SRSP-301.7 — Technical Requirements for Fixed Radio Systems Operating in the Bands 1700-1710 MHz and 1780-1850 MHz

Issue 3
May 2012

Spectrum Management and Telecommunications
Standard Radio System Plan

Preface

Issue 3 of SRSP-301.7 has been released to clarify provisions for fixed systems used for the management of the electricity supply. This issue replaces SRSP-301.7, Issue 2.

The following are the main changes:

  1. The types of systems permitted for the use of the electricity supply have been clarified (sections 1.1(b) and 6.2).
  2. Other editorial updates and improvements have been made.

Issued under the authority of
the Minister of Industry

space to insert full name
Marc Dupuis
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

Contents

1. Intent

1.1 This Standard Radio System Plan (SRSP) states the minimum technical requirements for the efficient use of the frequency bands 1700-1710 MHz and 1780-1850 MHz for:

  • (a) low-capacity (LC) and very low capacity (VLC) point-to-point digital line-of-sight radio systems in the fixed serviceFootnote 1 (hereafter referred to as LC and VLC systems); and
  • (b) fixed point-to-point and point-to-multipoint radio systems used for the management of the electricity supply.Footnote 2

1.2 This SRSP is intended to be employed in the design and specification of radio systems and equipment, as well as in the evaluation of technical applications for new radio facilities or modification to radio systems submitted in accordance with the current issue of Radio Standards Procedure (RSP-113), Application Procedures for Planned Radio Stations Above 960 MHz in the Fixed Service.

1.3 This SRSP specifies equipment characteristics related to efficient spectrum usage only, and is not to be regarded as a comprehensive specification for equipment design and/or selection.

2. General

2.1 This SRSP replaces SRSP 301.7, Issue 2. Further revision of this SRSP will be made as required.

2.2 Existing radio systems operating in the bands 1700-1710 MHz and 1780-1850 MHz and licensed as standard prior to the issuance of this SRSP may continue to operate as standard.Footnote 3 Extension or expansion of these systems will be considered by Industry Canada on a case-by-case basis. New systems deployed in the bands 1700-1710 MHz and 1780-1850 MHz, in order to be licensed as standard, must conform to the requirements of this SRSP.

2.3 For LC and VLC point-to-point systems in general, if hop lengths between new fixed stations are less than 17 km, applicants are encouraged to use a higher frequency band.Footnote 4

2.4 Radio systems conforming to the requirements of this SRSP will be given licensing priority over non-standard radio systems operating in these bands.

2.5 The arrangements for non-standard systems are outlined in SP Gen, General Information Related to Spectrum Utilization and Radio Systems Policies.

2.6 Fixed radio systems operating in the bands 1700-1710 MHz and 1780-1850 MHz share this spectrum with other radiocommunication services as outlined in SP 1-20 GHz.

2.7 The Geographical Differences Policy (GDP) guideline applies in these frequency bands. Additional information on the GDP can be found in SP 1-20 GHzFootnote 5

2.8 Even if a radio system conforms to the requirements of this SRSP, modifications may be required to that system if it causes harmful interference.Footnote 6

2.9 When a potential conflict between radio systems cannot be resolved by the parties concerned, Industry Canada should be advised. After consultation with these parties, the Department will determine the necessary modifications and schedule of modifications to resolve the conflict.

2.10 Industry Canada may require licensees and/or applicants to use a receiver with improved selectivity characteristics, in case of a potential interference conflict.

2.11 For LC and VLC systems employing frequency division duplexing, the use of a two-frequency plan is required. Where reasonable economic or technical justification is provided (e.g. where siting prevents adequate antenna discrimination), additional frequencies may be used to resolve the problem.

2.12 It should be noted that the fixed terrestrial service shares this band with other services in accordance with the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations. It may be necessary to coordinate with meteorological satellite (METSAT) earth stations operating in the band 1700-710 MHz.Footnote 7 For fixed systems operating near 1850 MHz and near 1710 MHz, coordination may be required with Personal Communications Service (PCS) and Advanced Wireless Services (AWS) systems operating in the adjacent bands.

2.13 Analogue and digital radio systems used for aural broadcasting studio-to-transmitter link (STL) services will be permitted in the band 1700-1710 MHz and, on a case by case basis, in the band 1780-1850 MHz. All STL systems must conform with the applicable provisions for digital LC and VLC systems in this SRSP. Channel bandwidths of STL systems shall not exceed 1 MHz.

3. Related Documents

3.1 The current issues of the following documents are applicable and available on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website at http://www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

SP 1-20 GHz

Revisions to Microwave Spectrum Utilization Policies in the Range of 1-20 GHz

SP 1-3 GHz

Amendments to the Microwave Spectrum Utilization Policies in the 1-3 GHz Frequency Range

SP Gen

General Information Related to Spectrum Utilization and Radio Systems Policies

RSP-113

Application Procedures for Planned Radio Stations Above 960 MHz in the Fixed Service

TRC-43

Designation of Emissions (Including Necessary Bandwidth and Classification), Class of Station and Nature of Service

CPC-2-0-03

Radiocommunication and Broadcasting Antenna Systems

DGRB-011-07

Licensing Framework for the Auction for Spectrum Licences for Advanced Wireless Services and other Spectrum in the 2 GHz Range

Arrangement D

Arrangement Between the Department of Transport and the Interdepartment Radio Advisory Committee for the Exchange of Frequency Assignment Information and Engineering Comments on Proposed Assignments Along the Canada-United States Borders in Certain Frequency Bands Above 30 Mc/s

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CPC — Client Procedures Circular
RSP — Radio Standards Procedure
SP — Spectrum Utilization Policy
TRC — Telecommunications Regulation Circular

4. Radio Frequency (RF) Channel Arrangement Description

4.1 RF Channel Arrangements for LC and VLC Radio Systems

In order to facilitate assignment of a range of frequencies and bandwidths in the available spectrum, centre frequencies may be assigned on a 125 kHz grid. Channel bandwidths of 1 to 10 MHz in 250 kHz increments may be assigned as needed in the band, with the exception of channel bandwidths of STL systems, which shall not exceed 1 Hz.

4.1.1 RF Channel Centre Frequencies for the Band 1700-1710 MHz

Centre frequencies will be selected from a 125 kHz grid, starting at 1700.5 MHz and ending at 1709.5 MHz, as expressed by the following relationship:

An = 1700.375 + 0.125n for n = 1 to 73

where n is an integer and An is the centre frequency in MHz of the radio frequency channel. The lowest available frequency shall be assigned first.

This sub-band shall be used for unidirectional radio systems for aural broadcasting STLs, which shall be licensed first in this sub-band. If no frequencies are available in this sub-band, new STL systems may be licensed in the band 1780-1850 MHz, in accordance with Section 2.13.

4.1.2 RF Channel Centre Frequencies for the Bands 1780-1800 MHz and 1830-1850 MHz

Equipment employing frequency division duplexing or time division duplexing is permitted in this band. The minimum transmit/receive (T/R) spacing will be determined by the limitations of the equipment and the ability to coordinate.

(a) Centre frequencies will be selected from a 125 kHz grid, starting at 1780.5 MHz and ending at 1849.5 MHz, as expressed by the following relationship:

Bn = 1780.375 + 0.125n for n = 1 to 553

where n is an integer and Bn is the centre frequency in MHz of the radio frequency channel.

(b) LC and VLC point-to-point systems shall use frequencies in the sub-bands 1780-1800 MHz and 1830-1850 MHz. Where there are no available frequencies in these sub-bands, these systems may use frequencies anywhere in the band 1780-1850 MHz.

4.1.3 Branching and Spur Route Channels

For LC and VLC point-to-point systems, frequencies assigned to a main route system should be reused on the branching or spur routes where possible. The siting of repeater stations should be planned with this requirement in mind so that sufficient antenna discrimination can be obtained at the branch-off angle.

4.1.4 Spectral Efficiency

LC and VLC digital systems shall have a minimum spectral efficiency of 1 bit/s/Hz on a single polarization. In some cases, for LC systems only, this requirement is enhanced to a more stringent value, as described in Section 9.4.

4.2 RF Channel Arrangements for Systems Used for the Management of the Electricity Supply

Systems used for the management, operation and maintenance of the electricity supply must use robust modulation schemes tolerant of interference, and the radio system design must include link budget margins for self-interference impairments. Network planning techniques must be used to maximize frequency reuse. To increase spectrum utilization, the centre frequencies shall be reassigned by employing frequency reuse to the maximum extent possible. Normally, the total bandwidth assigned to a given licensee should not exceed 20 MHz. At the discretion of the regional office, requests for additional bandwidth may be considered when technical justification is provided.

In order to facilitate assignment of a range of frequencies and bandwidths in the available spectrum, centre frequencies may be assigned on a 125 kHz grid.

4.2.1 RF Channel Centre Frequencies for the Band 1800-1830 MHz

Centre frequencies will be selected from a 125 kHz grid, starting at 1800 MHz and ending at 1830 MHz, as expressed by the following relationship:

Cn = 1799.875 + 0.125n for n = 1 to 241

where n is an integer and Cn is the centre frequency in MHz of the radio frequency channel.

4.3 Protection Channels

Protection channels are not permitted in these bands. However, quad-path diversityFootnote 8 applications will be considered on a hop-by-hop basis to solve special propagation problems.

5. Transmitter Characteristics

5.1 Transmitter Characteristics for LC and VLC Radio Systems

5.1.1 The transmitter power delivered to the antenna input shall not exceed the following limits for each RF channel bandwidth.

Table 1: Power Limits for LC and VLC Radio Systems
RF Channel Bandwidth (MHz) Power Limit
Watts dBW
10 10 +10
9 10 +10
8 10 +10
7 10 +10
6 10 +10
5 5 +7
4 5 +7
3 5 +7
2 2 +3
1 2 +3

5.1.2 An increase in transmitter power over the above specified limit may be permitted if technical justification is provided. The power delivered to the antenna input shall not exceed 20 Watts (+13 dBW) per channel.

5.1.3 The centre frequency of the emission shall be maintained within ±0.001% of the assigned frequency.

5.1.4 Emission Limits

(a) In any 4 kHz band, where the centre frequency is removed from the assigned frequency by more than 50% up to and including 250% of the authorized bandwidth, the mean power of emission shall be attenuated below the mean output power of the transmitter in accordance with the following equation:

A = 35 + 0.8 (P - 50) + 10 log10(B) (dB)

where: A = attenuation (dB) below the mean output power level

P = percent removed from the carrier frequency

B = authorized bandwidth (MHz)

Notes: 1. In no case shall the attenuation be less than 50 dB.

2. Attenuation greater than 80 dB or to an absolute power of less than -13 dBm/MHz is not necessary.

(b) In any 1 MHz band, where the centre frequency is removed from the assigned frequency by more than 250% of the authorized bandwidth, the mean power of emission shall be attenuated by 43 + 10 log10 (mean output power in watts) or 80 dB, whichever is the lesser attenuation.

5.2 Transmitter Characteristics for Systems Used for the Management of the Electricity Supply

5.2.1 The transmitter power delivered to the antenna input shall not exceed 2 watts in any 1 MHz segment within the channel bandwidth.

5.2.2 An increase in transmitter power over the above specified limit may be permitted if technical justification is provided. The power delivered to the antenna input shall not exceed 20 Watts (+13 dBW) per channel.

5.2.3 The centre frequency of the emission shall be maintained within ±0.001% of the assigned frequency.

5.2.4 Emission Limits

(a) In the 1 MHz bands immediately outside and adjacent to the upper and lower limits of the authorized bandwidth, the mean power of emission in any band equal to 1% of the authorized bandwidth shall be attenuated by 43 + 10 log10 (mean output power in watts) dB.

(b) Beyond the first 1 MHz bands immediately outside and adjacent to the upper and lower limits of the authorized bandwidth, the mean power of emission in a bandwidth equal to 1 MHz shall be attenuated by 43 + 10 log10 (mean output power in watts) dB.

6. Antenna Characteristics

6.1 Antenna Characteristics for LC and VLC Radio Systems

6.1.1 For LC systems, the co-polarized radiation pattern envelope in the horizontal plane of the antenna must remain within the envelope B shown in Figure A1 and Table A1 in Annex A for both vertical and horizontal polarizations.

6.1.2 For VLC systems, the co-polarized radiation pattern envelope in the horizontal plane of the antenna must remain within the envelope shown in Figure B1 and Table B1 in Annex B for both vertical and horizontal polarizations.

6.2 Antenna Characteristics for Systems Used for the Management of the Electricity Supply

6.2.1 The gain of base station antennas for point-to-multipoint systems must be at least 11 dBi. Omnidirectional antennas are permitted if they respect this minimum gain; however, the use of directional antennas is encouraged to reduce interference and facilitate network planning.

6.2.2 The gain of terminal station antennas for point-to-multipoint systems and point-to-point antennas must be at least 12 dBi. The 3 dB beam width shall not exceed 30° in vertical and horizontal polarizations, and the front-to-back ratio shall be at least 20 dB.

7. Maximum Equivalent Isotropically Radiated Power (e.i.r.p.)

7.1 The maximum e.i.r.p. from the antenna must not in any case exceed +55 dBW per RF channel.

8. Avoidance of the Geostationary Satellite Orbit

8.1 As far as practicable, sites for transmitting terrestrial stations operating in the fixed service should be selected so that the direction of maximum radiation of the antenna will be pointed at least 2° away from the geostationary satellite orbit, taking into account the effect of atmospheric refraction.

9. Enhanced Technical Requirements for Moderately Congested and Highly Congested AreasFootnote 9, Footnote 10

9.1 This section applies to LC systems only.

9.2 The co-polarized radiation pattern envelope in the horizontal plane of the antenna must remain within envelope A shown in Figure A1 and Table A1 in Annex A for both vertical and horizontal polarizations.

9.3 The antenna shall have a minimum front-to-back ratio of 44 dB.

9.4 Digital systems shall have a minimum spectral efficiency of 2.4 bits/s/Hz on a single polarization.

10. Coexistence with Systems Deployed in the United States

10.1 Under the provisions of Arrangement D between Canada and the United States, stations located in the band 1710-1850 MHz are subject to frequency coordination requirements with systems deployed in the United States under the following conditions:

(a) stations within 35 miles (56 kilometres) of the border and where the 3 dB antenna beam overlaps the 200° sector towards the border;Footnote 11

(b) stations within 5 miles (8 kilometres) of the border and where the 3 dB antenna beam is included in the 160° sector away from the Canada-United States border;Footnote 12 and

(c) stations within the coordination distance of a receiving earth station operating in the same band.

10.2 Canada does not currently have a formal arrangement with the U.S. government for the sharing of the 1700-1710 MHz frequency band in the border areas. Licensees will be subject to any future agreements between Canada and the U.S. regarding use of these systems in the border areas, which may include obtaining departmental approval before allowing certain stations to operate.

Annex A: Minimum Antenna Characteristics for Low-Capacity (LC) Systems

Figure A1: Minimum Antenna Characteristics for Low-Capacity (LC) Systems
Photo of Figure A1: Minimum Antenna Characteristics for Low Capacity (LC) Systems [Description of Figure A1]

Table A1: Minimum Antenna Characteristics for LC Systems
Envelope A Envelope B
Azimuth in Degrees from Main Lobe Antenna Directivity in dB Down from Main Lobe Azimuth in Degrees from Main Lobe Antenna Directivity in dB Down from Main Lobe
0 0
20 19
14° 21 14° 19
15° 25 20° 23
20° 27 48° 27
52° 32 100° 27
80° 32 136° 36
100° 44 180° 36
180° 44

Annex B: Minimum Antenna Characteristics for Very Low Capacity (VLC) Systems

Figure B1: Minimum Antenna Characteristics for Very Low Capacity (VLC) Systems
Photo of Figure B1: Minimum Antenna Characteristics for Very Low Capacity (VLC) System [Description of Figure B1]

Table B1: Minimum Antenna Characteristics for VLC Systems
Azimuth in Degrees from
Main Lobe
Antenna Directivity (Decibels Down
from Main Lobe)
0
1
15° 12
20° 13
60° 14
108° 18
120° 24
148° 24
152° 26
180° 26

Image Descriptions

Annex A — Figure A1

Line graph: Shows the antenna radiation pattern limits in dB down from the main lobe for azimuth separations from the main lobe between 0 and 180 degrees.

The y-axis measures antenna directivity in dB down from main lobe from −80 to 0. The x-axis plots azimuth in degrees from main lobe from 0 to 180.

There are two data lines. The first line, Envelope B applies to all low-capacity systems, whereas the enhanced requirements of Envelope A, the second line, apply to low-capacity systems in moderately congested and highly congested areas. The Envelope B line ranges from −36 to 0 on the y-axis. The Envelope A line ranges from −44 to 0 on the y-axis. Data points for envelopes A and B are also given in Table A1. Measured radiation pattern in the horizontal plane must be within these limits for vertical or horizontal polarizations.

Annex B — Figure B1

Line graph: Shows the antenna radiation pattern limits in dB down from the main lobe for azimuth separations from the main lobe between 0 and 180 degrees.

The y-axis measures antenna directivity in dB down from main lobe from −60 to 0. The x-axis plots azimuth in degrees from main lobe from 0 to 180. There is one plot line, which ranges from −26 to 0 on the y-axis. Data points are also given in Table B1. Measured radiation pattern in the horizontal plane must be within these limits for vertical or horizontal polarizations.

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