Arrangement Between Canada and the United States on Principles to Govern the Use of the 37.5-42.5 GHz Band by the Fixed and Fixed-Satellite Services

10 April 2002

Michael Binder
Assistant Deputy Minister
Spectrum, Information Technologies
and Telecommunications
Industry Canada

Dear Mr. Binder:

In preparations for the upcoming ITU World Radio Conference in 2003, staff of the FCC and Industry Canada have been working together to implement the results of the WRC-2000 with respect to the 37.5-42.5 GHz band in order to ensure the satisfactory operation of terrestrial fixed and fixed-satellite service radio stations in that band.

By way of history, WRC-2000 considered allocation and regulatory aspects of accommodating fixed services and satellite services in the band 37-43.5 GHz. One of the principal issues was the use and sharing of the band 37.5-42.5 GHz by the fixed service and the fixed-satellite service.

CITEL submitted a comprehensive Inter America Proposal (IAP) for Region 2 to the conference on this issue. For the band 37.5-42.5 GHz, the objective was to provide sufficient spectrum for high-density applications in the fixed service (HDFS) and, on a global basis, high-density applications in the fixed-satellite services (HDFSS). The CITEL proposal included provisions for soft segmentation between the services in which access to the bands would remain, but with a focus on 37-40 GHz for HDFS and 40-42 GHz for HDFSS. This proposal recognized that the trend for both services is toward ubiquitous deployments, and that while it may be technically possible for these two services to share the same spectrum in the same geographic area, the burden of co-ordination is usually seen as detrimental to the business case.

The results from WRC-2000 for these bands are very much in line with the objectives that CITEL administrations promoted going into the Conference. Resolution 84 calls for consideration of a number of remaining issues related to the sharing between fixed services and satellite services in the band 37.5-42.5 GHz, including pfd values and downlink fade compensation techniques and parameters. However, the key element of the resolution is the requirement that: ‘in the interim period before WRC-03, before an administration brings into use in Region 2 a frequency assignment for a GSO FSS network in the 37.5-40 GHz band, it shall seek the agreement of any administration in Region 2 on whose territory the power flux-density produced exceeds the values in Table 21-4 minus 12 dB'.

Both Canada and the US have licensed fixed systems in the band 38.6-40 GHz on an area basis intended to facilitate ubiquitous deployment of high-density broadband wireless applications. In accordance with the intended service applications in this band, Canada has adopted a footnote in its domestic table of allocations that gives priority to fixed service applications in the band. By virtue of this footnote, fixed-satellite service implementation in this spectrum in Canada will be limited to applications that will pose minimal constraints on the deployment of fixed service systems. In a similar manner, the US has adopted and released a Notice of Proposed Rule Making emphasizing the soft partitioning aspects between the fixed service and fixed-satellite service not just for the 38.6-40 GHz band but for the broader 37.5-42.5 GHz band. It is also noted that Canada and the US currently have an interim arrangement concerning the sharing of terrestrial broadband wireless systems in the frequency band 38.6-40 GHz.

Canada and the US share the view that the Table 21-4 pfd values minus 12 dB in resolves 2 of Resolution 84 specific to Region 2 is an issue that can be handled on the basis of bilateral and multilateral arrangements within the Region. We therefore believe it appropriate to initiate this exchange of letters to outline the details of an arrangement between our two administrations. Further, this arrangement can be used as a model for arrangements between other Region 2 administrations, and the issue can be pursued in developing CITEL common views. If this approach is successful, ITU-R Resolution 84 would no longer be required.

Some countries may believe that the values in Table 21-4 provide a sufficient level of protection and flexibility for fixed service use of the 38.6-40.0 GHz band. However, the parties to this arrangement believe that these values may not provide the protection necessary for fixed systems in these bands and that further studies are needed to determine the required pfd levels. To that end, the United States proposes that Canada and the US agree to the principles in the attached Arrangement concerning the use of the band 37.5-42.5 GHz.

Sincerely,

Donald Abelson
Chief, International Bureau
Federal Communications Commission


Arrangement Between Canada and the United States on Principles to Govern the Use of the 37.5-42.5 GHz Band by the Fixed and Fixed-Satellite Services

The parties to this arrangement:

  1. support retention of the pfd values contained in Table 21-4 of the Radio Regulations applicable to the bands within the 37.5-42.5 GHz range;
  2. will obtain concurrence of other administrations party to this arrangement before authorizing a frequency assignment for an FSS network in the 37.5-40 GHz band if such an FSS network would produce a power flux-density in excess of the values in Table 21-4 minus 12 dB in the other country's territory, noting that the –12 dB value is subject to review as per item (3) below;
  3. will consider the results of technical studies with regard to the appropriate value of downlink power control and adjust the criteria in item (2) above if warranted and agreed upon by each of the parties;
  4. will propose the suppression of Resolution 84 (WRC-2000) in national and international fora, e.g., CITEL, ITU, etc., with a view towards addressing the fade compensation requirements within Region 2;
  5. will take steps to reflect these principles in their respective domestic policies to ensure that operators of satellite systems wishing to implement services will be aware of their responsibilities and requirements;
  6. recognize that each administration is free to declare in a global context that it is under no obligation to accept the provision of FSS within its territory if it believes that emissions from satellites providing services in its territory would cause unacceptable interference to its terrestrial services in the 37.5-40 GHz and 42-42.5 GHz bands;
  7. recognize that these principles are subject to review at any time at the request of administrations party to this arrangement.

space to insert signature

Michael Binder
Assistant Deputy Minister
Spectrum, Information Technologies and Telecommunications
Industry Canada


space to insert signature
Donald Abelson
Chief, International Bureau
Federal Communications
Commission

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