RIC-22 — General Radio Operating Procedures

Issue 4
January 2008

Preface

Radiocommunication Information Circulars are issued for the guidance of those engaged in radiocommunications in Canada. The information contained in these circulars is subject to change without notice. It is therefore suggested that interested persons consult the nearest district office of Industry Canada for additional details. While every reasonable effort has been made to ensure accuracy, no warranty is expressed or implied. As well, these circulars have no status in law.

Comments and suggestions may be directed to the following address:

Industry Canada
Radiocommunications and
Broadcasting Regulatory Branch
235 Queen St.
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0H5

Attention: DOS

Email: ic.spectrumpublications-publicationsduspectre.ic@canada.ca

All Spectrum Management and Telecommunications publications are available on the following website: http://www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.


Contents


1. Intent

This document contains information useful to all radio operators. It outlines general operating procedures; including the proper manner in which a radio message is to be structured and sent, as well as the international phonetic alphabet used to avoid confusion and provide clarity when spelling words. General information on distress calling procedures can also be found in this document.


2. Background

This document originally contained information specifically used by candidates applying for the Restricted Operator's Certificate — Land (ROC-L). This certificate is no longer being issued. The general information provided here, is still relevant to all radio operators, and thus is being offered for that purpose.


3. General Information

3.1 Priority of Communications

The order of priority for the transmission of messages is:

  1. Distress communications
  2. Urgency communications
  3. Safety communications
  4. All other communications

3.2 Privacy of Communications

Radio operators and all persons who become acquainted with radiocommunications are required to preserve the privacy of those communications. In accordance with section 9(2) of the Radiocommunication Act no person shall divulge the contents, or the existence, of communications transmitted, received or intercepted by a radio station, except as permitted by the addressee of the message or his/her accredited agent, or to authorized officials of the Government of Canada, officers of the court or an operator of a telecommunications system as is necessary to forward or deliver the communication. These restrictions do not apply to a message of distress, urgency, safety or to messages addressed to "ALL STATIONS"; (i.e. weather reports, storm warnings, etc).

As outlined in section 9.1 of the Act, any person who violates the privacy of communications is liable, on summary conviction, in the case of an individual, to a fine not exceeding twenty-five thousand dollars or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year, or to both, or, in the case of a person other than an individual, on summary conviction, to a fine not exceeding seventy-five thousand dollars.

3.3 Control of Communications

In communications between base stations and mobile radio stations, the base station has control of communications, and the mobile station shall comply with all instructions in matters relating to the order and time of transmission, the choice of frequency and to the duration and suspension of work. This does not apply in the cases of distress or urgency communications, where control lies with the station initiating the priority call.

3.4 Superfluous Communications and Interference

Radiocommunications between stations should be restricted to those necessary to conduct the business operations of the radio station licence holder. In accordance with section 32.(1) of the Radiocommunication Regulations, superfluous communication as well as profane and obscene language are strictly prohibited.

As noted in section 10.(1)(d) of the Act, any person who violates the Regulations relative to unauthorized communications, profane or obscene language is liable, on summary conviction, in the case of an individual, to a fine not exceeding five thousand dollars or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year, or to both, or, in the case of a corporation, on summary conviction, to a fine not exceeding twenty-five thousand dollars.

The Act clearly states that all radio stations shall be operated so as not to interfere with or obstruct any radiocommunication. The penalties for doing so are the same as those noted above. The only situation under which you may interrupt or interfere with the normal working of another station is when you are required to transmit a higher priority message, for example, distress, urgency or other priority calls or messages.

3.5 False Distress Signals

Section 9.(1)(a) of the Act clearly states that no person shall knowingly send, transmit, or cause to be sent or transmitted any false or fraudulent distress signal, message, call or radiogram of any kind. Penalties for this offence, on summary conviction, in the case of an individual, can include a fine not exceeding five thousand dollars or imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year, or to both, or, in the case of a corporation, to a fine not exceeding twenty-five thousand dollars.


4. Radio Operating Procedures

4.1 Speech Transmission Techniques

The efficient use of radio depends to a large extent on the method of speaking and on the articulation of the operator. As the distinctive sounds of consonants are liable to become blurred in the transmission of speech and as words of similar length containing the same vowel sounds are apt to sound alike, special care is necessary to ensure proper pronunciation.

When using radio, the operator should speak all words plainly and clearly to prevent words from running together. Avoid any tendency to shout, to accent syllables, or to speak too rapidly. The following points should be kept in mind when using radio:

Speed: Keep the rate of speech constant, neither too fast nor too slow. Remember that the operator receiving your message may have to write it down.

Rhythm: Preserve the rhythm of ordinary conversation and word pronunciation. Also avoid the introduction of unnecessary sounds such as "er" and "um" between words.

4.2 Time and Date

The twenty-four hour clock system should be used to express time during radiocommunications. Time should be expressed and transmitted by means of four figures, the first two denoting the hour past midnight and the last two the minutes past the hour.

Examples:

12:45 a.m......................
is expressed as 0045
12:00 noon ....................
is expressed as 1200
11:45 p.m......................
is expressed as 2345
12:00 midnight...............
is expressed as 2400 or 0000
1:30 a.m........................
is expressed as 0130
1:45 p.m........................
is expressed as 1345
4:30 p.m........................
is expressed as 1630

Time is usually referenced to one standard time zone, Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) (often referred to as Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) or zulu time (Z)) to avoid confusion between different time zones. When operations are conducted solely in one time zone, standard or local time may be used.

Where the date, as well as the time of day, is required, a six-figure group should be used. The first two figures indicate the day of the month and the following four figures indicate the time.

Examples:

Noon (EST) of the 16th day of the month is expressed as ........
161200 E
2:45 a.m. (PST) of the 24th day of the month is expressed as ....
240245 P

4.3 ITU Phonetic Alphabet

The phonetic alphabet adopted by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) is used to avoid confusion when transmitting difficult or unusual words. This internationally recognized alphabet should be learned so that it is readily available whenever isolated letters or groups of letters are pronounced separately, or when communication is difficult. Call signs should also be spelled phonetically.

The ITU (International Telecommunication Union) phonetic alphabet is:

The ITU (International Telecommunication Union) phonetic alphabet
Letter Word Pronounced as
A Alfa AL FAH
B Bravo BRAH VOH
C Charlie CHAR LEE or SHAR LEE
D Delta DELL TAH
E Echo ECK OH
F Foxtrot FOKS TROT
G Golf GOLF
H Hotel HOH TELL
I India IN DEE AH
J Juliett JEW LEE ETT
K Kilo KEY LOH
L Lima LEE MAH
M Mike MIKE
N November NO VEM BER
O Oscar OSS CAH
P Papa PAH PAH
Q Quebec KEH BECK
R Romeo ROW ME OH
S Sierra SEE AIR RAH
T Tango TANG GO
U Uniform YOU NEE FORM or OO NEE FORM
V Victor VIK TAH
W Whiskey WISS KEY
X X-ray ECKS RAY
Y Yankee YANG KEY
Z Zulu ZOO LOO

Note:
The syllables to be emphasized are in bold.

Numbers are pronounced as follows:

0 – ZE-RO
1 – WUN
2 – TOO
3 – TREE
4 – FOW-er
5 – FIFE
6 – SIX
7 – SEV-en
8 – AIT
9 – NIN-er

Decimal –  DAY-SEE-MAL
Hundred – HUN-dred
Thousand – TOU-SAND

4.4 Transmission of Numbers

All numbers except whole thousands should be transmitted by pronouncing each digit separately. Whole thousands should be transmitted by pronouncing each digit in the number of thousands followed by the word "thousand".

Examples:

10 becomes
one zero
75 becomes
seven five
100 becomes
one zero zero
5,800 becomes
five eight zero zero
11,000 becomes
one one thousand
68,009 becomes
six eight zero zero nine

Numbers containing a decimal point shall be transmitted as above, with the decimal point indicated by the word "decimal".

Example:

121.5 becomes
one two one decimal five

Monetary denominations, when transmitted with groups of digits, should be transmitted in the sequence in which they are written.

Examples:

$17.25 becomes
dollars one seven decimal two five
.75 becomes
decimal seven five

Time should be expressed using the twenty-four hour clock system and should be transmitted by pronouncing each digit. Unless operations are conducted solely within the same time zone, the time should be reported in UTC with the last digit followed by the word "zulu".

Examples:

0920 Z Zero nine two zero zulu
09 Nine minutes past the hour

4.5 Procedural Words and Phrases

While it is not practical to set down precise phraseology for all radiotelephone procedures, slang expressions such as "OK", "REPEAT", "TEN-FOUR", "OVER AND OUT", "BREAKER BREAKER", "COME IN PLEASE", etc., should not be used. Appendix A contains a list of words and phrases that should be used where applicable.

4.6 Call Signs

A distinctive call sign, consisting of a group of letters and numbers, is assigned to base stations by Industry Canada for identification purposes and should be used at least when initial contact is being established and again when the radiocommunication is concluded. When two or more users share a common frequency, it is essential that correct identification be used at all times to ensure positive identification of the users. For mobile stations and hand-held units, a readily recognizable identifier such as fleet car or truck number should be used or, in the case of railroad operations, train number or unit identification.

Examples:

  • Land Stations
  • CJM702
  • XNM45
  • Mobile Stations
  • Car five one
  • Expressway one four two

4.7 Radiotelephone Calling Procedures

Before transmitting, the operator of every station shall listen to the desired radiocommunication channel for a period long enough to satisfy themselves that their transmission will not cause harmful interference to communications already in progress. If such interference seems likely, the operator should wait for the first break in the transmission. A station having distress, urgency or safety communications to transmit is entitled to interrupt, at any time, a transmission of lower priority that is in progress.

The identifier of the station being called is ALWAYS spoken first, followed by the words "THIS IS" and your own station identifier.

4.8 Single Station Call

When an operator wishes to establish communication with a specific station, the following items shall be transmitted in the order indicated:

  1. Call sign of the station called (not more than three times).
  2. The words "THIS IS".
  3. Call sign of the station calling (not more than three times).
  4. Invitation to reply.

Examples:

FREIGHTWAY TWO FIVE ZERO
THIS IS
FREIGHTWAY MONTREAL
XMT FIVE NINE
OVER

VYD FIVE SEVEN LA RONGE
THIS IS
VXX ONE TWO FIVE PRINCE ALBERT
OVER

4.9 Multiple Station Call

If more than one station is to be called simultaneously, the call signs of the desired stations may be transmitted in any convenient sequence followed by the words "THIS IS" and the originating station's call sign. As a general rule, operators replying to a multiple station call should answer in the order in which they have been called.

Examples: RED LINE CABS FIVE TWO, ONE ZERO, THREE SIX
THIS IS
XOV FOUR EIGHT TWO
OVER

XLR TWO NINE, XLR THREE ZERO, XMN THREE EIGHT
THIS IS
XOV FOUR EIGHT TWO
OVER

4.10 All Station General Call

When an operator wishes to establish communication with any station within range or in a certain area, the call should be made to "ALL STATIONS" as follows:

  1. All stations (not more than three times).
  2. The words "THIS IS".
  3. Call sign of the station calling (not more than three times).
  4. Invitation to reply.

Examples: ALL STATIONS
THIS IS
XJB SIX TWO
OVER

ALL STATIONS (or ALL ONTARIO FORESTRY STATIONS)
THIS IS
XLN ONE EIGHT TWO
OVER

When station operators wish to send information to all stations within range and do not require an acknowledgement or a reply, they proceed as indicated above, but instead end the transmission with the word "OUT".

4.11 Replying

Operators hearing a call directed to their station shall reply as soon as possible and advise the calling station to proceed with the message with the words "GO AHEAD", or not to proceed with the message with the words "STAND BY", followed by the anticipated number of minutes of delay.

Examples: FREIGHTWAY MONTREAL XMT FIVE NINE
THIS IS
FREIGHTWAY TWO FIVE ZERO
GO AHEAD

VXX ONE FOUR NINE
THIS IS
VYD TWO FIVE ZERO
STAND BY TWO MINUTES

When station operators hear a call but are uncertain that the call is intended for their station, they should not reply until the call has been repeated and understood. When station operators hear a call but are not sure of the identity of the calling station, they should reply immediately using the words "STATION CALLING", the called station's identification, and the words "SAY AGAIN" and "OVER".

4.12 Failure of Communications

When contact with a base station fails on a selected frequency, the mobile operator should try to establish contact on another frequency (if available) appropriate to the area in which it is operating.

When normal communications from a base station to a mobile cannot be established, the base station should try to relay the message via any other station which may be able to establish communications.

4.13 Corrections and Repetitions

When an error has been made in transmission, the word "CORRECTION" should be spoken, followed by the last correct word or phrase and then by the corrected version of the transmission.

Examples: PICK UP AT TWO SEVEN CORRECTION TWO EIGHT

FRANKLIN STREET

If the receiving station requires the repetition of an entire message, the operator should use the words "SAY AGAIN". If repetition of only a portion of a message is required, the receiving station should use the following:

  1. SAY AGAIN ALL BEFORE .... (first word satisfactorily received),
  2. SAY AGAIN .... (word before missing portion) to .... (word after missing portion), or
  3. SAY AGAIN ALL AFTER .... (last word satisfactorily received).

Requests for repetition of specific items of a message should be made using the words "SAY AGAIN" followed by the identification of the portion of the message desired.

Examples: SAY AGAIN NAME OF STREET
SAY AGAIN HOUSE NUMBER

4.14 Message Handling Procedures

When transmitting a message, the radio station operator should:

  1. plan the content of the message before transmitting;
  2. listen briefly before transmitting to avoid interference with other transmissions.
  3. deliver the radio message clearly and concisely using standard phraseology whenever practical;

The message handling format generally consists of four parts:

  1. the call indicating the addressee and the originator;
  2. the addressee reply;
  3. the message;
  4. the acknowledgement or ending

Examples:

Call-up:

XOV FOUR ONE NINE YELLOWKNIFE
THIS IS
XOV SIX ONE EIGHT
OVER

Reply:

XOV SIX ONE EIGHT
THIS IS
XOV FOUR ONE NINE
GO AHEAD
OVER

Message:

XOV FOUR ONE NINE YELLOWKNIFE
THIS IS
XOV SIX ONE EIGHT
WE WILL HAVE FOUR PASSENGERS ON TONIGHT'S FLIGHT
AND A BAG OF MAIL
OVER

Acknowledgement:

XOV SIX ONE EIGHT
THIS IS
XOV FOUR ONE NINE
ROGER

4.15 Signal (or Radio) Checks

When your radio station requires a signal (or radio) check, follow this procedure:

  1. Call another station and request a signal check.
  2. The signal check consists of "SIGNAL (or RADIO) CHECK 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. HOW DO YOU READ ME? OVER."
  3. Your station identification (call sign) should also be transmitted during such test transmissions.
  4. Signal checks should not last more than 10 seconds.
  5. When replying or receiving a reply to a signal check, the following readability scale should be used:
    1. Bad (unreadable)
    2. Poor (readable now and then)
    3. Fair (readable but with difficulty)
    4. Good (readable)
    5. Excellent (perfectly readable)

Examples:

CYM ONE FOUR
THIS IS
CYT SIX FOUR NINE
REQUEST SIGNAL CHECK

CYT SIX FOUR NINE
THIS IS
CYM ONE FOUR
READING YOU STRENGTH FIVE
OVER

5. Emergency Communications

5.1 Emergency Conditions

Emergency conditions are classified in accordance with the degree of danger or hazard as follows:

Distress: A condition of being threatened by grave and/or imminent danger and requiring immediate assistance.

Urgency: A condition concerning the safety of an aircraft or other vehicle, or of someone on board or within sight, but which does not require immediate assistance.

Safety: An indication that the station calling is about to transmit a message concerning the safety of navigation or important meteorological warnings.

Distress, urgency and safety procedures are outlined in regulations and are designed primarily for the aeronautical and maritime services. Use of these types of communications in the land mobile service is very rare.

Since detailed procedures for distress, urgency and safety communications have not been expressly developed for use in the land-mobile service, a brief outline of procedures for providing safety-related communications is given in the following sections.

5.2 Distress Communications

Distress communications should be conducted in accordance with the procedures outlined in this section. These procedures shall not, however, prevent a station in distress from making use of any means at its disposal to attract attention, to make known its position, and to obtain assistance.

5.2.1 Frequencies to Be Used

The first transmission of the distress call and message by a station should be made on the frequency in use at the time. If the station is unable to establish communications on the frequency in use, the distress call and message should be repeated on any other frequency available in an effort to establish communications with any other station.

5.2.2 Distress Signal

In radiotelephony, the spoken word for distress is "MAYDAY", and it should be used at the commencement of the first distress communication.

The distress signal indicates that a person or station sending the signal is:

  1. threatened by grave and imminent danger and requires immediate assistance, or
  2. aware that an aircraft, ship, other station or person is threatened by grave and imminent danger and requires immediate assistance.

5.2.3 Priority of Distress

The distress call has absolute priority over all other transmissions. All stations which hear it shall immediately cease any transmission capable of interfering with distress traffic and continue to listen on the frequency used for the distress call.

5.2.4 Control of Distress Traffic

The control of distress traffic is the responsibility of the station in distress or of the station which relays the distress message. These stations may, however, delegate the control of distress traffic to another station.

5.2.5 Distress Call

The distress call identifies the station in distress, and such calls shall only be sent on the authority of the person in command of the station. The distress call should comprise:

  1. the distress signal "MAYDAY" spoken three times;
  2. the words "THIS IS";
  3. the call sign of the station in distress spoken three times.

Example:

MAYDAY, MAYDAY, MAYDAY
THIS IS
PIPER CHARLIE FOXTROT X-RAY QUEBEC QUEBEC
PIPER CHARLIE FOXTROT X-RAY QUEBEC QUEBEC
PIPER CHARLIE FOXTROT X-RAY QUEBEC QUEBEC

The distress call shall not be addressed to a particular station and acknowledgement of receipt shall not be given before the distress message is sent.

5.2.6 Distress Message

The distress message shall follow the distress call as soon as possible.

The distress message should include as many as possible of the following elements spoken distinctly and, if possible, in the following order:

  1. the distress signal "MAYDAY";
  2. the call of the sign station in distress (once);
  3. the nature of the distress condition and the kind of assistance required (i.e. what has happened);
  4. the intentions of the person in command;
  5. the particulars of its position (location, airspeed, altitude, heading);
  6. the number of persons on board and injuries (if applicable);
  7. any other information that might facilitate the rescue;
  8. the call sign of the station in distress.

Example: MAYDAY
PIPER CHARLIE FOXTROT X-RAY QUEBEC QUEBEC
STRUCK BY LIGHTNING
DITCHING AIRCRAFT
POSITION: 20 MILES EAST OF WINNIPEG
ALTITUDE: 1500 FEET
AIRSPEED: 125 KNOTS
HEADING: 270 T
ONE PERSON ON BOARD
PIPER CHARLIE FOXTROT X-RAY QUEBEC QUEBEC

Note: If the station operator can transmit the distress message immediately after the distress call, then items 1 and 2 may be omitted from the message.

5.2.7 Repetition of a Distress Message

The distress message shall be repeated at intervals by the station in distress until an answer is received or until it is no longer feasible to continue. The intervals between repetitions of the distress message shall be sufficiently long enough to allow time for stations receiving the message to reply.

Any station that has heard an unacknowledged distress message and is not in a position to render assistance, shall take all possible steps to attract the attention of other stations that are in a position to assist.

In addition, all necessary steps shall be taken to notify the appropriate search and rescue authorities of the situation.

5.2.8 Action by Station in Distress

When a station is threatened by grave and imminent danger, and requires immediate assistance, the person in command should direct appropriate action as follows:

  1. transmit the distress call;
  2. transmit the distress message;
  3. listen for acknowledgement of receipt;
  4. exchange further distress traffic as applicable;
  5. activate automatic emergency equipment (emergency locator transmitter - ELT) if available and when appropriate.

5.2.9 Action by Stations Other than the Station in Distress

A station that is not in distress should transmit the distress message when:

  1. the station in distress is not in a position to transmit the message, or
  2. the person in command of the station that intervenes believes that further help is necessary.

When a distress message is received and it is known that the affected station is not in the immediate vicinity, sufficient time should be allowed before the distress message is acknowledged. This will permit stations nearer to the station in distress to reply.

5.2.10 Action by Other Stations Hearing a Distress Message

1. Continue to monitor the frequency on which the distress message was received and, if possible, establish a continuous watch on appropriate distress and emergency frequencies.

2. Notify any station with direction-finding or radar facilities and request assistance unless it is known that this action has been, or will be, taken by the station acknowledging receipt of the distress message.

3. Cease all transmissions that may interfere with the distress traffic.

5.2.11 Distress Traffic

Distress traffic consists of all transmissions relative to the immediate assistance required by the station in distress. Essentially, all transmissions made after the initial distress call are considered as distress traffic. In distress traffic, the distress signal "MAYDAY" spoken once, shall precede all transmissions. This procedure is intended to alert stations not aware of the initial distress call and now monitoring the distress channel that traffic heard relates to a distress situation.

Any station in the land mobile, aeronautical, or maritime mobile service that has knowledge of distress traffic and cannot itself assist the station in distress shall follow such traffic until it is evident that assistance is being provided. All stations that are aware of distress traffic, and that are not taking part in it, are forbidden to transmit on the frequencies being used for distress traffic until a message is received indicating that normal working traffic may be resumed (cancellation of distress).

5.2.12 Acknowledgement of Receipt of a Distress Message

The acknowledgement of receipt of a distress message shall be given in the following form:

  1. the distress signal "MAYDAY"
  2. the call sign of the station in distress (spoken three times);
  3. the words "THIS IS";
  4. 4. the call sign of the station acknowledging receipt (spoken three times);
  5. the words "RECEIVED MAYDAY".

Example: MAYDAY
PIPER CHARLIE FOXTROT X-RAY QUEBEC QUEBEC
PIPER CHARLIE FOXTROT X-RAY QUEBEC QUEBEC
PIPER CHARLIE FOXTROT X-RAY QUEBEC QUEBEC
THIS IS WINNIPEG TOWER
WINNIPEG TOWER
WINNIPEG TOWER
RECEIVED MAYDAY

5.2.13 Action by Stations Acknowledging Receipt of a Distress Message

  1. Forward information immediately to the appropriate search and rescue agencies or organizations.
  2. Continue to monitor the frequency on which the distress message was received and, if possible, any other frequency that may be used by the station in distress.
  3. Notify any station with direction-finding or radar facilities that may be of assistance, etc.
  4. Cease all transmissions that may interfere with the distress traffic.

5.2.14 Relay of a Distress Message

A distress message repeated by a station other than the station in distress shall transmit a signal comprised of:

  1. the signal "MAYDAY RELAY" (spoken three times);
  2. the words "THIS IS";
  3. the call sign of the station relaying the message (spoken three times);
  4. the distress signal "MAYDAY" (once);
  5. the particulars of the station in distress such as its location, the nature of distress, the number of persons on board, etc.

Example: MAYDAY RELAY, MAYDAY RELAY, MAYDAY RELAY
THIS IS
CESSNA CHARLIE NOVEMBER JULIETT INDIA
CESSNA CHARLIE NOVEMBER JULIETT INDIA
CESSNA CHARLIE NOVEMBER JULIETT INDIA
MAYDAY
PIPER CHARLIE FOXTROT X-RAY QUEBEC QUEBEC
STRUCK BY LIGHTNING
DITCHING AIRCRAFT
POSITION: 20 MILES EAST OF WINNIPEG
ALTITUDE: 1500 FEET
AIRSPEED: 125 KNOTS
HEADING: 270 DEGREES
ONE PERSON ON BOARD
PIPER CHARLIE FOXTROT X-RAY QUEBEC QUEBEC

5.2.15 Imposition of Silence

The station in distress, or the station in control of distress traffic, may impose silence on all stations in the area or on any station that interferes with the distress traffic. It shall address these instructions to "all stations", or to one station only as appropriate.

The station in distress, or the station in control, shall use the expression "SEELONCE MAYDAY".

If it is believed to be essential, other stations near the station in distress may also impose silence during a distress situation by using the international expression "SEELONCE DISTRESS".

Should radio silence be imposed during a distress situation, all transmissions shall cease immediately except for those stations involved in distress traffic.

Examples: Imposition of silence on a specific station by the station in distress.
(Cessna C-FNJI is causing interference to distress traffic.)

CESSNA CHARLIE FOXTROT NOVEMBER JULIETT INDIA
THIS IS
PIPER CHARLIE FOXTROT X-RAY QUEBEC QUEBEC
SEELONCE MAYDAY
OUT

Imposition of silence on all stations by a station other than the station in distress.

ALL STATIONS, ALL STATIONS, ALL STATIONS
THIS IS
CESSNA CHARLIE FOXTROT NOVEMBER JULIETT INDIA
SEELONCE DISTRESS
OUT

5.2.16 Cancellation of Distress

When a station is no longer in distress, or when it is no longer necessary to observe radio silence (i.e. the rescue operation has concluded), the station that controlled the distress traffic shall transmit a message addressed to "ALL STATIONS" on the distress frequency(ies) used, advising that normal operation may resume. The proper procedure for cancelling a distress message is:

  1. the distress signal "MAYDAY" (once);
  2. the words "HELLO ALL STATIONS" (three times);
  3. the words "THIS IS";
  4. the name or call sign of the station transmitting the message;
  5. the filing time of the message;
  6. the call sign of the station in distress (once);
  7. the words "SEELONCE FEENEE";

Example:
MAYDAY
HELLO ALL STATIONS, HELLO ALL STATIONS, HELLO ALL STATIONS
THIS IS
WINNIPEG TOWER
TIME 1630 ZULU
PIPER CHARLIE FOXTROT X-RAY QUEBEC QUEBEC
SEELONCE FEENEE
OUT

Note: The procedure outlined above is mainly for the benefit of other stations so they can resume regular service. To ensure that search and rescue stations are advised that a station is no longer in distress, a normal call to the nearest rescue coordination centre detailing the reasons for cancelling the distress call MUST be made.

6. Urgency Communications

6.1 Urgency Signal

The urgency signal indicates that the station calling has a very urgent message to transmit concerning the safety of a station or a person, but does not require immediate assistance and shall only be sent on the authority of the person in charge of the station.

The urgency signal is "PAN PAN" spoken three times. It should be used at the beginning of the first communication.

The urgency signal and the urgency message may be addressed to all stations or to a specific station.

6.2 Priority

The urgency signal has priority over all other communications except distress.

Stations that hear the urgency signal shall continue to listen for at least three minutes on the frequency which the signal was heard. After that, if no urgency message has been heard, stations may resume normal service. All stations that hear the urgency signal must take care not to interfere with the urgency message which follows. Stations that are in communication on frequencies other than those used for the transmission of the urgency message, may continue normal work without interruption, provided that the urgency message is not addressed to all stations.

6.3 Frequencies to Be Used

The first transmission of the urgency signal and message by a station should be made on the frequency in use at the time. If the station is unable to establish communication on the frequency in use, the urgency signal and message should be repeated on any other frequency available in an effort to establish communication with any other station.

6.4 Urgency Message

The urgency signal shall be followed by a message giving further information of the incident that necessitated the use of the urgency signal.

The urgency message should contain as many as required of the following elements spoken distinctly and, if possible, in the following order:

  1. the urgency signal "PAN PAN" (three times);
  2. the name of the station addressed or the words "ALL STATIONS" (three times);
  3. the words "THIS IS";
  4. the identification of the station sending the urgency message;
  5. the nature of the urgency condition;
  6. the intentions of the person in command;
  7. present position, flight level or altitude and heading;
  8. any other useful information.

Example:

PAN PAN, PAN PAN, PAN PAN
ALL STATIONS, ALL STATIONS, ALL STATIONS
THIS IS
CESSNA CHARLIE FOXTROT NOVEMBER JULIETT INDIA
LOST, REQUEST RADAR CHECK
POSITION: UNKNOWN
AIRSPEED: 112 KNOTS
ALTITUDE: 1050 FEET
CESSNA CHARLIE FOXTROT NOVEMBER JULIETT INDIA
OVER

Example of reply:

PAN PAN
CESSNA CHARLIE FOXTROT NOVEMBER JULIETT INDIA
THIS IS WINNIPEG TOWER
YOUR POSITION IS 20 MILES SOUTH OF WINNIPEG
WINNIPEG TOWER
STANDING BY

6.5 Cancellation of Urgency Message

When the urgency message which calls for action by the stations receiving the message has been transmitted, the station responsible for its transmission shall cancel it as soon as it knows that action is no longer necessary. The cancellation message shall be addressed to "ALL STATIONS".

Example:

PAN PAN
HELLO ALL STATIONS, HELLO ALL STATIONS, HELLO ALL STATIONS
THIS IS
CESSNA CHARLIE FOXTROT NOVEMBER JULIETT INDIA
CESSNA CHARLIE FOXTROT NOVEMBER JULIETT INDIA HAS BEEN
POSITIONED AT 20 MILES SOUTH OF WINNIPEG AIRPORT
PROCEEDING NORMALLY
CESSNA CHARLIE FOXTROT NOVEMBER JULIETT INDIA
OUT

7. Safety Communications

7.1 Safety Signal

The safety signal is used mainly in the maritime mobile service. It indicates that the station calling is about to transmit a message concerning the safety of navigation or important meteorological warnings.

The safety signal is the word "SECURITE" spoken three times and pronounced as in French. It should be used at the beginning of the first communication.

The safety signal and the safety message may be addressed to "ALL STATIONS" or to a specific station.

7.2 Priority

The safety signal has priority over all other communications except distress and urgency.

Stations that hear the safety signal shall continue to listen on the frequency on which the message was transmitted until they are satisfied that the message is of no interest to them.

All stations that hear the safety signal must take care not to interfere with the safety message that follows it.

7.3 Safety Message

The safety message should contain as many of the following elements and, if possible, in the following order:

  1. the safety signal "SECURITE" (three times);
  2. the name of the station addressed or "ALL STATIONS" (repeated three times);
  3. the words "THIS IS";
  4. the name or call sign of the station sending the message;
  5. the nature of the condition;
  6. the name or call sign of the station sending the message.

Example:

SECURITE, SECURITE, SECURITE
ALL STATIONS, ALL STATIONS, ALL STATIONS
THIS IS
VANCOUVER RADIO
NOTICE TO ALL VESSELS IN THE MERRY ISLAND AREA
LOG BOOM ADRIFT AND BREAKING UP SIX MILES SOUTH
OF MERRY ISLAND
VANCOUVER RADIO
OUT

Appendix A — Procedural Words and Phrases

Procedural Words and Phrases
Word or Phrase Meaning
ACKNOWLEDGE Let me know that you have received and understood this message.
AFFIRMATIVE Yes, or permission granted.
BREAK Indicates the separation between portions of the message. (To be used where there is no clear distinction between the text and other portions of the message.)
CHANNEL Change to channel ... before proceeding.
CLEARED Authorized to proceed under the conditions specified.
CONFIRM Have I received the following ... or
Did you receive the message?
CORRECTION An error has been made in this transmission (message indicated). The correct version is....
DISREGARD Consider this transmission as not sent.
GO AHEAD Proceed with your message.
HOW DO YOU READ? What is the readability of my transmission?
I SAY AGAIN Self-explanatory (use instead of "I REPEAT").
MAYDAY The spoken word for distress communications.
MAYDAY RELAY The spoken word for the distress relay signal.
MONITOR Listen on (frequency).
NEGATIVE No, or that is not correct, or I do not agree.
OUT Conversation is ended and no response is expected.
OVER My transmission is ended and I expect a response from you.
PAN PAN The spoken word for urgency communications.
READ BACK Repeat all, or the specified part of this message back to me exactly as received (do not use the word "REPEAT").
ROGER I have received all of your last transmission.
ROGER NUMBER I have received your message Number __.
SAY AGAIN Self-explanatory. (Do not use the word "REPEAT".)
STAND BY I must pause for a few seconds or minutes, please wait and I will call you.
SEELONCE An international expression to indicate that silence has been imposed on the frequency due to a distress situation.
SEELONCE FEENEE An international expression to indicate that the distress situation has ended.
SEELONCE MAYDAY An international expression to advise that a distress situation is in progress. The command comes from the station in control of the distress traffic.
THAT IS CORRECT Self-explanatory.
VERIFY Check coding, check text with originator and send correct version.
WILCO Your instructions received, understood and will be complied with.
WORDS TWICE (a) As a request: Communication is difficult, please send each word, or group of words, twice.

(b) As information: Since communication is difficult, I will send each word or group of words, twice.

Appendix B — Radio Station Licences

Unless otherwise exempted, all radio stations in Canada must be licensed by the Minister of Industry Canada. Please consult your local Industry Canada office for details.

The licence (or copy thereof) must be made available at the request of an Industry Canada inspector.

The radio station licence generally specifies the call sign of the station, the frequencies to be used for transmitting and any special conditions under which the station should be operated.

To obtain a radio station licence, a completed licence application form with the prescribed fee should be submitted to Industry Canada. To be eligible for licensing in Canada, radio equipment must be type-approved or found to be technically acceptable for licensing by the Department.

Station licence fees are due on April 1 of each year. Billing notices are mailed to licensees directly from departmental headquarters in Ottawa.

Note: Any person who establishes a radio station without a radio authorization is liable, on summary conviction, in the case of an individual, to a fine not exceeding five thousand dollars or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year, or to both, or, in the case of a corporation, to a fine not exceeding twenty-five thousand dollars.

Inquiries concerning radio licensing may be directed to any of the district offices of Industry Canada. For current address and telephone numbers, please refer to Radiocommunication Information Circular 66 - Addresses and Telephone Numbers of Regional and District Offices RIC-66). A copy of RIC-66 can be obtained at: http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf01742.html.

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