RIC-3 — Information on the Amateur Radio Service

5. Reciprocal Operating Agreements and Arrangements

5.1 Convention between Canada and the United States of America

The operation of amateur radio service equipment and stations in the territory of the other country is covered in Treaty Series 1952 No. 7 — Operation of Certain Radio Equipment or Stations, Convention between Canada and the United States of America.

Visiting amateurs are not required to register or receive a permit before operating their amateur radio stations.

Each amateur station shall indicate at least once during each contact with another station its geographical location as nearly as possible by city and state or city and province.

The amateur station shall be operated in accordance with the laws and regulations of the country in which the station is temporarily located.

anadian amateurs operating in the U.S. have the same privileges as they have in Canada, limited by U.S. band edges and mode restrictions in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations(CFR), Title 47, Chapter I (FCC), Part 97, Amateur Radio Service.

U.S. amateurs operating in Canada must abide by the Radiocommunication Regulations and Radiocommunication Information Circular 2, Standards for the Operation of Radio Stations in the Amateur Radio Service (RIC-2 Reclassified as RBR-4). Those who are qualified to send and receive Morse code at a speed of at least 5 w.p.m. may operate in accordance with privileges accorded to holders of the Amateur Radio Operator Certificate with Basic, Morse code and Advanced Qualifications. U.S. amateurs who are not qualified to send and receive Morse code may operate in accordance with privileges accorded to holders of the Amateur Radio Operator Certificate with Basic Qualification.

5.2 Temporarily Operating Canadian Amateur Stations in Other Countries

Canada has negotiated participation in the following multilateral operating agreements which allow Canadians to operate their amateur radio stations while temporarily visiting certain countries.

5.2.1 CEPT Recommendation T/R 61-01

CEPT is the abbr for Conférence européenne des administrations des postes et des télécommunications, translated as the European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations. Participating CEPT countries are the following: 

Austria, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco**, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain*, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey and United Kingdom.

* Implemented only for other CEPT countries.

** Location of station to be provided to the administration of Monaco.

Canada, Israel, Netherlands Antilles, New Zealand, Peru, South Africa and the U.S. are non-CEPT Countries that participate in Recommendation T/R 61-01.

A Canadian-issued CEPT permit has no legal status in Canada.

The permit is issued in two classes: Class 1 and Class 2. Class 1 permits are issued to those who hold an Amateur Radio Operator Certificate with Basic and Morse code (1 w.p.m.) Qualifications, while Class 2 permits are issued to those amateurs who hold only the Basic Qualification. The Advanced and Morse code (5 w.p.m.) Qualifications are of no consequence to determine the class of the CEPT permit.

Those who hold a Class 1 permit are authorized to use all frequencies and emissions allocated in the amateur radio service, while those who hold the Class 2 permit are limited to all the amateur allocations above 30 MHz, subject to the provisions of the country visited for the amateur radio service.

Foreign amateurs who are licensed by other administrations participating in the CEPT program must apply for the appropriate permit in accordance with the provisions stipulated by their home administration.

The Minister of Industry has delegated Radio Amateurs of Canada (RAC) to issue CEPT permits. The application for a CEPT permit requires the name, address, call sign and class of certificate of the applicant, along with photocopies of the station licence and operator certificate. RAC has set a fee of $10 for this permit to cover the cost of administration and handling. More details about how to apply for a CEPT permit can be found on the RAC's Web site, at http://www.rac.ca.

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5.2.2 International Amateur Radio Permit (IARP)

The International Amateur Radio Permit (IARP) is a document issued pursuant to the terms of the Inter-American Convention on an International Amateur Radio Permit. Canada is a signatory to this Convention. Other participating countries are the following:

Argentina, Brazil, Peru, United States of America, Uruguay and Venezuela.

The IARP is issued in two classes: Class 1 and Class 2. Class 1 permits are issued to those who hold an Amateur Radio Operator Certificate with Basic and Morse code (12 w.p.m.) Qualifications, while Class 2 permits are issued to those amateurs who hold only the Basic Qualification. The Advanced and Morse code (5 w.p.m.) Qualifications are of no consequence to determine the class of the IARP.

Those who hold a Class 1 permit are authorized to use all frequencies and emissions allocated in the amateur radio service, while those who hold the Class 2 permit are limited to all the amateur allocations above 30 MHz, subject to the provisions of the visited country for the amateur radio service.

A Canadian-issued IARP has no legal status in Canada.

Foreign amateurs who are licensed by other administrations participating in the IARP programs must apply for the appropriate permit in accordance with the provisions stipulated by their home administration.

The Minister of Industry has delegated Radio Amateurs of Canada (RAC) to issue IARP's. The application for an IARP requires the name, address, call sign and class of certificate of the applicant, along with photocopies of the station licence and operator certificate, and a recent passport-size photo of the applicant. RAC has set a fee of $25 to cover the cost of administration and handling. More details about how to apply for an IARP can be found on the RAC's Web site.

5.2.3 Other Foreign Operating Arrangements or Agreements

Any foreign administration may determine whether or not to permit a Canadian amateur to operate an amateur station while he/she is temporarily in its territory, subject to such conditions or restrictions it may impose.

Information about operation in other countries can be found on the RAC Web site. Canadians are urged to contact the responsible administrations well in advance in order to obtain the necessary documentation and permission, if required.

5.3 Third-party Agreements and Arrangements

International third-party communication in case of emergencies or disaster relief is expressly permitted unless specifically prohibited by a foreign administration.

Any foreign administration may permit its amateur stations to communicate on behalf of third parties without having to enter into any special arrangements with Canada.

Canada does not prohibit international communications on behalf of third parties.

6. Extracts from the Radiocommunication Regulations

The following extracts from the Radiocommunication Regulations pertaining to the Amateur Radio Service are provided in this circular for convenience only.

Operation of Radio Apparatus

30. A person may operate radio apparatus in respect of which a radio authorization has been issued only where the person complies with the terms and conditions of the authorization.

32. (1) A person may operate radio apparatus only to transmit a non-superfluous signal or a signal containing non-profane or non-obscene radiocommunications.

Applicability of International Regulations

37. In addition to these Regulations, every person who operates radio apparatus shall do so in accordance with the Radio Regulations of the International Telecommunication Union.

Proof of Radio Authorization

38. The holder of a radio authorization shall, at the request of an inspector appointed pursuant to the Act, show the radio authorization or a copy thereof to the inspector within 48 hours after the request.

Operation in the Amateur Radio Service

Operating Qualifications

42. An individual may operate radio apparatus in the amateur radio service if the individual is the holder of one or more of the following certificates or licences: SOR/2000-78

(a) an Amateur Radio Operator Certificate with Basic Qualification;

(b) a Radiocommunication Operator General Certificate (Maritime);

(c) a Radio Operator's First Class Certificate;

(d) a Radio Operator's Second Class Certificate;

(e) a Radiotelephone Operator's General Certificate (Aeronautical);

(f) a Radiotelephone Operator's General Certificate (Maritime);

(g) a Radiotelephone Operator's General Certificate (Land);

(h) a First-Class Radioelectronic Certificate;

(i) a radio licence in the amateur radio service and an amateur radio operator authorization, issued by the responsible administration of a country other than Canada, if

  • (i) the individual is a citizen of that country, and
  • (ii) a reciprocal arrangement that allows similar privileges to Canadians exists between that other country and Canada; and SOR/2000-78

(j) a radio licence for a radio station in the amateur radio service issued to a citizen of the United States by the Government of the United States.

Installation and Operating Restrictions

43. Section repealed. SOR/2000-78

44. A person who operates radio apparatus in the amateur radio service must hold an Amateur Radio Operator Certificate with Advanced Qualification in order to SOR/2000-78

(a) install or operate a transmitter or a radio frequency amplifier that is not commercially manufactured, for use in the amateur radio service; or

(b) install any radio apparatus to be used specifically

  • (i) for receiving and automatically retransmitting radiotelephone communications within the same frequency band, or
  • (ii) for an amateur radio club station.

Technical Requirements

45. A person shall operate radio apparatus in the amateur radio service in accordance with the technical requirements set out in the Standards for the Operation of Radio Stations in the Amateur Radio Service, issued by the Minister, as amended from time to time. SOR/2000-78

Participation in Communications

46. (1) Any person may participate in the operation of radio apparatus in the amateur radio service under the supervision and in the presence of an individual referred to in section 42.

(2) A holder of a certificate or licence referred to in section 42 may

(a) permit any person who does not hold such a certificate or licence to operate radio apparatus, subject to compliance with the terms and conditions of that holder's certificate or licence; and SOR/2000-78

(b) permit the participation in the operation referred to in paragraph (a) by any person only in accordance with subsection (1).

Communications with Radio Apparatus in the Amateur Radio Service

47. A person who operates radio apparatus in the amateur radio service may only

(a) communicate with a radio station that operates in the amateur radio service; SOR/2000-78

(b) use a code or cipher that is not secret; and

(c) be engaged in communication that does not include the transmission of

  • (i) music,
  • (ii) commercially recorded material,
  • (iii) programming that originates from a broadcasting undertaking, or
  • (iv) radiocommunications in support of industrial, business or professional activities.

Emergency Communications

48. In a real or simulated emergency, a person operating radio apparatus in the amateur radio service may only communicate with a radio station that is in the amateur radio service in order to transmit a message that relates to the real or simulated emergency on behalf of a person, government or relief organization. SOR/2000-78

Remuneration

49. A person who operates radio apparatus in the amateur radio service shall do so without demanding or accepting remuneration in any form in respect of a radiocommunication that the person transmits or receives. SOR/2000-78