SRSP-300.953 — Technical Requirements for Radio Systems in the Fixed Service Operating in the Band 953-960 MHz

Issue 2, October 2007

Spectrum Management and Telecommunications
Standard Radio System Plan

Effective December 2009, editorial corrections have been made to the table headings in Section 6.2.

Preface

Issue 2 of SRSP-300.953 has been released to take into account the release of RSS-194, Issue 1. Spectrum masks for Fixed Wireless Access have been removed from this SRSP and are now included in RSS-194. This SRSP replaces SRSP-300.953, Issue 1.

Issued under the authority of
the Minister of Industry

Original signed by
R.W. McCaughern
Director General
Spectrum Engineering Branch

Contents

  1. Intent
  2. General
  3. Related Documents
  4. Radio Frequency Channel Arrangement Description
  5. Coordination between STL and FWA Systems
  6. Transmitter Characteristics
  7. Antenna Characteristics
  8. Appendix 1 - STL Priority Access Zones

1. Intent

1.1  This Standard Radio System Plan (SRSP) states the minimum technical requirements for the efficient use of the frequency band 953-960 MHz by:

  • Studio-to-transmitter links (STL) in the fixed service using line-of-sight radio to convey sound signals for broadcast by radio broadcasting stations. Provision is made for both monophonic and stereophonic systems.
  • Fixed Wireless Access (FWA)1 including Wireless Local Loop (WLL) systems.

1.2  This SRSP is intended to be employed in the design and specification of radio systems and equipment, and in the technical evaluation of applications for new radio facilities or modification to radio systems submitted in accordance with the current issue of Radio Standards Procedure 101, Application Procedure for Planned Radio Stations Operating on Frequencies below 960 MHz (RSP-101).

1.3  This SRSP specifies equipment characteristics relating to efficient spectrum usage only and is not to be regarded as a comprehensive specification for equipment design and/or selection.

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2. General

2.1  This standard replaces SRSP-300.953, Issue 1. Further revisions to this standard will be made as required. Systems previously licensed under SRSP-300.953, Issue 1, remain standard.

2.2  Radio systems conforming to these technical requirements will be given priority in licensing over non-standard radio systems operating in this band.

2.3  The arrangements for non-standard systems are outlined in SP-Gen, General Information Related to Spectrum Utilization and Radio Systems Policies.

2.4  Although a radio system conforms to the requirements of this SRSP, modifications may be required to the system whenever harmful interference2 is caused to other radio stations or systems.

2.5  When potential interference between radio systems cannot be resolved by the users, Industry Canada should be advised, and after consultation with the parties concerned, it will determine the necessary modifications and schedule of modifications to resolve the conflicts.

2.6  Users of this band in congested areas may be required to employ more selective receivers or filters in order to minimize interference.

2.7  The Department may require changes in antennas, polarization3, transmitter power levels or other characteristics, to ensure efficient use of the spectrum.

2.8  STLs will have priority access within the geographical zones shown in Appendix 1.

2.9  STL applications are normally for one-way single hop studio-to-transmitter links. However, consideration may be given on a case-by-case basis to one-way systems requiring more than one hop if sufficient technical and/or economic justification is provided.

2.10  Equipment for FWA must be type-approved (certified) to Radio Standards Specification 194, Fixed Wireless Access Equipment Operating in the Band 953-960 MHz (RSS-194).

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3. Related Documents

The current issues of the following documents are applicable, and available on the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website at: http://www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

SP 944 MHz
Spectrum Utilization Policy in the Frequency Range 944-960 MHz

SP Gen
General Information Related to Spectrum Utilization and Radio Systems Policies

RSS-194
Fixed Wireless Access Equipment Operating in the Band 953-960 MHz

RSP-101
Application Procedure for Planned Radio Stations Operating on Frequencies Below 960 MHz

TRC-43
Notes Regarding Designation of Emission (Including Necessary Bandwidth and Classification), Class of Station and Nature of Service

CPC-2-0-03
Radiocommunication and Broadcasting Antenna Systems

CPC - Client Procedures Circular
RSP - Radio Standards Procedure
RSS – Radio Standards Specification
SP - Spectrum Utilization Policy
TRC - Telecommunications Regulation Circular

Safety Code 6, Limits of Human Exposure to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields in the Frequency Range from 3 kHz to 300 GHz is available on the Health Canada website at: http://hc-sc.gc.ca.

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4. Radio Frequency Channel Arrangement Description

The band is divided into 55 RF channels with 125 kHz spacing between centre frequencies.

4.1 Radio Frequency Channel Centre Frequencies

The centre frequencies of the 55 RF channels with 125 kHz spacing are expressed by the following relationship:

Dn = 953 + 0.125 × n, for n = 1 to 55

where n is the channel number and Dn is the centre frequency in MHz of the channel.

This arrangement provides guard bands at both ends of the band.

4.2 STL Channel Assignments

4.2.1  Composite stereophonic analogue systems will be assigned three consecutive channels involving a total channelling bandwidth of 375 kHz, and 375 kHz spacing between three centre frequencies of orthogonally polarized composite stereophonic systems (refer to Figure 1).4

4.2.2  Separate, discrete analogue stereophonic systems, left and right or (L + R) and (L - R), will be assigned two, 125 kHz channels co-polarized and separated by a single, orthogonally polarized channel. Spacing between centre frequencies of the two discrete stereophonic signals will be 250 kHz. Spacing to adjacent monophonic or discrete stereophonic systems will be 125 kHz between orthogonally polarized centre frequencies (refer to Figure 1).

4.2.3  Monophonic analogue systems will be assigned single 125 kHz channels, the adjacent channels being orthogonally polarized with spacings of 125 kHz between centre frequencies (refer to Figure 1). Figure 1 provides examples where broadcasters A, B and C require composite stereo STLs while broadcaster D requires discrete stereo STLs and broadcaster E, a monophonic STL.

4.2.4  STL systems carrying several radio broadcasting programs and their auxiliary data services on a common digital multiplex may be assigned more than three contiguous 125 kHz channels, when this yields the most efficient use of available spectrum in the circumstances. The actual number of channels required in each case will be determined by the regional office, in consultation with the applicant.

4.3 FWA Channel Assignments

FWA applications will use a minimum of five contiguous 125 kHz channels.

Figure 1: Example of STL utilization of the Band 953-960 MHz, with stereophonic transmission


[Description of Figure 1]

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5. Coordination between STL and FWA Systems

5.1  Within the identified geographic zones described in Appendix 1, where the demand for STL assignments is high, STLs will have priority access to the band 953-960 MHz. The regional offices may amend the boundaries in these geographical zones from time to time to account for changing demands for STL and FWA applications and other local conditions.

5.2  In population centers other than those listed in Appendix 1, where demand for STL assignments may be high, the priority given to STLs will be at the discretion of the regional office.

5.3  Outside the geographic zones defined in paragraphs 5.1 and 5.2, the band will be shared between STLs and FWA, on a first-come, first-served basis.

5.4  In addition to the provisions of paragraph 5.3, an amount of spectrum of approximately 1 MHz in the upper part of the band should be available for use by STL stations in areas outside those covered in paragraphs 5.1 and 5.2. The exact amount of spectrum and band edge limits will be determined by the regional office.

5.5  As a general practice, the provision of new STL licences should begin with the highest frequency assignment that can be successfully coordinated and FWA licences should begin with the lowest frequency assignment that can be successfully coordinated. However, these provisions are subject to the discretion of the regional office.

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6. Transmitter Characteristics

6.1  The transmitter power delivered to the antenna input shall not exceed 5 watts (+7 dBW) per RF carrier. An increase in transmitter power over the above-specified limits may be permitted if technical justification is provided. In no event shall the power delivered to the antenna be permitted to exceed 10 watts (+10 dBW) per RF carrier.

6.2  For STLs, the total emission levels should remain within the mask defined in the table in Figure 2. For FWA systems, refer to RSS-194.

Figure 2: STL Spectrum Mask


[Description of Figure 2]

Spectrum mask for STL systems
  RF Channel Bandwidth
(MHz )
Frequency Offset from Channel Centre (MHz)
A B C D E
STL Tx 1 0.125 0.05 0.0625 0.125 0.1875 0.25
STL Tx 2 0.375 0.15 0.1875 0.375 0.5625 0.75

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7. Antenna Characteristics

7.1 STL Antenna Characteristics

The smoothed horizontal directivity pattern of the antenna for both the E and H fields with vertical or horizontal polarization must remain within the envelope shown in Figure 3.

7.2 FWA Subscriber Antenna Characteristics

The smoothed horizontal directivity pattern of the antenna for both the E and H fields with vertical or horizontal polarization must remain within the envelope shown in Figure 4.

Figure 3: STL Antenna Characteristics


[Description of Figure 3]

Figure 4: FWA Subscriber Antenna Characteristics


[Description of Figure 4]

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Appendix 1 - STL Priority Access Zones

The four basic areas are Montréal-Sherbrooke, Ottawa-Gatineau, Toronto and Vancouver. These are shown in Figures 5, 6, 7 and 8, respectively, and the co-ordinates are listed in Table 1.

Figure 5: Montréal-Sherbrooke Area
Map of Montréal-Sherbrooke Area

[Description of Figure 5]

Figure 6: Ottawa-Gatineau Area
Map of Ottawa-Gatineau Area

[Description of Figure 6]

Figure 7: Toronto Area
Map of Toronto Area

[Description of Figure 7]

Figure 8: Vancouver Area
Map of Vancouver Area

[Description of Figure 8]

Table 1: Co-ordinates of STL Priority Zones

Co-ordinates of STL Priority Zones
Region Latitude
North (DD)
Latitude North
(DDMMSS)
Longitude West
(DD)
Longitude West
(DDMMSS)
Point
Montréal/ Sherbooke 45.200 451200 74.170 741012 1
Montréal/ Sherbooke 45.200 451200 71.740 714424 2
Montréal/ Sherbooke 46.100 460600 71.740 714424 3
Montréal/ Sherbooke 46.100 460600 74.170 741012 4
 
Ottawa/Gatineau 45.750 454500 75.970 755812 1
Ottawa/Gatineau 45.750 454500 75.250 751500 2
Ottawa/Gatineau 45.120 450712 75.250 751500 3
Ottawa/Gatineau 45.120 450712 75.970 755812 4
 
Toronto 44.421 442516 79.948 795653 1
Toronto 44.421 442516 78.296 781746 2
Toronto 43.977 435837 77.937 775613 3
Toronto 43.621 433716 78.709 784232 4
Toronto 43.449 432656 79.201 791204 5
Toronto 43.291 431728 79.086 790510 6
Toronto 42.859 425132 78.925 785530 7
Toronto 42.714 424250 80.379 802244 8
Toronto 42.714 424250 81.481 812852 9
Toronto 43.272 431619 81.371 812216 10
Toronto 43.533 433159 81.009 810032 11
Toronto 44.022 440119 80.074 800426 12
 
Vancouver 49.513 493047 124.100 1240600 1
Vancouver 49.513 493047 121.678 1214041 2
Vancouver 49.000 490000 121.678 1214041 3
Vancouver 49.000 490000 123.353 1232111 4
Vancouver 48.829 484944 123.035 1230206 5
Vancouver 48.785 484706 123.036 1230210 6
Vancouver 48.698 484153 123.280 1231648 7
Vancouver 48.528 483141 123.223 1231323 8
Vancouver 48.423 482523 123.139 1230820 9
Vancouver 48.289 481720 123.270 1231612 10
Vancouver 48.250 481500 123.501 1233004 11
Vancouver 49.000 490000 124.100 1240600 12

Footnotes

1 Fixed Wireless Access generally refers to the use of fixed or nomadic radios to provide access to a public telecommunications network for telephone and/or data services serving residential and business communities. These radio systems may also provide access to private networks.

2 For the purpose of this SRSP, "harmful interference" means interference that endangers the functioning of a radionavigation service or other safety services, or seriously degrades, obstructs, or repeatedly interrupts a radiocommunication service operating in accordance with regulations and technical requirements laid down by Industry Canada under the Radiocommunication Act.

3 It should be noted that where the FWA systems are operating on a non-line-of-sight basis, the use of orthogonal antenna polarizations may provide little or no additional signal discrimination.

4 Note that where assignments are made on adjacent channels at 125 kHz spacing between centre frequencies substantial antenna discrimination between systems will be required.


Descriptions of Figures

Figure 1: Example of STL utilization of the Band 953-960 MHz, with stereophonic transmission

This figure illustrates the channel spacing for composite stereophonic analogue systems, separate discrete analogue stereophonic systems and monophonic analogue systems as described in sections 4.2.1, 4.2.2 and 4.2.3 respectively

Figure 2: STL Spectrum Mask

This figure shows how to apply the values in the following table, which are used to define the spectrum mask for STL systems. No attenuation is required up to a frequency separation of A in MHz. From A to B, allowable emissions are reduced linearly from 0 to −25 dB. From B to C the allowable emission level is −25 dB. From C to D, allowable emissions are reduced linearly from −25 to −35 dB. From D to E, allowable emissions are reduced linearly from −35 to −45 dB. Beyond a separation of E, the allowable emission level is −45 dB.

Figure 3: STL Antenna Characteristics

Line Graph: Shows the antenna radiation pattern limits in dB down from the main lobe for azimuth separations from the main lobe between 0 and 180 degrees.

The y-axis measures antenna directivity in dB down from main lobe from −80 to 0. The x-axis plots azimuth in degrees from main lobe from 0 to 180. There is one plot line which ranges from −24 to 0 on the y-axis. Data points on the plot line include: 0 dB at 0 degrees, −4 dB at 10 degrees, −11 dB at 15 degrees, −15 dB at 20 degrees, −18 dB at 34 degrees, −18 dB at 52 degrees, −19 at 58 degrees, −19 dB at 100 degrees, −21 dB at 104 degrees, −21 dB at 122 degrees, and −24 dB from 132 to 180 degrees. Measured radiation pattern in the horizontal plane must be within these limits for vertical or horizontal polarizations.

Figure 4: FWA Subscriber Antenna Characteristics

Line Graph: Shows the antenna radiation pattern limits in dB down from the main lobe for azimuth separations from the main lobe between 0 and 180 degrees.

The y-axis measures antenna directivity in dB down from main lobe from −70 to 0. The x-axis plots azimuth in degrees from main lobe from 0 to 180. There is one plot line which ranges from −20 to 0 on the y-axis. Data points on the plot line include: 0 dB from 0 to 15 degrees, −2.5 dB at 45 degrees, −11 dB at 60 degrees, −20 dB at 100 degrees, −20 dB at 150 degrees, and −13 dB from 152.5 to 180 degrees. Measured radiation pattern in the horizontal plane must be within these limits for vertical or horizontal polarizations.

Figure 5: Montréal-Sherbrooke Area

This figure shows a map of the STL priority access zone in the Montreal-Sherbrooke area, which is defined as the square enclosed by the points given in Table 1.

Figure 6: Ottawa-Gatineau Area

This figure shows a map of the STL priority access zone in the Ottawa-Gatineau area, which is defined as the square enclosed by the points given in Table 1.

Figure 7: Toronto Area

This figure shows a map of the STL priority access zone in the Toronto area, which is defined as the polygon enclosed by the points given in Table 1.

Figure 8: Vancouver Area

This figure shows a map of the STL priority access zone in the Vancouver area, which is defined as the polygon enclosed by the points given in Table 1.

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