Co-operatives in Canada in 2012

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Aussi offert en français sous le titre Les Coopératives au Canada en 2012.

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Table of Contents

Table of Figures

List of Figures
Figure Title
Figure 1 Co-operatives by Type, 2012
Figure 2 Distribution of Reporting Co-operatives by Age, 2012
Figure 3 Total Number of Reporting Co-operatives by Industry Codes, 2012
Figure 4 Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting by Number of Reporting Co-operatives, 2012
Figure 5 Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting by Business Volume, 2012
Figure 6  Wholesale and Retail Trade by Number of Reporting Co-operatives, 2012
Figure 7 Wholesale and Retail Trade by Business Volume, 2012
Figure 8 Real Estate, Rental and Leasing by Business Volume, 2012
Figure 9 Health Care and Social Assistance by Business Volume, 2012

Foreword

Co-operatives in Canada in 2012 is an annual publication that provides national baseline data on the co-operatives sector. The Government of Canada has been collecting and publishing this data since the 1930s.

Co-operatives in Canada in 2012 is the 79th edition and is based on unweighted data gathered from the 2012 and 2011 Annual Surveys of Canadian Co-operatives that are coordinated by the Co-operatives Policy Unit in the Department of Innovation, Science and Economic Development. Data from 5,043 incorporated co-operatives was collected through the survey process, including estimates for co-operatives that submitted a response to the 2011 survey and were in operation in 2012 but did not submit a complete response to the 2012 survey.

Of note, co-operative businesses from every province and territory of Canada, excluding Quebec, participated in the 2012 Annual Survey. For Quebec, the provincial government has moved to the bi-annual collection of data on its non-financial co-operatives, and there is no available aggregate data on the province's non-financial co-operatives for the 2012 survey year. To ensure the greatest possible accuracy, and to provide national level data tables, the Quebec data shown in this report is from 2011.

The Co-operatives in Canada in 2012 publication classifies Co-operative businesses using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). This enables direct comparison of the co-operative sector with other sectors across the Canadian economy as well as sectors in the United States and Mexico who use NAICS to classify their industries.

The government would like to thank all of the co-operatives in Canada that responded to the 2011 and 2012 Annual Surveys and contributed to the data in this report. In addition, we would like to thank Quebec's Ministry of the Economy, Science and Innovation and Service Nova Scotia for their provincial contributions.

A Note on Financial and Non-Financial Co-operatives

In Canada, co-operatives are generally categorized as financial or non-financial co-operatives. Financial co-operatives consist of deposit-taking credit unions and caisses populaires, as well as mutuals involved in life, property and casualty insurance. At the federal level, these co-operatives are subject to the Co-operative Credit Associations Act, the Bank Act and the Insurance Companies Act, under the authority of the federal Minister of Finance. Since 1986, statistics on these co-operatives have been collected by Statistics Canada, and they have not been included in the Annual Survey of Canadian Co-operatives. As a result, no financial co-operatives are included in this publication.  A number of Canada's "non-financial" co-operatives have been coded as "Finance and Insurance" co-operatives. These co-operatives are not incorporated as financing institutions but are used by groups of people or businesses to serve as financial intermediaries and provide services such as small business loans.

Non-financial co-operatives generally consist of consumer, producer, worker or multi-stakeholder co-operatives and can be incorporated and regulated at the provincial, territorial or federal level. Federally incorporated co-ops are subject to the Canada Cooperatives Act under the mandate of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada.

A Note on Comparability

For the purposes of this report, baseline statistics on co-operatives have been presented and no comparisons are made with other forms of corporations. Because the co-operative business model overlaps with other models, further analysis is needed to enable comparisons. For example, some co-operatives are also considered small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) because they fit the definition of having 1 to 499 paid employees and less than $50 million in annual revenues. Similarly, an additional grouping of co-operatives also operate on a non-profit basis or have registered charity status with the Canada Revenue Agency; thus, they could further be compared to Not-For-Profit corporations and registered charities.

Abbreviations – Provinces and Territories
Province or Territory abbreviation
British Columbia BC
Alberta AB
Saskatchewan SK
Manitoba MB
Ontario ON
Quebec QC
New Brunswick NB
Nova Scotia NS
Prince Edward Island PE
Newfoundland and Labrador NL
Northwest Territories NT
Nunavut NU
Yukon YT
Territories (NT+NU+YT)Footnote 1 TE

Highlights

Number of Co-operatives

symbol of a double spoke

In 2012, there were 7,906 co-operatives in Canada, spanning all provinces and territories. Of these, data from 5,043 (or 64%) co-operatives was collected from the 2012 Annual Survey of Canadian Co-operatives. This number includes estimates for co-operatives that submitted a response to the 2011 Annual Survey of Canadian Co-operatives and were in operation in 2012, but did not submit a complete response to the 2012 survey.

Size of Co-operatives

Iconic image of a bar chart

In 2012, 49% of reporting co-operatives had no paid employees and were operating using volunteer resources, an equal percentage as 2011. These co-operatives generated the smallest share of business volumeFootnote 2 (2%), assets (11%), and memberships (3%). Compared to 2011, business volume and memberships remained unchanged in 2012, but there was a slight decrease in assets (1%).

Conversely, less than 0.01% of co-operatives were large enterprises (i.e., with 500 or more employees). Large co-operatives generated $23.4 billion in business volume (59% of the total business volume), owned assets of $11.4 billion (47% of the total assets) and employed approximately 31,700 employees (37% of total employment).

Of the remaining reporting co-operatives, 48% had 1–99 employees and 3% had 100–499 employees.Footnote 3

Types of Co-operatives

Iconic image of a pie chart

In 2012, 70% (or 3,514) of reporting co-operatives were member-owned consumer co-operatives and 16% (or 797) were member-owned producer co-operatives.

Excluding Quebec, 1,674 or 33% of all reporting co-operatives identified themselves as also operating as non-profits or as registered charities.

Age of Co-operatives

Iconic image of a bar chart

In 2012, 15% (or 750) of reporting co-operatives had been established over 40 or more years ago; almost half 52% (or 2,618) were established between 21 and 40 years ago.

Employment

Iconic image of a worker

Reporting co-operatives in 2012 contributed over 86,272 full-time and part-time jobs to the Canadian labour market. This represents a 1.0% decrease from 2011.

In 2012, almost 78% of co-operative jobs were held within three sectors: Wholesale and Retail (41%), Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting (22%), and, Construction and Manufacturing (15%). From 2003 to 2012, the total number of people employed by reporting co-operatives decreased by 1%.

Memberships

Iconic image of a group of people

Reporting co-operatives in 2012 had more than 7.9 million membershipsFootnote 4, a 1% increase from 2011. The overwhelming majority (6.2 million or 78%) of these memberships were within the Wholesale and Retail sectors.

Financial Performance

Iconic image of a bag of money

Non-financial co-operatives reported a total business volume of $39.6 billion in 2012, a 3% increase from 2011. Three sectors generated 94% of the business volume: Wholesale and Retail ($24.4 billion), Construction and Manufacturing ($6.5 billion), and Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting ($6.4 billion).

Reporting co-operatives held $24.0 billion in assets in 2012. Three sectors owned 76% of all assets:  Wholesale and Retail ($12.3 billion), Real Estate ($3.1 billion) and Construction and Manufacturing ($2.8 billion).

In 2012, reporting co-operatives paid out $607 million in patronage dividends to their members and communities. This represented a 33% decrease from 2011 that saw $911 million returned to members.

Governance and Volunteers

Iconic image of rotating symbols

In 2012, non-financial co-operatives, excluding those in QuebecFootnote 5, reported 16,109 Board of Directors elected by their membership to help guide the co-operative's operations and make key business decisions for the viability of their organizations. Housing co-operatives had the highest number of Board of Directors (over 5,300), followed by Retail and Wholesale (1,900), and Health Care and Social Services (over 1,800).

In addition, there were over 26,500 volunteers involved in the day-to-day operations of co-operatives in 2012, excluding co-operatives in Quebec. Housing co-operatives account for 61% of the total volunteers likely due to their non-profit, social housing mandates.

How we define Co-operatives

A non-financial co-operative is a legally incorporated corporation that is owned by an association of persons seeking to satisfy common needs such as access to products or services, sale of their products or services, or employment.

In Canada, a co-operative must incorporate pursuant to a specific corporate statute at the provincial, territorial or federal level. These Acts govern all types of co-operatives, with the exception of financial co-operatives, which are governed by separate legislation. The nature of the co-operative business model and how they operate is largely defined by these Acts.

Whatever the governing Act may be, co-operatives share three common characteristics in areas of ownership, governance and distribution of profits.

Ownership

A co-operative is a business jointly owned by its members who use its products or services. In some cases, co-operatives can have members who do not use its services or products (e.g. support members, investor members).

Governance

Co-operatives are democratically controlled businesses with the governing principle "one-member, one-vote". This right is exercised at the co-operative's annual general meeting (AGM), where members can vote directly for the board of directors. This democratic governance structure is reinforced by the co-operative's by-laws and the legislation under which the co-operative is incorporated (provincial, territorial or federal).

Distribution of Profits

Any surplus generated by a co-operative is owned by the member-owners who can decide how to distribute it at the AGM: Decisions can be taken on whether to allocate either part or all of the surplus to the general reserve for future investments, or whether to distribute the profits to all the members in the form of patronage dividends based on the individual member's usage of the co-operative over the past fiscal year.

Depending on the governing legislation, a co-operative may choose to operate on a non-profit basis and an additional small number of co-operatives are registered charities.  In both instances, these co-operatives do not provide members with a patronage dividend, and all surpluses are directed eventually into their general reserve.

To learn more about co-operatives and find other resources and information, please visit the Information Guide on Co-operatives and the Co-operatives Policy website.

An Overview of 2012 Reporting Co-operatives

Distribution by Geography

In 2012, there were 7,906 incorporated co-operativesFootnote 6 registered under a federal, provincial or territorial co-operative Act. Quebec had the highest share of incorporated co-operatives (36%), followed by Ontario (22%) and Saskatchewan (12%). Of all the incorporated co-operatives in Canada, data from 64% (or 5,043) of reporting co-operatives was collected for the 2012 Annual Survey of Canadian Co-operatives.

Distribution of Co-ops by Geography in Canada

Map of Canada showing distribution by geograpy of co-operatives  (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure
Distribution of Co-ops by Geography in Canada
Provinces Incorporated Reporting
BC 585 330
AB 606 347
SK 930 566
MB 364 228
ON 1,717 675
QC 2,860 2,390
NL 92 16
PE 109 45
NS 347 305
NB 175 111
YT 5 2
NT 16 8
NU 24 20
Total 7,906 5,043

Types of Co-operatives

Co-operatives are generally categorized based on their relationship and benefit to the member: consumer, producer, worker, multi-stakeholder and federations.

In 2012, 70% (or 3,514) of reporting co-operatives were consumer co-operatives. These co-operatives provided products or services to their members (e.g., retail stores, housing, health care, social services). 

Sixteen percent (or 797) of reporting co-operatives in 2012 were producer co-operatives. They processed and marketed the goods or services produced by their members, and/or supplied products or services necessary to the members' professional activities (such as farmers, independent entrepreneurs, or artisans). Consumer and producer co-operatives demonstrate the beneficial economies of scale for which co-operatives are known; member-owners band together to purchase large quantities of inputs, or to sell large quantities of outputs jointly. Members benefit from lower prices (for consumer co-operatives) or higher prices (for producer co-operatives). Members also benefit from the infrastructure put in place by their co-operative (e.g., processing facilities for agricultural co-operatives).

Eight percent (or 407) of the reporting co-operatives in 2012 were a federation, a co-operative whose membership is composed substantially of other co-operatives generally operating within the same sector. For example, many provinces have a co-operative housing federation that provides services to housing co-operatives and, in turn there is the Co-operative Housing Federation of Canada that provides national-level services such as advocacy to support the provincial federations.

Five percent (or 252) of reporting co-operatives in 2012 were worker co-operatives. They provided employment for their members. In this type of co-operative, the employees are the members and the owners of the enterprise. Common forms include arts and entertainment, manufacturing, education and home care services. Two percent (or 90) of reporting co-operatives in 2012 were worker-shareholder co-operatives that are a form of worker co-operative found in Quebec. They are incorporated co-operatives that hold partial ownership of the business in which the co-op's members are employed and the co-op can participate in the management of the business.

Less than one percent (or 28) of reporting co-operatives in 2012 were multi-stakeholder co-operatives created to serve the needs of different stakeholder groups, such as employees, producers, consumers, clients, service providers, community residents and other interested individuals and organizations. Generally, common forms of multi-stakeholder co-operatives include health care, community economic development, home care and social co-operatives.

Figure 1: Co-operatives by Type, 2012

Graphic of a pie chart, number of Co-operatives by type in 2012 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 1
Co-operatives by Type, 2012
Type of Co-op number
Producer (Entrepreneur) 797
Multi Stakeholder 28
Consumer (Client) 3514
Federation 407
Worker (Employee) 252

Age of Co-operatives

The survival rates of co-operatives are strong. Sixty-seven percent (or 2,777) of the reporting co-operatives in 2012 were incorporated over 20 years ago. Of these, 15% (or 750) were established over 40 or more years ago and almost half (2,618 or 52%) were established between 21 and 40 years ago.

A smaller proportion (15% or 757) of reporting co-operatives in 2012 were established between 3 to 10 years ago and 5% (or 262) were incorporated within 2 years or less.Footnote 7

Figure 2: Distribution of Reporting Co-operative by Age, 2012

Graphic of a pie chart, distribution of reporting co-operative by age, 2012 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 2
Distribution of Reporting Co-operative by Age, 2012
Age Distribution
41 years or more 750
21 to 40 years 2618
3 to 10 years 757
11 to 20 years 656
2 years or less 262

Distribution by Industry

Total Number of Co-operatives by Industry CodeFootnote 8

Co-operatives in Canada are involved in a wide range of activities, from manufacturing and processing to housing, daycare and health care services in communities. They run entire regional wholesale and retailing systems that provide millions of goods and services to Canadians, and they are also involved in the provision of local community utilities such as gas, water and electricity.

In 2012, 42% (or 2,135) of all reporting co-operatives were classified under the Real Estate sector primarily as housing co-operatives. Wholesale and Retail were second (14%), followed by Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting (8%), and Health Care and Social Assistance sectors (8%).

Figure 3: Total Number of Reporting Co-operatives by Industry Code, 2012
Horizontal Bar Chart Representing the Total Number of Reporting Co-operatives by Industry Code, 2012 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 3
Total Number of Reporting Co-operatives by Industry Code, 2012
Industry Code Number of Reporting Co-ops
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting(11) &
Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction (21)
406
Utilities (22) 218
Contruction (23) & Manufacturing (31–33) 106
Wholesale Trade (41) &
Retail Trade (44–45)
699
Transportation and warehousing (48–49) 56
Information and cultural industries (51) 96
Finance and insurance (52) 144
Real estate and rental and leasing (53) 2,135
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services (54) &
Educational Services (61)
132
Administrative and support, water management and remedial services (56) 73
Health care and social assistance (62) 387
Arts, entertainment and recreation (71) 309
Accommodation and food services (72) 55
Other Services (81) &
Public Administration (91)
212

Overview of Co-operatives by Industry CodesFootnote 9

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting

In 2012, there were 406 reporting co-operatives in the Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting sector that contributed $6.4 billion in business volume to the economy. The sector reported assets of $2.5 billion and employed over 18,853 employees (second largest employers after Wholesale and Retail) and had over 70,903 members. This sector can be further distributed into five sub-sectors. Animal production and aquaculture is the largest sub-sector accounting for 28% of co-operatives in this industry. It primarily includes collective grazing management activities, as well as poultry and egg production, and livestock-rearing accounts. Agriculture and Forestry Support is the second largest sub-sector and primarily provides farmers with seed cleaning services. Crop production includes fruits and vegetables, honey and maple products, as well as grains and oilseeds. The last two sub-sectors include fishing, hunting and trapping, as well as forestry and logging.

Figure 4: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting by Number of Reporting Co-ops, 2012
Horizontal Bar Chart Representing Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting by Number of Reporting Co-ops, 2012 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 4
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting by Number of Reporting Co-ops, 2012
Type Number of Reporting Co-ops
Fishing, hunting and trapping 33
Forestry and logging 43
Crop production 84
Animal production and aquaculture 109
Support activities for agriculture and forestry 137

Quebec's 126 co-operatives contributed $4.9 billion or 77% to the total business volume of the Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting sector. This difference is largely attributed to the business activities of La Coop Fédérée that was the second largest non-financial co-op in Canada in 2012 and reported $4.4 billion in total business volume. With over $535 million in total business volume in this sector, Ontario co-operatives reported the second largest amount of business activity in this sector.

Figure 5: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting by Business Volume (Millions), 2012
Horizontal Bar Chart Representing Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting by Business Volume (Millions), 2012 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 5
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting by Business Volume (Millions $), 2012
Province Business Volume (in dollars)
NL $24,467,156
PE $83,405,404
NS $85,720,409
NB $6,734,417
QC $4,934,592,812
ON $551,990,208
MB $443,938,535
SK $78,904,624
AB $134,883,954
BC $30,927,121

Wholesale and Retail Trade

Wholesale co-operatives mainly sell goods and provide services in bulk in order to reduce the overall costs to their members. co-operatives in this sector play a large role in providing inputs such as fertilizer, gas, seeds, hardware and other bulk items to farmers. The Retail sector operates retail outlets to provide their consumer members with groceries, hardware, petroleum and other general merchandise. In 2012, 699 of reporting co-operatives operating in the two sectors generated the highest business volume of the co-operatives sectors at $24.4 billion, and the highest assets at $12.3 billion. Together, the sectors employed the most people, providing over 35,000 jobs and had the most members (6.1 million). The high membership is explained by the large number of retail enterprises that offer memberships to individual consumers.

Figure 6: Wholesale and Retail Trade by number of Reporting Co-operatives, 2012
Horizontal Bar Chart Representing Wholesale and Retail Trade by number of Reporting Co-operatives, 2012 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 6
Wholesale and Retail Trade by number of Reporting Co-operatives, 2012
Wholesale/Retail trade area Number of Reporting Co-ops
Motor vehicle and parts dealers 6
Farm product merchant wholesalers 6
Food, beverage and tobacco merchant wholesalers 7
building Material and Garden Equipment and Supplies Dealers 14
Petroleum and petroleum products merchant wholesalers 15
Miscellaneous Store Retailers 20
Gasoline stations 33
Miscellaneous merchant wholesalers 75
Sporting goods, hobby, book and music stores 79
General merchandise stores 161
Food and beverage stores 277
Figure 7: Wholesale and Retail Trade by Business Volume (Millions), 2012
Horizontal Bar Chart Representing Wholesale and Retail Trade by Business Volume (Millions), 2012 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 7
Wholesale and Retail Trade by Business Volume (dollars), 2012
Province or Territory Business Volume
(in dollars)
TE $137,246,417
NL $57,886,779
PE $37,569,332
NS $111,268,748
NB $915,087,018
QC $1,929,886,575
ON $1,017,353,631
MB $2,140,295,911
SK $11,969,611,900
AB $4,697,421,677
BC $1,357,703,236

The largest sub-sector within Wholesale and Retail was food and beverage stores. These consisted of specialty food stores including bakeries, organic food stores and farmers' markets, as well as grocery stores. Together, they made up 40% of all co-operatives within Wholesale and Retail. General merchandise stores consisted of retail outlets trading in a wide range of goods from automotive to home merchandise.

Saskatchewan alone contributed the highest business volume ($11.9 billion) to Retail Trade, with Federated Co-operatives Limited (FCL) contributing $8.8 billion in business volume.

Real Estate and Rental and Leasing

Figure 8: Real Estate, Rental and Leasing by Business Volume (Millions), 2012
Horizontal bar chart representing Real Estate, Rental and Leasing by Business Volume (Millions), 2012 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 8
Real Estate, Rental and Leasing by Business Volume (in dollars), 2012
Province or Territory Business Volume
(in dollars)
TE $1,290,914
NL $139,861
PE $3,853,668
NS $17,645,065
NB $7,704,717
QC $242,278,826
ON $380,166,831
MB $29,621,825
SK $15,074,314
AB $28,356,160
BC $132,427,239

Co-operatives operating in the Real Estate, Rental and Leasing industry are primarily non-profit housing co-operatives (93%) associated with a social housing program with a small percentage (3%) of co-operatives operating in the rental and leasing sub-sector. co-operatives in this sub-sector rented or leased farm equipment and machinery to members.

Members of housing co-operatives are entitled to a number of benefits, such as affordable housing with rents that increase only when operating costs increase, the right to vote on important decisions, and security. The mission of these co-operatives is to help members find suitable housing based on their income.

In 2012, reporting co-operatives in the Real Estate sector generated $854 million in business volume and owned the second highest assets at $4.2 billion. It had over 105,300 members and employed over 1,300 people. At 2,135 or 42% of co-operatives, the Real Estate sector had the most co-operatives of any sector.

Health Care and Social Assistance

Figure 9: Health Care and Social Assistance by Business Volume (Millions), 2012
Horizontal Bar Chart Representing Health Care and Social Assistance by Business Volume (Millions), 2012 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 9
Health Care and Social Assistance by Business Volume (Millions), 2012
Province or Territory Business Volume
(in dollars)
NL $798,188
PE $173,405
NS $4,393,773
NB $843,193
QC $143,893,906
ON $33,139,785
MB $17,300,936
SK $42,609,449
AB $6,944,847
BC $755,909

Health Care and Social Assistance co-operatives fell into three NAICS subsectors, namely ambulatory health care services (12%), nursing and residential care facilities (3%), and social assistance (76%).Footnote 10 Social Assistance co-operatives provide services to individuals and families, including counselling, employment support, and services to individuals who face multiple barriers to employment, as well as child day-care services. Co-operatives in ambulatory health care services provide direct or indirect health care services to outpatients and include community health clinics, ambulance services and home health care.

In 2012, the 387 reporting co-operatives within the sector generated a business volume of $251 million, and owned assets valued at $57 million. They employed over 5,000 people and had a membership that stood at close to 161,000.

With 121 reporting co-operatives in 2012, Ontario held the highest proportion of Health Care and Social Assistance co-operatives.

Annex A: Detailed Data Tables

Table 1: Overview of Co-operatives by Province and Territories, 2003–2012

Number of Reporting Co-operatives
  BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL TE Total
2012 330 347 566 228 675 2,390 111 305 45 16 30 5,043
2011 338 415 611 246 736 2,390 108 303 58 18 29 5,251
2010 302 413 579 224 710 2,379 101 284 54 19 5 5,094
2009 392 469 763 255 900 2,315 135 285 61 30 35 5,642
2008 391 480 809 264 918 2 271 136 277 62 34 39 5,686
2007 390 482 840 269 950 2 294 139 285 64 34 39 5,795
2006 380 466 854 264 939 2 293 139 279 60 36 37 5,751
2005 385 440 842 267 963 2 258 139 272 62 43 35 5,710
2004 398 443 878 277 945 2 225 142 256 61 57 35 5,780
2003 403 485 917 281 925 2 153 136 215 59 60 34 5,732
Business volume (in Millions of Dollars)
  BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL TE TOTAL
2012 1,541 5,169 12,206 2,678 2,790 12,986 1,030 744 264 84 139 39,631
2011 1,425 5,201 11,494 2,501 2,759 12,986 990 815 258 91 137 38,657
2010 1,266 4,331 9,794 1,971 2,356 11,979 955 791 228 74 49 33,925
2009 1,285 4,558 9,512 2,082 2,478 11,619 1,085 778 219 76 154 33,853
2008 1,205 5,213 11,419 2,142 2,390 11,091 1,043 766 229 67 161 35,728
2007 1,223 4,600 8,361 1,788 2,355 10,177 1,035 738 237 63 153 30,804
2006 1,145 4,087 7,670 1,799 2,415 9,323 1,081 734 220 86 148 28,794
2005 1,132 4,131 6,808 1,712 2,392 9,073 1,171 728 229 124 109 27,686
2004 1,119 4,128 7,486 1,639 2,233 8,515 1,196 723 223 123 102 27,561
2003 1,058 3,924 6,765 1,609 2,197 8,153 1,141 708 213 125 97 26,067
Assets (in Millions of Dollars)
  BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL TE TOTAL
2012 1,478 2,698 7,746 1,302 3,110 6,598 326 434 114 40 146 23,992
2011 1,473 2,815 6,452 1,182 3,310 6,598 322 530 115 42 133 22,970
2010 1,361 2,583 5,395 1,003 3,187 6,055 318 488 98 38 27 20,685
2009 1,438 2,775 5,136 1,035 4,008 5,719 344 398 95 44 135 21,117
2008 1,400 2,635 5,036 968 4,161 5,449 341 391 90 41 144 20,653
2007 1,392 2,451 4,351 878 4,076 5,048 378 377 88 41 137 19,256
2006 1,377 2,185 3,791 876 4,107 4,796 381 362 88 50 134 18,417
2005 1,373 2,088 3,294 848 4,166 4,633 418 353 83 58 116 17,699
2004 1,462 2,067 3,670 803 4,068 4,145 484 339 83 74 108 17,574
2003 1,428 1,963 3,192 769 4,023 4,030 465 328 89 72 97 16,727
Members (in Thousands)
BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL TE TOTAL
2012 4,187 1,091 531 490 152 1,253 81 48 18 37 15 7,903
2011 3,993 1,211 510 469 171 1,253 84 45 18 41 15 7,809
2010 3,698 1,185 484 426 144 1,250 89 44 17 39 6 7,398
2009 3,467 1,189 586 433 158 1,186 96 50 21 31 21 7,239
2008 3,219 1,188 572 413 169 1,152 94 47 21 30 21 6,925
2007 2,909 1,175 560 376 180 1,126 193 46 24 28 20 6,647
2006 2,691 1,136 554 345 184 1,070 187 45 25 41 20 6,340
2005 2,471 1,074 467 328 179 1,026 171 40 24 45 17 5,886
2004 2,346 990 507 314 176 978 157 38 24 45 17 5,635
2003 2,149 1,005 545 296 177 907 70 36 20 41 14 5,304
Employees
  BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL TE TOTAL
2012 4,394 8,528 11,906 4,331 5,367 43,902 2,176 3,101 1,248 560 759 86,272
2011 4,378 9,305 14,443 4,289 5,676 43,902 2,282 3,216 1,211 599 770 90,070
2010 4,149 8,563 11,191 4,119 5,524 44,898 3,113 3,270 1,033 335 216 87,963
2009 3,779 9,925 11,439 4,149 5,639 42,739 3,169 3,170 1,056 897 1,745 87,735
2008 4,013 9,737 11,089 3,826 5,881 42,734 3,216 3,775 1,058 802 1,791 87,918
2007 4,429 9,315 10,796 3,497 5,750 43,054 3,704 3,531 919 822 1,686 87,620
2006 4,368 9,319 10,352 3,837 5,635 42,960 3,690 3,463 912 980 1,663 87,172
2005 4,636 9,338 9,955 4,027 5,676 43,013 3,729 3,360 1,161 1,121 1,589 87,600
2004 4,162 11,388 11,680 4,047 5,571 36,911 3,717 3,370 1,214 1,422 1,665 85,147
2003 4,224 11,330 12,046 4,048 5,442 36,894 3,417 3,293 1,381 1,402 614 84,097

Table 2: Trends by Province and Territories, 2007–2012

Trends by Province and Territories, 2007–2012
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Canada Number of co-ops reporting 5,686 5,642 5,094 5,251 5,043
Business volume in millions of dollars 35,728 33,853 33,925 38,657 39,631
Number of members in thousands 6,925 7,239 7,398 7,809 7,903
Number of employees 87,918 87,735 87,963 90,070 81,941
Assets in millions of dollars 20,653 21,117 20,685 22,970 23,992
Liabilities in millions of dollars 11,614 11,547 10,798 11,871 11,952
Equity in millions of dollars 9,038 9,570 9,883 11,108 12,038
British Columbia Number of co-ops reporting 392 393 301 338 330
Business volume in millions of dollars 1,205 1,285 1,265 1,425 1,541
Number of members in thousands 3,219 3,467 3,698 3,993 4,187
Number of employees 4,013 3,778 4,149 4,378 4,394
Assets in millions of dollars 1,400 1,438 1,359 1,473 1,478
Liabilities in millions of dollars 911 913 822 871 830
Equity in millions of dollars 489 526 537 603 647
Alberta Number of co-ops reporting 478 465 411 415 347
Business volume in millions of dollars 5,212 4,558 4,330 5,201 5,169
Number of members in thousands 1,188 1,188 1,184 1,211 1,091
Number of employees 9,732 9,918 8,555 9,305 8,528
Assets in millions of dollars 2,632 2,763 2,581 2,815 2,698
Liabilities in millions of dollars 1,040 1,129 1,034 1,152 1,112
Equity in millions of dollars 1,592 1,633 1,547 1,667 1,585
Saskatchewan Number of co-ops reporting 811 767 579 611 566
Business volume in millions of dollars 11,419 9,518 9,794 11,494 12,206
Number of members in thousands 572 587 483 510 531
Number of employees 11,089 11,456 11,191 14,443 11,906
Assets in millions of dollars 5,036 5,138 5,395 6,452 7,746
Liabilities in millions of dollars 1,890 1,734 1,810 2,314 2,751
Equity in millions of dollars 3,146 3,405 3,585 4,141 4,995
Manitoba Number of co-ops reporting 264 255 224 245 228
Business volume in millions of dollars 2,142 2,082 1,971 2,501 2,678
Number of members in thousands 413 433 426 469 490
Number of employees 3,826 4,149 4,119 4,288 4,331
Assets in millions of dollars 968 1,035 1,003 1,182 1,302
Liabilities in millions of dollars 337 357 343 392 427
Equity in millions of dollars 631 678 659 790 875
Ontario Number of co-ops reporting 918 901 708 736 675
Business volume in millions of dollars 2,390 2,478 2,356 2,759 2,790
Number of members in thousands 168 158 143 171 152
Number of employees 5,878 5,639 5,493 5,676 5,367
Assets in millions of dollars 4,159 4,008 3,184 3,310 3,110
Liabilities in millions of dollars 3,445 3,290 2,464 2,517 2,299
Equity in millions of dollars 714 718 720 793 811
Quebec Number of co-ops reporting 2,271 2,315 2,379 2,390 2,390
Business volume in millions of dollars 11,091 11,619 11,979 12,986 12,986
Number of members in thousands 1,152 1,186 1,250 1,253 1,253
Number of employees 42,734 42,739 44,898 43,902 43,902
Assets in millions of dollars 5,449 5,719 6,055 6,598 6,598
Liabilities in millions of dollars 3,344 3,479 3,608 3,904 3,904
Equity in millions of dollars 2,105 2,241 2,413 2,694 2,694
New Brunswick Number of co-ops reporting 135 133 101 108 111
Business volume in millions of dollars 1,043 1,085 955 990 1,030
Number of members in thousands 94 96 89 84 81
Number of employees 3,216 3,167 3,113 2,282 2,176
Assets in millions of dollars 341 344 318 322 326
Liabilities in millions of dollars 221 222 207 213 215
Equity in millions of dollars 120 122 111 109 110
Nova Scotia Number of co-ops reporting 282 288 284 303 305
Business volume in millions of dollars 769 780 791 815 744
Number of members in thousands 48 51 44 45 48
Number of employees 3,781 3,195 3,270 3,216 3,101
Assets in millions of dollars 393 398 488 530 434
Liabilities in millions of dollars 265 267 342 358 262
Equity in millions of dollars 128 131 147 174 171
Prince Edward Island Number of co-ops reporting 63 61 54 58 45
Business volume in millions of dollars 229 219 228 258 264
Number of members in thousands 21 21 17 18 18
Number of employees 1,058 1,054 1,033 1,211 1,248
Assets in millions of dollars 90 95 98 115 114
Liabilities in millions of dollars 45 46 47 64 61
Equity in millions of dollars 45 49 51 51 53
Newfoundland Number of co-ops reporting 33 29 19 18 16
Business volume in millions of dollars 67 76 74 91 84
Number of members in thousands 30 31 39 41 37
Number of employees 800 895 335 599 560
Assets in millions of dollars 41 44 38 42 40
Liabilities in millions of dollars 25 27 16 18 18
Equity in millions of dollars 16 16 22 23 23
Territories Number of co-ops reporting 39 35 34 29 30
Business volume in millions of dollars 161 154 183 137 139
Number of members in thousands 21 21 24 15 15
Number of employees 1,791 1,745 1,807 770 759
Assets in millions of dollars 144 135 167 133 146
Liabilities in millions of dollars 92 84 93 69 72
Equity in millions of dollars 51 51 74 64 73

Table 3: Comparison of Co-operatives (Average) by Province and Territories, 2011–2012

Comparison of Co-operatives (Average) by Province and Territories, 2011–2012
2011 2012
Canada Total Number of co-op reporting 5,252 5,043
Business volume ($) per co-operative (Canada) 7,360,466 7,858,711
Total Number of Members (Canada) 1,487 1,567
Total Number of Employees (Canada) 17 17
Assets ($) per co-operative (Canada) 4,373,656 4,757,464
Liabilities ($) per co-operative (Canada) 2,260,246 2,370,039
Equity ($) per co-operative 2,115,139 2,386,952
British Columbia Number of Reporting Co-ops 338 330
Business volume ($) per co-operative 4,216,684 4,670,893
Number of members per co-operative 11,814 12,688
Number of employees per co-operative 13 13
Assets ($) per co-operative 4,358,785 4,477,316
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 2,575,715 2,515,947
Equity ($) per co-operative 1,783,060 1,961,382
Alberta Number of Reporting Co-ops 415 347
Business volume ($) per co-operative 12,533,660 14,895,915
Number of members per co-operative 2,918 3,144
Number of employees per co-operative 22 25
Assets ($) per co-operative 6,782,434 7,774,525
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 2,774,859 3,205,508
Equity ($) per co-operative 4,017,584 4,568,758
Saskatchewan Number of Reporting Co-ops 611 566
Business volume ($) per co-operative 18,811,047 21,565,016
Number of members per co-operative 834 938
Number of employees per co-operative 24 21
Assets ($) per co-operative 10,559,007 13,686,153
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 3,786,823 4,859,823
Equity ($) per co-operative 6,777,820 8,825,856
Manitoba Number of Reporting Co-ops 246 228
Business volume ($) per co-operative 10,167,382 11,745,864
Number of members per co-operative 1,908 2,150
Number of employees per co-operative 17 19
Assets ($) per co-operative 4,804,764 5,710,269
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 1,593,519 1,871,918
Equity ($) per co-operative 3,211,322 3,838,351
Ontario Number of Reporting Co-ops 736 675
Business volume ($) per co-operative 3,748,264 4,133,891
Number of members per co-operative 232 225
Number of employees per co-operative 8 8
Assets ($) per co-operative 4,496,835 4,607,806
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 3,419,349 3,406,346
Equity ($) per co-operative 1,077,339 1,201,295
Quebec Number of Reporting Co-ops 2,390 2,390
Business volume ($) per co-operative 5,433,388 5,433,388
Number of members per co-operative 524 524
Number of employees per co-operative 18 18
Assets ($) per co-operative 2,760,702 2,760,702
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 1,633,588 1,633,588
Equity ($) per co-operative 1,127,111 1,127,111
New Brunswick Number of Reporting Co-ops 108 111
Business volume ($) per co-operative 9,166,456 9,277,791
Number of members per co-operative 775 733
Number of employees per co-operative 21 20
Assets ($) per co-operative 2,980,456 2,933,167
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 1,971,780 1,940,399
Equity ($) per co-operative 1,008,667 992,767
Nova Scotia Number of Reporting Co-ops 303 305
Business volume ($) per co-operative 2,691,062 2,440,322
Number of members per co-operative 149 158
Number of employees per co-operative 11 10
Assets ($) per co-operative 1,748,271 1,424,151
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 1,180,839 858,626
Equity ($) per co-operative 572,614 559,253
Prince Edward Island Number of Reporting Co-ops 58 45
Business volume ($) per co-operative 4,442,087 5,872,159
Number of members per co-operative 313 390
Number of employees per co-operative 21 28
Assets ($) per co-operative 1,978,800 2,530,056
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 1,104,565 1,354,832
Equity ($) per co-operative 874,235 1,175,212
Newfoundland and Labrador Number of Reporting Co-ops 18 16
Business volume ($) per co-operative 5,076,979 5,254,913
Number of members per co-operative 2,259 2,341
Number of employees per co-operative 33 35
Assets ($) per co-operative 2,308,186 2,527,597
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 1,009,089 1,116,706
Equity ($) per co-operative 1,299,097 1,410,891
Territories Number of Reporting Co-ops 29 30
Business volume ($) per co-operative 4,717,839 4,623,835
Number of members per co-operative 506 497
Number of employees per co-operative 27 25
Assets ($) per co-operative 4,594,948 4,857,556
Liabilities ($) per co-operative 2,379,635 2,413,912
Equity ($) per co-operative 2,215,314 2,443,644

Table 4: Business Volume of Co-operatives (Millions) by NAICS and Province and Territories, 2012Footnote 11

Business Volume of Co-operatives (Millions) by NAICS and Province and Territories, 2012
Canada BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL TE
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting – 11 & Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction – 21 6,375.6 30.9 134.9 78.9 443.9 552.0 4,934.6 6.7 85.7 83.4 24.5 .. 
Utilities – 22 237.0 0.1 157.6 0.3 10.1 41.6 14.9 12.1 0.1 0.0 ..  .. 
Construction – 23 & Manufacturing – 31–33 6,525.7 0.1 70.9 14.4 0.1 690.1 5,084.9 77.5 450.3 137.5 ..  .. 
Wholesale Trade – 41 & Retail Trade – 44–45 24,371.3 1,357.7 4,697.4 11,969.6 2,140.3 1,017.4 1,929.9 915.1 111.3 37.6 57.9 137.2
Transportation and Warehousing – 48–49 112.3 5.4 18.8 0.7 2.7 1.1 82.7 ..  0.9 ..  ..  .. 
Information and cultural industries – 51 245.3 0.5 0.2 75.3 27.4 36.6 52.6 1.6 51.1 .. ..  .. 
Finance and insurance – 52 26.2 2.7 11.4 1.2 3.4 4.9 .. 0.4 2.0 ..  0.2 .. 
Real estate and rental and leasing – 53 858.6 132.4 28.4 15.1 29.6 380.2 242.3 7.7 17.6 3.9 0.1 1.3
Professional, Scientific and
Technical Services – 54 &
Educational Services – 61
88.7 1.0 2.2 2.6 0.6 20.7 58.8 .. 2.0 0.1 0.6 .. 
Administrative and support, water management and remediation services – 56 56.9 ..  1.0 ..  0.2 5.6 34.2 .. 15.9 ..  ..  .. 
Health care and social assistance – 62 250.9 0.8 6.9 42.6 17.3 33.1 143.9 0.8 4.4 0.2 0.8 .. 
Arts, entertainment and recreation – 71 32.9 1.2 0.2 4.0 2.2 2.2 18.5 2.1 2.0 0.2 ..  0.2
Accommodation and food services – 72 22.2 0.5 0.2 .. 0.1 3.1 18.2 0.2 .. ..  .. .. 
Other Services – 81 & Public Administration – 91 427.9 8.1 38.7 1.0 0.2 1.8 370.3 5.3 0.9 1.4 ..  .. 
Total 39,631.5 1,541.4 5,168.9 12,205.8 2,678.1 2,790.4 12,985.8 1,029.8 744.3 264.2 84.1 138.7
X = suppressed data due to confidentiality
.. = no reporting co-operatives Unknown
NAICS = suppressed aggregate NAICS 2-digit data due to confidentiality

Table 5: Assets of Co-operatives (Millions) by NAICS and Province and Territories, 2012

Assets of Co-operatives (Millions) by NAICS and Province and Territories, 2012
Canada BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL TE
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting - 11 & Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction - 21 2,450.4 90.2 124.5 46.7 77.7 280.1 1,728.1 3.3 53.7 28.1 17.9 .. 
Utilities - 22 567.9 0.1 442.2 1.1 69.0 35.2 15.7 4.4 0.3 .. ..  .. 
Construction – 23 & Manufacturing – 31–33 2,814.6 0.1 126.0 4.0 .. 358.0 2,050.8 34.9 184.2 56.6 ..  .. 
Wholesale Trade – 41 & Retail Trade – 44–45 12,387.8 629.4 1,739.1 7,476.4 949.1 428.9 707.2 218.5 65.5 14.3 20.2 139.3
Transportation and Warehousing - 48–49 63.2 4.7 3.4 0.7 0.9 0.7 51.4 ..  1.3 ..  ..  .. 
Information and cultural industries - 51 367.3 0.2 2.9 115.4 39.1 128.2 67.3 1.4 12.6 0.1 ..  .. 
Finance and insurance - 52 199.8 9.8 89.4 27.7 43.5 19.5 .. 0.3 9.1 ..  0.4 .. 
Real estate and rental and leasing - 53 4,212.0 719.7 114.4 32.5 108.6 1,798.3 1,315.5 28.8 78.6 8.7 0.5 6.4
Professional, Scientific and
Technical Services – 54 & Educational Services - 61
104.9 6.4 2.9 1.2 0.3 36.6 54.4 0.5 1.6 .. 1.1 .. 
Administrative and support, water management and remediation services - 56 28.5 ..  0.4 ..  1.0 0.3 23.1 .. 3.6  .. ..  .. 
Health care and social assistance - 62 185.4 1.3 7.3 24.8 8.4 11.2 127.8 0.5 3.5 0.5 0.3  
Arts, entertainment and recreation - 71 83.4 8.0 0.3 12.0 3.2 2.5 37.4 3.0 16.8 0.1 ..  ..
Accommodation and food services - 72 18.7 1.9 1.4 .. 0.5 1.5 13.4 .. .. ..  ..  .. 
Other Services – 81 & Public Administration - 91 507.9 5.7 43.7 3.8 0.5 9.1 406.0 30.1 3.4 5.5 ..  .. 
Total 23,991.9 1,477.5 2,697.8 7,746.4 1,301.9 3,110.3 6,598.1 325.6 434.4 113.9 40.4 145.7
X = suppressed data due to confidentiality
  .. = no reporting co-operatives
Unknown NAICS = suppressed aggregate NAICS 2-digit data due to confidentiality

Table 6: Membership of Co-operatives (Thousands) by NAICS and Province and Territories, 2012

Membership of Co-operatives (Thousands) by NAICS and Province and Territories, 2012
Canada BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL TE
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting - 11 &
Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction - 21
70.9 4.4 24.5 18.2 3 4.8 11.3 1 2.2 0.5 0.9 .. 
Utilities - 22 113.5 .. 95.4 0.4 1.6 4.7 6 5.1 0.3 .. ..  .. 
Construction – 23 & Manufacturing – 31–33 34.8 .. 3 0.5 .. 5 20.1 0.5 4.3 1.3 ..  .. 
Wholesale Trade – 41 & Retail Trade – 44–45 6,880.00 4,148.40 909.4 454.8 441.4 51.3 721.9 66.1 27.6 8.9 35.4 14.8
Transportation and Warehousing - 48–49 12 7.2 0.3 0.1 0.1 0.9 2.2 1.2 ..  ..  .. 
Information and cultural industries - 51 104.1 5.1 0.2 1 32.1 21.2 42.1 1.2 0.8 0.4 ..  .. 
Finance and insurance - 52 16.7 0.4 3.3 8.7 0.2 0.5 .. 0.1 3.1 ..  0.5 .. 
Real estate and rental and leasing - 53 107.1 16.2 3.5 1.1 3.2 46.5 32.8 0.9 2 0.8 0 0.1
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services – 54 & Educational Services - 61 22.2 0.8 0.1 0.4 0.1 0.5 19.1 0.4 0.8 0.1 0.2 .. 
Administrative and support, water management and remediation services - 56 5.3  .. 0.3  .. .. 0.1 4.3 .. 0.6 ..  ..  .. 
Health care and social assistance - 62 160.9 1.8 0.4 29.6 3.8 7.8 114.2 0.6 0.3 1.9 0.4 .. 
Arts, entertainment and recreation - 71 37.9 1.1 0.3 12.1 4.3 1.3 14 2.7 2 0.1 ..  ..
Accommodation and food services - 72 10.9 0.1 0.1 .. 0.2 0.5 10.1 .. .. ..  ..  .. 
Other Services – 81 & Public Administration - 91 326.1 1.4 50.1 3.8 0.1 6.9 254.5 2.8 3 3.6  .. .. 
Total 7,902.40 4,186.90 1,090.90 530.7 490.1 152 1,252.60 81.4 48.1 18 37.4 14.9
X = suppressed data due to confidentiality
  .. = no reporting co-operatives
Unknown NAICS = suppressed aggregate NAICS 2-digit data due to confidentiality

Table 7: Employment of Co-operatives by NAICS and Province and Territories, 2012

Employment of Co-operatives by NAICS and Province and Territories, 2012
Canada BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL TE
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting – 11  18,853.00 981 371 86 611 890 14,290.00 156 575 609 284 .. 
Utilities – 22 675 1 491 2 40 28 21 86 6 .. ..  .. 
Construction – 23 and
Manufacturing – 31–33
13,678.00 4 138 2 3 850 10,627.00 248 1,458.00 348 ..  .. 
Wholesale Trade – 41 and
Retail Trade – 44–45
35,090.00 3,123.00 7,064.00 10,223.00 2,828.00 1,254.00 7,394.00 1,542.00 475 198 231 758
Transportation and
Warehousing – 48–49
1,083.00 32 81 19 14 9 910 ..  18 ..  ..  .. 
Information and
cultural industries – 51
918 7 2 224 155 172 308 20 30 .. ..  .. 
Finance and insurance – 52 624 44 42 151 27 323 .. 5 17  .. 15 .. 
Real estate and
rental and leasing – 53
1,361.00 95 60 42 82 765 231 7 25 54 .. ..
Professional, scientific and technical Services – 54 and
Educational Services – 61
1,270.00 16 10 25 4 97 1,058.00 2 49 3 6 .. 
Administrative and support, waste management and remediation services – 56 1,068.00 ..  4  .. 3 19 822 .. 220 ..  ..  .. 
Health care and social assistance – 62 5,057.00 30 85 976 513 904 2,313.00 24 184 4 24 .. 
Arts, entertainment an
recreation – 71
1,019.00 25 6 134 45 12 719 53 18 6 ..  1
Accommodation and
food services – 72
524 6 1 .. 1 .. 507 6 3 ..  ..  .. 
Other Services – 81 and
Public administration – 91
5,052.00 30 173 22 5 44 4,702.00 27 23 26 ..  .. 
Total 86,272.00 4,394.00 8,528.00 11,906.00 4,331.00 5,367.00 43,902.00 2,176.00 3,101.00 1,248.00 560 759
X = suppressed data due to confidentiality
  .. = no reporting co-operatives
Unknown NAICS = suppressed aggregate NAICS 2-digit data due to confidentiality
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