Treaty Series 1962 No. 15 — Coordination and Use of Radio Frequencies — Exchange of Notes between Canada and the United States of America

Ottawa, October 24, 1962
Entered into force October 24, 1962

Exchange of Notes (October 24, 1962) Between the Government of Canada and the Government of the United States of America Concerning the Coordination and Use of Radio Frequencies Above Thirty Megacycles per Second

I

The Chargé d'Affaires, a.i. of the United States  Embassy in Canada to the Secretary of State for External Affairs

Embassy of the United States of America

Ottawa, October 24, 1962

№ 107

Dear Sir:

I have the honour to refer to discussions which have taken place between representatives of the Government of Canada and the Government of the United States of America relating to the coordination and use of radio frequencies above thirty megacycles per second. In the course of these discussions, the sovereign right of each country to regulate its use of radio frequencies was acknowledged. Also, the desirability of providing for adequate spectrum space to meet equitably the requirements of the radio services of both Canada and the United States, now and in the future, was recognized. In addition, the representatives recognized that it was the mutual advantage of both countries to avoid harmful interference to each other's radio services and they noted the major developments that have taken place and are taking place in both countries in that part of the radio frequency spectrum allocated internationally by the International Telecommunication Union from thirty megacycles per second (30 Mc/s) up to forty gigacycles per second (40 Gc/s).

In the interest of efficient spectrum management the representatives have made the following proposals and drafted the attached Technical Annex which constitutes a part of them:

  1. The two countries will continue to recognize those frequency arrangements already in effect for bands above 30 Mc/s as described in the Technical Annex;
  2. They will establish, where mutually determined as being feasible and desirable, arrangements for the coordination of radio frequency assignments in those bands above 30 Mc/s for which there are no existing procedures;
  3. Where mutually determined as being feasible and desirable, and in order to facilitate development in both countries, joint frequency allotment plans should be developed by Canada and the United States for particular frequency bands and radio services above 30 Mc/s;
  4. The arrangements referred to in sub-paragraphs (2) and (3) above shall be as specified in the Technical Annex;
  5. Additional frequency bands, in which frequency coordination procedures should be developed or in which frequency allotment plans should be developed, may be added from time to time to the Technical Annex by listing them in the Index thereto, together with the designation of the Agencies responsible for such development;
  6. (a) The procedure to be followed in amending the Index to the Technical Annex as envisaged in sub-paragraph (5) would be that specified in sub-paragraph (12) (a) below;

    (b) The modification of frequency coordination procedures or joint frequency allotment plans in a particular band shall be the responsibility of the Agencies specified in the Index to the Technical Annex;
  7. (a) Radio broadcasting shall continue to be the subject of separate agreements and therefore is excluded from the provisions of this Note;

    (b) The coordination and use of frequencies by the amateur radio service are excluded from the provisions of this Note;
  8. In those bands where frequency coordination procedures have been established, when it is considered that the use of frequencies at locations not included in such procedures might result in harmful interference to the radio services of the other country, the assignment of the frequencies involved may, to the extent practicable, be the subject of special coordination by the Agencies authorized by the two Governments as specified in the Technical Annex;
  9. The authorized Agencies shall be responsible in their respective countries for the implementation of the frequency coordination procedures and joint frequency allotment plans provided for in this Note, as specified in the Technical Annex;
  10. It is recognized that existing coordination channels are adequate and nothing in this Note is intended to be construed as indicating a need for change in such channels unless and until such change is considered desirable by both parties hereto;
  11. This Note shall not be deemed to affect or supersede any other international agreements in the field of telecommunications in force for either country;
  12. (a) This Note may be amended by an Exchange of Notes between authorized representatives of the two Governments;

    (b) Any amendments or modifications to the Technical Annex other than those provided for in sub-paragraph (5) will be effected administratively by the Agencies specified either in the Technical Annex or in the Exchange of Notes provided for under sub-paragraph (6) (a);

    (c) All amendments or modifications made pursuant to sub-paragraph (12) (b) above shall be notified to the Department of External Affairs of Canada and the Department of State of the United States of America by the respective Agencies of each country.

Accordingly, I propose that this Note with the Technical Annex and your reply shall constitute an Agreement for the coordination and use of radio frequencies above thirty megacycles per second between our two Governments, effective from the date of your reply. Furthermore, because of its nature, I propose that, if you concur, this Agreement may only be terminated by either country giving twelve months' notice, in writing, of its intention to terminate the Agreement.

Accept, Sir, the renewed assurances of my highest consideration.

Chargé d'Affaires ad interim

IVAN B. WHITE

The Honourable
Howard C. Green, P.C., Q.C., M.P.
Secretary of State for External Affairs
Ottawa

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II

The Secretary of State for External Affairs
to the Chargé d'Affaires, a.i. of the United States Embassy in Canada

Department of External Affairs

Ottawa, October 24, 1962

No. 215

Sir,

I have the honour to refer to your Note of October 24, 1962, with its Technical Annex, proposing an Agreement between our two Governments concerning the coordination and use of radio frequencies above thirty megacycles per second.

The arrangements set forth in your Note and its Technical Annex are acceptable to the Government of Canada which concurs in the proposal that your Note with Technical Annex and this reply shall constitute an Agreement for the coordination and use of radio frequencies above thirty megacycles per second between the Government of Canada and the Government of the United States of America to be effective from the date of this reply. Furthermore, it is agreed that because of its nature and the Agreement concluded by these Notes may only be terminated by either party giving twelve months' notice, in writing, of its intention to terminate the Agreement.

Accept, Sir, the renewed assurances of my highest consideration.

H.C. GREEN

Secretary of State for External Affairs

The Honourable Ivan B. White
Chargé d'Affaires a.i.
Embassy of the United States of America
Ottawa

Technical Annex to the Exchange of Notes Between the Government of Canada and the Government of the United States of America Constituting an Agreement for Radio Frequency Coordination and Use of Radio Frequencies Above Thirty Megacycles per Second

Index to the technical annex listing

Frequency Bands, Authorized Coordination Agencies or Channels, and Arrangements
Item Frequency Bands Mc/s Authorized Coordination Agencies or Channels Coordination Arrangements and Remarks
U.S. Canada

* Authorized coordination channel only.

1 30.56-32.0 FCC DOT Arrangement A
2 33.0-34.0 FCC DOT Arrangement A
3 35.0-36.0 FCC DOT Arrangement A
4 37.0-38.0 FCC DOT Arrangement A
5 39.0-40.0 FCC DOT Arrangement A
6 42.0-46.6 FCC DOT Arrangement A
7 46.6-47.0 IRAC DOT ITU RR 228
8 47.0-49.6 FCC DOT Arrangement A
9 49.6-50.0 IRAC DOT ITU RR 228
10 72.0-74.6 FCC DOT Arrangement A
11 74.6-75.4 FAA DOT Arrangement B
12 75.4-76.0 FCC DOT Arrangement A
13 108.0-117.975 FAA DOT Arrangement B
14 117.975-121.975 FAA DOT Arrangement B
15 121.975-123.075 FCC DOT Arrangement B
16 123.075-123.575 FCC DOT Arrangement B
17 123.575-128.825 FAA DOT Arrangement B
18 128.825-132.025 FCC DOT Arrangement B
19 132.025-136.0 FAA DOT Arrangement B
20 137.0-144.0 JCS CCS* Arrangement C
21 150.8-174.0 FCC DOT Arrangement A
22 162.0-174.0 IRAC DOT Arrangement D
23 216.0-225.0 JCS CCS* Arrangement C
24 328.6-335.4 FAA DOT Arrangement B
25 420.0-450.0 JCS CCS* Arrangement C
26 450.0-470.0 FCC DOT Arrangement A
27 890.0-942.0 JCS CCS* Arrangement C
28 942.0-960.0 FCC DOT Arrangement A
29 960.0-1215.0 FAA DOT Arrangement B
30 1215.0-1400.0 JCS CCS* Arrangement C
31 1300.0-1350.0 FAA DOT Arrangement C
32 1400.0-1427.0     Coordination not required
33 1535.0-1660.0     Coordination not required at this time
34 1850.0-2200.0 FCC DOT Arrangement A
35 2300.0-2450.0 JCS CCS* Arrangement C
36 2450.0-2700.0     Coordination not required at this time
37 2700.0-2900.0 FAA DOT Arrangement C
38 2700.0-3700.0 JCS CCS* Arrangement C
39 2900.0-3100.0 IRAC DOT Arrangement C
40 3700.0-4200.00 FCC DOT Arrangement A
41 4200.0-4400.0     Coordination not required at this time
42 5000.0-5250.0     Coordination not required at this time
43 5250.0-5925.0 JCS CCS* Arrangement C
44 5460.0-5650.0 IRAC DOT Arrangement C
45 5925.0-7125.0 FCC DOT Arrangement A
46 8400.0-8500.0     Coordination not required at this time
47 8500.0-10500.0 JCS CCS* Arrangement C
48 9000.0-9200.0 FAA DOT Arrangement C
49 9300.0-9500.0 IRAC DOT Arrangement C
  Gc/s      
50 10.55-13.25 FCC DOT Arrangement A
51 13.25-13.4     Coordination not required at this time
52 13.4-14.0 JCS CCS* Arrangement C
53 14.0-15.7     Coordination not required at this time
54 15.7-17.7 JCS CCS* Arrangement C
55 17.7-23.0     Coordination not required at this time
56 23.0-24.25 JCS CCS* Arrangement C
57 24.25-33.4     Coordination not required at this time
58 33.4-36.0 JCS CCS* Arrangement C
59 36.0 and above     Coordination not required at this time

Arrangement A

Arrangement Between the Department of Transport and the Federal Communications Commission for the Exchange of Frequency Assignment Information and Engineering Comments on Proposed Assignments Along the Canada-United States Borders in Certain Bands Above 30 Mc/s

(Adopted by correspondence, May 1950; Revised Ottawa, March 1962)

    1. This arrangement involves assignments in the following frequency bands, except as provided in sub-paragraphs (b) (c) and (d) below:
      Mc/s
      30.56–32.00
      33.00–34.00
      35.00–36.00
      37.00–38.00
      39.00–40.00
      42.00–46.60
      47.00–49.60
      72.00–74.60
      Mc/s
      75.40–76.00
      150.80–174.00
      450.00–464.725
      465.275–470.00
      942.00–960.00
      1850.0–2200.0
      3700.0–4200.0
      5925.0–7125.0
      Gc/s
      10.55–13.25
    2. The following frequencies are not involved in this arrangement because of the nature of the services:
      Mc/s
      156.3
      156.35
      156.4
      156.45
      156.5
      156.55
      156.6
      156.65
      Mc/s
      156.7
      156.8
      156.9
      156.95
      157.0 and 161.6
      157.05
      157.1
      157.15
    3. Assignments proposed in accordance with the railroad industry radio frequency allotment plan along the United States-Canada border utilized by the Federal Communications Commission and the Department of Transport, respectively, may be excepted from this arrangement at the discretion of the referring Agency.
    4. Assignments proposed in any radio service in frequency bands below 470 Mc/s appropriate to this arrangement, other than those for stations in the Domestic Public (land mobile or fixed) category, may be excepted from this arrangement at the discretion of the referring Agency if a base station assignment has been made previously under the terms of this arrangement or prior to its adoption in the same radio service and on the same frequency and in the local area, and provided the basic characteristics of the additional station are sufficiently similar technically to the original assignment to preclude harmful interference to existing stations across the border.
    1. For Bands below 470 Mc/s, the areas which are involved lie between Lines A and B and between Lines C and D, as follows:

      Line A — Begins at Aberdeen, Wash., running by great circle arc to the intersection of 48° N., 120° W., thence along parallel 48° N., to the intersection of 95° W., thence by great circle arc through the southernmost point of Duluth, Min., thence by great circle arc to 45° N., 85° W., thence southward along meridian 85° W., to its intersection with parallel 41° N., thence along parallel 41° N., to its intersection with meridian 82° W., thence by great circle arc through the southernmost point of Bangor, Me., thence by great circle arc through the southernmost point of Searsport, Me., at which point it terminates; and

      Line B — Begins at Tofino, B.C., running by great circle arc to the intersection of 50° N., 125° W., thence along parallel 50° N., to the intersection of 90° W., thence by great circle arc to the intersection of 45° N., 79° 30' W., thence by great circle arc through the northernmost point of Drummondville, Quebec (Lat: 45° 52' N., Long: 72° 30' W.), thence by great circle arc to 48° 30' N., 70° W., thence by great circle arc through the northernmost point of Campbellton, N.B., thence by great circle arc through the northernmost point of Liverpool, N.S., at which point it terminates.

      Line C — Begins at the intersection of 70° N., 144° W., thence by great circle arc to the intersection of 60° N., 143° W., thence by great circle arc so as to include all the Alaskan Panhandle; and

      Line D — Begins at the intersection of 70° N., 138° W., thence by great circle arc to the intersection of 61° 20' N., 139° W. (Burwash Landing), thence by great circle arc to the intersection of 60° 45' N., 135° W., thence by great circle arc to the intersection of 56° N., 128° W., thence south along 128° meridian to Lat. 55° N., thence by great circle arc to the intersection of 54° N., 130° W., thence by great circle arc to Port Clements, thence to the Pacific Ocean where it ends.

    2. For bands above 470 Mc/s, the areas which are involved are as follows:
      1. For a station the antenna of which looks within the 200° sector toward the Canada-United States borders, that area in each country within 35 miles of the borders; and
      2. For a station the antenna of which looks within the 160° sector away from the Canada-United States borders, that area in each country within 5 miles of the borders.
    1. Each Agency shall furnish the other by July 1962, with a complete frequency assignment record, including, among the basic characteristics reported, the date of first usage of each frequency by each of the stations down regardless of the class of service, which were in actual operation on October 1, 1960, and located in the areas indicated in 2(a) above for the frequency bands below 470 Mc/s, and located in the areas indicated in 2(b) above for the frequency bands above 470 Mc/s. For the purpose of the revised arrangement, such record shall constitute, together with the 6th Edition of the Radio Frequency Record (Volume III), the master frequency assignment records for the two Agencies upon acceptance by the other Agency. Accordingly, in implementing the Geneva (1959) Radio Regulations, each Agency shall use these frequency records, in lieu of subsequent I.T.U. records, in matters leading to the resolution of pertinent cases of harmful interference involving stations authorized by the two Agencies.
    2. Each Agency shall keep its frequency assignment data in the aforementioned records current through the submission to the other Agency of its recapitulative master frequency assignment records at intervals of three months.
    1. Before the Federal Communications Commission takes final action on any application for the use of any frequency in the bands herein, in the areas stipulated above involving an effective radiated power in excess of five watts, or if protection is desired for an operation involving a power of five watts, or less, it will refer the pertinent particulars of the proposed assignment (see Appendix 3 or 4 as appropriate), in the form shown in Appendix 1 hereof, to the Department of Transport for comment as to whether the granting of an authorization will be likely to result in the causing of harmful interference to any existing Canadian assignments authorized by the Department.
    2. Before the Department of Transport takes final action on any application for the use of any frequency in the bands herein, in the areas stipulated above involving an effective radiated power in excess of five watts, or if protection is desired for an operation involving power of five watts, or less, it will refer the pertinent particulars of the proposed assignment (see Appendix 3 or 4 as appropriate), in the form shown in Appendix 2 hereof, to the Federal Communications Commission for comment as to whether the granting of an authorization will be likely to result in the causing of harmful interference to any existing United States assignments authorized by the Commission.
    3. Neither the Federal Communications Commission nor the Department of Transport shall be bound to act in accordance with the views of the other. However, to keep such instances to a minimum, each Agency should cooperate to the fullest extent practicable with the other by furnishing such additional data as may be required.
  1. Whenever differences of opinion concerning the probability of harmful interference exist, which cannot be resolved otherwise, or in cases where the information available makes it difficult to determine whether harmful interference would be created by the granting of a particular authorization, arrangement should be made for actual on-the-air tests to be observed by representatives of both the Federal Communications Commission and the Department of Transport. Should harmful interference be caused to the existing station, the Agency having jurisdiction over the proposed station should be notified promptly so that the transmissions of the interfering station may be halted. In the absence of a complaint of harmful interference, the authorization may not be granted until a lapse of 30 calendar days following the test period to allow sufficient time for the exchange, if desired, of engineering or other comments indicating an objection to the assignment.
  2. In the interest of planned use of the spectrum, information concerning future expansions and adjustments of the several services allocated to use the above bands, in the areas stipulated above, shall be exchanged to the maximum extent practicable.

Appendix 1 to Arrangement A

Appendix 1 to Arrangement A
Appendix 1 to Arrangement A

[Description of Figure]


Appendix 2 to Arrangement A

Appendix 2 to Arrangement A
Appendix 2 to Arrangement A

[Description of Figure]


Appendix 3 to Arrangement A

Basic Data Required for Coordination in the Fixed Service and Land Mobile Service Bands Below 470 Mc/s (Excluding Ionospheric Scatter)

  1. Operating agency
  2. Class of station
  3. Number of stations — Base and Mobile
  4. Frequency
  5. Location and coordinates
  6. Locality or area of reception
  7. Class of emission and necessary bandwidth
  8. Power (mean) delivered to the antenna
  9. Antenna gain (dB) and azimuth, when available
  10. Antenna elevation above M.S.L.

Appendix 4 to Arrangement A

Basic Data Required for Coordination in the Fixed Service and Land Mobile Service Bands Below 470 Mc/s (Excluding Tropospheric Scatter)

  1. Operating agency
  2. Class of station
  3. Number of stations — Base and Mobile
  4. Frequency
  5. Location and coordinates
  6. Locality or area of reception, including coordinates of fixed service receiving station
  7. Class of emission and necessary bandwidth
  8. Power (mean) delivered to the antenna
  9. Antenna gain (dB) and azimuth, when available
  10. Antenna elevation above M.S.L.
  11. Polarization of transmitted wave

Description of Images

Appendix 1 to Arrangement A

Appendix 1 provides a representation of a formatted letter to the Canadian Department of Transport, which was to be used by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission to provide information regarding the technical particulars of a proposed U.S. radio station. This allows provision of information, such as Serial Number, Date, Name of Applicant, File Number, Service, Class of Station, Number of Stations, Location, Frequency, Mean Power to Antenna, Emission, Antenna Gain and Azimuth, Antenna Height and any additional information. This information is required to be submitted in accordance with Section 4a of Arrangement A.
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Appendix 2 to Arrangement A

Appendix 2 provides a representation of a formatted letter addressed to the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC), which was to be used by the Canadian Department of Transport to provide information to the FCC concerning the technical particulars of a proposed Canadian radio station. This allows provision of information such as Serial Number, Date, Name of Applicant, File Number, Service, Class of Station, Number of Stations, Location, Frequency, Mean Power to Antenna, Emission, Antenna Gain and Azimuth, Antenna Height and any additional information. This information is required to be submitted in accordance with Section 4b of Arrangement A.
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Arrangement B

Department of Transport — Federal Communications Commission — Federal Aviation Agency — Arrangement for the Exchange of Frequency Assignment Information and Engineering Comments on Proposed Assignments Along the Canada/United States Borders in Certain Aviation Bands

(Ottawa, March 1962)

  1. This arrangement involves assignments in the frequency bands set forth in paragraph 7 hereof.
  2. In the interest of the planned use of the spectrum, information concerning future expansions and adjustments of the service allocated these bands, in the coordination zones stipulated in the Appendices attached hereto, shall be exchanged to the maximum extent practicable.
  3. The Agency proposing to establish a new station, or to modify the basic characteristics of an existing station, shall furnish to the appropriate Agency the technical data necessary to complete coordination, in accordance with the attached Appendices.
  4. The Agency responsible for coordination shall examine the information provided and shall reply as soon as practicable advising whether or not a conflict is anticipated. If so, the detail of the conflict and the particulars of the station likely to experience interference shall be supplied. New proposals or discussions may be initiated with the object of resolving the problem.
  5. Whenever differences of opinion concerning the probability of harmful interference exist, which cannot be resolved otherwise, or in cases where the information available makes it difficult to determine whether harmful interference would be created by the proposed operation, mutual arrangement should be made for actual on-the-air tests to be observed by representatives of both the Federal Aviation Agency/Federal Communications Commission and the Department of Transport. Should harmful interference be caused to the existing station, the Agency having jurisdiction over the proposed operation should be notified promptly so that the transmissions of the interfering station may be halted.
  6. Neither the Federal Aviation Agency/Federal Communications ;Commission nor the Department of Transport shall be bound to act in accordance with the views of the other. However, to keep such instances to a minimum, each Agency should cooperate to the fullest extent practicable with the other by furnishing such additional data as may be required.
  7. The bands treated and the agreed action on each are as follows:
    Department of Transport, Federal Communications Commission, Federal Aviation Agency — Arrangement for the Exchange of Frequency Assignment Information and Engineering Comments on Proposed Assignments Along the Canada/United States Borders in Certain Aviation Bands — bands treated and the agreed action
    Frequency Band Mc/s Authorized Coordination Agencies Remarks
    U.S. Canada
    74.60–74.40 FAA DOT Coordination not required at this time
    108.0–117.975 FAA DOT See Appendix
    117.975–121.975 FAA DOT See Appendix 2
    121.975–123.075 FCC DOT Coordination not required at this time
    123.075–123.575 FCC DOT Coordination not required at this time
    123.575–128.825 FAA DOT See Appendix 2
    128.825–132.025 FCC DOT See Appendix 3
    132.025–135.0 FAA DOT See Appendix 2
    135.0–136.0 DOS DOT See Appendix 4
    328.6–335.4 FAA DOT See Appendix 1
    960.0–1215.0 FAA DOT See Appendix 1

    Note: "Coordination not required at this time" in the Remarks column indicates that the present use of these frequencies does not cause conflict in their application, either in the United States or Canada. However, authorized agencies are designated to coordinate any future use which may be capable of causing harmful interference.

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Appendix 1 to Arrangement B

Radionavigation Service — Aeronautical

ILS–LOC, 108–112 Mc/s; ILS–GP, 328.6–335.4 Mc/s; VOR, 108–117.975 Mc/s;
DME, 960–1215 Mc/s.

Technical Data Required for Coordination

  1. Frequency
  2. Location name and geographical coordinates
  3. Class of emission and necessary bandwidth
  4. Transmitter mean power output (Peak for DME)
  5. Antenna azimuth and gain in the event of a directional antenna array
  6. Facility service volume in terms of altitude and radius protected

Coordination Zones

The coordination zones shall be based on the geographical separation between facilities as follows:

ILS — 100 NM of U.S./Canadian Border
VOR/DME up to 15000' — 200 NM of U.S./Canadian Border
VOR/DME up to 30000' — 300 NM of U.S./Canadian Border
VOR/DME up to 75000' — 450 NM of U.S./Canadian Border

  1. Note 1: DOT/FAA agree to exchange recapitulation records of assignments at intervals of 3 months beginning June 1, 1962.
  2. Note 2: DME channels 1 through 16 and 60 through 69 are excluded from coordination between the DOT and FAA.
  3. Note 3: The SSR frequencies 1030 and 1090 Mc/s are excluded from coordination between the DOT and FAA.
  4. Note 4: When the possibility exists that assignments outside of the normal coordination zones might result in harmful interference to the radio services of the other country due to their peculiar circumstances i.e., antenna height, power, directive arrays and abnormal service volumes, the assignment of the frequencies involved may, to the extent practicable, be the subject of special coordination by the DOT and FAA.
  5. Note 5: Coordination of airborne assignments is not required when use is an integral part of the Common Navigation System.

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Appendix 2 to Arrangement B

Aeronautical Mobile (R) Service — Air Traffic Control

117.975–121.975 Mc/s; 123.575–128.825 Mc/s; 132.025–135.0 Mc/s.

Technical Data Required for Coordination

  1. Frequency
  2. Location name and geographical coordinates
  3. Class of emission and necessary bandwidth
  4. Transmitter mean power outputv
  5. Antenna gain and azimuth in the event of a directional antenna array
  6. Facility service volume and function, e.g., typical function service volumes:

    Helicopter control 30 NM up to 5000 ft.
    Local control and VFR Radar Advisory 30 NM up to 20000 ft.
    Approach control including radar 60 NM up to 25000 ft.
    Departure control including radar 60 NM up to 20000 ft.
    Basic altitude enroute 100 NM up to 15000 ft.
    Intermediate altitude enroute 100 NM up to 24000 ft.
    High altitude enroute 200 NM up to 75000 ft.

Coordination Zones

The coordination zones for low-level and high-level operations are within 400 NM and 600 NM of the border, respectively, and are predicated upon the terminal assignments being placed between 117.975–126.975 Mc/s and the enroute assignments between 126.975–135.0 Mc/s. Exceptions should be handled in accordance with Note 7.

  1. Note 1: DOT and FAA agree to exchange recapitulative records of assignments at intervals of three months commencing June 1, 1962.
  2. Note 2: The frequencies 121.5 Mc/s and 121.6 Mc/s are excluded from coordination when used for SAR and scene-of-action functions, respectively.
  3. Note 3: Coordination of airborne assignments is not required when use is an integral part of the Air Traffic Control Service.
  4. Note 4: Protection is provided for the following fixed assignments in British Columbia:

    133.65 Mc/s ± 75 kc/s
    133.77 Mc/s ± 75 kc/s
    134.43 Mc/s ± 150 kc/s

  5. Note 5: Adjacent channel protection is provided for assignments on the frequency 134.10 Mc/s ± 100 kc/s.
  6. Note 6: The frequencies 126.90, 127.10, 127.30 and 128.50 Mc/s will continue to be used by Canada for enroute operational control.
  7. Note 7: When the possibility exists that assignments outside of the normal coordination zones might result in harmful interference to the radio services of the other country due to their peculiar circumstances, i.e., antenna height, power, directive arrays and abnormal service volumes, the assignment of the frequencies involved may, to the extent practicable, be the subject of special coordination by the DOT and FAA.

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Appendix 3 to Arrangement B

Aeronautical Mobile (R) Service — Enroute Operational Control

128.825–132.025 Mc/s

Technical Data Required for Coordination

  1. Frequency
  2. Location name and geographical coordinates
  3. Class of emission and necessary bandwidth
  4. Transmitter mean power output
  5. Antenna gain and azimuth in the event of a directional antenna array
  6. Level of operations:

    L-Level (ML) — below 15,000 feet
    High-Low-Level (LL) — 15,000 to 24,000 feet
    Mediumevel (HL) — above 24,000 feet

Coordination Zones

The coordination zones are within 400 NM of the border for Low-Level (LL) and Medium-Level (ML) operations and 600 NM of the border for High-Level (HL) operations, respectively. Exceptions should be handled in accordance with the provisions of Note 3.

Frequency Allotment Plans

The frequency allotment plan for the Aeronautical Mobile (R) / (Enroute) service in the band 128.825–132.025 Mc/s is shown for the United States in Attachment 1 hereto, and for Canada in Attachment 2. Case by case coordination effected subsequent to November 28, 1960, between the FCC and the DOT is a part of the attached plans.

  1. Note 1: DOC/FCC agree to exchange recapitulative records of assignments essentially within the zones specified at intervals of three months commencing June 1, 1962.
  2. Note 2: Coordination of airborne assignments is not required for enroute operational control communication assignments made in accordance with applicable rules and treaties.
  3. Note 3: When the possibility exists that assignments outside the normal coordination zones might result in harmful interference to the radio service of the other country due to their peculiar circumstances, i.e., antenna height, power and directive antenna arrays, the assignments of the frequencies involved may, to the extent practicable, be the subject of special coordination between the DOT and the FCC.

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Attachment 1 to Appendix 3 of Arrangement B

Frequency Allotment Plan for the Aeronautical Mobile (R)/ (Enroute) Service for the Band 128.825–132.025 Mc/s — United States
Freq. Mc/s Area of Use Level
128.9 California, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey HL
129.0 Minnesota, Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Ohio, Maryland, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Virginia, New York, New Jersey, Mississippi, Connecticut, Rhode Island and Delaware HL
129.1 Oregon,Mississippi, California and Nevada LL
Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia HL
129.2 Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Ohio HL
Florida, (International) HL
129.3 Montana, North Dakota, Wyoming, South Dakota, Nebraska, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, Missouri and Iowa LL
Ohio, Pennsylvania and New Jersey HL
129.35 Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio ML
129.4 Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, South Dakota, Utah and Calfornia LL
Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee and Alabama ML
129.45 Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Maryland HL
129.5 New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas, Georgia and Alabama HL
129.55 Illinois, Missouri, Tennessee, Indiana and Kentucky ML
South Carolina, Georgia and Florida HL
129.6 Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama ML
Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Washington, Utah and California LL
129.65 Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, West Virginia, Virginia, Missouri, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Oklahoma, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Florida HL
129.7 Washington, California and New York, (International) HL
Missouri, Arkansas, Tennessee, Mississippi and Louisiana ML
129.75 Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina and South Carolina LL
129.8 Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, North Carolina and Maryland LL
129.9 Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Nebraska, Kansas, Indiana and Louisiana LL
New York and New Hampshire (International) HL
130.0 California, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Michigan LL
130.1 Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, Tennessee, Mississippi, Michigan, Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey and Delaware LL
130.2 California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, West Virginia, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and New Jersey HL
Texas, Louisiana and Florida (International) HL
130.3 Minnesota, South Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York HL
130.4 Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Washington, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Kansas, Missouri, Michigan, Indiana and Ohio HL
New York and New Hampshire (International) HL
130.5 Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey LL
130.6 California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas and Pennsylvania HL
130.7 Vermont, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, West Virginia, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Washington, Oregon, California and Nevada LL
130.8 Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas HL
130.9 Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida HL
Illinois LL
Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas and Missouri ML
131.0 Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia, Maryland, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Florida HL
131.1 Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida HL
California, Nevada, Utah and Arizona ML
131.2 New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Illinois HL
131.3 Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland and Virginia ML
Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Nebraska LL
California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas HL
131.4 California, Nevada, Colorado, Utah, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas, New Mexico and Arizona HL
131.5 New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas and California HL
131.6 New York, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Illinois, Tennessee, Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas HL
131.7 Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Maryland, Virginia and Michigan HL
131.8 Oregon, Washington, California, Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island HL
Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Florida LL
131.85 Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut LL
131.9 Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, Noth Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida HL
Washington (International) HL
Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island and New York ML
132.0 Tennessee, Missouri, Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and Connecticut LL

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Attachment 2 to Appendix 3 of Arrangement B

Frequency Allotment Plan for the Aeronautical Mobile (R) / (Enroute) Service for the Band 128.825–132.025 Mc/s — Canada
Freq. Mc/s Area of UseFootnote * Level Remarks
Eastern Great Lakes Mid Western Western
128.85 X X X X ML Replacing 128.3 Mc/s
128.95 X X X X HL  
129.05   X   X HL Pilot-Dispatch (Toronto and Vancouver)
129.1 X X X X HL Pilot-Dispatch (Except Toronto-Windsor & Vancouver)
129.2 X   X X ML  
129.3 X       LL  
129.4 X       ML Replacing 127.1 Mc/s
129.5 X X X X ML  
129.6 X       LL Replacing 128.5 Mc/s
129.7 X X X X ML Pilot-Dispatch Edmonton HL
129.9   X X X ML Great Lakes LL
130.1 X X X   LL  
130.25 X X X X HL Replacing 128.1 Mc/s
130.35   X     LL  
130.5   X   X LL  
130.65   X     LL Replacing 127.3 Mc/s
130.7 X   X   LL  
130.8 X X X X HL Replacing 128.7 Mc/s
130.9   X X X ML West of 80EW and North of 45EN
131.1 X X X X ML Replacing 128.5 Mc/s Gardiner Great Lakes LL
131.2 X       HL Replacing 127.1 Mc/s
131.4     X   LL Replacing 128.5 Mc/s
131.9 X       ML Montreal only
132.0 X       HL Pilot-Dispatch Montreal

Footnotes

Footnote 1

See page 27 for map of areas concerned.

Return to footnote * referrer

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Attachment 2 to Appendix 3 of Arrangement B

Attachment 2 to Appendix 3 of Arrangement B
Attachment 2 to Appendix 3 of Arrangement B

[Description of Figure]

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Appendix 4 to Arrangement B

Aeronautical Mobile (R) Service — Enroute Operational Control and Air Traffic Control

135.0–136.0 Mc/s

Technical Data Required for Coordination

  1. Frequency
  2. Location name and geographical coordinates
  3. Class of emission and necessary bandwidth
  4. Transmitter mean power output
  5. Antenna gain and azimuth in the event of a directional antenna array
  6. For air traffic control facilities the service volume and function, e.g., typical function service volumes:

    Helicopter control 30 NM up to 5000 ft.
    Local control and VFR Radar Advisory 30 NM up to 20000 ft.
    Approach control including radar 60 NM up to 25000 ft.
    Departure control including radar 60 NM up to 20000 ft.
    Basic altitude enroute 100 NM up to 15000 ft.
    Intermediate altitude enroute 100 NM up to 24000 ft.
    High altitude enroute 200 NM up to 75000 ft.

For enroute operational control functions the level of operations:

Low-Level (LL) — below 15,000 feet
Medium-Level (ML) — 15,000 to 24,000 feet
High-Level (HL) — above 24,000 feet

Coordination Zones

The coordination zone is within 600 nautical miles of the border. Exceptions should be handled in accordance with the provisions of Note 4.

  1. Note 1: DOT and FAA agree to exchange recapitulative records of assignments at intervals of three months commencing September 1, 1962.
  2. Note 2: Coordination of airborne assignments is not required when use is an integral part of the Air Traffic Control Service.
  3. Note 3: Protection is provided temporarily for the existing fixed assignments on 136.03 Mc/s in British Columbia.
  4. Note 4: When the possibility exists that assignments outside of the normal coordination zones might result in harmful interference to the radio services of the other country due to their peculiar circumstances, i.e., antenna height, power, directive arrays and abnormal service volumes, the assignment of the frequencies involved may, to the extent practicable, be the subject of special coordination by the DOT and FAA.

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Arrangement C

Arrangement for Frequency Coordination of Fixed Installation Radars

(Ottawa, March 1962)

It is agreed that:

  1. Coordination shall be effected in those frequency bands used by fixed installation radars, some of which are essential to the defence of North America, whenever there is considered to be a likelihood of harmful interference. For this purpose information will be exchanged through the authorized coordination agencies, as follows:
    1. All relevant existing assignments as of the effective date of this arrangement, as soon as practicable.
    2. Current editions of the information in (a), as requested.
    3. Proposed or planned assignments as far in advance as practicable.
  2. The authorized agencies and channels through which coordination will be effected are specified in the Index to the Technical Annex. When more than one authorized coordination agency or channel is listed in that Index for a particular frequency band, military matters shall be coordinated through the authorized military agencies or channels and civil matters through the authorized civil agencies or channels indicated for that band.
  3. Detailed characteristics of transmitting and receiving equipment, for both radar and any relevant non-radar equipment, will be exchanged in advance of the coordination referred to above. The minimum desirable information is as follows:
    1. Frequency band or operating frequencies
    2. Location name and geographical coordinates
    3. Site elevation above sea level and antenna height above ground
    4. Class of emission and necessary bandwidth
    5. Power (peak) delivered to the antenna
    6. Function
    7. Antenna gain and orientation
  4. Until the bands covered by this arrangement have been cleared of potential conflicts, at installations where there is a possibility of harmful interference, evaluation testing of radar installations will be carried out at the time of activation and maximum cooperation will be extended in obtaining the best engineering solution to any harmful interference problems. It is recognized that special problems exist in bands presently in use for non-radar purposes. These problems require continuous further study as regards both the procedures and the necessity of allocation adjustments so as to accommodate radars essential to the defence of North America.
  5. Radar assignments in use on the effective data of this arrangement are not subject to further coordination by virtue of this arrangement.
  6. Mobile radar adjustments are not subject to this arrangement.

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Arrangement D

Arrangement Between the Department of Transport and the Interdepartment Radio Advisory Committee for the Exchange ofFrequency Assignment Information and Engineering Comments on Proposed Assignments Along the Canada-United States Borders in the Frequency Band 162–174 Mc/s

(Adopted Washington D.C., June 1956; Revised Ottawa, March 1962)

  1. This arrangement provides for the exchange of frequency assignment information and engineering comments on proposed assignments in the 162–174 Mc/s frequency band along the Canada-United States Borders.
  2. This arrangement applies in the areas bounded by:
    • Line A — Begins at Aberdeen, Wash. running by great circle arc to the intersection of 48°N., 120° W., thence along parallel 48° N., to the intersection of 95°W., thence by great circle arc through the southernmost point of Duluth, Min., thence by great circle arc to 45°N., 85°W., thence southward along meridian 85°W., to its intersection with parallel 41°N., thence along parallel 41°N., to its intersection with meridian 82°W., thence by great circle arc through the southermost point of Bangor, Me., thence by great circle arc through the southernmost point of Searsport, Me., at which point it terminates; and
    • Line B — Begins at Tofino, B.C., running by great circle arc to the intersection of 50°N., 125°W., thence along parallel 50°N., to the intersection of 90°W., thence by great circle arc to the intersection of 45°N., 79° 30'W., thence by great circle arc through the northernmost point of Drummondville, Quebec (Lat: 45° 52'N., Long: 72° 30'W.), thence by great circle arc to 48° 30'N., 70°W., thence by great circle arc through the northernmost point of Campbellton, N.B., thence by great circle arc through the northernmost point of Liverpool, N.S., at which point it terminates.
    • Line C — Begins at the intersection of 70°N., 144°W., thence by great circle arc to the intersection of 60°N., 143°W., thence by great circle arc so as to include all of the Alaskan Panhandle; and
    • Line D — Begins at the intersection of 70°N., 138°W., thence by great circle arc to the intersection of 61° 20'N., 139°W. (Burwash Landing), thence by great circle arc to the intersection of 60° 45'N., 135°W., thence by great circle arc to the intersection of 56°N., 128°W., thence south along 128° meridian to Lat. 55°N., thence by great circle arc to the intersection of 54°N., 130°W., thence by great circle arc to Port Clements, thence to the Pacific Ocean where it ends.
  3. Current records of frequency assignments in the frequency band 162–174 Mc/s will be exchanged as required.
    1. Before either Agency takes final action on any proposal for the use of any frequency in the band 162–174 Mc/s in the areas stipulated herein involving power in excess of five (5) watts, it will refer the pertinent particulars of the proposed assignment in the form shown in the appropriate Appendix hereof, to the other Agency for comment on whether the granting of an authorization will be liable to result in the causing of harmful interference to any existing radio operations of the Agency whose views are sought.
    2. If adverse comment is not received within thirty (30) calendar days from the date of the receipt of the proposal, the initiating Agency may go ahead with the operation after having notified the other Agency. In an emergency, coordination may be effected after the assignment is put into operation.
    3. Neither the Interdepartment Radio Advisory Committee nor the Department of Transport shall be bound to act in accordance with the views of the other. However, to keep such instances to a minimum, each Agency should cooperate to the fullest extent practicable with the other by furnishing such additional data as may be required.
  4. In cases where the information available makes it difficult to determine whether harmful interference would be created by the granting of a particular authorization, arrangements may be made for actual on-the-air tests to be observed by representatives of each Agency and further exchanges of engineering comments following such tests.
  5. In the interest of planned use of the spectrum, information about future expansions and adjustments of the services allocated the use of the band 162–174 Mc/s, in the areas stipulated herein, may be exchanged to the maximum extent practicable.
  6. Where a previously coordinated frequency assignment is in use and an additional assignment is proposed for the same frequency in the same area, the additional assignment must also be coordinated, attention being drawn to the previous coordination. This does not apply to the addition of mobile units to a previously coordinated land mobile system.

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Appendix 1 to Arrangement D

Appendix 1 to Arrangement D
Appendix 1 to Arrangement D

[Description of Figure]

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Appendix 2 to Arrangement D

Appendix 2 to Arrangement D
Appendix 2 to Arrangement D

[Description of Figure]

Image Descriptions

Attachment 2 to Appendix 3 of Arrangement B

This figure depicts a map of Canada divided into four regional areas, used to describe the frequency allotment plan and division of frequencies within Canada, as listed in Attachment 2 to Appendix 3 of Arrangement B. The Eastern area encompasses all the maritime provinces and most of the province of Quebec, bounded on the west by the meridian at approximately 76° 30’ west longitude. The Great Lakes area covers most of the province of Ontario, bounded between the meridians at approximately 76° 30' west longitude and approximately 90° west longitude. The Midwest area encompasses the provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan. The Western area encompasses the provinces of Alberta and British Columbia.
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Appendix 1 to Arrangement D

Appendix 1 provides a representation of a formatted letter to the U.S. Executive Secretary of the Interdepartment Radio Advisory Committee, which was to be used by the Canadian Department of Transport to provide information regarding the technical particulars of a proposed Canadian radio station in accordance with Section 4a of Arrangement D.
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Appendix 2 to Arrangement D

Appendix 2 provides a representation of a formatted letter to the Canadian Department of Transport which was to be used by the U.S. Executive Secretary of the Interdepartment Radio Advisory Committee to provide information regarding the technical particulars of a proposed U.S. radio station in accordance with Section 4a of Arrangement D.
Back to Figure

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