart of Transportation and Warehousing by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 16
Transportation and Warehousing by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Province Volume of Business
(millions $)
BC $4.5
AB $0.1
SK $0.6
MB $0.3
ON $0.8
QC $76.1
NS $0.5
PE $0.4
NL $0.3

Co-operatives in this sector transport passengers and merchandise, warehouse and store goods, and provide services to other enterprises engaged in these ventures. In 2010, reporting co-operatives in the sector generated $83.6 million in volume of business, $55.7 million in assets, employed 960 individuals and had 9,940 memberships.

The majority (74%) of co-operatives in this sector fell under transit and ground passenger transportation. This included taxi co-operatives that operated in many of the major municipalities across Canada and car-share co-operatives that provided an alternative for individuals to own and insure an automotive vehicle. In British Columbia, Modo Co-operative, the first car-sharing co-operative in North America, has more than 255 cars and 5,500 members in Vancouver and now provides car sharing services to businesses, government, and non-governmental organizations.

Of the remaining co-operatives in this sector, 14% were engaged in truck transportation and the remaining 12% were distributed among the air, water, support activities for transportation, and warehousing and storage sub-sectors.

While transportation co-operatives were found across the country, almost more than half were located in Quebec and contributed $76.1 million to the total volume of business ($83.6 million).

Distribution by Industry

Overview of Co-operatives by Industry Codes

Information and Cultural Industries

Co-operatives in this sector are engaged in the production and distribution of informational and cultural items. In 2010, reporting co-operatives in the sector generated a volume of business of $177.5 million, held assets of $331.4 million, had a membership base of over 115,500, and employed more than 860 personnel.

Within this sector, 32% were in telecommunications, 31% in broadcasting, 15% were engaged in activities such as newspaper, periodical and book publishing, 11% were operating in motion picture and sound recording industries, and 3% were in other services.

Figure 17: Information and Cultural Industries by Number of Reporting Co-operatives, 2010
Bar chart of Information and Cultural Industries by Number of Reporting Co-operatives, 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 17
Information and Cultural Industries by Number of Reporting Co-operatives, 2010
NAICS Sector Number of Reporting Co-operatives
Telecommunications 30
Broadcasting (Except Internet) 29
Publishing Industries (Except Internet) 14
Motion Picture and Sound Recording Industries 10
Data Processing, Hosting, and Related Services & Other Information Services 3

Of the total volume of business of $177.5 million, $69.4 million was contributed by Access Communications Co-operative Limited. This co-operative, operating as a non-profit communications and entertainment services provider in Saskatchewan, is one of the few non-agricultural co-operatives in the Top 50 co-operative list for 2010.

Finance and Insurance

Co-operatives are also employed as financial vehicles by groups of people or businesses to meet a shared economic need in the Financial or Insurance sector. For example, the co-operative model has been used as a fund to pool investments for communities or for co-operatives to access affordable loans and as a third-tier holding entity for large stock insurance companies.Footnote 9

In 2010, reporting co-operatives in the sector contributed $15.6 million in volume of business, owned $185 million in assets, had a membership of over 15,600 and employed close to 340 workers.

Community Investment Co-operatives are essentially an investment fund that offers its shares or units to various investors and generates a return through interest, dividends and capital gains. The co-operative then uses the investment capital to develop and grow business in the local community (e.g., Nova Scotia’s Community Economic Development Investment Funds).

Figure 18: Finance and Insurance by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Bar chart of Finance and Insurance by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 18
Finance and Insurance by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Province Volume of Business
(millions $)
BC $3.3
AB $4.1
SK $1.4
MB $3.0
ON $1.7
NB $0.3
NS $1.8

Saskatchewan is home to a number of loans co-operatives, created to provide loans to small businesses in order to promote local economic development. These co-operatives typically have a board of directors of local businesses who make the decision to approve or not approve small loans. Their clientele would generally be businesses that could not secure a loan from a financial institution, but are still deemed a worthy investment for the community. These co-operatives play a depository credit intermediation role. They hold a certain level of capital in a fund that is either entirely, or in part, loaned out with an interest rate that covers some of the costs. Gains are returned to grow the fund.

Feeder and Breeder Financing Co-operatives also play a financial intermediary role to ensure that farmers can purchase livestock. Once the co-operative is capitalized or secures a lender (financial institution), it approves the members’ credit limits and provides a revolving line of credit with a low interest rate. This is used to purchase and sell cattle. Members repay the co-operative directly and the loans are closed. There are many financial benefits that vary by province, including: very low interest rates, no payments until the sale of the cattle, one-time credit approval and financing up to 100%, among others. These co-operatives have several tools to manage the associated risk of providing loans. First, most are supported by a provincial loan program that guarantees 15-25% of the loans. In addition, the co-operative requires a security deposit from each member to create a reserve in the event of defaults.

Real Estate and Rental and Leasing

Figure 19: Real Estate and Rental and Leasing by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Bar chart of Real Estate and Rental and Leasing by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 19
Real Estate and Rental and Leasing by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Province Volume of Business
(millions $)
BC $140.6
AB $28.1
SK $9.8
MB $27.0
ON $413.6
QC $235.5
NB $7.4
NS $33.3
PE $3.4
NL $0.6
TE $0.5

Co-operatives operating in the Real Estate, Rental and Leasing (Real Estate or Housing) industry are primarily non-profit housing co-operatives associated with a social housing program (97%) with a small percentage of co-operatives operating in the rental and leasing sub-sector (3%). Co-operatives in this sub-sector rented or leased farm equipment and machinery to members.

Members of housing co-operatives are entitled to a number of benefits, such as affordable housing with rents that increase only when operating costs increase, the right to vote on important decisions, and security. The mission of these co-operatives is to help members find suitable housing based on their income.

In 2010, reporting co-operatives of all co-operatives in the Real Estate sector generated $899.9 million in volume of business and owned the second largest assets at $4.6 billion. It had close to 108,500 members and employed nearly 1,460 members. At 2,156 or 42% of co-operatives, the Real Estate sector had the most co-operatives of any sector.

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Professional, Scientific and Technical Services and Educational Services

Figure 20: Professional & Educational Services by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Bar chart of Professional & Educational Services by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 20
Professional & Educational Services by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Province Volume of Business
(millions $)
BC $1.8
AB $1.9
SK $2.2
MB $0.3
ON $20.1
QC $60.2
NB $0.1
NS $5.3
PE $0.3
NL $0.5

The Professional, Scientific and Technical Services (Professional Services) sector includes establishments whose activities are based primarily on human capital. These co-operatives range from provincial and national co-operative associations that provide professional support to their member co-operatives, to management consulting, research and advertising co-operatives, to the Coopérative de développement régional co-operatives in Quebec.

Educational Services co-operatives provide instruction and training in a vast array of subjects. Services are offered by specialized entities such as schools, post-secondary institutions and training centres. Their services range from sign language instruction to study abroad initiatives.

In 2010, reporting co-operatives in Professional and Educational Services generated a volume of business of $92.6 million, and owned assets totalling $79.7 million. The two sectors had a membership of more than 20,600, and employed close to 1,200 workers.

Quebec and Ontario with a combined volume of business of $58.6 million contributed the most to the Professional Services sector. Quebec was also the highest contributor ($21.7 million) to the volume of business of the Educational Services sector.

Administrative and Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services

Figure 21: Administrative, Support, Waste Management & Remediation by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Bar chart of Administrative, Support, Waste Management & Remediation by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 20
Administrative, Support, Waste Management & Remediation by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Province Volume of Business
(millions $)
AB $1.8
SK $0.1
MB $0.1
ON $5.5
QC $31.1
NS $3.4
TE $0.1

There are two distinct types of co-operatives engaged in this sector, the bulk of which provide daily operational support to organizations or individuals such as travel agencies and business support services (96% of co-operatives), and those involved with waste management activities such as recycling facilities (4% of co-operatives).

Reporting co-operatives in this sector generated $42.1 in volume of business and owned $24.8 million in assets. They had a membership of 4,700, and employed a 1,000 workers.

Quebec and Nova Scotia together had 87% of co-operatives working in the Administrative and Support Services sub-sector.

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Health Care and Social Assistance

Figure 22: Health Care and Social Assistance by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Bar chart of Health Care and Social Assistance by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 22
Health Care and Social Assistance by Volume of Business (Millions), 2010
Province Volume of Business
(millions $)
BC $0.4
AB $5.3
SK $35.8
MB $15.6
ON $31.9
QC $120.7
NB $0.7
NS $3.4
PE $0.2
NL $0.9

Health Care and Social Assistance co-operatives fell into three NAICS categories, namely ambulatory health care services (19%), nursing and residential care facilities (less than 1%) and social assistance (79%). Co-operatives in ambulatory health care services provide direct or indirect health care services to outpatients and include community health clinics, ambulance services and home health care. Social Assistance co-operatives provide services to individuals and families, including counselling, employment support and services to individuals who face multiple barriers to employment, as well as child day-care services.

In 2010, the 399 reporting co-operatives within the sector generated a volume of business of $214.7 million, and owned assets valued at $152 million. Membership stood at close to 147,900, and the sector employed over 4,800 people.

Arts, Entertainment and Recreation

Co-operatives in this sector operate facilities or provide artistic, cultural, entertainment and recreational services for their patrons. The sector includes co-operatives that enable members to exhibit or sell works such as paintings, textiles, jewellery and photographs. In addition, they include co-operatives that operate facilities that enable members or clients to take part in sports, hobbies or recreation (e.g. curling clubs, marinas, community centres, golf clubs).

In 2010, 290 reporting co-operatives generated a volume of business of $31.5 million. The sector had assets of $59.7 million, more than 33,800 members, and employed over 900 individuals.

The majority (73%) of these co-operatives operated in the amusement, gambling and recreation industries, 25% were performing co-operatives in arts, spectator sports and related industries and the remaining 2% were heritage institutions.

Arts, Entertainment and Recreation by Number of Reporting Co-ops, 2010
Bar chart of Arts, Entertainment and Recreation by Number of Reporting Co-ops, 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 23
Arts, Entertainment and Recreation by Number of Reporting Co-ops, 2010
NAICS Sector Number of Reporting Co-operatives
Amusement, gambling and recreation industries 211
Performing Arts, Spectator Sports and Related Industries 73
Heritage Institutions 6

Accommodation and Food Services

Co-operatives also provide accommodations for travellers and vacationers, as well as meals prepared for immediate consumption. This includes hotels, resorts, camping and RV parks as well as restaurants, coffee shops and student cafeterias.

In 2010, the 57 reporting co-operatives in Accommodation and Food Services generated a combined volume of business of $21.7 million, and owned assets of $17.9 million. The sector had nearly 10,300 members and employed close to 700 workers. Forty percent of co-operatives in the sector fell under the accommodation services sub-sector, while 53% fell under the food services and drinking places sub-sector. The majority of these co-operatives (86%) operated in Quebec.

It is important to note that these figures do not include the 19 Inns North hotels operated by the Arctic co-operatives in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories because those co-operatives are classified by their primary activity (retail) and not by all their business lines. These co-operatives are an essential part of the tourism industry in the Arctic providing accommodation, food, taxi, art/crafts and groceries as well as outfitters and adventure activities.

Other Services & Public Administration

Other Services co-operatives are mainly engaged in repairs and routine maintenance on products such as motor vehicles, machinery and equipment as well as co-operatives that provide personal care, funeral and other services. Co-operatives involved in the organization and support of religious activities, grant-making, advocacy and political causes are also included under this sector.

The eight Public Administration co-operatives provided firefighting services to their local communities in Saskatchewan and Alberta. These co-operatives brought together the firefighters, community members, and local government in order to pool resources, skills and support. Combined, they had a membership base of 3,285 and employed 57 personnel.

In 2010, reporting co-operatives in Other Services & Public Administration together generated a volume of business of $411 million. The sectors owned assets valued at $460 million, and had a membership of more than 312,000. The two sectors together employed over 4,900 people.

Co-operatives working within the personal and laundry services made up 59% of all reporting co-operatives operating in the Other Services sector. The private households sub-sector refers to households that employed workers such as cooks, maids and gardeners.

Figure 24: Other Services & Public Administration by Number of Reporting Co-ops, 2010
Bar chart of Other Services & Public Administration by Number of Reporting Co-ops, 2010 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 24
Other Services & Public Administration by Number of Reporting Co-ops, 2010
NAICS Sector Number of Reporting Co-operatives
Personal and Laundry Services  62
Funeral Services 49
Private Households 41
Federations (Business Associations) 26
Firefighters (Public Administration) 8
Repair and Maintenance 5

Annex A: Detailed Data Tables

Table 1: Overview of Co-operatives by Province and Territories, 2001 - 2010
Year BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL TE Total
Number of Co-ops Reporting
2010 301 411 579 224 708 2,379 101 284 54 19 34 5,094
2009 393 465 767 255 901 2,315 133 288 61 29 35 5,642
2008 392 478 811 264 918 2,271 135 282 63 33 39 5,686
2007 392 481 844 270 952 2,294 138 287 65 33 39 5,795
2006 380 467 855 263 940 2,293 140 280 61 35 37 5,751
2005 385 440 844 267 964 2,258 139 273 63 42 35 5,710
2004 398 504 879 277 947 2,225 141 257 61 56 35 5,780
2003 403 548 918 281 926 2,153 135 216 59 59 34 5,732
2002 406 590 929 289 930 2,065 143 216 58 57 35 5,718
2001 417 607 963 292 925 1,976 150 195 58 60 33 5,676
Volume of Business (in Millions of Dollars)
2010 1,265 4,330 9,794 1,971 2,356 11,979 955 791 228 74 183 33,925
2009 1,285 4,558 9,518 2,082 2,478 11,619 1,085 780 219 76 154 33,853
2008 1,205 5,212 11,419 2,142 2,390 11,091 1,043 769 229 67 161 35,728
2007 1,223 4,600 8,361 1,861 2,355 10,177 1,035 739 237 63 153 30,804
2006 1,145 4,161 7,670 1,799 2,415 9,323 1,091 734 220 86 148 28,794
2005 1,132 4,206 6,808 1,712 2,393 9,073 1,171 728 229 124 109 27,686
2004 1,119 4,203 7,594 1,639 2,233 8,515 1,088 723 223 123 102 27,561
2003 1,058 3,998 6,871 1,609 2,197 8,153 1,036 709 213 125 97 26,067
2002 1,083 3,623 7,874 1,459 2,080 7,735 1,092 688 216 115 124 26,088
2001 1,106 3,627 8,377 4,630 1,942 7,607 957 664 196 118 109 29,332
Assets (in Millions of Dollars)
2010 1,359 2,581 5,395 1,003 3,184 6,055 318 488 98 38 167 20,685
2009 1,438 2,763 5,138 1,035 4,008 5,719 344 398 95 44 135 21,117
2008 1,400 2,632 5,036 968 4,159 5,449 341 393 90 41 144 20,653
2007 1,393 2,448 4,351 918 4,076 5,048 378 378 88 41 137 19,256
2006 1,377 2,453 3,791 876 4,107 4,796 384 362 88 50 134 18,417
2005 1,373 2,356 3,294 848 4,166 4,633 418 353 83 58 116 17,699
2004 1,462 2,337 3,747 803 4,068 4,145 407 340 83 74 108 17,574
2003 1,428 2,234 3,259 769 4,023 4,030 398 328 89 72 97 16,727
2002 1,439 2,090 3,498 742 4,095 3,902 458 323 88 69 103 16,808
2001 1,402 2,021 3,730 1,936 4,000 3,789 443 303 79 70 92 17,864
Members (in Thousands)
2010 3,698 1,184 483 426 143 1,250 89 44 17 39 24 7,398
2009 3,467 1,188 587 433 158 1,186 96 51 21 31 21 7,239
2008 3,219 1,188 572 413 168 1,152 94 48 21 30 21 6,925
2007 2,909 1,175 560 385 180 1,126 193 46 25 28 20 6,647
2006 2,691 1,178 554 345 184 1,070 187 45 25 41 20 6,340
2005 2,471 1,117 467 328 179 1,026 171 40 24 45 17 5,886
2004 2,346 1,033 512 314 176 978 152 39 24 45 17 5,635
2003 2,149 1,048 548 296 177 907 66 37 20 40 14 5,304
2002 1,981 1,017 549 281 179 901 78 37 20 40 16 5,098
2001 1,825 1,009 532 345 177 977 79 38 20 39 15 5,055
Employment
2010 4,149 8,555 11,191 4,119 5,493 44,898 3,113 3,270 1,033 335 1,807 87,963
2009 3,778 9,918 11,456 4,149 5,639 42,739 3,167 3,195 1,054 895 1,745 87,735
2008 4,013 9,732 11,089 3,826 5,878 42,734 3,216 3,781 1,058 800 1,791 87,918
2007 4,429 9,311 10,797 3,617 5,750 43,054 3,704 3,533 919 820 1,686 87,620
2006 4,368 9,311 10,352 3,837 5,635 42,960 3,691 3,469 912 974 1,663 87,172
2005 4,636 9,330 9,956 4,027 5,676 43,013 3,729 3,361 1,163 1,120 1,589 87,600
2004 4,162 11,380 11,775 4,047 5,579 36,911 3,622 3,372 1,214 1,420 1,665 85,147
2003 4,224 11,325 12,165 4,048 5,450 36,894 3,301 3,294 1,381 1,401 614 84,097
2002 4,377 11,117 13,142 3,845 5,645 36,681 3,986 3,064 1,370 1,025 688 84,940
2001 4,323 10,962 15,549 5,301 5,346 35,626 3,869 2,994 1,328 1,034 577 86,909

Annex A: Detailed Data Tables

Table 2: Trends by Province and Territories, 2006 - 2010
2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
Canada Number of co-ops reporting 5,751 5,795 5,686 5,642 5,094
Volume of business in millions of dollars 28,794 30,804 35,728 33,853 33,925
Number of members in thousands 6,340 6,647 6,925 7,239 7,398
Number of employees 87,172 87,620 87,918 87,735 87,963
Assets in millions of dollars 18,417 19,256 20,653 21,117 20,685
Liabilities in millions of dollars 10,938 11,075 11,614 11,547 10,798
Equity in millions of dollars 7,475 8,181 9,038 9,570 9,883
British Columbia Number of co-ops reporting 380 392 392 393 301
Volume of business in millions of dollars 1,145 1,223 1,205 1,285 1,265
Number of members in thousands 2,691 2,909 3,219 3,467 3,698
Number of employees 4,368 4,429 4,013 3,778 4,149
Assets in millions of dollars 1,377 1,393 1,400 1,438 1,359
Liabilities in millions of dollars 954 935 911 913 822
Equity in millions of dollars 421 458 489 526 537
Alberta Number of co-ops reporting 467 481 478 465 411
Volume of business in millions of dollars 4,161 4,600 5,212 4,558 4,330
Number of members in thousands 1,178 1,175 1,188 1,188 1,184
Number of employees 9,311 9,311 9,732 9,918 8,555
Assets in millions of dollars 2,453 2,448 2,632 2,763 2,581
Liabilities in millions of dollars 977 961 1,040 1,129 1,034
Equity in millions of dollars 1,476 1,486 1,592 1,633 1,547
Saskatchewan Number of co-ops reporting 855 844 811 767 579
Volume of business in millions of dollars 7,670 8,361 11,419 9,518 9,794
Number of members in thousands 554 560 572 587 483
Number of employees 10,352 10,797 11,089 11,456 11,191
Assets in millions of dollars 3,791 4,351 5,036 5,138 5,395
Liabilities in millions of dollars 1,413 1,650 1,890 1,734 1,810
Equity in millions of dollars 2,378 2,701 3,146 3,405 3,585
Manitoba Number of co-ops reporting 263 270 264 255 224
Volume of business in millions of dollars 1,799 1,861 2,142 2,082 1,971
Number of members in thousands 345 385 413 433 426
Number of employees 3,837 3,617 3,826 4,149 4,119
Assets in millions of dollars 876 918 968 1,035 1,003
Liabilities in millions of dollars 352 316 337 357 343
Equity in millions of dollars 524 602 631 678 659
Ontario Number of co-ops reporting 940 952 918 901 708
Volume of business in millions of dollars 2,415 2,355 2,390 2,478 2,356
Number of members in thousands 184 180 168 158 143
Number of employees 5,635 5,750 5,878 5,639 5,493
Assets in millions of dollars 4,107 4,076 4,159 4,008 3,184
Liabilities in millions of dollars 3,483 3,431 3,445 3,290 2,464
Equity in millions of dollars 625 645 714 718 720
Quebec Number of co-ops reporting 2,293 2,294 2,271 2,315 2,379
Volume of business in millions of dollars 9,323 10,177 11,091 11,619 11,979
Number of members in thousands 1,070 1,126 1,152 1,186 1,250
Number of employees 42,960 43,054 42,734 42,739 44,898
Assets in millions of dollars 4,796 5,048 5,449 5,719 6,055
Liabilities in millions of dollars 3,068 3,092 3,344 3,479 3,608
Equity in millions of dollars 1,727 1,956 2,105 2,241 2,413
New Brunswick Number of co-ops reporting 140 138 135 133 101
Volume of business in millions of dollars 1,091 1,035 1,043 1,085 955
Number of members in thousands 187 193 94 96 89
Number of employees 3,691 3,704 3,216 3,167 3,113
Assets in millions of dollars 384 378 341 344 318
Liabilities in millions of dollars 274 268 221 222 207
Equity in millions of dollars 109 110 120 122 111
Nova Scotia Number of co-ops reporting 280 287 282 288 284
Volume of business in millions of dollars 734 739 769 780 791
Number of members in thousands 45 46 48 51 44
Number of employees 3,469 3,533 3,781 3,195 3,270
Assets in millions of dollars 362 378 393 398 488
Liabilities in millions of dollars 246 256 265 267 342
Equity in millions of dollars 116 122 128 131 147
Prince Edward Island Number of co-ops reporting 61 65 63 61 54
Volume of business in millions of dollars 220 237 229 219 228
Number of members in thousands 25 25 21 21 17
Number of employees 912 919 1,058 1,054 1,033
Assets in millions of dollars 88 88 90 95 98
Liabilities in millions of dollars 50 48 45 46 47
Equity in millions of dollars 38 40 45 49 51
Newfoundland Number of co-ops reporting 35 33 33 29 19
Volume of business in millions of dollars 86 63 67 76 74
Number of members in thousands 41 28 30 31 39
Number of employees 974 820 800 895 335
Assets in millions of dollars 50 41 41 44 38
Liabilities in millions of dollars 31 25 25 27 16
Equity in millions of dollars 18 16 16 16 22
Territories Number of co-ops reporting 37 39 39 35 34
Volume of business in millions of dollars 148 153 161 154 183
Number of members in thousands 20 20 21 21 24
Number of employees 1,663 1,686 1,791 1,745 1,807
Assets in millions of dollars 134 137 144 135 167
Liabilities in millions of dollars 91 91 92 84 93
Equity in millions of dollars 44 46 51 51 74

Annex A: Detailed Data Tables

Table 3: Comparison of Co-operatives (Average) by Province and Territories, 2009 - 2010
2009 2010
Canada Total number of co-ops reporting 5,642Footnote 10 5,094
Volume of business ($) per co-operative 6,000,177 6,659,796
Number of members per co-operative 1,283 1,452
Number of employees per co-operative 16 17
Assets ($) per co-operative 3,742,822 4,060,660
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 2,046,615 2,119,749
Equity ($) per co-operative 1,696,207 1,940,126
British Columbia Total number of co-ops reporting 393 301
Volume of business ($) per co-operative 3,269,720 4,202,658
Number of members per co-operative 8,822 12,286
Number of employees per co-operative 10 14
Assets ($) per co-operative 3,659,033 4,514,950
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 2,323,155 2,730,897
Equity ($) per co-operative 1,338,422 1,784,053
Alberta Total number of co-ops reporting 465 411
Volume of business ($) per co-operative 9,802,151 10,535,280
Number of members per co-operative 2,555 2,881
Number of employees per co-operative 21 21
Assets ($) per co-operative 5,941,935 6,279,805
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 2,427,957 2,515,815
Equity ($) per co-operative 3,511,828 3,763,990
Saskatchewan Total number of co-ops reporting 767 579
Volume of business ($) per co-operative 12,409,387 16,915,371
Number of members per co-operative 765 834
Number of employees per co-operative 15 19
Assets ($) per co-operative 6,698,827 9,317,789
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 2,260,756 3,126,079
Equity ($) per co-operative 4,439,374 6,191,710
Manitoba Total number of co-ops reporting 255 224
Volume of business ($) per co-operative 8,164,706 8,799,107
Number of members per co-operative 1,698 1,902
Number of employees per co-operative 16 18
Assets ($) per co-operative 4,058,824 4,477,679
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 1,400,000 1,531,250
Equity ($) per co-operative 2,658,824 2,941,964
Ontario Total number of co-ops reporting 901 708
Volume of business ($) per co-operative 2,750,277 3,327,684
Number of members per co-operative 175 202
Number of employees per co-operative 6 8
Assets ($) per co-operative 4,448,391 4,497,175
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 3,651,498 3,480,226
Equity ($) per co-operative 796,892 1,016,949
Quebec Total number of co-ops reporting 2,315 2,379
Volume of business ($) per co-operative 5,019,006 5,035,309
Number of members per co-operative 512 525
Number of employees per co-operative 18 19
Assets ($) per co-operative 2,470,410 2,545,187
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 1,502,808 1,516,604
Equity ($) per co-operative 968,035 1,014,292
New Brunswick Total number of co-ops reporting 133 101
Volume of business ($) per co-operative 8,157,895 9,455,446
Number of members per co-operative 722 1
Number of employees per co-operative 24 31
Assets ($) per co-operative 2,586,466 3,148,515
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 1,669,173 2,049,505
Equity ($) per co-operative 917,293 1,099,010
Nova Scotia Total number of co-ops reporting 288 284
Volume of business ($) per co-operative 2,708,333 2,785,211
Number of members per co-operative 177 155
Number of employees per co-operative 11 12
Assets ($) per co-operative 1,381,944 1,718,310
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 927,083 1,204,225
Equity ($) per co-operative 454,861 517,606
Prince Edward Island Total number of co-ops reporting 61 54
Volume of business ($) per co-operative 3,590,164 4,222,222
Number of members per co-operative 344 315
Number of employees per co-operative 17 19
Assets ($) per co-operative 1,557,377 1,814,815
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 754,098 870,370
Equity ($) per co-operative 803,279 944,444
Newfoundland Total number of co-ops reporting 29 19
Volume of business ($) per co-operative 2,620,690 3,894,737
Number of members per co-operative 1,069 2,053
Number of employees per co-operative 31 18
Assets ($) per co-operative 1,517,241 2,000,000
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 931,034 842,105
Equity ($) per co-operative 551,724 1,157,895
Territories Total number of co-ops reporting 35 34
Volume of business ($) per co-operative 4,400,000 5,382,353
Number of members per co-operative 600 686
Number of employees per co-operative 50 52
Assets ($) per co-operative 3,857,143 3,857,143
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 2,400,000 2,657,143
Equity ($) per co-operative 1,457,143 2,114,286

Annex A: Detailed Data Tables

Table 4: Volume of Business of Co-operatives by Industry Codes and Province and Territories, 2010
Canada BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL TE
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting - 11 & Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction - 21 5,496.7
Footnote 11
114.9 68.3 19.6 303.3 455.5 4,283.2 9.4 173.2 52.6 x
Footnote 12
..
Footnote 13
Utilities - 22 268.3 x 188.2 0.2 8.2 42.1 14.5 x 0.0 x .. ..
Construction - 23 & Manufacturing - 31-33 6,188.4 .. x 15.6 x 573.2 4,886.4 79.9 466.7 x .. ..
Wholesale Trade - 41 & Retail Trade - 44-45 19,983.9 994.7 3,961.1 9,633.2 1,585.4 741.6 1,865.6 835.1 99.3 31.9 54.2 181.9
Transportation and Warehousing - 48-49 83.6 4.5 x x x x 76.1 .. 0.5 x x ..
Information and Cultural Industries - 51 177.5 0.5 x 70.2 x 30.9 47.2 1.5 0.7 x .. ..
Finance and Insurance - 52 15.6 3.3 4.1 1.4 3.0 1.7 .. x 1.8 .. .. ..
Real Estate and Rental and Leasing - 53 899.9 140.6 28.1 9.8 27.0 413.6 235.5 7.4 33.3 3.4 x x
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services - 54 & Educational Services - 61 92.6 1.8 x x x 20.1 60.2 x 5.3 x x ..
Administrative and Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services - 56 42.1 .. x x x x 31.1 .. 3.4 .. .. x
Health Care and Social Assistance - 62 214.7 x x 35.8 15.6 31.9 120.7 x 3.4 0.2 x ..
Arts, Entertainment and Recreation - 71 31.5 0.8 x 4.4 1.5 2.6 15.7 2.0 3.1 0.2 x x
Accommodation and Food Services - 72 21.7 x x x x .. 21.1 x .. .. .. ..
Other Services - 81 & Public Administration - 91 410.7 3.2 41.4 1.0 x 36.1 323.5 3.3 0.6 1.5 .. ..
TotalFootnote 14 33,925.3 1,265.1 4,329.9 9,794.0 1,970.9 2,355.7 11,979.0 954.8 791.3 227.9 74.1 182.6

Annex A: Detailed Data Tables

Table 5: Assets of Co-operatives by Industry Codes and Province and Territories, 2010
Canada BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL TE
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting - 11 & Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction - 21 2,176.4
Footnote 15
95.8 94.8 14.1 72.2 272.0 1,519.9 3.9 72.3 16.5 x
Footnote 16
..
Footnote 17
Utilities - 22 589.7 x 494.6 1.1 45.0 28.7 15.7 x 0.2 x .. ..
Construction - 23 & Manufacturing - 31-33 2,528.7 .. x 4.2 x 290.3 1,906.2 34.1 180.5 x .. ..
Wholesale Trade - 41 & Retail Trade - 44-45 9,452.0 510.1 1,659.3 5,174.6 688.4 253.5 700.0 215.9 57.3 12.0 17.5 163.5
Transportation and Warehousing - 48-49 55.7 3.3 x x x x 48.7 .. 1.6 x x ..
Information and Cultural Industries - 51 331.4 0.3 x 111.5 x 121.9 62.0 1.1 1.0 x .. ..
Finance and Insurance - 52 185.0 6.9 85.9 25.9 43.7 11.8 x x 10.4 .. .. ..
Real Estate and Rental and Leasing - 53 4,568.0 711.0 125.6 30.4 108.8 2,153.9 1,240.3 29.5 152.5 10.7 x x
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services - 54 & Educational Services - 61 79.7 5.7 x x x 16.7 49.1 x 2.2 x x ..
Administrative and Support, Waste Management and Remediation  Services - 56 24.8 .. x x x 0.4 20.5 .. 2.9 .. .. x
Health Care and Social Assistance - 62 152.0 x x 18.4 8.0 11.4 102.2 x 3.3 0.4 x ..
Arts, Entertainment and Recreation - 71 59.7 2.2 x 10.2 2.5 3.4 34.2 3.4 2.3 0.1 x x
Accommodation and Food Services - 72 17.9 x x x x .. 13.9 x .. .. .. ..
Other Services - 81 & Public Administration - 91 459.8 20.2 47.3 3.0 x 19.4 337.9 24.9 1.6 5.5 .. ..
TotalFootnote 18 20,684.6 1,359.0 2,580.9 5,395.2 1,002.6 3,184.1 6,054.6 318.1 487.9 97.7 37.7 166.7

Annex A: Detailed Data Tables

Table 6: Membership of Co-operatives by Industry Codes and Province and Territories, 2010
Canada BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL TE
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting - 11 & Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction - 21 60.4
Footnote 19
4.2 26.7 3.2 4.8 4.9 12.0 0.8 2.2 0.5 x
Footnote 20
..
Footnote 21
Utilities - 22 126.1 x 114.5 0.4 1.8 1.7 7.4 x 0.1 x .. ..
Construction - 23 & Manufacturing - 31-33 35.2 .. x 0.5 x 7.1 19.8 0.5 3.6 x .. ..
Wholesale Trade - 41 & Retail Trade - 44-45 6,397.9 3,664.4 979.2 425.6 371.8 41.8 750.9 70.1 25.4 7.9 36.8 24.0
Transportation and Warehousing - 48-49 9.9 6.0 x x x x 2.2 .. 1.1 x x ..
Information and Cultural Industries - 51 115.5 4.0 x 4.4 x 19.6 41.0 9.2 0.7 x .. ..
Finance and Insurance - 52 15.7 0.5 8.0 2.9 0.3 0.9 .. x 3.0 .. .. ..
Real Estate and Rental and Leasing - 53 108.5 13.9 3.4 1.1 3.5 50.6 32.1 0.9 2.1 0.8 x x
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services - 54 & Educational Services - 61 20.7 1.2 x x x 0.5 17.6 x 0.6 x x ..
Administrative and Support, Waste Management and Remediation  Services - 56 4.7 .. x x x x 3.4 .. 0.5 .. .. x
Health Care and Social Assistance - 62 147.9 x x 30.3 5.1 10.4 96.9 x 0.3 1.9 x ..
Arts, Entertainment and Recreation - 71 33.8 0.7 x 10.4 3.2 1.0 12.9 2.7 2.0 0.4 x x
Accommodation and Food Services - 72 10.3 x x x x .. 9.9 x .. .. .. ..
Other Services - 81 & Public Administration - 91 312.1 1.1 47.9 4.0 x 4.1 244.6 3.9 2.6 3.8 .. ..
TotalFootnote 22 7,397.6 3,697.6 1,184.4 483.4 426.2 143.1 1,249.8 88.7 44.2 17.0 39.2 24.1

Annex A: Detailed Data Tables

Table 7: Employment of Co-operatives by Industry Codes and Province and Territories, 2010
Canada BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL TE
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting - 11 & Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction - 21 20,393 1,113 232 41 805 995 15,777 238 726 417 x
Footnote 23
..
Footnote 24
Utilities - 22 782 x 584 1 40 24 36 x 0 x .. ..
Construction - 23 & Manufacturing - 31-33 13,586 .. x 2 x 830 10,468 244 1,525 x .. ..
Wholesale Trade - 41 & Retail Trade - 44-45 36,033 2,784 7,202 9,656 2,590 1239 7,515 2,398 467 142 240 1,800
Transportation and Warehousing - 48-49 960 34 x x x x 873 .. 19 x x ..
Information and Cultural Industries - 51 861 9 x 244 x 151 294 28 25 x .. ..
Finance and Insurance - 52 336 48 65 62 26 39 .. x 91 .. .. ..
Real Estate and Rental and Leasing - 53 1,457 91 68 43 83 872 231 7 18 44 x x
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services - 54 & Educational Services - 61 1,195 7 x x x 99 1,030 x 19 x x ..
Administrative and Support, Waste Management and Remediation  Services - 56 1,000 .. x x x x 768 .. 187 .. .. x
Health Care and Social Assistance - 62 4,832 x x 967 417 1,019 2,175 x 125 13 x ..
Arts, Entertainment and Recreation - 71 927 18 x 100 33 77 581 53 49 7 x x
Accommodation and Food Services - 72 697 x x x x .. 681 x .. .. .. ..
Other Services - 81 & Public Administration - 91 4,901 25 184 48 x 115 4,466 22 19 18 .. ..
TotalFootnote 25 87,963 4,149 8,555 11,191 4,119 5,493 44,898 3,113 3,270 1,033 335 1,807

Annex B: North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)Footnote 26

Table 8: Former Activity Code Classification Versus NAICS Classification
Former Sector Classification Current NAICS Classification
Agriculture Farm Supplies Wholes Sale Trade (NAICS 41)
Processing and Marketing Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting (NAICS 11)
Support to Agriculture Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting (NAICS 11)
Wholesale and Retail Food Stores Retail Trade (NAICS 44-45)
General Merchandise & Other Consumer Goods Retail Trade (NAICS 44-45)
Book Stores, School Supplies Retail Trade (NAICS 44-45)
Petroleum (consumer) Retail Trade (NAICS 44-45)
Natural Resources and Manufacturing Production/Manufacturing Manufacturing (NAICS 31-33)
Forestry Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting (NAICS 11)
Fisheries Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting (NAICS 11)
Natural Resources - Other Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction (NAICS 21)
Housing Housing - non-profit Real Estate and Rental and Leasing (NAICS 53)
Housing - Other Real Estate and Rental and Leasing (NAICS 53)
Arts, Culture and Communications Arts and Culture Arts, Entertainment and Recreation (NAICS 71)
Recreation, Accommodation and Food Services Recreation Arts, Entertainment and Recreation (NAICS 71)
Accommodation and Food Services Accommodation and Food Services (NAICS 72)
Health and Social Services Health Health Care and Social Assistance (NAICS 62)
Social Services Health Care and Social Assistance (NAICS 62)
Other Services Professional, Scientific and Technical Services Professional, Scientific and Technical Services (NAICS 54)
Personal, Administrative and Support Services Administrative and Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services (NAICS 56) & Other Services (Except Public Administration (NAICS 81)
Public Utilities Utilities (NAICS 22)
Transportation Transportation and Warehousing (NAICS 48-49)
Services - Other Other Services (Except Public Administration (NAICS 81)
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