A book of Canadian innovation

Canada 150

On July 1, 1867, the four founding provinces officially became the Dominion of Canada. The first Canadian transcontinental railroad was still a dream, the telephone had not yet been invented and the discovery of insulin was decades away. Since that day, much has changed, thanks to the help of innovative Canadians. Each day, we are surrounded by thousands of different intellectual property rights. Whether it's the buzz of the alarm on our smartphones that wakes us up in the morning, the design of our favourite shoes, the song we listen to on the radio or the catchy slogan that entices us to buy a coffee, each of these is subject to intellectual property registration. To celebrate Canada's 150th birthday, the Canadian Intellectual Property Office has created an activity book to help you learn about the wonders of innovation and intellectual property in Canada.

Trademarks

Colouring page featuring sample items that could be trademarked and a description of trademarks.
Detailed description of the image

The previous image incorporates a variety of trademark-related inventions that are presented in white and black. Surrounding these items are two squiggles and eleven logos related to the Canada 150 theme. The illustrative texts shown are: “mots”, “words” and “slogans.” The icons are displayed in order of appearance from left to right moving downwards:

  1. Seven music note symbols
  2. Can of fish
  3. Perfume
  4. Store sign
  5. Eye glasses
  6. Shopping bag
  7. Tea can
  8. Coffee cup
  9. Box of cereal
  10. Bottled drink
  11. String
  12. T-shirt
  13. Pair of pants

A trademark is a combination of letters, words, slogans, designs or even sounds. It distinguishes one product or service from another.

A trademark is unique and over time it can stand not only for the actual goods and services a company sells, but is often associated with a company's reputation and brand.

Did you know that one of the first trademarks in Canada was registered in 1865?

To learn more about trademarks, visit Canada.ca/trademarks.

A dot-to-dot activity featuring a storefront and a description of the Hudson's Bay Company's trademark.

Founded in 1670, the Governor and Company of Adventurers of England Trading into Hudson's Bay's focus was then fur trading. Since that time, the scope of the company has expanded considerably into the domain of general retailer and has brought with it almost 400 active trademarks on the Canadian Trademarks Database.

Registered in 1914 by the Governor and Company of Adventurers of England Trading into Hudson's Bay, the inspiration for this page is the Hudson's Bay Company logo.

Registration number: TMDA19773

Patents

Colouring page featuring sample items that could be subject matter for patent registration and a description of patents.
Detailed description of the image

The previous image incorporates a variety of patent-related inventions that are presented in white and black. Surrounding these items are eight logos related to the Canada 150 theme. The icons are displayed in order of appearance from left to right moving downwards:

  1. Coffee cup
  2. Puzzle piece
  3. Pacemaker
  4. Lock
  5. Beverage case
  6. Baseball bat
  7. Key
  8. Inhaler
  9. Mortar and pestle
  10. Smartphone
  11. Crutch
  12. Beaker
  13. Magnifying glass
  14. Microscope
  15. Bulb
  16. Canned drink
  17. Paper
  18. Wireless radio
  19. Battery
  20. USB stick
  21. Screwdriver

A patent is an invention that is new, useful and inventive. It can be cutting-edge technology or it can be an improvement on products or processes.

Patent protection applies in the country or region that issues the patent. You can sell them, license them or use them as assets to attract funding from investors.

Did you know almost all patents granted in Canada are improvements to a previous invention?

To learn more about patents, visit Canada.ca/patents.

A dot-to-dot activity featuring a screwdriver and a screw, and a description of the Robertson screwdriver.

A turning point in Canadian tool history, P. L. Robertson was demonstrating a spring-loaded screwdriver when the blade slipped and cut his hand. This inspired him to invent a new square socket drive for screws, often called the Robertson drive. With a patent granted in 1909 by Peter Lymburner Robertson, the Robertson screwdriver is at the centre of this dot-to-dot. Title: Screw

Patent: CA 116463

Copyright

Colouring page featuring sample items that could be subject matter for copyright registration and a description of copyright.
Detailed description of the image

The previous image incorporates a variety of copyright-related inventions that are presented in white and black. Surrounding these items are twelve logos related to the Canada 150 theme. The illustrative texts shown are: “mots” and “words.” The icons are displayed in order of appearance from left to right moving downwards:

  1. Clapperboard
  2. Music note symbol
  3. Pen
  4. Headphones
  5. Four music note symbols
  6. Video recorder/camera
  7. Guitar
  8. Mask
  9. Painting
  10. Paint tube
  11. Art palette
  12. Camera
  13. Microphone
  14. Ballet slipper
  15. Book

Copyrights serve to protect an original work such as a dance, a song, or a dramatic reading. Your work is automatically protected in Canada the moment it is created. The creator of a work is usually the copyright owner, unless there is an agreement in place stating otherwise. Did you know that in Canada, copyrights exist during a creator's lifetime and for 50 years following his/her death?

To learn more about copyright, visit Canada.ca/copyright.

A dot-to-dot activity featuring a singer and a description of Buffy Sainte-Marie's work.

Did you know that live and televised performances, such as those seen at the Juno Awards, can be registered as copyright in Canada? Singer-songwriter and avid music performer, Buffy Sainte-Marie, has been recognized for her substantial contributions to the music industry throughout Canada and around the world. She has won countless other awards throughout the years, including a Golden Globe, and most recently a Juno Award for Aboriginal Album of the Year in 2016 and a Governor General's Performing Arts Award in 2010.

Industrial Design

Colouring page featuring sample items that could be subject matter for industrial design registration and a description of industrial design.
Detailed description of the image

The previous image incorporates a variety of inventions related to industrial designs, presented in white and black. Surrounding the industrial designs are ten logos related to the Canada 150 theme. The icons are displayed in order of appearance from left to right moving downwards:

  1. Chair
  2. Tumbler
  3. Playing piece
  4. Butter dish
  5. Faucet
  6. Doorknob
  7. Blow-dryer
  8. Teapot
  9. Hockey mask
  10. Fabric
  11. Lamp
  12. Butter knife
  13. Spoon
  14. Tire
  15. Shoe
  16. Gem
  17. Plant vase
  18. Lamp
  19. Pitcher
  20. Smartphone
  21. Clothespin
  22. Fireplace

Industrial designs are the features that make the products we use every day more visually appealing. These can include the contour of a car hood, the pattern on a sweater, even the shape of a computer monitor. Did you know industrial designs must be original and cannot closely resemble any other design?

To learn more about industrial designs, visit Canada.ca/industrial-design.

A dot-to-dot activity featuring a vehicle lantern and a description of an industrial design registration for a vehicle lantern.

Although vehicle headlights were already commonplace by the1920's, many cities prohibited them. As such, vehicles were often equipped with side oil lamps. In 1922, The Sheet Metal Products Company of Canada, Limited, produced and registered the industrial design for a vehicle lantern, which is the inspiration for this page. Title: Vehicle lantern Industrial design number: 5507

IP crossword puzzle

A French crossword puzzle featuring information on intellectual property in Canada.

Across

Down

Solution

Click to reveal the answer
  1. Traditional
  2. Intellectual Property
  3. Patent
  4. Fee
  5. Examiner
  6. Opposition
  7. Claims
  8. Domain
  9. Trade
  10. CIPO
  11. Industrial Designs
  12. Licence
  13. Author
  14. Small Entity
  15. Art
  16. Copyright
  17. Trademark

IP word search

A French word search featuring Canadian innovations.
Image details

R L I A V R T V E B E T A M N T R T G T
T I M C K Z L E X N D S N D G N A V X N
R G A Y H R T K L X O I S P A B B L U B
A A X H X O A R L E L H E O L N L N R Z
N B P M C R C P S U V A P E R A A Y J M
S E R O W L L O S N N I T E B C M C R N
C G O M I J E N L U O O S T L R A Y L M
E A J K Z D I E T A P W E I A E T L P Y
I B E L S N A B H H T K B D O Y T N R M
V R C O Y A U R O W S E A L S N A D Y G
E A T W D T M C S A C N B U O G Z O V N
R G O I T O K Y B S A I P A G W I Y L L
P G R E M E M A E C E E R O R D E P T L
M U R K Y E M E P K R L B T A X A R D B
J W Z G A A Z P T M C O E R C B I X I B
P G A Z U Y D O A E T O M R L E Q X P R
B M W T L Y A N N P R A H U I R L N J W
E Y I R Y E D K N E R T M Q Y W Y E Z Q

Canadian Innovations

Solution

The solution is 6 letters followed by the number 150

Click to reveal the answer

Canada 150

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