SRSP-512 — Technical Requirements for Land Mobile and Fixed Radio Services Operating in the Band 220–222 MHz

Issue 1
April 2006

Table of Contents


1. Intent

1.1 This Standard Radio System Plan (SRSP) states the minimum technical requirements for the purpose of efficient spectrum utilization for land mobile and multipoint communications systems operating in the band 220-222 MHz.

1.2 Radio systems conforming to the requirements of this SRSP will take priority in licensing and coordination over non-standard systems proposed for operation in this band. However, the use of more spectrally efficient technologies is strongly encouraged and different channellization from what is described herein may be considered if it results in increased spectrum efficiency. Such systems would likely be authorized on a standard basis.

1.3 This SRSP provides more detail regarding the technical parameters stated in Section 4.3 of the policy paper Proposals and Changes to the Spectrum in Certain Bands Below 1.7 GHz.

2. General

2.1 Equipment used for land mobile or fixed systems operating in the band 220-222 MHz must comply with RSS-119.

2.2 Although a radio system may conform to the requirements of this SRSP, the Department can require modifications to the system whenever harmful interferenceFootnote 1 is caused to other radio sites or systems, except when such interference is due to inadequate receiver selectivity as dealt with under Section 2.3.

2.3 The Department reserves the right to limit protection to licensed radio receivers only to the extent of the bandwidth of the transmitters whose emissions they are licensed to receive. Licensees and/or applicants should use receiver selec­tivity characteristics or filters that provide rejection of undesired signals.

2.4 Systems which employ a base station as an automatic repeater station shall transmit on frequencies identified as base transmit frequencies. Subscriber dispatcher stations (often referred to as control stations) operating through an automatic repeater station shall transmit on frequencies identified as mobile transmit frequencies.

2.5 For radiocommunication carriers and service providers, simplex frequency operation utilizing the base/repeater and mobile transmit frequencies (known as repeater talk around) is licensed within the authorized service area on a no-interference, no-protection basis.Footnote 2 Such operation may be licensed on a case-by-case basis beyond the service area of a duplex frequency system as an adjunct to operations. The public safety mutual aid channels are exempted from this restriction.

3. Related Documents

The current issues of the following documents are applicable, and available on the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications web site at http://www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

TRAA
Interim Sharing Arrangement between the Canadian Department of Industry, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, and the Federal Communications Commission Concerning the Use of the Band 220 to 222 MHz along the United States-Canada Border
Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations 9 kHz to 275 GHz
RP-Gen
General Spectrum Policy Principles and Other Information Related to Spectrum Utilization and Radio System Policies
RP-003
Policy Guidelines for Mobile Radio Trunked Systems
RP-004
Policy for the Licensing of Very Low Capacity Point to Point Links in the Band 30-890 MHz
RP-013
Spectrum Utilization Policy on the Use of Certain Public Correspondence Bands in Canada
SP-Gen
General Information Related to Spectrum Utilization and Radio Systems Policies
SP 30-896 MHz,
Part II
Spectrum Utilization Policy for the Mobile, Broadcasting and Amateur Services in the Frequency Range 30-896 MHz (Part II)
Gazette Notice
DGTP-004-05
Proposals and Changes to the Spectrum in Certain Bands Below 1.7 GHz
RSS-Gen
General Requirements and Information for the Certification of Radiocommunication Equipment
RSS-102
Radio Frequency Exposure Compliance of Radiocommunication Apparatus (All Frequency Bands)
RSS-119
Land Mobile and Fixed Radio Transmitters and Receivers Operating in the Frequency Range 27.4-960.0 MHz
SRSP-502
Technical Requirements for Land Mobile and Fixed Radio Services Operating in the Bands 806-821/851-866 MHz and 821 824/866 869 MHz
RSP-100
Radio Equipment Certification Procedure
RSP-101
Application Procedure for Planned Radio Stations Operating on Frequencies below 960 MHz
RIC-6
Spectrum Consumption and the Saturation Index
CPC-2-0-03
Environmental Process, Radiofrequency Fields and Land-Use Consultation
GL-04
Channel Loading Guidelines

CPC - Client Procedures Circular
GL - Guidelines
RIC - Radiocommunication Information Circular
RP - Radio Systems Policy
RSP - Radio Standards Procedure
RSS - Radio Standards Specification
SP - Spectrum Utilization Policy
SRSP - Standard Radio System Plan
TRAA - Terrestrial Radiocommunication Agreements and Arrangement

4. General Guidelines

4.1 Channel Assignments for the Band 220-222 MHz

4.1.1 Frequency assignments shall be in accordance with Table B1 in Annex B.

4.1.2 This band is to be used on the basis of a two-frequency channelling plan. For land mobile service operations, the base station transmitters will normally operate in the band 220 221 MHz and the mobile station transmitters will normally operate in the band 221 222 MHz. A mobile station may also transmit on its associated base station frequency when operating in a simplex mode, provided that power limits for such transmissions are maintained in accordance with Section 6.3.

4.1.3 The lower edge of channel 1 starts at 220 MHz and is spaced 5 kHz apart from the next channel, for a total of 200 channels. The centre frequency of the channel corresponding to the channel number can be determined by the following formula, where n is the channel number:

F = 220.0025 + (n–1) x (.005) where n = 1 to 200

Note: Only base station frequencies are listed in MHz. Paired mobile station frequencies are 1 MHz higher.

4.1.4 The geographic availability and channel designation plan are shown in Annexes A and B.

4.1.5 The standard channel width for this spectrum is 5 kHz and assignments of centre frequencies begin 2.5 kHz from the band edge. Channels may be aggregated, to accommodate, for example, 12.5 kHz systems, and priority of assignment will be given to the most spectrally efficient technologies.

4.1.6 To improve spectrum efficiency of wide-area systems or networks that re-use frequencies licensed to one holder, the assignment of frequencies to each particular site does not have to follow the allocation structure defined herein. Each frequency that may be used on a particular site must be approved by the regional director, as it will impact on the geographic re assignment of that particular frequency, unless an arrangement has been made for the use of the frequencies within a specified geographical area.

4.1.7 Frequencies designated for duplex operation may be assigned for simplex operation where conditions warrant.

4.2 Conventional Mobile Radio Systems

Assignments for conventional systemsFootnote 3 can be made from the available spectrum in a given area. In general, assignments will be made commencing at the upper end of the band and working downward.

4.3 Channel Groups

As outlined in Table B2 of Annex B the Department has listed, as a guideline, twenty 5 channel groups for system deployments in this band. However, assignments for use are at the discretion of the regional office depending on local requirements.

4.4 The Use of the Band 220-222 MHz

This band is used for radio applications such as public safety, railway, and utility telemetry operations. Other fixed and mobile radio applications will be permitted at the discretion of the regional director once these initial requirements have been addressed.

4.5 Public Safety - Hierarchy of Safety Service Providers

For the identification of public safety service providers, the Department recognizes the hierarchy of safety service provides as stated in Section 5.1.1 of SRSP-502.

Note: This reference is no longer current. See SRSP-502, Section 4.1.3 instead

4.6 Multipoint Communications Systems (MCS)

4.6.1 Multipoint Communications Systems operationFootnote 4 can be authorized in this band. Two types of operation are permitted for MCS: one way (from master stationFootnote 5 to remote sitesFootnote 6 or from remote sites to master station); and two way (from master station to remote sites and from remote sites to master station). Assignments are licensed from available spectrum in a geographic area.

4.6.2 Mobile master station operation may be permitted with adequate justification and without expanding the service area and on a no-interference, no-protection basis.

4.6.3 Mobile remote stations would only be permitted ancillary to fixed remote stations. Such mobile remote stations would only be permitted to communicate with fixed MCS master stations and cannot expect the same degree of protection as fixed stations due to their varying operating environment.

4.6.4 Communications between master stations may be authorized on a case-by-case basis.

5. Spectrum Availability and Sub-allocation Plans

5.1 Sharing Arrangement along the Canada/United States Border

In the interest of equitable sharing of spectrum along the border and to reduce coordination and administrative effort and time, the governments of Canada and the United States have entered into an arrangement in which each country has unrestricted geographic use of certain portions of the band 220-222 MHz along the border, set aside on a block and zone basis as illustrated in Figure A1 of Annex A. The terms of this arrangement take into account the demographic differences that exist along the border between the two countries. Within 120 km of the Canada/United States border, the band is shared on a block and zone basis and the frequencies shall be used as specified in this section. The sharing zone is illustrated in Figure A2 of Annex A. Beyond 120 km from the Canada/United States border, each country shall have full use of the band 220-222 MHz. There are also power and height restrictions applicable as described in Section 6.3.1.

Note: This section is partially superseded by the document, Statement of Intent of the Federal Communications Commission of the United States of America and the Department of Industry of Canada Related to the Sharing and Use of Portions of the Frequency Band 220-222 MHz for Positive Train Control Systems along the United States–Canada Border.

5.1.1 Distribution/Allotment of Frequencies

Table 5.1 below shows the channels allocated for Canadian and United States unrestricted use according to the Canada/United States arrangement concerning the use of the band 220 222 MHz.

Table 5.1 - Canada/United States Allocation of Frequencies
Area Canada Unrestricted Use United States Unrestricted Use
Outside Sharing Zone (beyond 120 km from Canada/U.S. border All Channels All Channels
Sharing Zone - (Outside Sectors 1 & 2) Within 120 km of the Canada/U.S. border area. 1 to 20, 25, 26, 56 to 85, 121 to 145, 155, 156, 175 to 180, and 190 to 195 21 to 24, 27 to 55, 86 to 120, 146 to 154, 157 to 160, 171 to 174, 186 to 189
Within Sector 1 (81°W to 85°W) 121 to 140, 179, 180, and 193 to 195 1 to 120, 141 to 160, 171 to 178, and 186 to 192
Within Sector 2 (71°W to 81°W) 1 to 20, 24 to 27, 31 to 50, 54 to 87, 121 to 147, 154 to 157, 173 to 180, and 189 to 195 21 to 23, 28 to 30, 51 to 53, 88 to 120, 148 to 153, 158 to 160, 171, 172, and 186 to 188

Note: Within 120 km of the border channels 161 to 170, 181 to 185, and 196 to 200 will be available for use by Canada and United States. Furthermore, channels 111, 113, 115, 117 and 119 will be available for Canada if used for Intelligent Transportation Systems/Intelligent Vehicle Highway Channels (ITS/IVHS).

5.2 Special Provisions for the Canada/United States Arrangement Concerning the Use of the Band 220-222 MHz

5.2.1 Public Safety and Mutual Aid Channels

5.2.1.1 The following channels are available to public safety organizations in both Canada and the United States on a shared basis for the purpose of public safety and mutual aid within 120 km of the Canada/United States border. These channels are available for assignment to operators eligible under Section 4.5.

Table 5.2 - Public Safety and Mutual Aid Channels
Channel Centre Frequency (MHz)
161 220.8025
162 220.8075
163 220.8125
164 220.8175
165 220.8225
166 220.8275
167 220.8325
168 220.8375
169 220.8425
170 220.8475
181 220.9025
182 220.9075
183 220.9125
184 220.9175
185 220.9225

Note: Only base station frequencies are listed. Paired mobile station frequencies are 1 MHz higher.

5.2.1.2 The public safety mutual aid channels, 161-170 and 181-185 (also listed above in Section 5.2.1.1), are available on a non-restricted basis everywhere in Canada. Further, they are available to both the United States and Canada on a shared basis within the coordination zones. These channels are to be used only for coordination of tactical communications between different public safety agencies, or for other similar emergency communications.

5.2.1.3 The use of these channels in the border area may be locally coordinated in accordance with general sharing principles.

5.2.2 Use of Frequencies Allotted to the United States

5.2.2.1 Under the interim sharing arrangement between Canada and the United States, frequencies primarily allotted for unrestricted use by the United States may be assigned by Canada within 120 km of the border under the following conditions:

  1. The maximum power flux density (pfd) at any point at or beyond the border shall not exceed -108 dBW/m2 in any 5 kHz bandwidth;
  2. Stations operating under this provision shall be considered as secondary and shall neither be granted protection against harmful interference from U.S. stations that have primary use of their authorized frequency, nor shall they cause harmful interference to U.S. primary stations, regardless of whether they meet the pfd value specified in Section 5.2.2.1(a);
    1. In the event that the actual signals at or beyond the border are found to exceed the specified value, the signal level should be reduced accordingly.
    2.  If the actual signals are found to cause harmful interference to U.S. stations that have primary use of their authorized frequency, regardless of signal strength, the licensee shall take immediate action to eliminate such interference.

5.3 Intelligent Transportation Systems/Intelligent Vehicle Highway Systems Channels (ITS/IVHS)

The Department is keeping the following channels in reserve for the future implementation of ITS/IVHS:

Table 5.3 - Intelligent Transportation System and Intelligent Vehicle Highway System Channels
Channel Centre Frequency (MHz)
111 220.5525
113 220.5625
115 220.5725
117 220.5825
119 220.5925

Note: Only base station frequencies are listed. Paired mobile station frequencies are 1 MHz higher.

5.4 Low-power Channels

The following are low-power channels and shall be available on an unprotected basis. See Section 6.3.1.2 for the technical limitations.

Table 5.4 - Low-power Channels
ChannelCentre Frequency (MHz)
196 220.9775
197 220.9825
198 220.9875
199 220.9925
200 220.9975

Note: Only base station frequencies are listed. Paired mobile station frequencies are 1 MHz higher.

5.5 Channels Designated to the Railway Association of Canada

5.5.1 The channels in Table 5.5 are available for the exclusive use by the Railway Association of Canada within the geographical area consisting of a corridor bounded by 70 km on each side of railway lines. Railway Association of Canada frequencies may be used for fixed and land mobile services beyond this geographical area according to this SRSP, provided that the Railway Association of Canadais protected within their geographical area of operation bounding the railway lines.

Table 5.5 - Railway Channels
Channel Centre Frequency (MHz)
21 220.1025
22 220.1075
23 220.1125
24 220.1175
25 220.1225

Note: Only base station frequencies are listed. Paired mobile station frequencies are 1 MHz higher.

5.5.2 These channels are identified for the Railway Association of Canadain order to be interoperable with those of the Association of American Railroads (AAR) in the United States. It should be noted that, the use of these channels in the coordination zone is subjectto the interim sharing arrangement between Canada and the United States for the band 220 222 MHz. They may be used by Canada within 120 km of the border under the conditions described in Section 5.2.2.1 of this SRSP.

5.6 Multipoint Communications Systems Channels

5.6.1 Master stations shall be licensed in the lower part of the band (220-221 MHz) and the remote stations in the upper part of the band (221-222 MHz).

5.6.2 Generally for distant remote stations, a directional antenna should be used. A minimum front to-back ratio (F/B) of 15 dB will be assumed when a directional antenna is used. This F/B ratio will be the basis of the geographical distance between two master stations and carrier to interference (C/I) calculations. These assumptions are not applicable for MCS mobile remote antennas.

5.7 Canadian Radio Amateur Use in the Band 220-222 MHz

5.7.1 Proposals and Changes to the Spectrum in Certain Bands Below 1.7 GHz announced allocation changes in the band 220-222 MHz after January 25, 2006. Amateur service allocation has been reduced from primary to secondary radio service status to support public safety agencies for emergency and disaster relief communications, and fixed and mobile services are now allocated on a primary basis.

5.7.2 For radio amateur secondary use in the band 220-221 MHz, channels are permitted to be aggregated. The maximum effective radiated power (e.r.p.) allowable per 5 kHz, in any one 5 kHz segment, shall be the applicable maximum e.r.p. depending on antenna height above average terrain described in Table 6.1 of Section 6.3.1.1.

5.7.3 For radio amateur secondaryuse in the band 221-222 MHz, the maximum e.r.p. allowable shall be 50 watts per 5 kHz in any one 5 kHz segment, and up to the applicable maximum e.r.p. depending on antenna height above average terrain described in Table 6.1 of Section 6.3.1.1. Such transmissions from antennas that are higher than 7 metres above average terrain will be permitted if the effective radiated power is reduced below 50 watts per 5 kHz by 20 log10(h/7) dB, where h is the height of the antenna above average terrain, in metres.


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