Industry Canada’s 2012 Sustainable Development Strategy

Table of contents

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1. Industry Canada's Sustainable Development Vision Statement

2. Industry Canada's Sustainable Development Practices

3. Industry Canada’s Contribution to Themes I to III of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

4. Industry Canada’s Complementary Sustainable Development Activities

5. Industry Canada’s Contribution to Theme IV of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

6. Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

Industry Canada's legislative responsibility for sustainable development is defined in its founding act, the Department of Industry Act, 1995, which mandates the Minister of Industry to "strengthen the national economy and promote sustainable development."

1. Industry Canada's Sustainable Development Vision Statement

In support of innovation and competitiveness, Industry Canada works with key partners to promote the benefits of sustainable development, and to encourage the greater adoption of sustainable technologies and practices by Canadian businesses, consumers and communities.

The Sustainable Development Vision Statement builds on Industry Canada’s mandate and acknowledges the key role that Industry Canada has in fostering innovation and competitiveness, and promoting awareness of the economic benefits of sustainable development practices for businesses, consumers and communities.

Industry Canada will strive to be guided by this new vision statement in policy and program development and implementation. As Canadian business, consumers and communities adopt sustainable technologies and practices, there is likely to be positive benefits for the environmental goals of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy—air, water and nature.


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2. Industry Canada's Sustainable Development Practices

The remainder of Industry Canada’s 2012 Sustainable Development Strategy presents information on how the department integrates sustainable development considerations into its decision-making process and in performance reporting. Information is included on Industry Canada’s contribution to Themes I to IV of the 2010 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, particularly addressing climate change and air quality and Greening Government Operations.

There is also a link to a list of complementary activities at Industry Canada related to sustainable development.

Sustainable Development and Decision Making

Sustainable development considerations are integrated into Industry Canada’s decision making process in four ways:through a dedicated sustainable development management system;

  1. through sustainable development performance reporting;
  2. through its participation in interdepartmental committees; and
  3. through the application of multi-criteria decision-making tools including Strategic Environmental Assessment.

1. Sustainable Development Management System

The Assistant Deputy Minister of the Strategic Policy Sector is the Sustainable Development Champion for Industry Canada. In this role, the Assistant Deputy Minister leads the planning and implementation of the department’s contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy and to Industry Canada’s Sustainable Development Strategy.

Responsibility for sustainable development issues is also reflected in the Performance Management Agreements of the Director General of the Strategic Policy Branch and the Director of Policy Coordination and Regulatory Affairs at Industry Canada.

In support of the Sustainable Development Champion, the Strategic Policy Branch works closely with other parts of Industry Canada to integrate sustainable development considerations into policy and program development and implementation. This includes leading regular meetings of intradepartmental working groups on sustainable development policy and operational issues, and advising the Assistant Deputy Minister of Strategic Policy Sector, as needed.

Also, Industry Sector hosts a regular bi-weekly Coordination Meeting on Environmental Policy and Regulatory Developments and provides updates to the Assistant Deputy Minister of Industry Sector, as needed.

In keeping with the commitments made in Industry Canada’s 2011 Sustainable Development Strategy, work is underway to strengthen the department’s Sustainable Development Management System, for example, by integrating Industry Canada’s Greening Government Operations leads into the system. This would ensure better alignment with the 2010 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy.

2. Sustainable Development Performance Reporting

As required in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, Industry Canada will report progress annually on the implementation of its commitments under the Federal and Departmental Sustainable Development Strategies through the Departmental Performance Report.

3. Participation in Interdepartmental Committees

Officials at Industry Canada are members of a number of interdepartmental working groups related to sustainable development, including on the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, Strategic Environmental Assessment, life cycle assessment, green growth agenda, corporate social responsibility, and planning for the June 2012 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development.

Officials at Industry Canada are also members of ad hoc, sector-focussed interdepartmental working groups related to consultations and regulatory development covering greenhouse gas emissions and Base Level Industrial Emissions Requirements.

4. Multi-criteria Decision-Making Tools, including Strategic Environmental Assessment

As noted in Industry Canada’s 2011 Sustainable Development Strategy, the department uses two main Cabinet Directives to inform its decision-making process with regards to environmental and sustainable development considerations. These tools will continue to be used in 2012:

Consistent with the Cabinet Directive on Streamlining Regulation (2007), all departments must perform a cost-benefit analysis of their regulatory proposals with a medium or high impact. The Directive also requires all departments to show that their recommended regulatory action maximizes the net economic, environmental, and social benefits to Canadians, business, and government over time more than any other type of regulatory or non-regulatory option.

A cost-benefit analysis allows for the comparison of all quantifiable, long-term economic, environmental and social impacts of a given regulatory proposal. By conducting cost-benefit analyses for all of its regulatory proposals, Industry Canada ensures that its recommended regulatory actions integrate environmental and sustainability considerations.

The Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals (2010) requires all departments to align their Strategic Environmental Assessments with the goals of the 2010 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy.

Industry Canada has begun work on reviewing its Strategic Environmental Assessment, in keeping with the commitments made in the 2011 Sustainable Development Strategy. This work will be reported in 2013.

In 2012, Industry Canada will incorporate best practices when reporting information on Strategic Environmental Assessments and linking results to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy to ensure that decision-making on issues related to the environment is transparent and in keeping with the 2010 Cabinet Directive. In particular, Industry Canada will publish in the Departmental Performance Report the number of preliminary and detailed Strategic Environmental Assessments conducted.

For more detail on Industry Canada’s Strategic Environmental Assessment, please see the department’s Strategic Environmental Assessment website.


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3. Industry Canada’s Contribution to Themes I to III of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

Under the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, Industry Canada is responsible for seven implementation strategies that contribute to Theme I (Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality).

With respect to Theme II (Maintaining Water Quality and Availability) and Theme III (Protecting Nature) of the Federal Strategy, Industry Canada’s ongoing work to promote the benefits of sustainable development, and to encourage the greater adoption of sustainable technologies and practices by Canadian businesses, consumers and communities has positive impacts on water quality and availability, and protecting nature.

The following lists seven implementation strategies that Industry Canada is responsible for, as they appear in Annex 1 of the 2010 Federal Strategy:

  • Continue to provide science policy advice and policy frameworks, and work with portfolio agencies to fulfill commitments made in Canada's Science & Technology Strategy in support of the environmental science and technologies, natural resources and energy, and information and communications technologies research priorities. (Implementation Strategy 1.1.21)
  • Continue to work with industry stakeholders to encourage and promote the adoption and adaptation of new technologies such as information and communications technologies, biotechnology and clean energy technologies. (Implementation Strategy 1.1.22)
  • Continue to implement the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative in support of strategic, research and development projects that contribute to new A&D technologies, and which may reduce greenhouse gas emissions and produce new energy efficiencies. (Implementation Strategy 1.1.23)
  • Continue to promote the development and use of CSR management tools by industry and the use of CSR standards in the Canadian marketplace in support of environmental sustainability. (Implementation Strategy 1.1.24)
  • Continue to collaborate with partners to enhance Canada's competitive advantage in hydrogen and fuel cell technology development and commercialization. (Implementation Strategy 1.1.36 / 2.1.24)
  • Asia-Pacific Partnership: Manage Canadian Asia Pacific Partnership funded projects that promote the development, diffusion, and deployment of clean technologies (Implementation Strategy 1.1.50) - With EC and NRCan
  • Continue to implement the Automotive Innovation Fund through to 2013 in support of strategic, large-scale research and development projects leading to innovative, greener, more fuel-efficient vehicles. (Implementation Strategy 2.1.26)

A detailed description of these activities and how they contribute to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy goals and targets is provided below.


Implementation Strategy 1.1.21

Continue to provide science policy advice and policy frameworks, and work with portfolio agencies to fulfill commitments made in Canada's Science & Technology Strategy in support of the environmental science and technologies, natural resources and energy, and information and communications technologies research priorities.

Link to FSDS Goals and Targets

  • Theme I Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
    • Goal 1 Climate Change: Reduce greenhouse gas emission levels to mitigate the severity and unavoidable impacts of climate change
      • Target 1.1 Climate Change Mitigation: Relative to 2005 emissions levels, reduce Canada’s total greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) 17% by 2020.

Link to Industry Canada’s PAA

  • Strategic Outcome 2 - Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
    • Program Activity 2.1 - Government Science and Technology Policy Agenda

Description of the Implementation Strategy

IC is working closely with both portfolio agencies and Science Based Departments and Agencies, to further implementation of the federal S&T Strategy.

In 2008, the Minister of Industry received recommendations from the Science, Technology and Innovation council’s (STIC) on sub-priorities of strategic importance to Canada.  Related to sustainable development, under the priority of environmental science and technologies, STIC identified the following sub-priorities: water (health, energy, security); cleaner methods of extracting, processing and using hydrocarbon fuels, including reduced consumption of these fuels.  Industry Portfolio agencies and other departments and agencies will apply these priorities to their research agenda’s, as appropriate.

In June 2009, Minister Goodyear released an S&T Strategy Progress Report, noting that implementation was progressing well.  IC continues to work through the ADM Committee on S&T, the whole-of-government co-ordinating body for S&T Strategy implementation, to provide policy advice and frameworks in support of the S&T Strategy.

Relationship with FSDS Target(s)

By identifying four priority areas in the S&T Strategy, this should encourage research in sustainable development related fields, notably in the sub-priority areas of clean energy and reduced fuel consumption. It is important to note that the S&T programs and activities in support of sustainable development, such as reducing greenhouse gas emissions, are conducted by other federal Science Based Departments and Agencies (e.g. Natural Resources Canada and Environment Canada).

Non-Financial Performance Expectations

IC encourages departments and agencies to go beyond the S&T Strategy commitments in order to "deepen" implementation, so that the spirit of the S&T Strategy can take hold, in this context, in the priority areas of environmental science and technologies and natural resources and energy.


Implementation Strategy 1.1.22

22  Continue to work with industry stakeholders to encourage and promote the adoption and adaptation of new technologies such as aerospace and information and communications technologies.

Link to FSDS Goals and Targets

  • Theme I Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
    • Goal 1 Climate Change: Reduce greenhouse gas emission levels to mitigate the severity and unavoidable impacts of climate change
      • Target 1.1 Climate Change Mitigation: Relative to 2005 emissions levels, reduce Canada’s total greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) 17% by 2020.

Link to Industry Canada’s PAA

  • Strategic Outcome 2 Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
    • Program Activity 2.1 Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity
    • Program Activity 2.2 Information and Communications Technologies  Research and Innovation
    • Program Activity 2.3 Industrial Research and Development Financing
      • Program Sub Activity 2.3.2 Aerospace innovation

Description of the Implementation Strategy

Industry Canada is involved in the development of a Canadian Aerospace Environmental Technology Roadmap (CAETRM). The objective of CAETRM is to identify critical, enabling technologies and infrastructure that the Canadian aerospace industry will need in order to meet environmental and sustainability requirements over the next ten to fifteen years. The CAETRM was conceived to formulate a Canadian Strategy to identify the technology drivers and trends, and address the need for a coordinated Canadian industry response to changes in the global aerospace landscape. In addition, the Green Aviation Research and Development Network (GARDN) fosters development of technologies that will reduce aviation’s environmental footprint in a broad range of areas from noise and emission to materials and manufacturing processes. The objective of GARDN is to provide collaborative opportunities for the OEMs, SMEs, and other key stakeholders in the areas of environmental technologies. Activities related to GARDN are in support of the competitive excellence of Canadian aerospace products and services, the economic success of the member companies and the development and training of highly qualified personnel in the aerospace environmental field.

Work with industry through Precarn and CANARIE to support the development and application of intelligent systems, sensors, and advanced networks which optimize energy use and monitor and reduce pollution.

Specific project for FY 2010‑2011 for Precarn under their T-Gap Program include:

  • Smart Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Refuelling Station
  • Wireless Intelligent Building Sensor Network
  • Wireless Pipeline Inspection Robot to Detect Leakages
  • Infrastructure Operations Optimization for Oil Sands

CANARIE is the sponsor of the Green Star Network, which is built around three components. Industry Canada’s Communications Research Centre (CRC) is a major partner in the CANARIE Greenstar Network, and actively participates in research that benefits carbon emission reduction.

  • Networking and computational infrastructure at geographically distributed facilities via the CANARIE network;
    • Middleware to provide cloud services to applications and users;
    • A "Carbon Protocol" for the ICT industry, providing a quantified approach to CO2 emission reductions, based on the ISO14064 family of standards.

Relationship with FSDS Target(s)

CAETRM and GARDN are intended to assist the Canadian aviation industry in reducing its environmental footprint and meeting environmental and sustainability requirements (in operation and manufacturing) through environmental technologies, infrastructure development, and collaboration across the industry.

The development and application of intelligent systems and networks will reduce carbon consumption and GHGs. In manufacturing and resource processing, the adoption of an intelligent system which combines a network of energy or pollution sensors with automated infrastructure management software can very precisely adjust energy and resource requirements to optimize output, and avoid wastage, many times a second, if required. This can ensure a reduction in energy requirements, lower carbon emissions, and a lower cost per unit of output. 
For intelligent building systems, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems can be linked through ICT networks to advanced environmental monitoring sensors to minimize energy consumption and optimize the contribution of passive solar heating over a 24 hour period.

CANARIE's Green Star network (GSN) has the goal of creating technology, protocols, and standards for reducing the carbon footprint of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). ICT is responsible for 2% of global CO2 emissions, due to high consumption of electricity produced from coal.

Non-Financial Performance Expectations

In fiscal year 2012–2013, Industry Canada will work to develop appropriate performance expectations for this implementation strategy.  The quality and influence of Industry Sector’s industry and supply chain analysis, and other industrial intelligence, has an indirect impact on the achievement of the FSDS goals cited.

Industry Canada provides an oversight for function for both Precarn and CANARIE which is outlined in the funding agreements between Industry Canada and Treasury Board.  Industry Canada does not directly choose or manage projects, but rather ensures that that the provisions of the funding agreement are adhered to throughout the period of the agreement.

Implementation Strategy 1.1.23

Continue to implement the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative in support of strategic, research and development projects that contribute to new A&D technologies, and which may reduce greenhouse gas emissions and produce new energy efficiencies.

Link to FSDS Goals and Targets

  • Theme I Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
    • Goal 1 Climate Change: Reduce greenhouse gas emission levels to mitigate the severity and unavoidable impacts of climate change
      • Target 1.1 Climate Change Mitigation: Relative to 2005 emissions levels, reduce Canada’s total greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) 17% by 2020.

Link to Industry Canada’s PAA

  • Strategic Outcome 2. – Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
    • Program Activity 2.3 – Industrial Research and Development Financing
      • Program Sub activity 2.3.3 – Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative

Description of the Implementation Strategy

  • The Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI) has three objectives, namely: to encourage strategic R&D that will result in innovation and excellence in new products and services; enhance the competitiveness of Canadian aerospace and defence companies; and, foster collaboration between research institutes, universities, colleges, and the private sector.

Although the environment and sustainable development are not explicit objectives of SADI, results from some projects may reduce greenhouse gas emissions and produce new energy efficiencies.

Relationship with FSDS Target(s)

SADI projects have potential sustainable development benefits including the following: Reduction in GHGs; Reduction in water pollution; Reduction in carbon / ecological footprint; Lower energy consumption; and, reduction of hazardous / toxic materials in manufacturing processes.

Non-Financial Performance Expectations

SADI’s ultimate outcome is to contribute to the achievement of broader technological, economic, environmental and social benefits for Canadians.


Implementation Strategy 1.1.24

Continue to promote the development and use of CSR management tools by industry and the use of CSR performance and reporting standards in the Canadian marketplace in support of environmental sustainability.

Link to FSDS Goals and Targets

Theme I Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

  • Goal 1 Climate Change: Reduce greenhouse gas emission levels to mitigate the severity and unavoidable impacts of climate change
    • Target 1.1 Climate Change Mitigation: Relative to 2005 emissions levels, reduce Canada’s total greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) 17% by 2020.

Link to Industry Canada’s PAA

  • Strategic Outcome 3 Canadian businesses and communities are competitive
    • Program Activity 3.1  Small business growth and prosperity
      Program Activity 3.2 Industrial competitiveness and capacity

Description of the Implementation Strategy

Under this implementation strategy, Industry Canada will:

  • Continue to develop information and management tools for business to help them integrate CSR practices into their operations in support of their competitiveness in the global marketplace.
  • Continue to post resources on the IC CSR website, such as the existing SME Sustainability Road Map and the Sustainability Tool Kit for Business.
  • Undertake strategic outreach activities to enhance effectiveness and reach of these tools.
  • Continue to promote CSR performance and reporting standards and practices relevant to Canadian business.
  • Commission at least one survey of Canadian companies’ CSR disclosure practices over the three year period of the Departmental SD Strategy.

Relationship with FSDS Target(s)

Increased private sector implementation of CSR practices will help reduce GHG emissions by the private sector. CSR practices that can help reduce GHG emissions include: eco-efficiency, which leads to reduced energy consumption; rationalization of fleets towards more fuel efficient transportation; design for environment/sustainability (DfE, DfS), life cycle analysis (LCA), sustainable/lean manufacturing practices and extended producer responsibility (EPR) help reduce resource inputs into the production of products, thus reducing GHG emissions.

Non-Financial Performance Expectations

In fiscal year 2011‑12, Industry Canada will work to develop appropriate (SMART, outcomes-based) performance expectations for this implementation strategy.


Implementation Strategy 1.1.36 / 2.1.24

Continue to collaborate with partners to enhance Canada's competitive advantage in hydrogen and fuel cell technology development and commercialization.

Link to FSDS Goals and Targets

Theme I Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

  • Goal 1 Climate Change: Reduce greenhouse gas emission levels to mitigate the severity and unavoidable impacts of climate change
    • Target 1.1 Climate Change Mitigation: Relative to 2005 emissions levels, reduce Canada’s total greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) 17% by 2020.
  • Goal 2 Air Pollution: Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems
    • Target 2.1 Air Pollutants: Reduce air pollutants in order to maintain or improve air quality across the country and achieve the emission targets which are currently under development in consultations with provinces and stakeholders.

Link to Industry Canada’s PAA

  • Strategic Outcome 2  Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
    • Program Activity 2.1 Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Description of the Implementation Strategy

Work on the clean energy technologies sector focuses on fostering development of energy sub-sectors where IC has an influence and where Canada has an emerging competitive advantage, such as supplier industries for fuel cells, wind, solar, and ocean energy.  To this end, Industry Canada provides expert analysis, advice, and facilitation to raise awareness of Canadian technology and service capabilities in emerging energy sectors; promotes global supply chain opportunities; and produces reasoned policy recommendations.

Recent activities related to this implementation strategy include the creation of supply chain studies and sector profiles for wind and fuel cell industries, participation in the International Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells in the Economy (IPHE), and co-chairing of the federal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Interdepartmental Committee. IC also plans to collaborate on the development of a marine energy technology roadmap.  IC will continue to examine the current business environment for Canadian firms, ensuring that business issues are understood in policy making and leveraging available resources across the federal government to strengthen Canada’s strategic advantages

Relationship with FSDS Target(s)

Enhancing the development and commercialization of clean energy technologies can accelerate the deployment of lower-emitting energy generation.  Deployment of energy generation technologies such as wind and energy carriers such as hydrogen fuel cells will help to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. Commercialization of hydrogen fuel cells could have utility in moving toward this goal, as they are a versatile technology with a variety of applications.

Non-Financial Performance Expectations

In fiscal year 2011–2012, Industry Canada will work to develop appropriate performance expectations for this implementation strategy. The quality and influence of Industry Sector’s industry and supply chain analysis, and other industrial intelligence, has an indirect impact on the achievement of the FSDS goals cited.


Implementation Strategy 1.1.50

Asia-Pacific Partnership: Manage Canadian Asia Pacific Partnership-funded projects that promote the development, diffusion and deployment of clean technologies (completed).

Link to FSDS Goals and Targets

Theme I Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

  • Goal 1 Climate Change: Reduce greenhouse gas emission levels to mitigate the severity and unavoidable impacts of climate change
    • Target 1.1 Climate Change Mitigation: Relative to 2005 emissions levels, reduce Canada's total greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) 17% by 2020.

Link to Industry Canada's PAA

  • Strategic Outcome N.A.
    • Program Activity N.A.
      • Program Subactivity N.A.

Description of the Implementation Strategy

Industry Canada participated in the work of the Asia-Pacific Partnership Task Forces and facilitated the involvement of the private sector.In this context, consultations with key domestic industrial sectors were held.

The Asia-Pacific Partnership initiative will not continue after 2010‑2011.

Relationship with FSDS Target(s)
N/A - initiative will not continue after 2010‑2011.

Non-Financial Performance Expectations
N/A - initiative will not continue after 2010‑2011.


Implementation Strategy 2.1.26

Continue to implement the Automotive Innovation Fund through to 2013 in support of strategic, large-scale research and development projects leading to innovative, greener, more fuel-efficient vehicles.

Link to FSDS Goals and Targets

Theme I Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

  • Goal 2 Air Pollution: Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems
    • Target 2.1  Air Pollutants: Reduce air pollutants in order to maintain or improve air quality across the country and achieve the emission targets which are currently under development in consultations with provinces and stakeholders.

Link to Industry Canada’s PAA

Strategic Outcome 2  Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy

  • Program Activity 2.3 Canada's Research and Innovation Capacity
    • Program Subactivity 2.3.1  Automotive Innovation

Description of the Implementation Strategy

Budget 2008 announced that the government would provide $250 million over five years to support strategic, large-scale R&D projects in the automotive sector, in developing innovative, greener and more fuel-efficient vehicles.

Under the Automotive Innovation Fund (AIF ), Industry Canada considers funding proposals that provide for private sector investment in Canada of more than $75 million over five years for vehicle or power train assembly operations associated with significant automotive innovation and R&D initiatives.  The objectives of the AIF are as follows:

  • build automotive research and development capacity in Canada and secure knowledge-based jobs;
  • enhance the government’s science and technology (S&T) and environmental agendas;
  • support the development and/or implementation of innovative, fuel efficient technologies or processes;
  • promote long-term economic benefit to Canada including significant job creation/retention; and
  • leverage private sector investments to foster Canadian competitiveness.

Each eligible project considered for funding is subjected to a comprehensive due diligence process that may involve external experts that will examine the feasibility of the proposed eligible project.  All proposals are assessed in the context of their relevance to the objectives of the AIF and must provide environmental, technological, and economic benefits to Canada.

Reporting requirements are outlined in the AIF ’s Results-based Management and Accountability Framework and Risk Based Audit Framework (RMAF -RBAF).  The RMAF and RBAF provide a strategy for monitoring and evaluating project performance, and a risk-based approach to monitor and manage risks associated with the project.

Relationship with FSDS Target(s)

Eligible activities supported under the AIF are those typically associated with major automotive innovation and R&D initiatives to develop and build greener, more fuel-efficient vehicles, including:

  • new product development (e.g., advanced emissions technologies, energy-efficient engines and transmissions, advanced materials, including engineered plastics, and lightweight components and materials);
  • leading-edge engineering and design, and prototype development;
  • advanced product testing that ensures cleaner, more efficient automotive performance, and reduced greenhouse gases;
  • development of new production methods and process technologies, including advanced flexible manufacturing techniques;
  • new or expanded facilities to produce leading-edge and more energy efficient vehicles and power trains;
  • substantive investments in new flexible manufacturing processes; and
  • introduction of other new transformative production technologies to substantially increase productivity and efficiency (e.g., robotics and advanced IT systems).

Non-Financial Performance Expectations

As a result of the projects (i.e. once successfully completed), it is anticipated that innovative, greener, and more fuel-efficient vehicles and/or power trains will be assembled in Canada, and/or more innovative, fuel efficient technologies or processes will be implemented in the automotive sector.

Projects should result in reduced environmental impacts of the manufacturing and assembly of vehicle parts.

Projects should also increase the automotive R&D capacity in Canada and thus secure knowledge-based jobs in that sector.


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4. Industry Canada’s Complementary Sustainable Development Activities

In keeping with the commitments made in the 2011 Sustainable Development Strategy, a list of complementary sustainable development activities has been prepared for Industry Canada.

The list is structured according to the applicable Strategic Outcome and Program Activity, which is identical to the Report on Plans and Priorities and the Departmental Performance Report. The broad scope of the list demonstrates that many sectors in Industry Canada continue to encourage and implement sustainable development activities.

In 2012, Industry Canada commits to update this list.


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5. Industry Canada's Contribution to Theme IV of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

As a participant in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, Industry Canada contributes to Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint: Beginning with Government, through its internal services program activity. Specifically, the Department contributes to:

  • green procurement targets (including targets related to training, performance evaluations, and management processes and controls);
  • recycling all surplus electronic and electrical equipment in an environmentally sound manner;
  • reducing internal paper consumption per employee by 20 percent from 2006–07 levels;
  • achieving an 8:1 ratio of employees to printing units;
  • adopting a guide for greening meetings and events;
  • reducing greenhouse gas emissions from fleet vehicles by 17 percent from 2005–06 levels by 2020; and,
  • achieving a high environmental performance of buildings.

Details on Industry Canada’s commitments and targets towards Greening Government Operations are provided through the supplementary information tables itemized in the Report on Plans and Priorities. These tables are available on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat website.


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6. Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

To consult the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy and obtain the broader federal context to departmental and agency sustainable development activities, please see the Environment Canada website.

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy outlines the integrated, whole-of-government picture of actions and results to achieve environmental sustainability.

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy website is the central location of all departmental sustainable development goals, targets and implementation strategies.

In the coming year, the department will contribute to the development of the next Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (2013‑2016) by working with other government departments and other stakeholders to enhance the integration of economic sustainability considerations into the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy framework.

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