Technical Conditions for Implementation of Digital Radio Broadcasting (DRB) Services in Canada in the Band 1452-1492 MHz and Digital Radio by Satellite (DARS) Services in the United States in the Band 2320-2345 MHz

United States Department of State
Washington, D.C. 20520

August 28, 1998

Dear Mr. Binder:

This is in response to your letter of August 25, 1998 concerning the technical conditions for implementation of Digital Radio Broadcasting (DRB) services in Canada in the bands 1452-1492 MHz and Digital Radio by Satellite (DARS) services in the United States in the bands 2320-2345 MHz.

I confirm that officials of our two governments have worked out the mutually agreeable details described in the attachments to your letter. Pending conclusion of a binding agreement the United States intends, to the extent possible under its laws, to implement the technical conditions attached to your letter on an interim basis.

Sincerely,

signed by Vonya B. McCann

Ambassador Vonya B. McCann
United States Coordinator
International Communications and
Information Policy

Mr. Michael Binder
Assistant Deputy Minister
Spectrum, Information Technologies and
Telecommunications
Industry Canada


August 25, 1998

U.S. Coordinator and Deputy
Assistant Secretary
Ambassador Vonya McCann
Communications and Information Policy
U.S. Department of States
2201 C Street North West
Washington, D.C.
20520

Dear Ambassador McCann:

I am pleased that officials of Industry Canada and the relevant United States Government agencies have, after lengthy and challenging negotiations, worked out mutually agreeable details of the technical conditions for the implementation of Digital Radio Broadcasting (DRB) services in Canada in the band 1452-1492 MHz and Digital Audio Radio by Satellite (DARS) services in the United States in the band 2320-2345 MHz. These conditions are attached.

The operators of these services are very keen to implement their new services as soon as possible. As a result, I am informing you that Industry Canada intends to implement, to the extend possible under its law, these technical conditions effective September 1, 1998. Since implementation of these technical conditions entails action on the part of the U.S. Government, I would like your assurance that U.S. Government agencies have the same intentions, including reference to the September 1st implementation date.

In parallel, officials of our two Governments are initiating steps toward concluding the formalities to make these technical conditions a binding international agreement in the shortest time possible. I have asked the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade to immediately undertake this process on behalf of Canada.

Pending conclusion of a binding agreement, Canada intends to implement the attached technical conditions on an interim basis and we look forward to an early reply confirming the intentions of the United States to do the same.

Yours sincerely,

Michael Binder
Assistant Deputy Minister
Spectrum, Information Technologies
and Telecommunications

Attachments


This agreement deals specifically with the Canadian Terrestrial Broadcasting at 1452-1492 MHz and U.S. Mobile Aeronautical Telemetry Service at 1435-1525 MHz.

Canada is no longer pursuing a frequency allocation for Mobile Satellites in the 1435-1525 MHz band.

In the event that Canada would want to implement a broadcast satellite in the 1452-1492 MHz band a separate agreement would need to be negotiated regarding coordination and use of the satellite. Implementation of a broadcast satellite service could only proceed subsequent to completion of such an agreement between Canada and the U.S. Any such agreement would have to fully protect the interference-free use of the 1435-1525 MHz band for aeronautical telemetry by the United States.

The U.S. requires the entire band 1435-1525 MHz for its aeronautical telemetry operations. Canada requires the entire band 1452-1492 MHz to implement terrestrial digital radio broadcasting (T-DRB). However, because of the geographic location of the principal operations, the United States is able to coordinate with Canadian terrestrial broadcasting stations in certain geographical areas as contained in this agreement. In order to meet its requirements for aeronautical telemetry, the United States must maintain the availability of the remainder of the band in the areas near the border, and the entire 1435-1525 MHz band for the rest of the United States.

The U.S. has current and continuing firm requirements for use of the full 90 MHz of spectrum, 1435-1525 MHz, for Aeronautical Telemetry (ATM). Canada has firm commitments to use 40 MHz of this same band, as indicated in this agreement, for T-DRB to provide a digital service for each AM and FM station. The signal strengths and receiver sensitivities associated with ATM and T-DRB operations are such that the use of the same frequencies for both operations, in the same locations, is not possible. The operation of both types of systems in the same geographic areas therefore requires that the available spectrum be sub-divided and used on an exclusive basis. Thus, portions of the band will not be available to each of the users in certain geographic areas.

Because of the geographic distribution of U.S. ATM ground receiving sites and the ATM traffic requirements at these various sites, it is deemed possible to accept sufficient constraints on U.S. ATM use in the area of the U.S./Canada border, to accommodate Canadian use of a portion of this band to T-DRB. Also because of these geographically-differing station locations, the amount of spectrum that can be protected for Canadian T-DRB use is not the same for all locations along the common border. The specifics of the protection agreement set forth below detail this situation, and describe the sub-bands and locations that can be protected. Specifically, the United States has a firm long term requirement to operate in the 1435-1452 and 1483-1525 MHz band along the United States/Canada border except in certain locations as described in this agreement. This provides for 40 MHz contiguous broadband spectrum (plus 2 MHz of guardbands) for broadband ATM assignments.

This agreement is predicated on the assumption that the ATM spectrum that is not protected for Canadian T-DRB will continue to be useable for U.S. ATM operations throughout the country, and especially in the northern portions of the U.S. Any additional reduction of ATM spectrum in this band beyond that covered by this agreement would seriously and unacceptably degrade U.S. ATM operations.

In furtherance of this agreement the following shall apply:

  1. West of 83.25°, and East of 68° West Longitude:
    1. United States use of 1452-1483 MHz will be on a non-interference basis to Canadian T-DRB receiving stations whenever United States transmitters are within radio line-of-sight (4/3 earth radius) of the United States/Canada border. Canadian T-DRB will not protect United States ATM receivers in this band, it being understood that the EIRP of a T-DRB transmitter located in Canada will not exceed, towards the United States, 50 kW at an effective antenna height above average terrain of 1500 meters, or the equivalent balance of power and antenna height.
    2. The Canadian use of 1483-1492 MHz will be on a non-interference basis to United States mobile telemetry ground stations whenever Canadian transmitters are within radio line-of sight (4/3 earth radius) of the United States/Canada border. United States telemetry transmitters will not protect Canadian T-DRB receivers in this band.
  2. East of 83.25°, and West of 68° West Longitude:

    The United States use of 1452-1492 MHz will be on a non-interference basis to Canadian T-DRB receiving stations whenever United States transmitters are within radio line-of-sight (4/3 earth radius) of the United States/Canadian border. Canadian T-DRB will not protect United States ATM receivers in this band , it being understood that the EIRP of a T-DRB transmitter located in Canada will not exceed, towards the United States, 50 kW at an effective antenna height above average terrain of 1500 meters, or the equivalent balance of power and antenna height.

  3. No United States ATM operations will be conducted in the protected band(s) within Radio Line-of-Sight (RLOS) of the Canadian border without prior coordination and approval of Canada.
  4. West of 83.25° West longitude, certain United States ATM transmitters and receivers in the states of Washington, Idaho and Montana will continue to operate in the 1452-1483 MHz band for a minimum of 24 months from entry into force of this agreement without affording protection to Canadian T-DRB operations. After 24 months, Canadian T-DRB operations would be protected from U.S. aeronautical telemetry when Canada advises the U.S. that T-DRB in a given area is ready to be brought into use. Both parties may agree to an earlier implementation of T-DRB transmitters on a case-by-case basis.
  5. It is understood that this agreement can be reviewed at the request of either party.

Language Accepted - 12 June 1998


[AGREEMENT]
Concerning the Coordination between U.S. Satellite Digital Audio Radio Service and Canadian Fixed Service and Mobile Aeronautical Telemetry Service in the band 2320-2345 MHz

Introduction

This document describes an [Agreement] between the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), U.S.A. and the Department of Industry Canada (IC), concerning the coordination between U.S. satellite DARS (BSS(sound)) and Canadian Fixed Services (FS) and Mobile Aeronautical Telemetry Systems (MATS) in the band 2320-2345 MHz.

Background

Bilateral meetings between FCC and IC to discuss satellite DARS/FS/MATS coordination at 2320- 2345 MHz began in September 1995. Discussions were based on four proposals in the U.S. to provide satellite DARS from 2320-2345 MHz and proposed service rules. The FCC adopted final service rules and a licensing selection method for U.S. satellite DARS on March 3, 1997. In April 1997, it auctioned 25 MHz of spectrum for two licences for satellite DARS in the 2320-2345 MHz band. Two licences have since been granted to the auction winners and ITU-R APS4/II information for coordination has been provided to the ITU based on these licences.

The majority of Canadian fixed point-to-point systems are currently licensed in channels at 2326 MHz and below. In addition, a number of Canadian MATS systems also operate in the 2320-2345 MHz band and are expected to be subject to interference from DARS emissions. The U.S. recognizes that DARS satellite transmissions and MATS operations are generally incompatible on a co-frequency, co-coverage basis. IC has also expressed its view that it would be difficult for it to accept power flux-density (pfd) constraints higher than the -144/-154 dB(W/m2/4 kHz) (ref. RR No. 2556) on the entire 50 MHz of DARS spectrum and it has therefore requested that the U.S. identify the minimum amount of spectrum required for DARS.

Satellite DARS in the U.S.

One satellite DARS system is licensed by the U.S. to operate in 12.5 MHz of spectrum from 2320-2332.5 MHz. A second satellite DARS system is licensed in the 12.5 MHz of spectrum from 2332.5-2345 MHz. Feeder links for both systems will be implemented in the band 7025-7075 MHz. The licence term for U.S. space systems is 8 years but the expected lifetime of first generation U.S. satellite DARS systems is 15 years and it is likely that the licence terms will be extended or renewed to reflect actual lifetime. Though outside of the scope of this [Agreement] which pertains to the 2320-2345 MHz band, the U.S. has developed service rules and issued licences for Wireless Communication Services (WCS) in portions of the S-band where Canadian FS and MATS systems operate. WCS licensees are permitted to offer satellite DARS in the 2310-2320 MHz and 2345-2360 MHz bands consistent with the ITU Radio Regulations and the FCC Rules. Satellite DARS use of the WCS spectrum would require a separate coordination agreement between the Administrations.

The service area for satellite DARS systems will include the 48 CONtiguous United States (CONUS) Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands. The maximum pfd level required in the service area of the satellite systems is –119 dB(W/m2/4 kHz). The use of terrestrial repeaters, operating within the same spectrum as the licenced space station is anticipated by the licensees to fill in, but not to extend, the satellite footprint where necessary. However, the FCC has not issued final rules for these repeaters. Protection of satellite DARS reception from unacceptable interference from FS and MATS transmitters operating in Canada will be necessary.

FS/MATS in Canada

Current Canadian operations in the 2290-2360 MHz band consists of low capacity point-to-point and subscriber radio systems where a requirement for large or high performance antennas would not be practical. For new systems, while there is some flexibility in the site location and pointing of point-to-point systems, with point-to-multipoint systems there are fewer options to avoid interference. Constraints of a higher value of pfd will limit the use of frequencies in certain areas corresponding to the coverage of the particular co-frequency satellite DARS beam. In addition, a requirement to protect satellite DARS receivers from interference could place operational constraints on Canadian FS use in the border area.

There will be an increased demand for low-capacity fixed systems in the band for services that have been displaced by other newer Canadian services. For example low capacity point-to-point systems will be displaced by PCS and T-DAB. New applicants and licensees have been encouraged to use the lower channels first as an interim measure but this has resulted in more difficult domestic coordination, since the heaviest population of existing FS systems is currently in the lower part of the band. In Canada the frequency bands available for MATS includes the 2320- 2345 MHz band and a number of systems are currently in operation.

The [Agreement]

System Characteristics

This [Agreement] establishes sharing conditions between U.S. Satellite DARS and Canadian fixed and mobile systems in the 2320-2345 MHz band. The relevant system characteristics are contained in U.S. information filed with the ITU Radiocommunication Bureau and Canadian information contained in the Appendix. The Appendix includes the current ITU APS4/II information that has been provided by the United States to the ITU (identified as USASAT-28C, USASAT-28D, USASAT-28E, USASAT-28F, and USASAT-28G), and a current listing of Canadian FS/MATS systems (entitled "Existing Canadian FS/MATS systems). The U.S. agrees to supply Canada any ITU APS4/II modifications when sent to the ITU. Any changed parameters of the ITU APS4/II information filed by the U.S. for U.S. satellite DARS systems prior to their launch – with the exception of the pfd specified in the next section – will become effective immediately.

Satellite DARS pfd Level and EIRP Contours

The maximum satellite DARS pfd level for any angle of arrival will not be greater than –119 dB(W/m2/4 kHz) in the 2320-2345 MHz band. Coordination under this [Agreement] is based on the maximum pfd value of –119 dB(W/m2/4 kHz) along with other relevant parameters derived from the current ITU information as filed with the Radiocommunication Bureau (for the U.S. systems) and the information contained in the Appendix (for Canadian systems). PFD derivation is based on the power density specified over a 4 kHz bandwidth at the input to the satellite transmit antenna and the satellite transmit antenna equi-gain contours relative to maximum gain specified in 2 dB increments up to 10 dB (and in 10 dB increments thereafter as specified in the information as filed with the Radiocommunication Bureau) and the spreading loss due to the altitude and slant range of the individual space stations. However to facilitate the evaluation of the DARS satellite impact on Canadian FS and MATS systems, the DARS transmit antenna equi-gain contours in the range -10 to -20 dB will be supplied in 2 dB increments.

U.S. Satellite DARS spectrum and service area

This [Agreement] provides for the operation of two satellite DARS systems consisting of the networks designated as USASAT-28C, USASAT-28D, USASAT-28E, USASAT-28F, and USASAT-28G. The pertinent characteristics of these satellite DARS systems are specified in the information filed with the Radiocommunication Bureau, the current version of which is contained in the Appendix. One U.S. satellite DARS system will operate in the 12.5 MHz of spectrum from 2320-2332.5 MHz (at present, USASAT-28C or both USASAT-28D and USASAT-28E) and a second system will operate in the band 2332.5-2345 MHz (at present, USASAT-28F and USASAT-28G). The service area for the licensed satellite DARS systems includes the 48 CONtiguous United States (CONUS). Service to Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico/Virgin Is. is also permitted. It is understood that U.S. satellite DARS licensees do not intend to provide service to Canadians in Canada. Therefore, spillover of satellite DARS signals should be minimized to the extent practical.

New Canadian Fixed Systems

For the purpose of this [Agreement], new Canadian fixed systems are defined as systems licensed after the date that this [Agreement] is signed, including existing systems which are modified in such a manner that interference potential increases.

New Canadian fixed systems will not claim protection from U.S. satellite DARS systems operating in accordance with this [Agreement].

New Canadian fixed systems in the 2320-2345 MHz band shall not exceed a pfd of -155 dB(W/m2/4 kHz) at U.S. satellite DARS receivers, within the United States.

Existing Canadian Fixed and Existing and Future MATS Systems

For the purpose of this [Agreement] the existing fixed and MATS systems are described in the Appendix.

In order to provide the maximum possible transition period for existing fixed and MATS systems operating in Canada in accordance with existing Agreements, existing fixed and existing MATS systems in Canada will be protected from interference from U.S. satellite DARS systems for a minimum of 18 months after the date that this [Agreement] is signed. Launch and operational testing of the first DARS satellites is expected to be as early as 18 months after the date that this [Agreement] is signed. Existing fixed and existing and future MATS systems in Canada may be afforded protection for a transition period not to exceed a maximum of 24 months after the date that this [Agreement] is signed, depending upon the actual launch and operational testing dates of the DARS satellites. To facilitate the transition process, the FCC agrees to provide information concerning launch, operational testing, and in-service dates of the satellite DARS systems referred to in this [Agreement]. After the end of the transition period, if any, existing fixed and MATS systems in Canada will not claim protection from the U.S. satellite DARS systems operating in accordance with this [Agreement].

Existing and Future MATS systems in Canada (after 18 months plus the end of the transition period, if any) will both:

  1. not claim protection from U.S. satellite DARS; and
  2. either be moved out of the 2320-2345 MHz band entirely, or not be utilized within line of sight (considering the altitude of the MATS transmitter) of the U.S. border.

In cases where satellite DARS systems are brought into service prior to 24 months after the date that this [Agreement] is signed, it is understood that operators of the satellite DARS systems and the operators of affected existing fixed terrestrial systems in Canada will develop mutual Arrangements, to address potential interference situations.

Satellite DARS feeder links

The U.S. will licence its satellite DARS feeder links in the band 7025-7075 MHz. It is agreed that coordination of the satellite DARS Feeder Link Earth stations will be conducted using the routine ITU process (e.g. Appendix 28 and relevant ITU-R Recommendations). The U.S. agrees to provide appropriate ITU information to IC as it becomes available.

Cross-polarization

U.S. satellite DARS operators are permitted to use circular cross-polarization within their assigned spectrum.

Satellite DARS Terrestrial Repeaters

It is anticipated that, subject to completion of the FCC rulemaking process, satellite DARS operators will be permitted to construct and operate terrestrial transmitters under the following conditions:

  1. the terrestrial repeaters will be used to retransmit signals received from their operating DARS satellites on the exclusive frequency assignment of the licensee and for use of the same bandwidth as the satellite space stations;
  2. the terrestrial repeaters shall not be used to extend satellite DARS coverage outside of the satellite systems' authorized service area;.
  3. the two Administrations agree that coordination of terrestrial repeaters is not necessary provided that the individual repeaters do not exceed a power flux density of –119 dB(W/m2/4 kHz) at and beyond the common border.

The pfd limit applies to all land areas, including islands, lying within the U.S. territories. Computations of the pfd shall be based on calculations taking account of available intervening terrain propagation loss (shielding) of a satellite DARS repeater, if any, plus free space calculations as described below:

pfd(dBW/m2) = 10log(EIRP/4piD2);

Where:

EIRP = 1.64xERP
EIRP is the power relative to an isotropic radiator in Watts at the azimuth of interest;
ERP is the power relative to a dipole in Watts at the azimuth of interest.

If the terrestrial repeater pfd threshold is exceeded, the assignment shall be subject to coordination on a case-by-case basis.

The U.S. agrees to provide IC with the operating parameters of all new or modified satellite DARS terrestrial repeater assignments which exceed the agreed pfd value. The information which will be provided to IC includes:

Location (Community/State);
Geographic coordinates of transmitting antenna;
EIRP (including line loss) value; Ground elevation and antenna height above ground;
Center frequency;
Polarization;
Antenna pattern/tabulation of the pattern (if requested);
Azimuth of the main lobe;
Frequency stability of the transmitter;
Bandwidth and Emission designation.

Canada and the U.S. agree to notify the ITU that the coordination of the subject networks is completed under this [Agreement]. It is understood that this [Agreement] can be reviewed at the request of either party.


Appendix
USASAT-28C, USASAT-28D, USASAT-28E, USASAT-28F and USASAT-28G

Note: The current ITU APS4/II information (identified above) that has been provided by the United States to the ITU is not available electronically.