Archived — Notice No. SMBR-003-96

Industry Canada

Government Notices

Radiocommunication Act

Notice No. SMBR-003-96

Digital Data Transmissions within the Video Portion of the NTSC/M System

Industry Canada proposes to approve two "overscan" and two "sub-video" methods of ancillary digital data insertion within the video portion of the NTSC/M television transmissions. The overscan As proposed by Yes! Entertainment Corp. and A.C. Nielsen Co. The overscan (1) method is capable of providing relatively low data rates in the range of 15 to 20 kbps (kilobits per second) method functions by replacing the transmitted video signal with digitally encoded information at the edge of the picture not normally seen by the viewers. The sub-video As proposed by Digideck, Inc. and Wavephore, Inc. The sub-video (2) method is capable of providing relatively high data rates in the range of 300 to 500 kbps. method distributes the ancillary data throughout the video picture in a way that is imperceptible to the viewer. It is proposed to amend the Broadcasting Procedures and Rules (BPR), Part IV and Broadcast Transmission Standard (BTS) No. 3 to allow licensees of television undertakings to insert ancillary digital data using the methods as identified in footnotes 1 and 2.

It is intended to require a notification to the Department when the use of these ancillary services is considered. For ancillary services that are deemed to be broadcasting or program-related, potential users are reminded of the policy of the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) regarding these services (Public Notice 1989-23). Ancillary services that are neither broadcasting nor program-related may require a specific radio authorisation. The Department is currently reviewing the matter to determine what requirements should apply for the provision of these services.

Overscan systems do not cause visible degradation of received video because the affected portion of the picture is not normally seen by viewers. The National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) and the Consumer Electronics Group of the Electronic Industries Association (CEG/EIA) in the U.S. reviewed the sub-video system and indicated that the system should not cause material picture degradation. Nevertheless, it should be emphasized that the operational conditions for these systems are intended to be similar to other ancillary data transmissions, i.e. they will not compromise the integrity of the television picture or cause harmful interference to other television channels. Also, the overscan or sub-video data transmissions cannot expect to be protected against interference or malfunction from the main television signal or from other television channels.

Interested parties may submit comments on this proposal to the Director General, Spectrum Engineering Branch, Industry Canada, 300 Slater Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0C8, or at the Internet address broadcast.gazette@ic.gc.ca in the case of E-mail submissions.

Comments should be postmarked no later than 60 days from the date of publication of this notice. Comments received will be made available on written request to the Director General.

Dated at Ottawa this 28th day of October 1996.

R.W. McCaughern
A/Director General
Spectrum Engineering Branch


Note 1: As proposed by Yes! Entertainment Corp. and A.C. Nielsen Co. The overscan method is capable of providing relatively low data rates in the range of 15 to 20 kbps (kilobits per second)

Note 2: As proposed by Digideck, Inc. and Wavephore, Inc. The sub-video method is capable of providing relatively high data rates in the range of 300 to 500 kbps.

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