Joshua Turner

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Joshua Turner

COPYRIGHT REFORM PROCESS

SUBMISSIONS RECEIVED REGARDING THE CONSULTATION PAPERS


Documents received have been posted in the official language in which they were submitted. All are posted as received by the departments, however all address information has been removed.

Submission from Joshua Turner received on September 11, 2001 via e-mail

Subject: Canadian copyright reform

To Industry Canada, the Department of Canadian Heritage, the Intellectual Property Policy Directorate and other concerned agencies:

I recently became aware of the IPPD's Consultation Paper on Digital Copyright Issues (CPCDI). I strongly oppose the introduction of any such policy in Canada. I fear that Canada's status and reputation as a society in which free technological development can occur is in jeopardy.

The provisions of the CPCDI remind me strongly of the American Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). I feel that similar policy and legislation values the rights of the publisher far more than the rights of the individual. As I am sure you are aware, the DMCA in the US has come under significant fire for stifling the publication of cryptographic research. Particularly frightening is the effect that the US law has had on international research, where scientists have been hesitant to publish their work for fear of being prosecuted should they visit the US -- The case of Dmitry Skylarov is the obvious example.

I fear that the CPCDI will have the same chilling effect in Canada as the DMCA has had in the US and abroad.

Although I am not a lawyer or a judge, I am a software developer who would be impacted by this policy and any pursuant legislation. I believe that it is not unreasonable to consider software as a form of expression. As human expression, I would hope and expect that software would be protected by law, rather than censored for a narrow interest group. I especially oppose the adoption of such policy elements simply "because the Americans are doing it" -- as a sovereign nation, the opinions of Canadians should be the basis upon which Canada bases its laws.

The CPCDI should not be imported and forced on Canadians.

Sincerely,


Joshua Turner
(Address removed)

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