SRSP-502 — Technical Requirements for Land Mobile and Fixed Radio Services Operating in the Bands 806-821/851-866 MHz and 821-824/866-869 MHz

Issue 5
November 2013

Spectrum Management and Telecommunications
Standard Radio System Plan

Posted on Industry Canada website: November 22, 2013

Preface

Issue 5 of SRSP-502 has been released to provide a channel plan for narrower channels and to update technical provisions. International obligations for sharing of the bands 806-821/851-866 MHz and 821-824/866-869 MHz along the Canada‑United States border regions have also been updated. This issue replaces SRSP-502, Issue 4.

The following are the main changes:

  • editorial restructuring to align Issue 5 with the format and style of more recent SRSPs;
  • addition of a narrower channelization;
  • additional guidance and clarification on interoperability channels;
  • removal of provisions that are no longer relevant;
  • updated channel sharing and loading guidelines;
  • clarified maximum power limits and co‑channel separation requirements; and
  • updated cross‑border provisions.

Issued under the authority of
the Minister of Industry

space to insert signature

Marc Dupuis
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch




 


1. Intent

1.1 This Standard Radio System Plan (SRSP) states the minimum technical requirements for the purpose of efficient spectrum utilization for land mobile and fixed point‑to‑point systemsFootnote 1 operating in bands 806–821/851–866 MHz and in the public safety bands 821–824/866–869 MHz.

1.2 Radio systems conforming to the requirements contained in this SRSP will take priority in licensing and coordination over non‑standard systems proposed for operation in these bands. However, the use of more spectrally efficient technologies is strongly encouraged. Different channelization from what is described herein may be considered if it results in increased spectrum efficiency. Such systems would be authorized on a standard basis. The arrangements for non‑standard systems are outlined in Spectrum Utilization Policies SP-Gen, General Information Related to Spectrum Utilization and Radio Systems Policies.

1.3 Existing radio systems operating in the paired bands 806–821/851–866 MHz and 821–824/866–869 MHz that were licensed as standard prior to the issuance of this SRSP may continue to operate as standard. Extension or expansion of these systems will be considered by Industry Canada on a case‑by‑case basis. New systems must conform to the requirements of this standard.

 


2. General

2.1 Equipment used for land mobile or fixed systems operating in the bands 806–821/851–866 MHz and 821–824/866–869 MHz must comply with appropriate technical Standards listed in Section 3. A technical acceptance certificate (TAC) is required for the equipment if the applied Radio Standards Specification appears on the Category 1 Equipment List.

2.2 Although a radio system conforms to the requirements of this SRSP, the Department may require modifications to the system whenever harmful interferenceFootnote 2 is caused to other radio sites or systems, except when such interference is due to inadequate receiver selectivity as discussed in Section 2.3 below.

2.3 The Department reserves the right to limit protection to licensed radio receivers, only to the extent of the bandwidth of the transmitters whose emissions they are licensed to receive. Licensees and/or applicants should use receiver selectivity characteristics or filters that reject harmful interference.

2.4 Systems that employ a base station as an automatic repeater station shall transmit on frequencies identified as base transmit frequencies. Dispatch stations (often referred to as control stations) operating through an automatic repeater station shall transmit on frequencies identified as mobile transmit frequencies.

2.5 Simplex frequency operations using the base/repeater transmit frequency (known as repeater talk around) may be permitted within the authorized service area at the discretion of the system operator. These operations will be licensed on a no-interference, no-protection basisFootnote 3 to the other users in the case of a radio service provided by a radiocommunication service provider. Such operations may be licensed on a case-by-case basis beyond the service area of a duplex frequency system as an adjunct to operations. The public safety interoperability channels are exempt from this restriction.

2.6 Very low‑capacity fixed systems may be authorized in these bands on a secondary no‑interference, no‑protection basis in accordance with the appropriate Radio Systems Policies (RPs) and should be in accordance with applicable technical provisions of Standard Radio System Plan SRSP‑507.

 


3. Related Documents

The current issues of the following documents are applicable and are available on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website at http://www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.



Acronyms

Acronyms
CPC Client Procedures Circular
GL Guidelines
RP Radio Systems Policy
RSP Radio Standards Procedure
RSS Radio Standards Specification
SP Spectrum Utilization Policy
SRSP Standard Radio System Plan
TRAA Terrestrial Radiocommunication Agreements and Arrangements

 


4. General Guidelines

4.1 Channel Assignments for the Bands 806–824 MHz and 851–869 MHz

4.1.1 Frequencies shall be assigned in accordance with Annex A and Annex B.

4.1.2 The bands 806–824 MHz and 851–869 MHz are to be used on the basis of a two‑frequency (duplex) channel plan. For land mobile service operations, the mobile station transmitters will normally operate in the band 806–824 MHz and the base station transmitters will normally operate in the band 851–869 MHz. A mobile station may also transmit on its associated base station frequency when operating in a simplex mode. Base station to base station transmissions may occur in either frequency band, i.e. 806–824 MHz or 851–869 MHz (blocks A and B in Figure 1).Footnote 4

Figure 1 — Frequency blocks for the bands 806–824 MHz and 851–869 MHz
Figure 1 — Frequency blocks for the bands 806-824 MHz and 851-869 MHz (the long description is located below the image)

Description of Figure 1

This chart shows the paired frequency blocks for land mobile operation in the bands 806 to 824 MHz and 851 to 869 MHz. Frequencies from 806 to 824 MHz will be used for mobile station transmissions, whereas frequencies from 851 to 869 MHz will be used for base station transmissions. Block A is from 806 to 821 MHz paired with 851 to 866 MHz. Block B is from 821 to 824 MHz paired with 866 to 869 MHz and is designated for use by public safety services.
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4.1.3 The bands 821–824 MHz and 866–869 MHz are designated for use by public safety services (Block B in Figure 1). Public safety services (services involving the preservation of life and protection of property) will continue, if possible, to have access to exclusive channels and any eventual sharing of channels by public safety services will be with other public safety services. The Department recognizes the following hierarchy of public safety agencies:

  • (a) Category 1 — police, fire and emergency medical services;
  • (b) Category 2 — forestry, public works, public transit, hazardous material clean‑up, border protection and other agencies contributing to public safety;
  • (c) Category 3 — Other government agencies and certain non‑government agencies or entities.

Category 1 system operators are eligible for trunked or conventional systems. Category 2 system operators are eligible to share trunked systems with Category 1 users provided that the latter remain the major users of the system. Major users are agencies which have priority over other types of users on the system. Category 2 system users would not be eligible to operate their own systems within the bands 821–824 MHz and 866–869 MHz unless the local spectrum management office is satisfied that their operation would not preclude the future introduction of a Category 1 system. Category 3 system operators and selected supervisory personnel of non‑government agencies (e.g. hydro and gas utilities) may be permitted access to public safety systems during emergency situations where their access will be controlled by the major users operating those systems.

4.1.4 For the bands 806–821 MHz and 851–866 MHz, channels shall be spaced 25 kHz, 12.5 kHz and 6.25 kHz apart, centred on the frequencies as indicated in Table A1 of Annex A. Channel series AA, AB and AC correspond to channel bandwidths of 25 kHz, 12.5 kHz and 6.25 kHz respectively (see Figure 2 below). Channels will be assigned according to the required bandwidth of the system.Footnote 5 However, meeting a minimum spectrum efficiency standard data rate of 4.8 kbps per 6.25 kHz bandwidth or at least one voice channel per 12.5 kHz bandwidth is strongly encouraged.

Figure 2 — Example of channel plan for the bands 806–821/851–866 MHz
Figure 2 — Example of channel plan for the bands 806-821/851-866 MHz (the long description is located below the image)

Description of Figure 2

This chart shows an example of the two‑frequency (duplex) channel plan for the band 806 to 821 MHz paired with the band 851 to 866 MHz. There are three channel series AA, AB, and AC that correspond to a channel bandwidth and spacing of 25 kHz, 12.5 kHz and 6.25 kHz respectively. The example shows channels AA3 to AA5 centred from 806.0625 to 806.09375 MHz inclusive; AB5 to AB10 centred from 806.0625 to 806.09375 MHz inclusive; and AC10 to AC20 centred from 806.0625 to 806.009375 MHz inclusive. Only mobile station frequencies are listed. The paired base station frequencies are 45 MHz higher.
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4.1.5 For the bands 821–824 MHz and 866–869 MHz, channels shall be spaced 12.5 kHz and 6.25 kHz apart, centred on the frequencies as indicated in Table B1 of Annex B. Channel series BA, BB and BC correspond to channel bandwidths of 25 kHz, 12.5 kHz and 6.25 kHz respectivelyNote 5 (see Figure 3 below). Channels will be assigned according to the required bandwidth of the system. Meeting a minimum spectrum efficiency standard data rate of 4.8 kbps per 6.25 kHz bandwidth or at least one voice channel per 12.5 kHz bandwidth, as noted above, is strongly encouraged.

4.1.6 The channel spacing between associated mobile and base station centre frequencies is 45 MHz.

4.1.7 Frequency reuse is required in systems where many frequencies may be licensed to one licensee.

4.1.8 Frequencies in the bands 806–821/851–866 MHz and 821–824/866–869 MHz may be assigned for simplex operation, on a standard or a non‑standard basis at the discretion of the local spectrum management office. See Section 5.2 for provisions related to conventional simplex operations.

Figure 3 — Example of channel plan for the bands 821–824/866–869 MHz
Figure 3 — Example of channel plan for the bands 821-824/866-869 MHz (the long description is located below the image)

Description of Figure 3

This chart shows an example of the two‑frequency (duplex) channel plan for the band 821 to 824 MHz paired with the band 866 to 869 MHz. There are three channel series (BA, BB, and BC) that correspond to channel bandwidths of 25 kHz, 12.5 kHz and 6.25 kHz respectively. The channel spacing for the BA and BB channel series is 12.5 kHz; and the channel spacing for the BC channel series is 6.25 kHz. The example shows channels BA3 to BA7 centred from 821.05 to 821.1 MHz inclusive; BB2 to BB6 centred from 821.05 to 821.1 MHz inclusive; and BC4 to BC13 centred from 821.05 to 821.10625 MHz inclusive. Only mobile station frequencies are listed. The paired base station frequencies are 45 MHz higher.
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4.2 Channel Usage in the Canada‑United States Border Area

All channel usage in the Canada‑United States border areaFootnote 7 will be assigned based on the technical and operational requirements outlined in Annex C and at the discretion of the local spectrum management office, depending on the local requirements.

 

5. Spectrum Availability and Sub‑Allocation Plan

See Annex A for the list of channels in table format for the bands 806–821 MHz and 851–866 MHz. Annex B contains the list of channels in table format for the bands 821–824 MHz and 866–869 MHz.

5.1 Public Safety Interoperability Channels

5.1.1 The following 25 kHz wide channels are available to public safety organizations as public safety interoperability channels within Canada. These channels are available for use in all areas and are to be used only for coordination of tactical communications between public safety agencies or within the same public safety agency, or for other similar emergency communications associated with Canadian operations for the preservation of life and protection of property. The channels in Table 1 are separated by 500 kHz. Adjacent channels will not be assigned closer than 25 kHz. Calling and tactical channels will be assigned together.

Table 1 — Public Safety Interoperability Channels in the Bands 821–824 MHz and 866–869 MHz Within CanadaFootnote 8
- Designation Channel Number Centre Frequency (MHz)
Calling Channel
and Calling DirectFootnote 9
I-CALL BA1
(601)
821.0125 paired with 866.0125
I-CALL1D BA1 821.0125 paired with 866.0125
Tactical Channels
and Tactical DirectFootnote 10
ITAC-1 BA39
(639)
821.5125 paired with 866.5125
ITAC-1D BA39 866.5125 paired with 866.5125
ITAC-2 BA77
(677)
822.0125 paired with 867.0125
ITAC-2D BA77 867.0125 paired with 867.0125
ITAC-3 BA115
(715)
822.5125 paired with 867.5125
ITAC-3D BA115 867.5125 paired with 867.5125
ITAC-4 BA153
(753)
823.0125 paired with 868.0125
ITAC-4D BA153 868.0125 paired with 868.0125

5.1.2 The following 25 kHz wide channels are available as public safety interoperability channels. These channels are available for use within 30 km of the Canada‑United States border in all areas. Interoperability channels are to be used only for coordination of tactical communications between public safety agencies or within the same public safety agency, or for other similar emergency communications associated with Canada‑United States operations for the preservation of life and protection of property. Usage of these channels in the Sharing Zones may be locally coordinated in accordance with the interoperability requirements of the Canadian and U.S. public safety licensees. Within 30 km of the Canada‑United States border, adjacent channels will not be assigned closer than 25 kHz. Calling and tactical channels will be assigned together.

Table 2 — Canada‑United States Public Safety Interoperability Channels in the Bands 806–821 MHz and 851–866 MHzFootnote 11
Designation Channel Number Centre Frequency (MHz)
Calling Channel
and Calling Direct
8CALL90 AA1 806.0125 paired with 851.0125
8CALL90D AA1 851.0125 paired with 851.0125
Tactical Channels
and Tactical‑Direct
8TAC91 AA21 806.5125 paired with 851.5125
8TAC91D AA21 851.5125 paired with 851.5125
8TAC92 AA41 807.0125 paired with 852.0125
8TAC92D AA41 852.0125 paired with 852.0125
8TAC93 AA61 807.5125 paired with 852.5125
8TAC93D AA61 852.5125 paired with 852.5125
8TAC94 AA81 808.0125 paired with 853.0125
8TAA94D AA81 853.0125 paired with 853.0125

5.1.3 Continuous Tone‑Coded Squelch System (CTCSS) Frequency and Modulation

The CTCSS frequency 156.7 Hz will be used on both transmitters and receivers for the interoperability channels listed in tables 1 and 2. Base stations will standardize on analog frequency modulation.

5.2 Conventional Radio SystemsFootnote 12

5.2.1 Channels BA191 to BA193 are available for conventional duplex or simplex assignments in the bands 821–824 MHz and 866–869 MHz.

5.2.2 Additional assignments for conventional systems can be made from available trunked channel groups, where spectrum is available and where justified.

5.3 Wide Area Channels

5.3.1 A wide area land mobile radio system is a system that has common frequencies assigned for use under the following conditions: (1) operational necessity for the land mobile/portable radio equipment to travel and be used on a regular basis between two or more geographic areas (a geographic area is defined as the coverage area obtained from a base station in accordance with its effective radiated power (ERP) and effective antenna height); AND (2) operational necessity for the land mobile/portable equipment to operate on the same frequency(ies) at all operating locations.

5.3.2 As outlined below in Table 3, 40 (25 kHz wide) duplex channels are sub‑allocated for wide area radio systems. Thirty more (25 kHz wide) duplex channels may be assigned in each area as specified, for local or wide area systems. Where many blocks of frequencies may be licensed to one holder, assignment of frequencies to each particular site may differ from the block allocation outlined below. Alternative block allocations in such situations will be considered if they improve spectrum efficiency or improve reuse in wide area systems. Each frequency for a particular site must be approved by the local spectrum management office, as it will affect the geographic reassignment of that particular frequency unless an arrangement has been made for the use of frequencies within a specified geographical area.

Table 3 — Wide Area and Local Area Channels (AA Series) in the Bands 806–821 MHz and 851–866 MHz
System Type Channels (“AA” series)
Wide area 261–264, 266–280, 331–332, 336–342, 346–352, 356–360
Local area (or wide area, where required) 265, 333–335, 343–345, 353–355
- Between 71°W and 81°W 241–260
- Between 81°W and 85°W
(Outside Sharing Zone)
191–210
- West of 85°W and East of 71°W
(Outside of Sharing Zone)
141–150, 251–260

5.4 Trunked Radio Systems

5.4.1 Any system using more than three channels at one site should be configured as a trunked system. The interoperability channels listed in tables 1 and 2 will not be counted as channels with respect to trunked systems.

5.4.2 As outlined in annexes A and B, the Department has listed, as a guideline, trunking groups for system deployments in the bands. Trunking groups are identified by the first channel number of the "A" series channels. Within the Canada‑United States border area, the number of trunking groups varies depending on the number of channels available (see Annex C for border use).

5.4.3 For the bands 806–821 MHz and 851–866 MHz, trunking groups are based on 25 kHz wide channels. Spectrum is channelized in five‑channel groups. Within a given five‑channel group, the separation between channels is 250 kHz (see Table A4 of Annex A). Trunking groups may also be based on narrower channels (i.e. where applicable, channels of bandwidth 12.5 kHz or 6.25 kHz may be used to form trunking groups). For example, to form a trunking group using 12.5 kHz wide channels, trunking group 281 based on the 25 kHz wide AA channel series may be divided to form three new trunking groups based on the 12.5 kHz wide AB channel series.Footnote 13 Similarly, the AC channel series can be used to form five new trunking groups using 6.25 kHz wide channels.Footnote 14 See Figure 4.

Figure 4 — Example of trunking groups using narrower channel sizes for the bands 806–821 MHz and 851–866 MHz
Figure 4 — Example of trunking groups using narrower channel sizes for the bands 806-821 MHz and 851-866 MHz (the long description is located below the image)

Description of Figure 4

This chart shows an example of trunking groups using narrower channel sizes for the bands 806–821 MHz and 851–866 MHz. There are five 25 kHz wide AA channels per group with a separation between channels of 250 kHz (e.g. AA channels 281, 291, 301, 311 and 321). The trunking group 281, based on the 25 kHz wide AA channel series, may be divided to form three new trunking groups with 12.5 kHz wide channels in the AB channel series or five new trunking groups with 6.25 kHz wide channels in the AC channel series, as follows:
Figure 4 — New Trunking Groups
BB channels 560 580 600 620 640
BB channels 561 581 601 621 641
BB channels 562 582 602 622 642
or
BC channels 1120 1160 1200 1240 1280
BC channels 1121 1161 1201 1241 1281
BC channels 1122 1162 1202 1242 1282
BC channels 1123 1163 1203 1243 1283
BC channels 1124, 1164, 1204, 1244, 1284.
View full size image

5.4.4 For the bands 821–824 MHz and 866–869 MHz, trunking groups are based on the BA series (i.e. 25 kHz wide) channels. Spectrum is channelized in six‑channel groups. Within a given six‑channel group, the separation between channels is 500 kHz. See Table B4 of Annex B. Trunking groups in these bands may also be based on narrower channels in the 6.25 kHz wide BC channel seriesFootnote 15. See Figure 5.

Figure 5 — Example of trunking groups using narrower channel sizes for the bands 821–824 MHz and 866–869 MHz
Figure 5 — Example of trunking groups using narrower channel sizes for the bands 821-824 MHz and 866-869 MHz (the long description is located below the image)

Description of Figure 5

This chart shows an example of the trunking group using narrower channel sizes for the bands 821–824 MHz and 866–869 MHz. There are six 25 kHz wide BA channels per group with a separation between channels of 500 kHz (e.g. BA channels 3, 41, 79, 117, 155 and 195). A trunking group based on the 12.5 kHz wide BB channel series may also be formed using the same centre frequencies of the 25 kHz wide BA channel series trunking group. The trunking group 3 based on the 25 kHz wide BA channel series may also be divided to form two new trunking groups based on the 6.25 kHz wide BC, as follows:
Figure 5
BB channels 4 79 154 229 304 384
BB channels 5 80 155 230 305 385
View full size image

5.4.5 An applicant for a trunked radio system may be assigned up to five duplex channels at a time. However, where an application is made for more than five duplex channels to be used on multiple sites, the application will be considered subject to adequate justification being provided. Minimum loading of the existing channels in accordance with Section 6.2 will be a condition for system expansion.

5.4.6 Expansion of trunked systems to more channels per group is to be from other trunked system groups with 250 kHz separation higher in frequencyFootnote 16 except where Canadian use in the border area is not sufficient to accommodate a trunking system with 250 kHz channel separation within one group of channels. Here, trunking schemes with much closer channel separation than 250 kHz are feasible and would be considered. For the bands 821–824 MHz and 866–869 MHz, groups BA19, BA20 and BA21 are not expandable (e.g. no more groups with 250 kHz separation higher in frequency).

5.4.7 Interoperability channels used for trunking systems are assigned on a secondary no‑interference, no‑protection basis to conventional interoperability operations. If interoperability channels are used in a trunking system, they must immediately be released when they are needed for conventional interoperability purposes.

5.4.8 The Calling channel should not be included in a trunking system. Tactical channels may be included in a trunking system in accordance with Section 5.4.7.

5.4.9 Variations and combinations of the trunking groups can be assigned at the discretion of the local spectrum management office.

5.4.10 In areas where there is spectrum congestion, conventional channels may be combined to create trunking groups at the discretion of the local spectrum management office.

 


6. Technical Criteria

6.1 Channel Sharing

6.1.1 The assignment of a frequency or frequencies to a holder of a radio authorization does not confer a monopoly on the use of the frequency or frequencies, nor shall a radio authorization be construed as conferring any right of continued tenure in respect of the frequency or frequencies.

6.2 Loading Guidelines

6.2.1 Industry Canada will apply the guidelines found in GL-04, Channel Loading Guidelines, in determining the loading of radio channels.

6.2.2 In the frequency assignment process, these guidelines may be used in conjunction with current observed channel occupancy data (obtained with automatic occupancy measuring equipment) to determine whether additional channels are required. Such observations will also be used to assess the general loading criteria and the inherent trade-off between sound spectrum management and acceptable grades of service.

6.2.3 The Department is using this approach to make frequency assignments, but may also take into account other considerations when assessing the number of radio channels to be assigned to a system. Applicants should provide as much traffic-related data as possible with their application.

6.3 Technical Requirements

6.3.1 Radiated Power and Antenna Height Limits

Within the sharing and protection zones, the ERP will be subject to the limitations in tables C3 and C4 of Annex C. Outside the sharing and protection zones, the ERP shall be limited to that necessary to provide the required service as determined by the system requirements. Systems requiring an ERP greater than 125 watts may require additional justification and will be considered on a case‑by‑case basis by the local spectrum management office.

6.3.2 Co‑Channel Separation

6.3.2.1 Normally, the minimum geographic separation between co‑channel base stations of different networks will be calculated based on a non‑overlap of the 40 dBμV/m protected contour of the existing station and the 22 dBμV/m interference contour of the proposed station. This criterion is not applicable to systems operating on the same channel (vertical loading) within the same service area.

6.3.2.2 The protected contour of the existing station is calculated based on a probability of service of 50% of the time for 50% of the locations at the edge of the contour.

6.3.2.3 The interference contour is calculated using the probability that the interfering signal level used is not exceeded more than 10% of the time for 50% of the locations at the edge of the contour (i.e. 90% of the time it is below the threshold for 50% of the locations).

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Fixed systems are authorized on a secondary no‑interference, no‑protection basis with respect to land mobile systems. See Section 2.6 for additional details.

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Footnote 2

As defined in the Radiocommunication Act, harmful interference means an adverse effect of electromagnetic energy from any emission, radiation or induction that (a) endangers the use or functioning of a safety‑related radiocommunication system, or (b) significantly degrades or obstructs, or repeatedly interrupts, the use or functioning of radio apparatus or radio‑sensitive equipment.

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Footnote 3

No‑interference, no‑protection basis means that a service or stations in a service cannot cause harmful interference to another service or to another station in the same service, nor can the service which is subject to not causing interference claim protection from harmful interference caused by the other service or other station in the same service.

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Footnote 4

Base‑to‑base transmissions include fixed (repeater) and fixed (control) operations.

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Footnote 5

Typically, systems requiring a channel bandwidth of 12.5 kHz, regardless of their spectrum efficiency, will be assigned frequencies in the "AB" series.

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Footnote 6

The legacy channel plan for the bands 821–824 MHz and 866–869 MHz provided 25 kHz channel bandwidth on all channels spaced 12.5 kHz apart so that channels were interstitial or overlapping. Geographic separation between adjacent base stations using 25 kHz channel bandwidth in the "BA" channel series is required.

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Footnote 7

Usage in the Canada‑United States border area is subject to international agreements between the two countries. Conditions may be added during the term of the licence if required by the terms of international agreements between the governments of the United States and Canada.

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Footnote 8

Channel numbers correspond to 25 kHz wide channels in the "BA" series, as listed in Table B1, Annex B.

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Footnote 9

Calling channels are used to establish contact between public safety entities in order for the parties to move to an interoperability channel. These channels are not used as traffic channels.

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Footnote 10

Tactical channels are used as traffic channels.

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Footnote 11

Channel numbers correspond to 25 kHz wide channels in the "AA" series, as listed in Table A1, Annex A.

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Footnote 12

Conventional radio systems are defined as radio systems in which one or more radio frequency channels are assigned to mobile and base stations, but are not used as a trunk group.

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Footnote 13

The availability of the new 12.5 kHz trunking group (e.g. AB560 and AB562 in Figure 4) is dependent on the adjacent trunking group use (e.g. AA280 and AA282, not shown).

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Footnote 14

The availability of some of the new 6.25 kHz trunking groups (e.g. AC 1123 and AC 1124 in Figure 4) is dependent on the adjacent trunking group use.

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Footnote 15

As the 25 kHz wide BA channel series is spaced 12.5 kHz apart, only two new trunking groups can be formed based on the 6.25 kHz wide BC channel series.

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Footnote 16

For example, trunked group BA2 can be expanded from group BA22 (e.g. 250 kHz separation), group BA3 can be expanded from group BA23, etc.

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