SP 3-30 — Revisions to Spectrum Utilization Policies in the 3‑30 GHz Frequency Range and Further Consultation

5.0 The Ka Band

5.1 Background

In Canada, the Ka band satellite spectrum includes the bands the 19.7-20.2 GHz (space-to-Earth) and 27.5-30.0 GHz (Earth-to-space). The bands 19.7-20.2 GHz and 29.5-30.0 GHz are designated on an exclusive and primary basis to the fixed-satellite service. This spectrum was allocated at the 1992 World Administrative Radiocommunication Conference (WARC-92), with the objective to develop multimedia consumer access satellite services. Licensing of satellites in the bands 17.8-19.7 GHz and 28.35-29.5 GHz has been guided by domestic footnote C16A on spectrum for feeder links/gateways.

The Department has been active in authorizing future Canadian geostationary Ka band multimedia satellites i.e. 91°W and 111.1°W Longitude) which will deploy a range of customer services in the bands 19.7-20.2/29.5-30 GHz and use associated spectrum for feeder links/gateways in the bands 18.3-18.8 GHz, 28.35-28.6 GHz and 29.25-29.5 GHz.

At WRC-95, spectrum for FSS employing non-geostationary satellites was identified in the bands 18.8-19.3 GHz (space-to-Earth) and 28.6-29.1 GHz (Earth-to-space) under the provisions of Resolution 118 (WRC-95). NGSO FSS systems have global applications employing a large number of low-Earth orbiting (LEO) satellites which promise to provide a variety of voice, data and video services directly to business customers and potentially to consumers. WRC-97 subsequently confirmed the sharing criteria for the use of this band.

The band 19.3-19.7 GHz is allocated to the FSS (space-to-Earth) and FS on a co-primary basis. The band 29.1-29.5 GHz is allocated to the FSS (Earth-to-space) and FS on a co-primary basis. Use by the FSS is limited to feeder links (FL) for NGSO systems in the MSS. At WRC-97, power flux-density limits were adopted defining the amount of interference allowed from NGSO MSS feeder links into terrestrial fixed systems (Resolution 46). NGSO MSS feeder links use frequencies allocated to the FSS to interconnect a mobile-satellite space station with other fixed communications networks by means of one or more gateway earth stations. Based on these provisions, the Iridium MSS satellite constellation was developed and a gateway to interconnect with the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) was established in the U.S. to serve the North American market.

In the band 17.7-19.7 GHz, the FSS has a co-primary allocation with the fixed service and shares access to the spectrum with fixed systems authorized in accordance with SP 1-20 GHz. The current spectrum utilization policies for the fixed service operating in the band 17.7-19.7 GHz include provisions for low, medium and high-capacity point-to-point systems, Local MCS, VHCM, TV Studio Transmitter Link (STL) and TV-pickup. These fixed service systems operate according to channelling plans defined in SRSP documents.

In the band 27.5-29.5 GHz, the FSS has a co-primary allocation with the fixed service. The band 25.35-28.35 GHz (28 GHz) is currently designated in Canada for Local Multipoint Communications Systems (LMCS). Access to the band 27.5-28.35 GHz is in accordance with the spectrum utilization policy for LMCS services and domestic footnote C47A which limits FSS to applications which will pose minimal constraints on the deployment of FS systems. Spectrum designations for fixed services have not been developed for the remaining band 28.35-29.5 GHz.

5.2 17.7-20.2 GHz

In making proposals for these bands, the Department took into account two existing models for designating the spectrum. The first is the European Radiocommunications Committee decision ERC/DEC/(00)07 dealing with the shared use of the band 17.7-19.7 GHz by the fixed service and the fixed-satellite service (space-to-Earth). Coordinated use of the band 17.7-19.7 GHz is permitted. However, Decides (1) of ERC/DEC/(00)07 states that earth stations in the fixed-satellite service (space-to-Earth), which are not coordinated through a national frequency assignment process, shall not claim protection from stations of the fixed service. This would imply that the decision to implement uncoordinated receiving earth terminals in portions of the band could be made by individual administrations, but that there would be no protection to such terminals on a bilateral basis. While there are proposals to pair this band with spectrum at 28 GHz, the provisions for uncoordinated transmitting earth stations are different in decision ERC/DEC(00)09 discussed later. These designations do not differentiate between GSO and NGSO implementations of the FSS further than described in international footnotes.

The second existing model is in the United States, where specific spectrum designations were made for each of the services in portions of the 17.7-20.2 GHz range. These U.S. domestic designations differentiate between GSO and NGSO implementations of the FSS. The FCC Report and Order for 18 GHz removed designations for secondary access to the bands while 28 GHz still makes provision for secondary access by other services.

In the consultation document, the Department recognized the importance of aligning spectrum use within the North American marketplace and the Americas particularly for satellite services. The Department wished to align spectrum designations, but sought to retain flexibility for all services within the bands, to the extent possible. Proposals were made that the band could be soft partitioned to emphasize the implementation of one service in a specific portion of the band, with access by co-primary services on a more restricted basis.

In the comments, there was considerable support for soft partitioning of the spectrum including the element of designating priority to the fixed service or the fixed-satellite service as appropriate, with limitations to avoid constraining the development of the service granted priority in the band. With respect to replacement texts for footnote C16A several different proposals were made relating to the individual portions of the band. In most of the proposed texts for replacement footnotes, the element of assigning priority to one or the other service was missing. As previously discussed, the concept of soft partitioning was to be applied in situations where it was desirable to place emphasis on the use of the spectrum by one service over another. In this fashion access to the spectrum would not be removed, but would be limited to implementations that would not constrain the development of the service for which priority would be given. This was intended to facilitate the implementation of applications or services where the deployment of terminals would occur in a ubiquitous manner, with minimal burden of coordination and the possibility of authorization on a spectrum and geographic area basis. In contrast, many of the proposals for footnotes introduced the element of coordination between services in bands where it was intended to grant priority to the fixed service. The Department notes that the term coordination has long been associated with the access afforded to co-primary services sharing a band on an equitable first-come, first-served basis. As well, there are responsibilities and obligations placed on both parties in a coordination process. Since the intention of soft partitioning is to place emphasis on the implementation of one service, this element will not be incorporated in the footnotes for the band segments.

FCC Spectrum Designations

FCC Spectrum Designations (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 2

Current FCC Spectrum Designations

The frequency band 17.7 – 20.2 GHz is represented in a diagram which depicts one row of five adjacent rectangles. This indicates that the frequency band 17.7 -20.2 GHz is divided into five frequency segments. The first border of the first rectangle represents the lower frequency limit of 17.7 GHz. The borders between each rectangle represent simultaneously the lower frequency limit of the frequency segment on the right and the upper frequency limit of the frequency segment on the left. The last border of the last rectangle represents the upper frequency limit of 20.2 GHz. The five frequency segments are allocated as follows:

  • the first between 17.7 GHz and 18.3 GHz to the FS (Fixed Service);
  • the second between 18.3 GHz and 18.8 GHz to the FSS GSO (Fixed Satellite Service Geostationary Satellite Orbit);
  • the third between 18.8 GHz and 19.3 GHz to the FSS NGSO (non-Geostationary Satellite Orbit);
  • the fourth between 19.3 GHz and 19.7 GHz to the FS and the FSS (MSS FL) (feeder links to the Mobile Satellite Service); and
  • the fifth and final between 19.7 GHz and 20.2 GHz to the FSS.

Proposal 17.7-20.2 GHz

Proposal 17.7-20.2 GHz (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 3

Proposal 17.7-20.2 GHz

The frequency band 17.7 – 20.2 GHz is represented in a diagram which depicts one row of six adjacent rectangles. This indicates that the frequency band 17.7 -20.2 GHz is divided into six frequency segments. The first border of the first rectangle represents the lower frequency limit of 17.7 GHz. The borders between each rectangle represent simultaneously the lower frequency limit of the frequency segment on the right and the upper frequency limit of the frequency segment on the left. The last border of the last rectangle represents the upper frequency limit of 20.2 GHz. The six frequency segments are allocated as follows:

  • the first between 17.7 GHz and 17.8 GHz to the BSS (Broadcast Satellite Service);
  • the second between 17.8 GHz and 18.58 GHz to the FS (Fixed Service);
  • the third between 18.58 GHz and 18.8 GHz to the FSS (Fixed Satellite Service);
  • the fourth between 18.8 GHz and 19.3 GHz to the FSS;
  • the fifth between 19.3 GHz and 19.7 GHz to the FS and the FSS (MSS FL) (feeder links to the Mobile Satellite Service); and
  • the sixth and final between 19.7 GHz and 20.2 GHz to the FSS.

Existing Fixed Service Channel Plans

Existing Fixed Service Channel Plans (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 4

Existing Fixed Service Channel Plans

The existing fixed service channel plans shown in the frequency band 17.7 – 19.7 GHz is represented in a diagram which depicts one row of seven adjacent rectangles. This indicates that the frequency band 17.7 – 19.7 GHz is divided into seven channels. The first border of the first rectangle represents the lower frequency limit of 17.7 GHz. The borders between each rectangle represent simultaneously the lower frequency limit of the frequency segment on the right and the upper frequency limit of the frequency segment on the left. The last border of the last rectangle represents the upper frequency limit of 19.7 GHz. The seven frequency channel bandwidths are as follows:

  • the first between 17.7 GHz and 18.14 GHz has 440 MHz;
  • the second between 18.14 GHz and 18.58 GHz has 440 MHz assigned to VHCM (Very High Capacity Microwave);
  • the third between 18.58 GHz and 18.82 GHz has 240 MHz;
  • the fourth between 18.82 GHz and 18.92 GHz has 100 MHz;
  • the fifth between 18.92 GHz and 19.16 GHz has 240 MHz;
  • the sixth between 19.16 GHz and 19.26 GHz has 100 MHz; and
  • the seventh and final between 19.26 GHz and 19.7 GHz has 440 MHz.

 

5.2.1 17.7-17.8 GHz

No change was proposed to the status of services in this band. This band is allocated to the broadcast-satellite service (BSS) after April 1, 2007 and is currently used for feeder links for the BSS operating in the band 12.2-12.7 GHz. When the BSS is implemented in the 17 GHz band, feeder links will be accommodated in the 25 GHz band (see Canadian domestic footnotes C45 and C47).

Noting the de facto moratorium in Section 4.5 of SRSP-317.7 for the licensing of fixed systems in the band 17.7-17.8 GHz, and based on the possibility that a BSS service could be introduced in Canada as early as April 1, 2007 in the band 17.3-17.8 GHz, the RABC suggested that the Department issue a moratorium on the licensing of new fixed systems in the band 17.7-17.8 GHz as soon as practicable. It is also noted that domestic footnote C-45 effectively reduces the status of the fixed service to secondary with respect to the broadcast-satellite service after April 1, 2007.

The Department is in agreement with the comments received and is placing a moratorium on the licensing of new fixed service systems in the band 17.7-17.8 GHz. Transition issues have already been covered in domestic footnote C45.

5.2.2 17.8-18.58 GHz

It was proposed to place emphasis on a designation for FS in this band. Sharing with low density FSS use was deemed to be feasible if the use of spectrum for fixed-satellite services in the band would continue to be limited in accordance with the intentions of domestic footnote C16A. There was general support for this proposal.

The current FS designations in the band pairs 17.7-18.14 GHz with 19.26-19.7 GHz are for low, medium and high-capacity point-to-point systems, and in the contiguous band 18.14-18.58 are for Local MCS, VHCM, TV STL and TV-pickup. It should be noted that 17.7-17.8 GHz is paired with 19.26-19.36 GHz resulting in minimal impact from the respective BSS and FSS designations. The Department's original proposal would therefore have left the bulk of these two bands intact for use of fixed services.

The RABC strongly supported the Department's proposal for emphasizing a designation for FS in the band 17.8-18.58 GHz, along with a similar proposal for FS in the companion band 19.3-19.7 GHz. These two FS designations were seen as important, as there are currently a large number of LC/MC/HC radio systems operating in the paired bands 17.7-18.14 GHz and 19.26-19.7 GHz, licensed in accordance with SRSP-317.7.

The RABC also urged the Department to leave the 18.14-18.58 GHz MCS/VHCM band intact since the 12.7-13.2 GHz VHCM band available to cable operators is limited to 500 MHz of spectrum. Cable operators' networks are expanding up to 860 MHz in some cases and, therefore, the current capacity of the existing VHCM band is insufficient to support the spectrum requirements of the operators. They will require additional spectrum to enable them to deliver/backhaul signals to their smaller, remote systems. The spectrum band between 18.14-18.58 GHz will provide that relief. These views were supported in a separate submission from the Canadian Cable and Television Association (CCTA). Coordination and equipment procurement were cited as important reasons to retain alignment with the designations for Cable Television Relay Service (CARS) applications in the U.S..

At the same time, the Department has been active in authorizing future Canadian geostationary Ka band multimedia satellites, in the band 19.7-20.2 GHz, to use associated spectrum for feeder link/gateways in the band 18.3-18.8 GHz. The gateways were expected to be relatively few in number (in the order of 6-10 gateways per satellite to serve North America) and capable of being located in areas which would minimize constraints on the deployment of fixed service systems.

The intent in proposing a definition of gateway/feeder link systems is that they represent the kind of low density applications which could be implemented with minimal constraint to the FS in bands which are designated as priority for the fixed service. Feeder link systems typically require higher performance and reliability and therefore use antennas which are very much larger in relation to the antennas for service links. Comments to the Department indicated that a feeder link/gateway definition may not be appropriate for the kinds of FSS systems envisaged for the Ka band. (i.e. not circuit switched architecture with bent pipe repeaters at the satellite, but an on-board processing model where the traditional double hop could be eliminated).

The Department notes the FCC Second Order on Reconsideration (FCC 02-317) which alters their current band plan to make FSS the sole primary spectrum allocation in the band 18.3-18.58 GHz. This adds to the current allocation to make 18.3-18.8 GHz exclusive GSO FSS spectrum and balances with the amount of uplink spectrum available for GSO FSS at 28 GHz in the U.S..

In Canada, the band 18.14-18.58 GHz has had little demand for access to date. As described in the CCTA submission, cable systems are only recently being rebuilt to 750-860 MHz capacity. As noted in the discussion on the 12 GHz band, in recent years with the wide deployment of fibre and coaxial CATV networks, a number of links in many VHCM systems have been decommissioned. The Department therefore anticipates that the demand for additional spectrum beyond the capacity currently available in the band 12.7-13.25 GHz to support cable systems can be handled on a case-by-case basis taking the anticipated future use and geographic area into account. With respect to the local MCS applications, this designation has resulted in the band being listed in Radio Systems Policy 20, Guidelines on the Licensing Process and Spectrum Release Plan (RP-020) as requiring a competitive process for licensing, and is currently listed as suspended, pending a future competitive process. The demand for MCS applications in this spectrum has been limited, perhaps in part because this band is either not available or has very limited use for wireless access in other markets. There is also an abundance of spectrum available for broadband wireless access and MCS services in bands between 23 and 38 GHz.

Based on the submissions, there is considerable interest from both terrestrial and satellite service providers to align spectrum in the band 17.8-19.7 GHz to the extent possible with the U.S. to achieve economies of scale for equipment as well as to facilitate coordination. The Department will add a footnote to the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations designating priority to the use of fixed services in the band 17.8-18.3 GHz. Multi-channel systems will be considered on a case-by-case basis taking the anticipated future use and geographic area into account. The designation for Local MCS is removed from the band 18.14-18.58 GHz, noting the next section on designations for the fixed-satellite service. The channel plan to accommodate this mix of applications and facilitate sharing, noting the asymmetry of paired spectrum available, will be developed by the Department in consultation with industry.

5.2.3 18.3-19.3 GHz

5.2.3.1 18.3-18.58 GHz

As previously discussed, the FCC has altered their current band plan to make FSS the sole primary spectrum allocation in the band 18.3-18.58 GHz, adding to the current allocation to make 18.3-18.8 GHz exclusive GSO FSS spectrum. At the same time, the Department has been active in authorizing future Canadian geostationary Ka band multimedia satellites, in the band 19.7-20.2 GHz, to use associated spectrum for feeder links/gateways in the band 18.3-18.8 GHz. Comments to the Department indicated that a feeder link/gateway definition may not be appropriate for the types of FSS systems envisaged for the Ka band. As well, in the submissions from both terrestrial and satellite proponents, there was considerable importance placed on the alignment of spectrum use in the band 17.8-19.7 GHz within the North American marketplace and the Americas, particularly for satellite services.

The band 18.14-18.58 GHz has not been available in Canada for several years and there are very few incumbent systems authorized to operate in the band. The Department is of the view that a designation of spectrum for priority use of fixed-satellite services in the band 18.3-18.58 GHz can be accomplished with minimal impact on terrestrial services. This will advance the alignment of spectrum for use of fixed-satellite services within the North American marketplace and should facilitate the introduction of multimedia consumer access satellite services. Further, the spectrum can be made available for FSS in a relatively short time frame since there are no issues surrounding a moratorium or transition for this portion of the band, and the anticipated requirement for spectrum for VHCM systems to support cable services has been treated in the previous section.

The Department is placing a moratorium on the licensing of fixed services in the band 18.3-18.58 GHz, and will add text to a footnote in the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations designating priority to the use of fixed-satellite services in the band 18.3-18.58 GHz.

5.2.3.2 18.58-18.8 GHz

The spectrum utilization policies for fixed services operating in the band 18.58-19.26 GHz include provisions for low and medium-capacity point-to-point systems, and low-capacity MCS. These fixed service systems operate according to channelling plans defined in Standard Radio System Plan (SRSP) documents. There are currently two channel plans for the use of fixed services in the band 18.58-19.26 GHz. At the release of the consultation document, there were 670 licensed frequency assignments for low and medium-capacity fixed links in the paired bands 18.58-18.82 GHz and 18.92-19.16 GHz; and 80 frequency assignments for MCS fixed links licensed in the paired bands 18.82-18.92 GHz and 19.16-19.26 GHz. The MCS bands align with the previous designation for Digital Electronic Messaging Systems (DEMS) in the U.S., the licensees of which were transitioned to the 24 GHz band.

The consultation proposed to place emphasis on a designation for the use of fixed-satellite services in the band 18.58-18.8 GHz. Most submissions expressed support for this proposal, as well as a requirement for a moratorium on the licensing of new fixed service systems in the band. The Department is in agreement with the comments received and is placing a moratorium on the licensing of new fixed service systems in the band 18.58-18.8 GHz. Text will be added to a footnote in the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations designating priority to the use of fixed-satellite services in the band 18.58-18.8 GHz.

Comments on the requirements for the transition between services were not solicited in the consultation. In line with the concept of soft partitioning, it could be argued that once a moratorium restricts the licensing of new FS systems in the band, it would be the responsibility of the FSS operators to locate receiving FSS terminals in areas where no interference is received from transmitting incumbent FS systems. However, situations may arise where the ubiquitous deployment of FSS terminals is blocked by a transmitting FS system. Therefore a sunset date on the full co-primary coordinated access to the spectrum by terrestrial services is required.

The Department notes the 10-year time frame granted in the original FCC Report and Order which allowed fixed services full co-primary status in the spectrum until June 8, 2010. The RABC submission suggested that Industry Canada undertake a subsequent consultation to deal with the issues of the existing FS, consistent with the prioritization of FSS use. Other comments expressed the view that a minimum 10-year time frame, similar to that granted in the U.S., would be required by incumbent fixed services.

A 10-year time frame is significantly more time than has traditionally been granted in other processes where there is a transition between services in a band. It is also much more than the timing allowed under Spectrum Utilization Policy SP-GEN, General Information Related to Spectrum Utilization and Radio Systems Policies (SP-GEN) for systems which become non-standard due to a change in either the policy or standards for a band. The Department is of the view however, that such a time frame could be granted without unduly constraining the deployment of satellite services in the band. Ten years from the date of publication of this policy document would not align precisely with the dates determined in the U.S. for the band 18.58-18.8 GHz, however this would be offset by the fact that in the band 18.3-18.58 GHz, access for FSS on a priority basis is immediate and unencumbered. After the sunset date, operation of incumbent fixed service systems would be on a no-interference basis to FSS systems. In the meantime, mutually acceptable arrangements between FS and FSS operators would be required for earlier transition.

The provisions for transition are detailed at the end of this section.

5.2.4 18.8-19.3 GHz

The band 18.8-19.3 GHz contains the upper portions of the paired bands 18.58-18.82/18.92-19.16 GHz and 18.82-18.92/19.16-19.26 GHz, treated in the previous section. At the release of the consultation document, there were 670 licensed frequency assignments for low and medium-capacity fixed links in the paired bands 18.58-18.82 GHz and 18.92-19.16 GHz; and 80 frequency assignments for MCS fixed links licensed in the paired bands 18.82-18.92 GHz and 19.16-19.26 GHz. The MCS bands align with the previous designation for DEMS in the U.S., whose licensees were transitioned to the 24 GHz band.

The consultation proposed to place emphasis on a designation for the use of fixed-satellite services in the band 18.8-19.3 GHz. Most submissions expressed support for this proposal, as well as a requirement for a moratorium on the licensing of new fixed service systems in the band. The bands are paired with the lower bands treated in the previous section, so decisions for either the upper or lower portion will implicitly affect the paired spectrum. The issue of a moratorium on the licensing of new fixed service systems under the current utilization policies and standards becomes a moot point. The Department is however still in agreement with the comments received and is placing a moratorium on the licensing of new fixed service systems in the band 18.8-19.3 GHz. Text will be added to a footnote in the Canadian Table designating priority to the use of fixed-satellite services in the band 18.8-19.3 GHz.

This band is designated for non-geostationary fixed-satellite services in the U.S.. The Department did not propose making a distinction in the band between GSO and NGSO systems. Events which have occurred since the publication of the consultation would indicate that this band may come under review for the designation of services. Industry Canada recognizes that the licensing activities of regional FSS systems in other countries, particularly U.S. licensing proceedings, will have an impact on how the spectrum will be designated for a number of new FSS systems. This will be taken into consideration in the designation and authorization of spectrum for particular systems and technologies.

Similarly with the issue of the moratorium, transition provisions of FS systems in the lower band implicitly affect systems in the paired band. While there are currently no proposals for FSS systems in Canada which would trigger the displacement of FS systems, given the pairing issue, and the length of time granted in the sunset provisions in the lower portion, the Department is of the view that there would be little additional impact on incumbent FS systems by starting the clock for this band at the same time.

The provisions for transition are detailed at the end of this section.

5.2.5 19.3-19.7 GHz

It was proposed to place emphasis on a designation for FS in this band. Sharing with low-density FSS use was deemed to be feasible if the use of spectrum for fixed-satellite services in the band would continue to be limited in accordance with the intentions of domestic footnote C16A. There was general support for this proposal.

The current FS designations in the band pairs 19.26-19.7 GHz with 17.7-18.14 GHz are for low, medium and high-capacity point-to-point systems. It should be noted that 17.7-17.8 GHz is paired with 19.26-19.36 GHz resulting in minimal impact from the respective BSS and FSS designations.

The RABC strongly supported the Department's proposal for emphasizing a designation of FS in the band 19.3-19.7 GHz, along with a similar proposal for FS in the companion band 17.8-18.58 GHz. These two FS designations are important, as there are currently a large number of LC/MC/HC radio systems operating in the paired bands 17.7-18.14 GHz and 19.26-19.7 GHz, licensed in accordance with SRSP-317.7.

The Department will add a footnote to the Canadian Table designating priority to the use of fixed services in the band 19.3-19.7 GHz.Multi-channel systems will be considered on a case-by-case basis taking the anticipated future use and geographic area into account. The channel plan to accommodate this mix of applications and facilitate sharing, noting the asymmetry of paired spectrum available, will be developed by the Department in consultation with industry.

5.2.6 19.7-20.2 GHz

The consultation proposed no changes to the status of FSS in this band. Most submissions expressed support for this proposal. The Department will take no action on this band.

In the Call for Applications to Develop and Operate Fixed-Satellite Space Stations in the 118.7 W Longitude Orbital Position (DGRB-008-00), the Department indicated that a footnote would be incorporated in the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations to indicate a preference for paired bands for the FSS. The footnote, in addition to footnote C16A, was also to indicate the bands to be used for service links and the bands to be limited for feeder links/gateways as follows:

CXX (CAN-01)
Geostationary orbit fixed satellites (GSO FSS) providing multimedia service to customers (service links) in the bands 19.7-20.2 GHz and 29.5-30.0 GHz will use spectrum for feeder link (gateways) in the bands 18.3-18.8 GHz (space-to-Earth), 28.35-28.6 GHz (Earth-to-space) and 29.25-29.5 GHz (Earth-to-space).

However, based on the decisions made in this document (i.e. SP 3-30 GHz), this footnote will not be incorporated in the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations.


Decision: 

The Department is making the spectrum utilization policy provisions for the band 17.7-19.7 GHz as follows: 

A moratorium is placed on the licensing of new fixed service systems in the band 17.7-17.8 GHz. Modifications to existing fixed service systems which do not increase the interference environment to FSS or which can be coordinated with FSS systems will be authorized on a case-by-case basis.

A footnote will be added to the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations designating priority to the use of fixed services in the band 17.8-18.3 GHz and 19.3-19.7 GHz as follows:

C16D
In the bands 17.8-18.3 GHz and 19.3-19.7 GHz use of the fixed service has priority over use of the fixed-satellite service in the space-to-Earth direction. Use of the fixed-satellite service in this band shall be limited to applications that pose minimal constraints on the deployment of fixed services. An example of such an application would be the use of a small number of large aperture earth stations, taking into account existing and potential service areas for ubiquitous deployment of fixed service systems.

Spectrum for low, medium and high-capacity point-to-point applications in the band 17.8-18.3 GHz can be paired with spectrum in the band 19.3-19.7 GHz.

Multi-channel systems will be considered on a case-by-case basis taking the anticipated future use and geographic area into account.

The designation for Local MCS is removed from the band 18.14-18.58 GHz.

A moratorium is placed on the licensing of new fixed service systems in the band 18.3-19.3 GHz until there is better definition of the kinds of fixed services which can be implemented with minimal constraints on the fixed-satellite services in accordance with the footnote.

Modifications to existing fixed service systems which do not increase the interference environment to FSS or which can be coordinated with FSS systems will be authorized on a case-by-case basis.

Events which have occurred since the publication of the consultation would indicate that the band 18.8-19.3 GHz may come under review for the designation of services. Industry Canada recognizes that the licensing activities of regional FSS systems in other countries, particularly U.S. licensing proceedings, will have an impact on how the spectrum will be designated for a number of new FSS systems. This will be taken into consideration in the designation and authorization of spectrum for particular systems and technologies.

The Department will add a footnote in the Canadian Table designating priority to the use of fixed-satellite services in the band 18.3-19.3 GHz as follows: 

C16E
In the band 18.3-19.3 GHz use of the fixed-satellite service has priority over use of the fixed service. Use of the fixed service in this band shall be limited to applications that pose minimal constraints on the deployment of fixed-satellite services. Domestic implementation of fixed-satellite services in the band 18.8-19.3 GHz will be governed by spectrum utilization policies which will be formulated in the future. These policies will take regional developments into consideration in the designation and authorization of spectrum for particular systems and technologies.

The Department is making the following provisions for transition: 

Ten years after the date of publication of this document, the operation of incumbent fixed service systems in the band 18.58-19.3 GHz, licensed in accordance with SP 1-20 GHz, will be on a no-interference basis with respect to fixed-satellite services. Until such time, existing licensed fixed-service systems may continue to operate under the current provisions, including coordination with co-primary fixed-satellite services.

The Department will, on behalf of the FSS licensee, issue formal notifications to the incumbent licensees for the displacement of affected fixed frequency assignments on an as-required basis, a minimum of one year prior to the sunset date. These systems will need to be identified to the Department by the FSS licensee in sufficient time for notification to be issued.

Earlier displacement to the formal notification date may be achieved through mutually acceptable arrangements between the FSS operators and the affected microwave operator(s).

Fixed station operators will cease operation of the identified frequency assignments on or before the date in the served notification.

Industry Canada will retain oversight of the displacement process and will assist, where necessary, affected fixed operators in identifying new replacement frequency assignments.

Industry Canada will monitor the effectiveness of the spectrum policy provisions related to the displacement of fixed systems.

Based on the decisions made in this document, footnote CXX (CAN 01) will not be incorporated in the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations.

Details of the changes to the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations can be found in the Allocation section of this document.


Designations 27.35-30

Designations 27.35-30 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 5

Designations 17.7-19.7 GHz

[editorial note, this title says up to 19.7 but the diagram shows up to 20.2]

The frequency band 17.7 – 20.2 GHz is represented in a diagram which depicts one row of six adjacent rectangles. This indicates that the frequency band 17.7 -20.2 GHz is divided into six frequency segments. The first border of the first rectangle represents the lower frequency limit of 17.7 GHz. The borders between each rectangle represent simultaneously the lower frequency limit of the frequency segment on the right and the upper frequency limit of the frequency segment on the left. The last border of the last rectangle represents the upper frequency limit of 20.2 GHz. The six frequency segments are allocated as follows:

  • the first between 17.7 GHz and 17.8 GHz to the BSS (Broadcast Satellite Service);
  • the second between 17.8 GHz and 18.3 GHz to the FS (Fixed Service);
  • the third between 18.3 GHz and 18.8 GHz to the FSS (Fixed Satellite Service);
  • the fourth between 18.8 GHz and 19.3 GHz to the FSS;
  • the fifth between 19.3 GHz and 19.7 GHz to the FS and the FSS (MSS FL) (feeder links to the Mobile Satellite Service); and
  • the sixth and final between 19.7 GHz and 20.2 GHz to the FSS.

5.2.7 Further Consultation 19.3-19.7 GHz

The band 17.7-19.7 GHz is allocated internationally to the fixed-satellite service in the space-to-Earth direction. The 19.3-19.7 GHz band has an additional allocation to FSS in the opposite direction, Earth-to-space. In its' response to the consultation, the RABC suggested the deletion of this allocation as this usage has not materialized and this requirement seems to have disappeared. The Department supports this view and will provisionally implement the removal of the allocation to FSS in the Earth-to-space direction in the band 19.3-19.7 GHz from the Canadian Table.

The Department also notes the U.S. domestic footnote: 

NG166
The use of the band 19.3-19.7 GHz by the fixed-satellite service (space-to-Earth) is limited to feeder links for the mobile-satellite service.

Given the designations that are made in this document and the apportionment of the amount of spectrum for priority access by fixed and fixed-satellite services, the Department will provisionally adopt a similar footnote in the Canadian Table.


Provisional Changes:

The Department provisionally removes the allocation to FSS in the Earth-to-space direction in the band 19.3-19.7 GHz.

The Department provisionally adopts a footnote in the Canadian Table as follows: 

CYY
The use of the band 19.3-19.7 GHz for fixed-satellite services (space-to-Earth) is limited to feeder links for the mobile-satellite service.

A comment period of 30 days from the release of this document will apply to these provisional changes. In the absence of compelling arguments to the contrary, these changes will be incorporated in the Canadian Table.

Details of the changes to the Canadian Table can be found in the Allocation section of this document


5.3 27.5-30.0 GHz

In making proposal for these bands, the Department took into account two existing models for designating the spectrum. The first is the European Radiocommunications Committee decision ERC/DEC/(00)09 dealing with the use of the band 27.5-29.5 GHz by the fixed service and the fixed-satellite service (Earth-to-space). This decision identifies priority bands for FS and uncoordinated FSS Earth stations; however, coordinated use of the entire band 27.5-29.5 GHz by the FSS is permitted. Frequency bands are also identified where FS use can be defined in geographical areas with FSS having access to the band outside those areas. While there are proposals to pair this band with spectrum at 18 GHz, there are no provisions for priority bands for uncoordinated receiving earth stations at 18 GHz in decision ERC/DEC(00)07 discussed in Section 9 of that document. These designations do not differentiate between GSO and NGSO implementations of the FSS further than described in international footnotes. The second existing model is in the United States, where specific spectrum designations were made for each of the services in portions of the 27.5-30.0 GHz range. These U.S. domestic designations differentiate between GSO and NGSO implementations of the FSS.The FCC Report and Order for 28 GHz also still makes provision for secondary access by other services to the designations while at 18 GHz secondary access has been removed.

In the consultation document, the Department recognized the importance of aligning spectrum use within the North American marketplace and the Americas particularly for satellite services.The Department wished to align spectrum designations, but sought to retain flexibility for all services within the bands. Proposals were made that the band could be soft partitioned to emphasize the implementation of one service in a specific portion of the band, with access by co-primary services on a more restricted basis.

In the comments, there was considerable support for soft partitioning of the spectrum including the element of designating priority to the fixed service or the fixed-satellite service as appropriate, with limitations to avoid constraining the development of the service granted priority in the band. With respect to replacement texts for footnote C16A several different proposals were made relating to the individual portions of the band. In most of the proposed texts for replacement footnotes, the element of assigning priority to one or the other services was missing. As previously discussed, the concept of soft partitioning was to be applied in situations where it was desirable to place emphasis on the use of the spectrum by one service over another. In this fashion, access to the spectrum would not be removed, but would be limited to implementations that would not constrain the development of the service for which the priority would be given. This was intended to facilitate the implementation of applications or services where the deployment of terminals would occur in a ubiquitous manner, with minimal burden of coordination and the possibility of authorization on a spectrum and geographic area basis.

In contrast, many of the proposals for footnotes introduced the element of coordination between services in bands where it was intended to grant priority to fixed services. The Department notes that the term coordination has long been associated with the access afforded to co-primary services sharing a band on an equitable first-come, first-served basis. As well, there are responsibilities and obligations placed on both parties in a coordination process. Since the intention of soft partitioning is to place emphasis on the implementation of one service, this element will not be incorporated in the footnotes for the band segments.

Current FCC Spectrum Designations

Current FCC Spectrum Designations (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 6

Current FCC Spectrum Designations

The frequency band 27.5 – 30 GHz is represented in a diagram which depicts one row of six adjacent rectangles. This indicates that the frequency band 27.5 – 30 GHz is divided into six frequency segments. The first border of the first rectangle represents the lower frequency limit of 27.5 GHz. The borders between each rectangle represent simultaneously the lower frequency limit of the frequency segment on the right and the upper frequency limit of the frequency segment on the left. The last border of the last rectangle represents the upper frequency limit of 30 GHz. The six frequency segments are allocated as follows:

  • the first between 27.5 GHz and 28.35 GHz to the FS (Fixed Service);
  • the second between 28.35 GHz and 28.6 GHz to the FSS GSO (Fixed Satellite Service Geostationary Satellite Orbit);
  • the third between 28.6 GHz and 29.1 GHz to the FSS NGSO (Fixed Satellite Service non-Geostationary Satellite Orbit);
  • the fourth between 29.1 GHz and 29.25 GHz to the FS and the FSS (MSS FL) (feeder links to the Mobile Satellite Service);
  • the fifth between 29.25 GHz and 29.5 GHz to the FSS GSO and the FSS (MSS FL); and
  • the sixth and final between 29.5 GHz and 30 GHz to the FSS.

Proposal 27.35-39 GHz

Proposal 27.35-39 GHz (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 7

Proposal 27.35-30 GHz

This diagram is identical to the Current FCC Spectrum Designations diagram above, except for the following differences:

  • the first segment between 27.35 GHz and 28.35 GHz is allocated to the FS (Fixed Service).
  • the second segment between 28.35 GHz and 28.6 GHz is not limited to the FSS GSO (Fixed Satellite Service Geostationary Satellite Orbit) but can be assigned to any FSS;
  • the third segment between 28.6 GHz and 29.1 GHz is not limited to the FSS NGSO (Fixed Satellite Service non-Geostationary Satellite Orbit) but can be assigned to any FSS; and
  • the fifth segment between 29.25 GHz and 29.5 GHz is not limited to the FSS GSO but can be assigned to any FSS and to the FSS (MSS FL).

5.3.1 27.35–28.35 GHz

No changes were proposed to the spectrum utilization policy decisions which have already been made for this band. This band is currently designated for LMCS in the fixed service. Access to this spectrum by fixed-satellite earth stations is limited to applications which will pose minimal constraints on the deployment of fixed service systems, such as a small number of large antennas for feeder links, in accordance with Canadian Table, domestic footnote C47A.Footnote 3

Modifications to footnote C47A to bring it in line with other footnotes adopted for Ka band in this document and will be treated in a general clean-up exercise being proposed for the Canadian Table.

5.3.2 28.35-28.6 GHz

The consultation proposed to place emphasis on a designation for the use of fixed-satellite services in the band 28.35-28.6 GHz. The Department has already been active in authorizing future Canadian geostationary Ka band multimedia satellites, in the band 29.5-30.0 GHz, to use associated spectrum for feeder links/gateways in the bands 28.35-28.6 GHz and 29.25-29.5 GHz.

Most submissions expressed support for this proposal, as well as a requirement for a moratorium on the licensing of new fixed service systems in the band. The Department is in agreement with the comments received and is placing a moratorium on the licensing of new fixed service systems in the band 28.35-28.6 GHz. Text will be added to a footnote in the Canadian Table designating priority for the use of fixed-satellite services in the band 28.35-28.6 GHz.

There are no incumbent fixed services authorized in this band since spectrum utilization policies for it have not been developed until now. There are no issues of transition in this band which would result from a designation of priority access to fixed-satellite services.

5.3.3 28.6-29.1 GHz

The consultation proposed to place emphasis on a designation for the use of fixed-satellite services in the band 28.6-29.1 GHz. Most submissions expressed support for this proposal, as well as a requirement for a moratorium on the licensing of new fixed service systems in the band.

The Department is in agreement with the comments received and is placing a moratorium on the licensing of new fixed service systems in the band 28.6-29.1 GHz. Text will be added to a footnote in the Canadian Table designating priority to the use of fixed-satellite services in the band 28.6-29.1 GHz.

This band is designated for non-geostationary fixed-satellite services (NGSO FSS) in the U.S.. The Department did not propose making a distinction in the band between GSO and NGSO systems. Events which have occurred since the publication of the consultation would indicate that this band may come under review for the designation of services. Industry Canada recognizes that the licensing activities of regional FSS systems in other countries, particularly U.S. licensing proceedings, will have an impact on how the spectrum will be designated for a number of new FSS systems. This will be taken into consideration in the designation and authorization of spectrum for particular systems and technologies.

There are no incumbent fixed services authorized in this band since spectrum utilization policies for it have not been developed until now. There are no issues of transition in this band which would result from a designation of priority access to fixed-satellite services.

5.3.4 29.1-29.25 GHz

In the consultation, the Department proposed to place emphasis on a designation for FS in this band. Sharing with low density FSS (MSS feeder links) use was deemed to be feasible if the use of spectrum for fixed-satellite services in the band would continue to be limited in accordance with the intentions of domestic footnote C16A. There was general support for this proposal.

The Department proposed designating this band for LMCS type of services with pairing at 31.0-31.3 GHz. The combined proposal is treated in Section 5.3.9. Comments indicated general support for aligning this spectrum with the current Local Multipoint Distribution Systems (LMDS) designations in the U.S., however the RABC noted that it would be premature to designate additional spectrum for LMCS based on the history of use to date.

In any event, there is sufficient interest in this spectrum for the Department to make a designation granting priority to fixed services. A footnote will be added the Canadian Table designating priority to the use of fixed services in the band 29.1-29.25 GHz. As indicated in the original proposal for the designation of this spectrum, the licensing of systems within this band will be the subject of a future consultation.

5.3.5 29.25-29.5 GHz

The consultation proposed to place emphasis on a designation for the use of fixed-satellite services in the band 29.25-29.5 GHz, including feeder links for MSS systems. The Department has already been active in authorizing future Canadian geostationary Ka band multimedia satellites in the band 29.5-30.0 GHz, to use associated spectrum for feeder links/gateways in the bands 28.35-28.6 GHz and 29.25-29.5 GHz.

Most submissions expressed support for this proposal, as well as a requirement for a moratorium on the licensing of new fixed service systems in the band. The Department is in agreement with the comments received and is placing a moratorium on the licensing of new fixed service systems in the band 29.25-29.5 GHz. Text will be added to a footnote in the Canadian Table designating priority for the use of fixed-satellite services in the band 29.25-29.5 GHz.

There are no incumbent fixed services authorized in this band since spectrum utilization policies have not been developed for it until now.There are no issues of transition in this band which would result from a designation of priority access to fixed-satellite services.

5.3.6 29.5-30 GHz

The consultation proposed no changes to the status of FSS in this band. Most submissions expressed support for this proposal. The Department will take no action on this band.

In the call for applications for the geostationary orbit position at 118.7 W Longitude, the Department indicated that a footnote would be incorporated in the Canadian Table to indicate a preference for paired bands for the FSS. The footnote, in addition to footnote C16A, would also indicate the bands to be used for service links and the bands to be limited for feeder links/gateways as follows:

CXX (CAN-01)
Geostationary orbit fixed-satellites (GSO FSS) providing multimedia service to customers (service links) in the bands 19.7-20.2 GHz and 29.5-30.0 GHz will use spectrum for feeder link (gateways) in the bands 18.3-18.8 GHz (space-to-Earth), 28.35-28.6 GHz (Earth-to-space) and 29.25-29.5 GHz (Earth-to-space).

Based on the decisions made in this document, this footnote will not be incorporated in the Canadian Table. This has already been treated in the section on the 18 GHz portion of Ka band (5.2.6).


Decision:

The Department is making spectrum utilization policy provisions for the band 28.35-30.0 GHz as follows: 

A moratorium is placed on the licensing of new fixed service systems in the bands 28.35-29.1 GHz and 29.25-29.5 GHz until there is better definition of the types of fixed services which can be implemented with minimal constraints on the fixed-satellite services in accordance with the footnote C16F.

Events which have occurred since the publication of the consultation indicate that the band 28.6-29.1 GHz may come under review for the designation of services. Industry Canada recognizes that the licensing activities of regional FSS systems in other countries, particularly U.S. licensing proceedings, will have an impact on how the spectrum will be designated for a number of new FSS systems. This will be taken into consideration in the designation and authorization of spectrum for particular systems and technologies.

A footnote will be added to the Canadian Table designating priority to the use of fixed-satellite services in the bands 28.35-29.1 GHz and 29.25-29.5 GHz as follows: 

C16F
In the bands 28.35-29.1 GHz and 29.25-29.5 GHz use of the fixed-satellite service has priority over use of the fixed service. Use of the fixed service in this band shall be limited to applications that pose minimal constraints on the deployment of fixed-satellite services. Domestic implementation of fixed-satellite services in the band 28.6-29.1 GHz will be governed by spectrum utili zation policies to be developed. These policies will take regional developments into consideration in the designation and authorization of spectrum for particular systems and technologies.

A footnote will be added to the Canadian Table designating priority to the use of fixed services in the bands 29.1-29.25 GHz as follows: 

C16G
In the band 29.1-29.25 GHz use of the fixed service has priority over use of the fixed-satellite service. Use of the fixed-satellite service in this band shall be limited to applications that pose minimal constraints on the deployment of fixed services. An example of such an application would be the use of a small number of large aperture earth stations, taking into account existing and potential service areas for ubiquitous deployment of fixed service systems.

Based on the decisions made in this document, footnote CXX (CAN 01) will not be incorporated in the Canadian Table.

Details of the changes to the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations can be found in the Allocation section of this document.

Future Consultation: 

The policy and licensing framework for systems within the bands 29.1-29.25 GHz and 31.0-31.3 GHz will be the subject of a future consultation.


Designations 27.35-30

Designations 27.35-30 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 8

Designations 27.35-30 GHz

The frequency band 27.35 – 30 GHz is represented in a diagram which depicts one row of six adjacent rectangles. This indicates that the frequency band 27.35 – 30 GHz is divided into six frequency segments. The first border of the first rectangle represents the lower frequency limit of 27.35 GHz. The borders between each rectangle represent simultaneously the lower frequency limit of the frequency segment on the right and the upper frequency limit of the frequency segment on the left. The last border of the last rectangle represents the upper frequency limit of 30 GHz. The six frequency segments are allocated as follows:

  • the first between 27.35 GHz and 28.35 GHz to the FS (Fixed Service);
  • the second between 28.35 GHz and 28.6 GHz to the FSS (Fixed Satellite Service);
  • the third between 28.6 GHz and 29.1 GHz to the FSS;
  • the fourth between 29.1 GHz and 29.25 GHz to the FS and the FSS (MSS FL) (feeder links to the Mobile Satellite Service);
  • the fifth between 29.25 GHz and 29.5 GHz to the FSS and the FSS (MSS FL); and
  • the sixth and final between 29.5 GHz and 30 GHz to the FSS.

5.3.7 Further Consultation 27.35–28.35 GHz

This band is currently designated for LMCS in the fixed service. The use of the spectrum in this band was originally licensed to a number of applicants as a complete package of 1 GHz within a given area. Over the last several years, the licenses have been returned to the Department.

In the initial licensing process, the business plans to deliver wireless broadband services to subscribers called for access to the entire 1 GHz of spectrum in order to meet capacity and spectrum re-use requirements. One concern that had been expressed at the time was the limited separation of spectrum that would be available to accommodate two-way traffic (go and return channel separation) particularly given the requirement to use the entire 1 GHz of spectrum within a given area to meet capacity requirements. Any requirement for a guard band between the go and return channels would limit the spectrum and therefore the capacity available. Since that time, major improvements have been made in the technology that will facilitate the implementation of systems within the band. As well, the business case for systems to use the entire spectrum within a given area is changing, particularly in rural areas. It is within these rural areas that the Department has received a number of requests for developmental licenses to prove technologies for the delivery of broadband services.

As detailed in the Department's Spectrum Release Plan (RP-020), it can generally be anticipated that the licensing of multipoint spectrum in urban areas will generate sufficient initial interest that a competitive process will beal demand is typically lower, with much less probability that multiple applicants will wish to use the same spectrum to serve the same area. The availability of several licences to use spectrum within a band in a given area would further reduce the possibility of mutually exclusive demands precipitating the requirement for a competitive process in many rural areas.

Given the developments to date, the Department is seeking comment on the potential for dividing the spectrum in the band 27.35–28.35 GHz into paired blocks to accommodate a minimum of three licensable packages, to be made available on a first-come, first-served basis in rural areas.


Further Consultation:

In order to facilitate access in rural areas, the Department proposes to divide the spectrum in the band 27.35–28.35 GHz into smaller blocks such as three paired blocks of 150+150 MHz separated by a common go-return spacing of approximately 550 MHz.

The Department also proposes to make licences to use this spectrum available on a first-come, first-served basis in rural areas where it is evident that there is more spectrum than demand.

The Department seeks comment on these proposals as well as on the following: 

  1. The suitability of defining rural areas as those areas for which the population density does not exceed 400 people per square kilometre as measured by the latest Statistics Canada Census Report.
  2. The designation of a buffer zone and/or other conditions to avoid encroachment on the eventual use of this spectrum in urban areas.
  3. The block pairing accommodates frequency division duplex systems. Are there measures which should be introduced or other accommodations which should be made for time division duplex systems (TDD) such as guard bands between the blocks, or dedicated spectrum for TDD use?

A comment period of three months from the release of this document will apply.


5.3.8 Further Consultation 29.1-29.25 GHz

The Department notes U.S. domestic allocation of the band 29.1-29.25 GHz that limits use of the band by the fixed-satellite service (Earth-to-space) to feeder links for the mobile-satellite service. While the proposals for this band indicated that the low density applications in the fixed-satellite service were feeder links for the mobile-satellite service, the Department would like to clarify its intentions for access to this band which has been designated on a priority basis for fixed services.


Provisional Changes: 

The Department provisionally adopts a footnote in the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations as follows:

CZZ
The use of the band 29.1-29.25 GHz by the fixed-satellite service (Earth-to-space) is limited to feeder links for the mobile-satellite service.

A comment period of 30 days from the release of this document will apply to these provisional changes. In the absence of compelling arguments to the contrary, these changes will be incorporated in the Canadian Table.

Details of the changes to the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations can be found in the Allocation section of this document.


5.3.7 Further Consultation 27.35–28.35 GHz

This band is currently designated for LMCS in the fixed service. The use of the spectrum in this band was originally licensed to a number of applicants as a complete package of 1 GHz within a given area. Over the last several years, the licenses have been returned to the Department.

In the initial licensing process, the business plans to deliver wireless broadband services to subscribers called for access to the entire 1 GHz of spectrum in order to meet capacity and spectrum re-use requirements. One concern that had been expressed at the time was the limited separation of spectrum that would be available to accommodate two-way traffic (go and return channel separation) particularly given the requirement to use the entire 1 GHz of spectrum within a given area to meet capacity requirements. Any requirement for a guard band between the go and return channels would limit the spectrum and therefore the capacity available. Since that time, major improvements have been made in the technology that will facilitate the implementation of systems within the band. As well, the business case for systems to use the entire spectrum within a given area is changing, particularly in rural areas. It is within these rural areas that the Department has received a number of requests for developmental licenses to prove technologies for the delivery of broadband services.

As detailed in the Department's Spectrum Release Plan (RP-020), it can generally be anticipated that the licensing of multipoint spectrum in urban areas will generate sufficient initial interest that a competitive process will beal demand is typically lower, with much less probability that multiple applicants will wish to use the same spectrum to serve the same area. The availability of several licences to use spectrum within a band in a given area would further reduce the possibility of mutually exclusive demands precipitating the requirement for a competitive process in many rural areas.

Given the developments to date, the Department is seeking comment on the potential for dividing the spectrum in the band 27.35–28.35 GHz into paired blocks to accommodate a minimum of three licensable packages, to be made available on a first-come, first-served basis in rural areas.


Further Consultation:

In order to facilitate access in rural areas, the Department proposes to divide the spectrum in the band 27.35–28.35 GHz into smaller blocks such as three paired blocks of 150+150 MHz separated by a common go-return spacing of approximately 550 MHz.

The Department also proposes to make licences to use this spectrum available on a first-come, first-served basis in rural areas where it is evident that there is more spectrum than demand.

The Department seeks comment on these proposals as well as on the following: 

  1. The suitability of defining rural areas as those areas for which the population density does not exceed 400 people per square kilometre as measured by the latest Statistics Canada Census Report.
  2. The designation of a buffer zone and/or other conditions to avoid encroachment on the eventual use of this spectrum in urban areas.
  3. The block pairing accommodates frequency division duplex systems. Are there measures which should be introduced or other accommodations which should be made for time division duplex systems (TDD) such as guard bands between the blocks, or dedicated spectrum for TDD use?

A comment period of three months from the release of this document will apply.


5.3.9 Further Consultation 31.0-31.3 GHz

This band is allocated to mobile and fixed services on a primary basis. The Department proposed to designate the band 31.0-31.3 GHz for LMCS, and to structure the band in a manner that would pair the centre 150 MHz with the spectrum at 29.1-29.25 GHz and also pair the two 75 MHz blocks at either end as shown below.

Further Consultation 31.0-31.3 GHz

Further Consultation 31.0-31.3 GHz (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 9

Further Consultation 31.0-31.3 GHz

The frequency band 31.0 to 31.3 GHz is allocated to the mobile and fixed services on a primary basis and designated for Local Multipoint Communication Systems. The frequency band 29.1 to 29.25 GHz is paired with the frequency band 31.075 to 31.225 GHz. The frequency band 31.0 to 31.075 GHz is paired with the frequency band 31.225 to 31.3 GHz.

Comments on this proposal indicated general support for aligning this spectrum with the current LMDS designations in the U.S., however the RABC noted that it would be premature to designate additional spectrum for LMCS based on the history of its use to date. The Department also notes on-going international activities to study adjacent band issues with passive services for the possible implementation of High Altitude Platform Stations (HAPs) in the fixed service in the band 31.0-31.3 GHz. In any event, there is sufficient interest in this spectrum for the Department to make a designation reserving it for terrestrial services to be implemented in multipoint, transportable and/or mobile configurations. As indicated in the original proposal for the desi gnation of this spectrum, the licensing of systems within this band will be the subject of a future consultation. The designation for the band 29.1-29.5 GHz has been treated in Section 5.3.4.


Decision:

The band 31.0-31.3 GHz is designated for terrestrial services to be implemented in multipoint, transportable and/or mobile configurations.

Future Consultation:

The policy and licensing framework for systems within the bands 31.0-31.3 GHz and 29.1-29.25 GHz will be the subject of a future consultation.


6.0 Additional Issues

6.1 Very Low-capacity (VLC)

The current definition of traffic load for low-capacity systems comprises bit rates between 1.544 Mb/s (T-1) and 24.704 Mb/s (16 T-1). The Department sought comments on the suitability of including traffic rates of less than 1.544 Mb/s in the definition of low-capacity systems for microwave bands above 1 GHz. Respondents saw no requirement for the provision of fractional T1 links in these bands. The RABC suggested that there is no need to change the definition of low-capacity systems as currently defined in
SP 1-20 GHz since the current note in SP 1-20 GHz stating that “Smaller system capacities are also permitted in LC bands on a case-by-case basis” would be adequate to meet any unforeseen demand for traffic rates less than 1.544 Mb/s. The Board also noted that the FCC Part 101 rules do not permit the use of traffic rates less than DS-1 in any radio system employing digital modulation and operating below 19.7 GHz.


Decision:

The Department will make no additional provisions for systems with traffic rates of less than 1.544 Mb/s.


6.2 Domestic Coordination Considerations

In Canada, for coordination between FS and FSS stations, the Department protects only the assigned frequency and direction for the earth station even though the initial coordination contour for the earth station with respect to fixed service stations is developed on a full-band, full-arc basis. Subsequent coordination is typically carried out directly between an applicant for a new licence and the licence holder.

In the consultation, the Department noted the FCC Notice of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM) (FCC 00-369) treating a request for a ruling to require partial-band licensing of earth stations in the fixed-satellite service in bands shared on a primary basis with the terrestrial fixed service. In the United States, earth stations are coordinated and licensed for the entire allocated frequency band and for all azimuth directions pointing to visible locations on the geostationary orbital arc (full-band, full-arc basis). This is intended to provide the earth station operator the flexibility to protect communications with any approved satellites on the orbital arc and any transponder frequencies in the full band in order to meet operational requirements. The proposal made in the NPRM would “require an FSS earth station that has been licensed to operate in C or Ku band shared frequencies for 24 months or longer to demonstrate, in response to the denial of a request of an FS applicant to coordinate spectrum, that the FSS earth station denying coordination is using, has recently used, or has imminent plans to use the requested spectrum. If the FSS earth station licensee cannot make such a demonstration during the coordination, then the FS station may be successfully coordinated and the FSS earth station must not cause unacceptable interference to, nor is it protected from interference from, the FS station on that spectrum in the future.” This is intended to improve the efficient use of spectrum by both FS and FSS.

The Department sought comment on the suitability of adopting similar spectrum sharing arrangements as in the FCC proposal in C and Ku bands. Respondents noted that the petition in the U.S. had been denied and that current practices in Canada were satisfactory.


Decision:

The Department will not make modifications to the domestic coordination practices for any of the bands for which comment was solicited.


6.3 Licence-exempt Applications Below 10 GHz

There has been a lot of interest in licence-exempt applications, particularly for wireless local area networks which can be characterized as local transmission devices available to provide a wide range of applications for high-speed broadband digital distribution including voice, video and data. The current spectrum designations for these devices are in the 900 MHz, 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands which are shared with ISM applications.

The Department is interested in determining the general need and opportunities for spectrum to provide greater choice of access and distribution technologies to service providers and users in bands below 10 GHz. It therefore sought comments on whether there is spectrum where LE applications could be designated, the amount of spectrum that would be required, and the types of applications that could be accommodated.

Responses focused mainly on the perceived opportunities at 5470–5725 MHz, which was on the agenda of the WRC-03 for the consideration of regulatory provisions and spectrum requirements for new and additional services in the band. In preparation for participation at the conference, Canada developed a series of proposals, in consultation with industry, for the treatment of these issues.

At WRC-03, decisions were made to adopt a number of changes to the International Table of Frequency Allocations to provide new or upgraded allocations to the mobile, Earth exploration-satellite (active), space research (active) and radiolocation services. As well, a number of international footnotes were adopted to facilitate sharing amongst the services in the 5 GHz range. In general, the results of WRC-03 reflect Canada’s positions prior to the conference.

The Department has since issued a consultation document proposing frequency allocation changes to the mobile, Earth exploration-satellite (active), space research (active) and radiolocation services, taking into account decisions taken by WRC-03. Furthermore, this document proposes new or revised policy and technical rules governing the use of wireless local area networks operating in the 5 GHz band. These proposals can be found in the consultation document announced in Canada Gazette Notice DGTP-005-04 and entitled Consultation on Allocation Changes and Revisions to Spectrum Utilization Policy and Technical Rules in the 5GHz Band.

Comments from the Bell Telecom Group and TELUS both requested the Department to assess the potential of harmonization with the FCC’s Part 15 rules on ultra-wide band (UW) technology. On 14 February 2002 the FCC issued a News Release advising of the adoption of a First Report and Order (FCC 02-08) regarding the revision of Part 15 rules which permits the marketing and operation of certain types of new products incorporating UWB technology. The UWB technology is expected to provide a vast array of new applications that have the potential to provide new public safety applications and broadband Internet access among the uses envisioned. The Order includes also standards designed to ensure that existing and planned radio services, particularly safety services, are adequately protected.


Future Consultation:

The Department is following developments of UWB technologies and will consult in the near future on the potential introduction of UWB applications and devices.


6.4 Further Consultation

The Department notes the recent FCC 02-328 Notice oOf Inquiry released December 20, 2002 seeking comment on the feasibility of permitting unlicensed devices to operate in the band 3650–3700 MHz, and under more restrictive conditions in the TV broadcast bands.

In 1997, the Canadian Table was modified to include an allocation for fixed services in the band 3400–3500 MHz. In 1998 the Department designated the band 3400–3700 MHz for Fixed Wireless Applications (FWA) and opened the band 3400–3550 MHz for licensing in rural areas. In 2003 the band was rearranged to accommodate priority spectrum for radiolocation and fixed wireless access systems. The Department will be licensing the band 3475–3650 MHz, including urban areas, in the near future.

The band 3500–4200 MHz had traditionally been available for fixed service and fixed-satellite service systems on a coordinated first-come, first-served basis. When the Department opened the band 3400–3550 MHz under SP 3400–3700 MHz for licensing FWA systems in rural areas on a first-come, first-served basis in 1998, it established that new point-to-point systems would not be authorized to use assignments in the band 3500–3700 MHz. Existing point-to-point systems would be permitted to continue, provided the technical characteristics were in accordance with the current SRSP. Extensions and/or expansions of existing systems which require the use of assignments in the band 3500–3700 MHz were considered by the Department on a case-by-case basis outside of urban centres. Policy and Licensing Procedures for the Auction of Spectrum Licenses in the 2300 and 3500 MHz Bands (DGRB-003-03) imposes a moratorium on the licensing of point-to-point systems in the band 3500–3650 MHz and provides a detailed transition policy to accommodate FWA systems.

With respect to the use of the band by the fixed-satellite service, traditional authorization for domestic and Canada-U.S. traffic has been in the conventional C-band between 3700–4200 MHz. However, authorizations of earth stations using foreign satellites providing international overseas traffic have included the extended C-band between 3500–3700 MHz. These earth stations are limited in number and are located in isolated areas, away from urban centres.

DGRB-003-03 limits the authorization of new FSS earth stations in the bands 3500–3650 MHz to large antenna applications such as gateways located in remote areas outside urban centres. Furthermore, the licensing of any new FSS receiving earth stations in the band 3500–3650 MHz will be subject to successful prior coordination with FWA licensees. FWA operators planning to establish systems in the vicinity of existing FSS receive earth stations will be required to coordinate with the earth station operators. Currently there are earth stations in the band 3500–3700 MHz located in Weir, Que. (Laurentides).

In 2001 the consultation on licensing FWA systems in urban areas noted that although this spectrum is not available for FWA in the U.S., the FCC had earmarked the band 3650–3700 MHz for advanced communication services. The consultation also indicated that the public interest in harmonizing this spectrum would be sufficient to delay a decision on licensing this spectrum in Canada until further progress had been made in the U.S..

In the U.S., this band was allocated for radiolocation uses by the government and for FSS use by non-government entities, restricted to international intercontinental systems. In 1999, the spectrum became part of the spectrum transferred from government to non-government. Noting the limited use by existing licensed systems in the band, the FCC is soliciting comment on the conditions under which unlicensed and/or licensed systems could be authorized in the band. The discussions lean toward permitting unlicensed devices at power levels similar to those currently allowed in the ISM bands at 900 MHz, 2.4 GHz and 5.7 GHz. As of December 1, 2000, new earth stations in the band 3650–3700 MHz are authorized on a secondary basis to the fixed and mobile services.

The possibility for licence-exempt devices to operate in the in the TV broadcast bands is beyond the intended scope of the consultation in this document.


Further Consultation:

The Department seeks comment on whether to make the band 3650–3700 MHz available for license-exempt applications. Comment is also requested on the types of systems and services that could be implemented in the band, and noting the availability of licensed spectrum in the adjacent bands, whether there is a requirement to continue the designation for licensed services in the band.

The Department also seeks comment on the measures which should be introduced for the treatment of incumbent licences in the band, noting the existing policy for the accommodation of FWA services in the band 3500–3650 MHz.

  1. Are there measures which could be introduced for the operation of licence-exempt devices which would ensure the protection of existing licensed systems?
  2. How could such measures be enforced?
  3. Should existing licenses be grandfathered indefinitely or should a sunset period apply?

A comment period of three months from the release of this document will apply.


6.5 Licence-exempt Applications Above 10 GHz

6.5.1 Licence-exempt Applications at 57 GHz

In January 2001, the Department announced the release of a spectrum utilization policy (Gazette Notice, DGTP-001-01) for the introduction of new licence-exempt wireless devices in the frequency bands 46.7–46.9 GHz, 57–64 GHz and 76–77 GHz. The band 59–64 GHz was designated for use by licence-exempt devices to accommodate a variety of short range high-capacity wireless communication devices for the delivery of multimedia applications.

In the consultation that preceded the release of the utilization policy for licence-exempt devices in the b and 59–64 GHz, the Department solicited comments on proposals for the bands 57–59 GHz and 64–66 GHz. At the time, most respondents preferred to defer comments on technical rules, future services and applications for these bands. Based on the response to the consultation, the Department deferred decisions on the introduction of LE devices in the 57–59 GHz band. Since that time the FCC adopted technical rules for the use of the band 57–59 GHz by unlicensed devices, and the Department received representation from the Radio Advisory Board of Canada to adopt a similar designation and technical rules.

In the consultation the Department therefore proposed the adoption of rules to allow licence-exempt devices in the band, noting that several European administrations had adopted technical rules and channel plans for the band for licensed applications. It was further noted that while the use of the band by licence-exempt devices does not necessarily preclude the introduction of licensed services, it may make sharing difficult.

Comments generally supported the proposal for licence-exempt devices, and there were no representations made about licensable applications. Recognizing the value of harmonizing spectrum use with other countries particularly for applications which involve consumer devices, the Department is adopting a designation in the band 57–59 GHz for use by licence-exempt devices on the basis that such devices cannot claim protection from other radio systems and cannot cause interference into licensed radio services. As a baseline, the technical requirements should align with those adopted by the FCC for the operation of such devices. Details of the technical requirements for certification and operation will be developed by Industry Canada in consultation with interested parties in an industry forum, and the results incorporated in an appropriate Radio Standards Specification.


Decision:

The Department is adopting a designation in the band 57–59 GHz for use by licence-exempt devices on the basis that such devices cannot claim protection from other radio systems and cannot cause interference into licensed radio services. The technical requirements for certification and operation will be developed by Industry Canada in consultation with interested parties in an industry forum, and the results incorporated in an appropriate Radio Standards Specification.


6.5.2 Licence-exempt Applications at 90 GHz

In the consultation it was anticipated that the band 92–95 GHz would provide good transmission range for very high-capacity last-mile access applications and computer to computer communications. The Department sought comments on the type of applications which would require access to this spectrum and the time frame for that requirement, the amount of spectrum which would be required and whether portions of the spectrum should be made available on a licensed basis rather than a licence-exempt basis. Very little comment was received on the band and there were no representations made about licensable applications. The Department notes the recent Report and Order issued by the FCC (FCC 03-248) which establishes rules to permit unlicensed indoor use of the band 92–95 GHz on the basis of existing regulations for the band 57–64 GHz.


Decision: 

Recognizing the value of harmonizing spectrum use particularly for applications which involve consumer devices: 

The Department is adopting a designation in the band 92–94 GHz and 94.1–95 GHz for indoor use by licence-exempt devices on the basis that such devices cannot claim protection from other radio systems and cannot cause interference into licensed radio services. The technical requirements for certification and operation will be developed by Industry Canada, and based on current rules adopted for the band 57–64 GHz, in consultation with interested parties in an industry forum, and the results incorporated in an appropriate Radio Standards Specification.


The Department also notes that in the same proceeding in the U.S., (FCC 3-248) the bands at 71–76 GHz, 81–86 GHz and 92–95 GHz have been made available for licensed use of fixed services. The licenses are intended to be awarded as non-exclusive and nationwide with rights to access the entire 12.9 GHz of spectrum. Individual station rights would be established by the date and time registration kept in a database. Noting that the allocation changes to these bands which were adopted by the WRC-00 will be treated in a separate review of the Canadian Table, the Department would like to initiate consideration of these bands for similar fixed service applications.


Further Consultation:

The Department seeks comment on the framework, including technical and operational rules which would be required to open the bands 71-76 GHz 81–86 GHz and 92–95 GHz for fixed service operation on a licensed, non-exclusive basis.

  1. What are the technical and operational limits which should be established to facilitate co-existence:
    1. among licensees within the fixed service
    2. with future implementations of co-primary services (FSS, BSS and MS services as applicable)
  2. What are the characteristics, data elements and access requirements for a database which could establish rights within an area based on date and time registration?
  3. Are there propagation models which could be readily incorporated to develop interference contours and increase sharing efficiencies?

A comment period of three months from the release of this document will apply.


6.5.3 Licence-exempt Applications at 24.05–24.25 GHz

The band 24.05–24.25 GHz is currently allocated to the radiolocation service on a primary basis and to the amateur service and Earth exploration-satellite service (active) on a secondary basis in the Canadian Table. This band has a designation for use by industrial, scientific, and medical equipment. The lower adjacent band 24.00–B24.05 GHz is allocated on a primary basis to amateur and amateur-satellite services and the upper adjacent band 24.25–24.45 GHz has recently been authorized for fixed service applications. For a number of years, the band 24.05–24.25 GHz has been available for licence-exempt devices including field disturbance sensors which are permitted to operate at field strengths up to 2500 mV/m in the band 24.075–24.175 GHz.

In the consultation paper, the Department requested comments on new service applications which could be introduced in the band 24.05–24.25 GHz. Respondents expressed little interest in the specific proposal that was made. Some respondents expressed concerns regarding sharing with the secondary allocation for the amateur service. Also, a submission was received from one manufacturer on designating this band for licence-exempt transmission links to align with the U.S. market. The Federal Communications Commission issued a Report and Order (FCC 01-357) in December 2001 amending Part 15 Rules to allow the operation of fixed point-to-point transmitters in the band 24.05–24.25 GHz at field strengths of up to 2500  mV/m (average field strength values measured at 3 meters). The Rules state that transmitters operating at these power levels are required to use highly directional antennas with gains of at least 33 dBi or a main lobe beamwidth (half power points) not exceeding 3.5 degrees to minimize the occurrence of harmful interference to other services in the band. The Rules are intended to allow the operation of licence-exempt point-to-point transmitters thus allowing for a variety of innovative products and applications in the band.

The Department was urged in the consultation process to consider harmonizing the band 24.05–24.25 GHz for licence-exempt transmission links and set technical standards under Radio Standards Specification 210 (RSS-210). It is important to harmonise the spectrum policy and technical requirements to operate in a regional and global marketplace in order to ensure maximum benefit to Canadians and so that products achieve economies of scale. As well, it is important to encourage the development of innovative radio communications which may further the governments' connectedness agenda.

The Department concluded that opening the band 24.05–24.25 GHz could provide the opportunity for a range of point-to-point transmission facilities to support local broadband distribution and network applications. The decision to make a designation of spectrum in the band 24.05–24.25 GHz to accommodate licence-exempt fixed point-to-point transmission links using highly directional antennas was announced in Notice No. DGTP-005-03 — Spectrum Designation to Accommodate Licence-Exempt Fixed Point-to-Point Transmission Links in the Band 24.05–24.25 GHz.

6.5.4 Licence-exempt Applications at 21.2–23.0 GHz

In developing the provisions for the introduction of licence-exempt applications in the band 24.05–24.25 GHz, the Department noted that the band was adjacent to the lower half of a band recently licensed for fixed service applications (24.25–24.45 GHz paired with 25.05–25.25 GHz). It had been indicated that this would be interesting to operators wishing to implement licence-exempt links, initially within an area, taking advantage of the ability to rapidly deploy without the delays typically associated with obtaining a licence. Once network requirements developed to the point where the protection afforded by operating in licensed spectrum was required, the radio could readily be retuned to the licensed spectrum. This has been seen as a means to facilitate the best of both worlds in developing a network. Since that time the Department has become interested in exploring the possibility of facilitating such operation in other bands (i.e. opening a portion of the spectrum within a traditionally licensed fixed service band for license-exempt operation). Systems could be readily retuned to operate in the licensed band by selecting another channel, once authorization for licensed operation had been attained.

In reviewing the bands, the spectrum between 21.2–23.0 GHz looks sufficiently interesting, that the Department is seeking comment on the possibilities at this time.

Currently the 23 GHz plan is divided into three band plans. The first is spectrum which is designated for point-to-point operation in 21.8–22.4 GHz paired with 23-23.6 GHz, and is currently open for licensing. The second is spectrum which is designated for point-to-multipoint operation in 21.2–21.6 GHz paired with 22.4–22.8 GHz, this band has been listed as requiring a future competitive process in order for that band to be opened. The third is spectrum which is designated as reserved in 21.6-21.8 GHz paired with 22.8–23.0 GHz.


Further Consultation: 

The Department is seeking comment on the level of interest in opening a portion of this spectrum for license-exempt operation.

  1. Would spectrum within the point-to-point designation or the point-to-multipoint designation be more appropriate?
  2. What technical rules would be required to facilitate co-existence with fixed services as well as other co-primary allocated services in the band?
  3. How would cross-border interference/coordination be managed with the U.S.?

(One possibility would be to only authorize entities capable of becoming radiocommunication carriers to operate license-exempt equipment in the band. Rules could then be established which would avoid the possibility of cross-border interference).

A comment period of three months from the release of this document will apply.


6.6 TV Pick ups and Airborne TV Pick ups

In October 1999, Industry Canada released a Spectrum Utilization Policy, entitled Amendments to the Microwave Spectrum Policies in the 1–3 GHz Frequency Range (SP 1-3 GHz) in which it designated the band 2025–2110 MHz, on a shared geographical basis, for TV-pickups and point-to-point fixed systems. Since that time, industry has identified a need for TV-pickup operations from airborne platforms transmitting to receivers on the ground. Anticipating that coexistence with the fixed service systems would be difficult due to the large area over which these systems would operate, the Department sought comment on whether suitable additional spectrum for these applications could be found in the existing video distribution band at 8275–8500 MHz or the current TV pick-up band 6930–7125 MHz and whether these applications could share with LE devices.

Comment on the band 8275–8500 MHz from both the RABC and the Canadian Association of Broadcasters (CAB) expressed concern for the existing TV distribution systems, and cited a lack of equipment for the band that would not likely be remedied for a Canadian only market.

Comments on the band 6930–7125 MHz cited congestion of current TV pick-up use in the major markets as an impediment to the introduction of operations from airborne platforms. The Department does not agree with these observations since it would be possible for individual broadcasters operating TV pick-ups to decide whether to use a channel in a terrestrial or airborne mode, or both, at any particular time. Further, congestion for these applications is compounded by the slow development and acceptance of digital equipment.However, more sympathy is extended to the argument submit ted on behalf of NGSO MSS feeder link operation in the space-to-Earth direction (receiving earth terminals) which could potentially receive interference airborne operation over large distances.

There was no support in the comments for these applications to be accommodated in LE spectrum.


Decision:

The Department will not make designations for TV pick-ups operating from airborne platforms at this time.


6.7 31.8–33.4 GHz

The frequency range 31.8-33.4 GHz has primary allocations to the radionavigation, space research (space-to-Earth) (deep space) and the inter-satellite services. WRC-00 dealt with the allocation to the FS at 31.8–33.4 GHz, and as a result, the band was identified as available for high-density fixed service (HDFS) in footnote 5.547. It was noted in the consultation that this band is one of very few bands allocated internationally and in all regions that the fixed service does not share on a co-primary basis with the fixed-satellite service. It would therefore be well suited for HDFS applications including both point-to-point and point-to-multipoint configurations.

It is generally accepted that it is preferable for HDFS implementations to have access to spectrum blocks within a geographic service area rather than site by site authorization. This band therefore fits the general rule for situations where the Department foresees using a competitive licensing process (where there is, or could be excess spectrum demand relative to supply).

Comment was requested on possible applications which would make use of this spectrum and the anticipated time frame in which this spectrum would be required.

While there was some support expressed for opening this spectrum for applications such as those currently being implemented in Europe, others advocated delaying the designation of applications until there is a clearer picture of the requirements.

The Department tends to agree with the latter, noting the amount of spectrum above 20 GHz that is currently available for fixed applications.


Future Consultation: 

The Department will make the band 31.8–33.4 GHz available for HDFS with the precise definition of applications in a future policy and licensing framework consultation.


6.8 Footnote C44 24.75–25.225 GHz

Although not discussed in the consultation, comments were received relating to several aspects of domestic footnote C44. The first is the submission by Telesat anticipating that the 24.75–25.25 GHz band might be used for other signals associated with the BSS in addition to the feeder link signals, in other words, innovative services requiring a degree of interactivity which could involve transmissions from ubiquitous earth stations.

Telesat therefore proposed a modification to the first sentence to read:

“The use of the fixed-satellite service (Earth-to-space) in the band 24.75–25.25 GHz is limited to feeder links to broadcasting-satellite space stations, or to other digital carriers in the fixed-satellite service that are associated with the broadcasting-satellite service, operating in the band 17.3–17.8 GHz.”

The second proposal from Telesat was to urge the Department neither to award any additional fixed service licences in the 24.75–25.25 GHz band, nor to re-allocate any forfeited fixed service licences in the 24.75–25.25 GHz band on the basis that that substantial limitations will be imposed on where feeder link stations may be located, particularly since the fixed service is licensed on an area basis, for ubiquitous FS deployments.

The Department notes that both these comments pertain to the entire 500 MHz allocated for FSS use in the band 24.75–25.25 GHz whereas the restrictions placed on the FSS with respect to the fixed service in FN C44 is for 200 MHz in the band 25.05–25.35 GHz.

There remains 300 MHz of spectrum from 24.75–25.05 MHz for which there is no fixed service allocation. The determination to partition the spectrum in this manner was made in the original policy and licensing framework for services in this band prior to the auction of this spectrum. The restriction of FSS use to feeder links for the BSS remains an issue since it does not include allowances for ubiquitous deployments, however it is beyond the immediate scope of this consultation and should be dealt with in a future consultation related to the provision and licensing of BSS services.

The third issue raised by the RABC was a proposal to align C44 with the intent of the FCC footnote NG167 which restricts the FSS use of the band 24.75–25.25 GHz to feeder links for BSS operating at 17.3–17.7 GHz, rather than prescribe the use of 25 GHz for feeder links for BSS operating at 17.3–17.8GHz as in C44.

While NG167 apparently allows BSS at 17 GHz to use spectrum other than 25 GHz for feeder inks, the band at 25 GHz is still restricted to use for BSS at 17 GHz. It is also noted that in the U.S. domestic table there is no allocation for FSS in the Earth-to-space direction in the band 17.9–18.4 GHz so the point appears to be moot since the choices for feeder link spectrum for BSS are even more restricted.

Canadian Domestic Footnote: 

C44 (CAN-00)
Feeder links to broadcasting-satellite space stations operating in the band 17.3–17.8 GHz shall be implemented in the band 24.75–25.25 GHz. In areas where fixed systems have been licensed using a competitive process, future earth stations. (Earth-to-space) in the band 25.05–25.25 GHz will be permitted provided that such installations will not cause interference to any fixed service to be deployed in the authorized service area.

U.S. Domestic Footnote:

NG167
The use of the fixed-satellite service (Earth-to-space) in the band 24.75–25.25 GHz is limited to feeder links for the broadcasting-satellite service operating in the band 17.3–17.7 GHz. The allocation to the fixed-satellite service (Earth-to-space) in the band 24.75–25.25 shall come into effect on 1 April 2007.

Future Consultation: 

While it was not raised in the 3-30 GHz consultation itself, the Department will address footnote C44 in a future consultation relating to the provision and licensing of BSS services.


6.9 Review of Broadband Spectrum Cap Applicable to the Bands 24, 28, and 38 GHz

In May 1999 the Policy and Licensing Procedures for the Auction of the 24 and 38 GHz Frequency Bands, (DGRB-003-99/DGTP-005-99) was released to facilitate the timely and orderly implementation of broadband wireless telecommunications in Canada. Among the various policy provisions, the document established a spectrum cap (or spectrum aggregation limit) to foster competition in the provision of broadband facilities and services. The Department concluded that certain spectrum limits were required to stimulate competition and consequently provide the possibility for new broadband services.

In the Framework for Spectrum Auctions in Canada publication, the Department expressed that when multiple licences in a given geographic area are auctioned, and can be used to provide closely substitutable services, limits on the amount of spectrum that any single bidder is allowed to acquire may be required to ensure competitive markets. Moreover, the Department established that, “aggregation limits may be imposed in the following circumstances:

  1. a bidder that acquires an amount of spectrum beyond a certain level would not face effective competition from providers of closely substitutable services provided by firms that use infrastructure other than the spectrum being auctioned; and
  2. the anti-competitive effects arising from the acquisition of an amount of spectrum beyond a certain level by a single bidder would not be offset by lower costs or higher valued services resulting from having a single entity hold this amount of spectrum.”

The Department established the spectrum cap as follows: 

  • In a given service area, any entity (and its affiliates) other than an incumbent local exchange carrier (ILEC), whose local exchange area overlaps that area, may hold up to 1000 MHz in spectrum licences in the Local Multipoint Communication Systems (LMCS) 28 GHz band OR up to 600 MHz in spectrum licences in the LMCS 28 GHz band and the 24 or 38 GHz bands; and,
  • An ILEC (and its affiliates) in an area which is overlapped by its local exchange area, may hold up to 200 MHz in spectrum licences in the LMCS 28 GHz band OR up to 200 MHz in spectrum licences in the LMCS 28 GHz band and the 24 GHz or 38 GHz bands.

Refer to Sections 2.3.5 of the Policy and Licensing Procedures for the Auction of the 24 and 38 GHz Frequency Bands (DGRB-003-99/DGTP-005-99) for further information.

The policy stated that these broadband spectrum cap limits would be reviewed when a subsequent licensing process was announced for other wireless broadband spectrum or three years following the close of the auction, whichever came first. Moreover, depending on the degree to which competition had developed in the local broadband services marketplace, as evidenced by factors such as the concentration of market shares or the availability of choice of local broadband services, the Department could modify or remove the established limits.

Three years have passed since the establishment of the spectrum cap. The Department had anticipated that with a diversity of service providers, resulting from the 1999 auction, Canadians would be well served with new broadband services. Unfortunately, the roll-out of wireless broadband facilities using these spectrum resources have been minimal. Moreover, the LMCS 28 GHz spectrum (1000 MHz) has been returned to the Department.

In light of the present limited use of the spectrum in the bands 24, 288 and 38 GHz and the recent addition of spectrum available for the purpose of broadband internet access and local distribution (i.e. at 2.3 GHz, 2.5 GHz and 3.5 GHz), the Department deems there to be ample spectrum available for the provision of such services. Furthermore, the Department recognizes that a number of other technologies are also available for the delivery of similar services. The Department is of the view that there now exists an opportunity for competition and delivery of a choice of services and that the spectrum cap is no longer required.


Further Consultation:

The Department seeks comments, with supporting rationale, on the proposal to rescind the spectrum cap for the bands 24, 28 and 38 GHz.

A comment period of three months from the release of this document will apply.


7.0 Consequential Changes to the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations

Based on the decisions made in the spectrum utilization policies, a number of changes are required in the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations. These changes include new or modified domestic footnotes to describe the inter-relationship between co-primary allocated services in certain bands. Since these footnotes are intended to reflect the decisions made in the utilization policies, comments, if any, should be directed at the language used rather than the overall intent. The comment period specified in the gazette notice announcing the release of this document will apply to these changes, after which time they will be incorporated into the Canadian Table at the earliest opportunity.

The proposals contained in this section are identified as modifications to the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations, last revised as a result of WRC-00. (The current version of the Canadian Table may be obtained from the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site

ADD
indicates an international footnote created at WRC-03 or a proposed new Canadian footnote.
SUP
indicates an international footnote suppressed at WRC-03 or a Canadian footnote proposed for suppression.
MOD
indicates an international footnote modified at WRC-03 or a Canadian footnote proposed for modification. These appear in both the Table and in the lists of footnotes.
Strikeout
indicates the proposed removal of a radio service or footnote, or removal of specific text within a Canadian footnote.
Underlining
indicates the proposed addition of a radio service or footnote, or removal of specific text within a Canadian footnote.
CAN ZZ
identifies a Canadian footnote.
5.XXX
identifies a international footnote.

Note: The text of international footnotes is not open for consideration in this discussion paper and consequently the modifications to footnotes made at WRC-03 are incorporated but not identified.

7.1 Changes to the Band 4500–4990 MHz

In line with the spectrum policy decisions made in Sections 3.2.1 and 3.2.2, the following changes to the Canadian Table are required.

4 400-4 500
FIXED
begin proposed additionMOBILEend proposed addition

MOD C25
4 500 - 4 800
FIXED
begin proposed additionMOBILEend proposed addition
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)

5.441 MOD C25 MOD C16A
4 800 - 4 825
FIXED
begin proposed additionMOBILEend proposed addition
Radio Astronomy

begin proposed additionC25end proposed addition
4 825 - 4 835
FIXED
begin proposed additionMOBILEend proposed addition begin proposed addition5.442end proposed addition
RADIO ASTRONOMY 5.443

5.149 begin proposed additionC25end proposed addition
4 835 - 4 950
FIXED
begin proposed additionMOBILEend proposed addition
Radio Astronomy

MOD C25
4 950 - 4 990
FIXED
begin proposed additionMOBILEend proposed addition begin proposed addition5.442end proposed addition
RADIO ASTRONOMY 5.443

5.149 5.339 begin proposed deletionC25end proposed deletion

Footnote: MOD C25 for the Band 4400–4940 MHz

MOD C25
The begin proposed deletionbands 4 460 - 4 540 MHz and 4 900 - 4 990 MHz are alsoend proposed deletion begin proposed additionband 4400–4940 MHz isend proposed addition allocated to the fixed and mobile services on a primary basis, for the exclusive use of the Government of Canada.
MOD C16A (CAN-00)
begin proposed deletionThe use of spectrum for fixed-satellite services in the bands 4500-4800 MHz, 10.7-11.45 GHz and 17.8-19.7 GHz in the space-to-Earth direction and 6725-7025 MHz, 12.75-13.25 GHz, and 28.35-29.5 GHz in the Earth-to-space direction is presently limited to large antenna earth stations located in areas outside of urban centres. Domestic implementation of fixed-satellite services in these bands will be governed by spectrum utilization policies which will be formulated in the future. These policies will consider existing services, ITU Radio Regulations and operating criteria for sharing between services and systems.end proposed deletion begin proposed additionIn the band 4500–4800 MHz the use of the fixed and mobile services by the Government of Canada in the vicinity of major military bases has priority over the use of the fixed-satellite service. The use of the fixed-satellite service in this band shall be limited to applications that pose minimal constraints on the deployment of fixed and mobile service systems by the GoC in the vicinity of major military bases.end proposed addition

Existing Radio Astronomy Footnote: 

5.442 In the bands 4 825-4 835 MHz and 4 950-4 990 MHz, the allocation to the mobile service is restricted to the mobile, except aeronautical mobile, service.

7.2 Changes to the Band 5850–7075 MHz

5 850 - 5 925
FIXED
begin proposed additionMOBILEend proposed addition
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
Amateur
Radiolocation

5.150 begin proposed additionC16Xend proposed addition
5 925 - 6 700
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)

5.149 5.440 5.458
6 700 - 7 075
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) (space-to-Earth) 5.441 C40

5.458 5.458A 5.458B 5.458C begin proposed deletionC16Aend proposed deletion

Further Consultation: 

Comment is sought in on the proposal (Section 3.4) for a domestic footnote to ensure that DSRC systems in the FS and MS services have priority over FSS operations in the band 5850–5925 MHz.

C16X
In the band 5850–5925 MHz the use of the fixed and mobile services has priority over the use of the fixed-satellite service. The use of the fixed-satellite service in this band shall be limited to applications that pose minimal constraints on the deployment of fixed and mobile service systems. An example of such an application would be the use of a small number of large aperture earth stations, taking into account existing and potential service areas for ubiquitous deployment of fixed and mobile service systems.

A comment period of three months from the release of this document will apply.


7.3 Changes to the Band 10.7-13.25 GHz

10.7 - 11.7
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.441 5.484A C41

C16 begin proposed deletionC16Aend proposed deletion C16C C16B
11.7 - 12.2
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.484A

5.485 5.486 5.488 C16B

12.2 - 12.7
BROADCASTING
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE C43 C47
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)

5.487A 5.488 5.490 5.492 C16B
12.7 - 12.75
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
12.75 - 13.25
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.441

begin proposed deletionC16Aend proposed deletion C16C

7.4 Changes to the Band 13.75-14.0 GHz

13.75-14
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.484A C41
RADIOLOCATION
Standard Frequency and Time Signal-Satellite (Earth-to-space)
begin proposed additionEarth exploration-satelliteend proposed addition

MOD 5.502 MOD 5.503 begin proposed deletion5.503Aend proposed deletion C16B
MOD 5.502
(WRC-03)
In the band 13.75-14 GHz, an earth station of a geostationary fixed-satellite service network shall have a minimum antenna diameter of 1.2 m and an earth station of a non geostationary fixed-satellite service system shall have a minimum antenna diameter of 4.5 m. In addition, the e.i.r.p., averaged over one second, radiated by a station in the radiolocation or radionavigation services shall not exceed 59 dBW for elevation angles above 2° and 65 dBW at lower angles. Before an administration brings into use an earth station in a geostationary-satellite network in the fixed-satellite service in this band with an antenna size smaller than 4.5 m, it shall ensure that the power flux-density produced by this earth station does not exceed:
  • 115 dB(W/m2 · 10 MHz)) for more than 1% of the time produced at 36 m above sea level at the low water mark, as officially recognized by the coastal state;
  • 115 dB(W/m2 · 10 MHz)) for more than 1% of the time produced 3 m above ground at the border of the territory of an administration deploying or planning to deploy land mobile radars in this band, unless prior agreement has been obtained.

For earth stations within the fixed-satellite service having an antenna diameter greater than or equal to 4.5 m, the e.i.r.p. of any emission should be at least 68 dBW and should not exceed 85 dBW.

MOD 5.503
(WRC-03)
In the band 13.75-14 GHz, geostationary space stations in the space research service for which information for advance publication has been received by the Bureau prior to 31 January 1992 shall operate on an equal basis with stations in the fixed-satellite service; after that date, new geostationary space stations in the space research service will operate on a secondary basis. Until those geostationary space stations in the space research service for which information for advance publication has been received by the Bureau prior to 31 January 1992 cease to operate in this band:

  • in the band 13.770-13.780 GHz, the e.i.r.p. density of emissions from any earth station in the fixed-satellite service operating with a space station in geostationary-satellite orbit shall not exceed:
    1. 4.7D + 28 dB(W/40 kHz), where D is the fixed-satellite service earth station antenna diameter (m) for antenna diameters equal to or greater than 1.2 m and less than 4.5 m;
    2. 49.2 + 20 log(D/4.5) dB(W/40 kHz), where D is the fixed-satellite service earth station antenna diameter (m) for antenna diameters equal to or greater than 4.5 m and less than 31.9 m;
    3. 66.2 dB(W/40 kHz) for any fixed-satellite service earth station for antenna diameters (m) equal to or greater than 31.9 m;
    4. 56.2 dB(W/4 kHz) for narrow-band (less than 40 kHz of necessary bandwidth) fixed-satellite service earth station emissions from any fixed-satellite service earth station having an antenna diameter of 4.5 m or greater;
  • the e.i.r.p. density of emissions from any earth station in the fixed-satellite service operating with a space station in non-geostationary-satellite orbit shall not exceed 51 dBW in the 6 MHz band from 13.772 to 13.778 GHz.

Automatic power control may be used to increase the e.i.r.p. density in these frequency ranges to compensate for rain attenuation, to the extent that the power flux-density at the fixed-satellite service space station does not exceed the value resulting from use by an earth station of an e.i.r.p. meeting the above limits in clear-sky conditions.

SUP 5.503A


Provisional Changes: 

The Department is provisionally adopting the changes to the regulations made at WRC-03 which will facilitate the operation of transmitting earth stations with antenna diameters as small as 1.2 meters in the band 13.75-14.0 GHz under the restrictions prescribed in the regulations.

A comment period of 30 days from the release of this document will apply to these provisional changes. In the absence of compelling arguments to the contrary, these changes will be incorporated in the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations.


7.5 Changes to the Band 17.8-19.7 GHz

17.8 - 18.1
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) (Earth-to-space) 5.484A 5.516

begin proposed deletionC16Aend proposed deletion C43 C47 begin proposed additionC16Dend proposed addition
18.1 - 18.4
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) (Earth-to-space) 5.484A 5.520

5.519 begin proposed deletionC16Aend proposed deletion C43 C47 begin proposed addition C16D C16Eend proposed addition
18.4 - 18.6
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.484A

begin proposed deletionC16Aend proposed deletion begin proposed additionC16Eend proposed addition
18.6 - 18.8
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.522B
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)

5.522A begin proposed deletionC16Aend proposed deletion begin proposed additionC16Eend proposed addition
18.8 - 19.3
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.523A

begin proposed deletionC16Aend proposed deletion begin proposed additionC16Eend proposed addition
19.3 - 19.7
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)begin proposed deletion Earth-to-spaceend proposed deletion 5.523B 
5.523C 5.523D 5.523E
begin proposed deletionC16Aend proposed deletion begin proposed additionC16D CYYend proposed addition
ADD C16D
In the bands 17.8-18.3 GHz and 19.3-19.7 GHz use of the fixed service has priority over use of the fixed-satellite service in the space-to-Earth direction. Use of the fixed-satellite service in this band shall be limited to applications that pose minimal constraints on the deployment of fixed services. An example of such an application would be the use of a small number of large aperture earth stations, taking into account existing and potential service areas for ubiquitous deployment of fixed service systems.
ADD C16E
In the band 18.3-19.3 GHz use of the fixed-satellite service has priority over use of the fixed service. Use of the fixed service in this band shall be limited to applications that pose minimal constraints on the deployment of fixed-satellite services. Domestic implementation of fixed-satellite services in the band 18.8-19.3 GHz will be governed by spectrum utilization policies to be developed. These policies will take regional developments into consideration in the designation and authorization of spectrum for particular systems and technologies.

Note:  Based on the decisions made in this document, footnote CXX (CAN 01) will not be incorporated in the Canadian Table.

begin proposed deletionCXX (CAN-01)end proposed deletion
begin proposed deletionCXX (CAN-01) Geostationary orbit fixed satellites (GSO FSS) providing multimedia service to customers (service links) in the bands 19.7-20.2 GHz and 29.5-30.0 GHz will use spectrum for feeder link (gateways) in the bands 18.3-18.8 GHz (space-to-Earth), 28.35-28.6 GHz (Earth-to-space) and 29.25-29.5 GHz (Earth-to-space).end proposed deletion

It is the intention of the Department to incorporate these changes in the Canadian Table, however comment will be accepted on improvements to the language. The comment period specified in the gazette notice announcing the release of this document will apply to these changes. In the absence of compelling arguments to the contrary, these changes will be incorporated as presented.


Provisional Changes:

The Department provisionally removes the allocation to FSS in the Earth-to-space direction in the band 19.3-19.7 GHz.

The Department provisionally adopts a footnote in the Canadian Table as follows:

CYY
The use of the band 19.3-19.7 GHz for fixed-satellite services (space-to-Earth) is limited to feeder links for the mobile-satellite service.

A comment period of 30 days from the release of this document will apply to these provisional changes. In the absence of compelling arguments to the contrary, these changes will be incorporated in the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations.


7.6 Changes to the Band 27.5-29.5 GHz

27.5 - 29.5
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.484A 5.523A 5.523C
5.523E 5.535A 5.539 5.541A
MOBILE

5.538 5.540 begin proposed deletionC16Aend proposed deletion C47A begin proposed additionC16F C16G CZZend proposed addition
ADD C16F
In the bands 28.35-29.1 GHz and 29.25-29.5 GHz use of the fixed-satellite service has priority over use of the fixed service. Use of the fixed service in this band shall be limited to applications that pose minimal constraints on the deployment of fixed-satellite services. Domestic implementation of fixed-satellite services in the band 28.6-29.1 GHz will be governed by spectrum utilization policies to be developed. These policies will take regional developments into consideration in the designation and authorization of spectrum for particular systems and technologies.
ADD C16G
In the band 29.1-29.25 GHz use of the fixed service has priority over use of the fixed-satellite service. Use of the fixed-satellite service in this band shall be limited to applications that pose minimal constraints on the deployment of fixed services. An example of such an application would be the use of a small number of large aperture earth stations, taking into account existing and potential service areas for ubiquitous deployment of fixed service systems.

Note: Based on the decisions made in this document, footnote CXX (CAN 01) will not be incorporated in the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations.


Provisional Changes: 

The Department provisionally adopts a footnote in the Canadian Table as follows:

CZZ
The use of the band 29.1-29.25 GHz by the fixed-satellite service (Earth-to-space) is limited to feeder links for the mobile-satellite service.

A comment period of 30 days from the release of this document will apply to these provisional changes. In the absence of compelling arguments to the contrary, these changes will be incorporated in the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations.


Appendix A

Definitions of Short Forms and Acronyms Referred to in SP 3-30 GHz

Definitions of Short Forms and Acronyms Referred to in SP 3-30 GHz
Abbreviations Definition
AWS Advanced Wireless Service
BSS broadcast-satellite service
C band Refers to frequencies in the range between 3700 and 7025 MHz
CAB Canadian Association of Broadcasters
CARS Cable Television Relay Service
CATV Cable Television
CCTA Canadian Cable and Television Association
CEC Cooperative Engagement Capability
DEMS Digital Electronic Messaging Systems
DND Department of National Defence
DSRC Dedicated Short Range Communications
FCC Federal Communications Commission
FL feeder links
FS fixed service
FSS fixed-satellite service
FWA Fixed Wireless Access
GoC Government of Canada
GSO geostationary satellite orbit
HAPs High Altitude Platform Stations
HC High Capacity (traffic rates > 51.840 Mb/s)
HDFS high-density fixed service
ISM Industrial, scientific and medical
ITS Intelligent Transportation Systems
Ka band Refers to frequencies in the ranges 19.7-20.2 GHz and 27.5-30.0 GHz
Ku band Refers to frequencies within the range 10.7 GHz - 14.5 GHz
LC Low Capacity (traffic rates less than or equal to1.544 Mb/s less than or equal to24.704 Mb/s )
LE Licence Exempt
LEO low-Earth orbiting
LMCS Local Multipoint Communications Systems
LMDS Local Multipoint Distribution Systems
MC Medium Capacity (traffic rates > 24.704 Mb/s less than or equal to 51.840 Mb/s)
MCS Multipoint Communications System
MS mobile services
MSS mobile-satellite service
MSS FL Mobile Satellite Service Feederlinks
NGSO non-geostationary satellite orbit
NPRM Notice of Proposed Rule Making (FCC document)
PCS Personal Communications Service
PFD power flux-density
PSTN Public Switched Telephone Network
RABC Radio Advisory Board of Canada
RP-008 Policy Framework for the Provision of Fixed-satellite Services
RP-015 Microwave Licensing Policy Respecting Carriage of Program Signals to Broadcasting Undertakings
RP-020 Guidelines on the Licensing Process and Spectrum Release
RP-022 Microwave Licensing Policy Framework
RPV remote piloted vehicles
SCADA system control and data acquisition
SNG satellite news gathering
SP 1-20 GHz Revisions to Microwave Spectrum Utilization Policies in the Range of 1-20 GHz
SP-GEN General Information Related to Spectrum Utilization and Radio Systems Policies
SRSP Standard Radio System Plan
STL studio transmitter links
TDD time division duplex
TLRCT Tactical Long-Range Communications Terminals
UWB ultra-wide band
VHCM Very High-capacity Microwave
VLC Very Low Capacity (traffic rates < 1.544 Mb/s)
VSAT Very Small Aperture Terminal
WARC-92 1992 World Administrative Radiocommunication Conference
WCS Wireless Communications Service
WRC-03 World Radio Conference 2003
WTO World Trade Organization
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