Archived—Interim Arrangement Concerning the Sharing between Canada and the United States of America on Local Multipoint Communication Systems, the Local Multipoint Distribution Service and Certain Other Services in Parts of the Frequency Bands 27.35‑28.35 GHz, 29.1‑29.25 GHz, and 31.0‑31.3 GHz

Appendix A

LMCS and LMDS Service Areas

LMCS is licensed by LMCS service areas and LMDS is licensed by Basic Trading Areas (BTAs).Footnote 14 For the purposes of this Arrangement, Tier 3 service areas, instead of LMCS service areas, are used to determine coordination entities in Canada.Footnote 15 The following tables show the Tier 3 service areas and BTAs in the 27.5 - 28.35 GHz frequency band that may need to coordinate with each other. The Administrations will provide licensee names and points of contact to allow the licensees to contact the relevant licensee(s) on the other side of the border to initiate coordination in accordance with this Arrangement. Footnote 16

In the 27.35 - 27.5 GHz frequency range, for purposes of this Arrangement, Tables 1A and 1B will be used to determine coordination entities. The point of contact will be NTIA in the U.S. and Industry Canada in Canada.

Table 1A

U.S. licensees may need to coordinate with the corresponding Canadian Tier 3 service areas indicated below:

BTA Number BTA Name TIER 3 Number TIER 3 Name
14 Anchorage, AK 3-59 Yukon, Northwest Territories & Nunavut/Yukon, Terrtories du Nord-Ouest & Nunavut
30 Bangor, ME 3-09 Quebec
30 Bangor, ME 3-05 Southern New Brunswick/ Nouveau-Brunswick-Sud
30 Bangor, ME 3-06 Western New Brunswick/ Nouveau-Brunswick-Ouest
36 Bellingham, WA 3-51 Okanagan/Columbia
36 Bellingham, WA 3-52 Vancouver
41 Billings, MT 3-42 Moose Jaw
41 Billings, MT 3-41 Regina
60 Buffalo-Niagara Falls, NY 3-30 London/Woodstock/St. Thomas
60 Buffalo-Niagara Falls, NY 3-25 Toronto
60 Buffalo-Niagara Falls, NY 3-29 Niagara-St. Catharines
63 Burlington, VT 3-12 Trois-Rivières
63 Burlington, VT 3-11 Eastern Townships/Cantons de l'Est
63 Burlington, VT 3-13 Montreal
112 Detroit, MI 3-31 Chatham
112 Detroit, MI 3-32 Windsor/Leamington
112 Detroit, MI 3-33 Strathroy
119 Duluth, MN 3-38 Thunder Bay
136 Fairbanks, AK 3-59 Yukon, Northwest Territories & Nunavut/Yukon, Territoires du Nord-Ouest & Nunavut
166 Grand Forks, ND 3-40 Brandon
166 Grand Forks, ND 3-39 Winnipeg
166 Grand Forks, ND 3-38 Thunder Bay
171 Great Falls, MT 3-42 Moose Jaw
171 Great Falls, MT 3-45 Medicine Hat/Brooks
171 Great Falls, MT 3-46 Lethbridge
215 Jamestown, NY-
Warren,
PA-
Dunkirk,
NY
3-30 London/Woodstock/St. Thomas
215 Jamestown, NY-
Warren,
PA-
Dunkirk,
NY
3-29 Niagara-St. Catharines
221 Juneau-Ketchikan, AK 3-57 Prince George
221 Juneau-Ketchikan, AK 3-59 Yukon, Northwest Territories & Nunavut/Yukon, Territories du Nord-Ouest & Nunavut
224 Kalispell, MT 3-46 Lethbridge
224 Kalispell, MT 3-50 Kootenays
251 Lewiston-Auburn, ME 3-11 Eastern Townships/Cantons de l'Est
299 Minot, ND 3-40 Brandon
299 Minot, ND 3-41 Regina
330 Olean, NY-Bradford, PA 3-29 Niagara-St. Catharines
352 Plattsburgh, NY 3-18 Cornwall
352 Plattsburgh, NY 3-11 Eastern Townships/Cantons de l'Est
352 Plattsburgh, NY 3-13 Montreal
356 Port Angeles, WA 3-54 Nanaimo
356 Port Angeles, WA 3-53 Victoria
363 Presque Isle, ME 3-09 Quebec
363 Presque Isle, ME 3-06 Western New Brunswick/ Nouveau-Brunswick-Ouest
363 Presque Isle, ME 3-08 Bas du fleuve/Gaspésie
379 Rochester, NY 3-29 Niagara-St. Catharines
403 Sandusky, OH 3-32 Windsor/Leamington
409 Sault Ste. Marie, MI 3-35 Sault Ste. Marie
413 Seattle-Tacoma, WA 3-51 Okanagan/Columbia
413 Seattle-Tacoma, WA 3-52 Vancouver
413 Seattle-Tacoma, WA 3-53 Victoria
425 Spokane, WA 3-46 Lethbridge
425 Spokane, WA 3-51 Okanagan/Columbia
425 Spokane, WA 3-50 Kootenays
444 Toledo, OH 3-32 Windsor/Leamington
463 Watertown, NY 3-20 Kingston
463 Watertown, NY 3-21 Belleville
463 Watertown, NY 3-15 Ottawa
463 Watertown, NY 3-18 Cornwall
463 Watertown, NY 3-19 Brockville
463 Watertown, NY 3-13 Montreal
465 Waterville-Augusta, ME 3-09 Quebec
465 Waterville-Augusta, ME 3-11 Eastern Townships/Cantons de l'Est
468 Wenatchee, WA 3-51 Okanagan/Columbia
468 Wenatchee, WA 3-52 Vancouver
476 Williston, ND 3-41 Regina
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Table 1B

Canadian licensees may need to coordinate with the corresponding U.S. BTA service areas indicated below:

TIER 3 Number TIER 3 Name BTA Number BTA Name
3-05 Southern New Brunswick/ Nouveau Brunswick-Sud 30 Bangor, ME
3-05 Southern New Brunswick/ Nouveau Brunswick-Sud 363 Presque Isle, ME
3-06 Western New Brunswick/ Nouveau Brunswick-Ouest 30 Bangor, ME
3-06 Western New Brunswick/ Nouveau Brunswick-Ouest 363 Presque Isle, ME
3-07 Eastern New Brunswick/ Nouveau Brunswick-Est 363 Presque Isle, ME
3-08 Bas du fleuve/Gaspésie 363 Presque Isle, ME
3-09 Quebec 30 Bangor, ME
3-09 Quebec 363 Presque Isle, ME
3-09 Quebec 465 Waterville-Augusta, ME
3-11 Eastern Townships/Cantons de l'Est 63 Burlington, VT
3-11 Eastern Townships/Cantons de l'Est 251 Lewiston-Auburn, ME
3-11 Eastern Townships/Cantons de l'Est 352 Plattsburgh, NY
3-11 Eastern Townships/Cantons de l'Est 465 Waterville-Augusta, ME
3-12 Trois-Rivières 63 Burlington, VT
3-13 Montreal 63 Burlington, VT
3-13 Montreal 352 Plattsburgh, NY
3-13 Montreal 463 Watertown, NY
3-15 Ottawa 463 Watertown, NY
3-18 Cornwall 352 Plattsburgh, NY
3-18 Cornwall 463 Watertown, NY
3-19 Brockville 463 Watertown, NY
3-20 Kingston 463 Watertown, NY
3-21 Belleville 463 Watertown, NY
3-25 Toronto 60 Buffalo-Niagara Falls, NY
3-29 Niagara-St. Catharines 60 Buffalo-Niagara Falls, NY
3-29 Niagara-St. Catharines 215 Jamestown, NY-
Warren,
PA-
Dunkirk,
NY
3-29 Niagara-St. Catharines 330 Olean, NY-
Bradford,
PA
3-29 Niagara-St. Catharines 379 Rochester, NY
3-30 London/Woodstock/ St. Thomas 60 Buffalo-Niagara Falls, NY
3-30 London/Woodstock/ St. Thomas 215 Jamestown, NY-
Warren,
PA-
Dunkirk,
NY
3-31 Chatham 112 Detroit, MI
3-32 Windsor/Leamington 112 Detroit, MI
3-32 Windsor/Leamington 403 Sandusky, OH
3-32 Windsor/Leamington 444 Toledo, OH
3-33 Strathroy 112 Detroit, MI
3-35 Sault Ste. Marie 409 Sault Ste. Marie, MI
3-38 Thunder Bay 119 Duluth, MN
3-38 Thunder Bay 166 Grand Forks, ND
3-39 Winnipeg 166 Grand Forks, ND
3-40 Brandon 166 Grand Forks, ND
3-40 Brandon 299 Minot, ND
3-41 Regina 41 Billings, MT
3-41 Regina 299 Minot, ND
3-41 Regina 476 Williston, ND
3-42 Moose Jaw 41 Billings, MT
3-42 Moose Jaw 171 Great Falls, MT
3-45 Medicine Hat/Brooks 171 Great Falls, MT
3-46 Lethbridge 171 Great Falls, MT
3-46 Lethbridge 224 Kalispell, MT
3-50 Kootenays 224 Kalispell, MT
3-50 Kootenays 425 Spokane, WA
3-51 Okanagan/Columbia 36 Bellingham, WA
3-51 Okanagan/Columbia 425 Spokane, WA
3-51 Okanagan/Columbia 468 Wenatchee, WA
3-52 Vancouver 36 Bellingham, WA
3-52 Vancouver 413 Seattle-Tacoma, WA
3-52 Vancouver 468 Wenatchee, WA
3-53 Victoria 36 Bellingham, WA
3-53 Victoria 356 Port Angeles, WA
3-53 Victoria 413 Seattle-Tacoma, WA
3-54 Nanaimo 356 Port Angeles, WA
3-57 Prince George 221 Juneau-Ketchikan, AK
3-59 Yukon, Northwest Territories & Nunavut/ Yukon, Territories du Nord-Ouest & Nunavut 14 Anchorage, AK
3-59 Yukon, Northwest Territories & Nunavut/ Yukon, Territories du Nord-Ouest & Nunavut 136 Fairbanks, AK
3-59 Yukon, Northwest Territories & Nunavut/ Yukon, Territories du Nord-Ouest & Nunavut 221 Juneau-Ketchikan, AK
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Appendix B - Sample Calculation for the 27 GHz Band

The following example is provided to illustrate how the pfd level at the service area boundary can be determinedFootnote 17:

Proposed station parameters:

Parameter Symbol Value
Hub transmitter power into the antenna PT -12 dBW
Channel bandwidth B 40 MHz
Transmitter antenna height above ground HT 100 meter
Transmitter antenna gain (Maximum gain towards the service area boundary at any elevation point 0-500 m above local terrain) GT 21 dBi
Centre frequency of channel F 28 150 MHz
Distance from hub transmitter to the boundary of service area Y D 10 km

Figure 1. Graphical representation of the proposed situation

The spectral power density in dBW/MHz received by an isotropic antenna (Pat the boundary of Service Area Y) at the boundary of service area Y may be calculated using free space propagation, and taking into account such factor as atmospheric losses as follows:

Pat the boundary of Service Area Y
= PT'+ GT - 20 log FMHz - 20 log Dkm - 32.4 - La
= (-28 + 21 - 20log(28 150) - 20 log(10) - 32.4 - 0.1x10) dBW/MHz
= (-28 + 21 - 89 - 20 - 32.4 - 1) dBW/MHz
= -149.4 dBW/MHz
where: PT'
= PT - 10 log BMHz
= -12 - 10 log(40)
= -28 dBW/MHz
GT
FMHz
Dkm
La
= 21 dBi
= 28 150
= 10
= atmospheric losses
= 0.1 dB/km

Then, the power flux density in dBW/m2 in 1 MHz (pfd) may be calculated as follows:

pfd
= Pat the boundary of Service Area Y - 10 log Ar
= (-149.4 - 10 log(9.038 x 10-6)) dBW/m2 in 1 MHz
= (-149.4 - (-50.4)) dBW/m2 in 1 MHz
= -99 dBW/m2 in 1 MHz
where: Ar 
= area of an isotropic receiving antenna
= λ2/(4π)
= c2/(4πFHz2)
= (3x108)2/(4π x (28.15x109)2)
= 9.038 x 10-6m2

Appendix C - Sample Calculation for the 29 GHz and 31 GHz Bands

The following example is provided to illustrate how the pfd level at the Canada/U.S. border can be determinedFootnote 18:

Proposed station parameters:

Parameter Symbol Value
Hub transmitter power into the antenna PT -12 dBW
Channel bandwidth B 40 MHz
Transmitter antenna height above ground HT 100 meter
Transmitter antenna gain (Maximum gain towards the U.S./Canada border at any elevation point 0-500 m above local terrain) GT 21 dBi
Centre frequency of channel F 29 150 MHz
Distance from hub transmitter to the Canada/U.S. border D 10 km

Figure 1. Graphical representation of the proposed situation

The spectral power density in dBW/MHz received by an isotropic antenna (Pat the U.S./Canada border) at the U.S. Canada border may be calculated using free space propagation, and taking into account such factor as atmospheric losses as follows:

Pat the U.S./Canada border
= PT'+ GT - 20 log FMHz - 20 log Dkm - 32.4 - La
= (-28 + 21 - 20 log(29 150) - 20 log(10) - 32.4 - 0.1x10) dBW/MHz
= (-28 + 21 - 89.3 - 20 - 32.4 - 1) dBW/MHz
= -149.7 dBW/MHz
where: PT'
= PT - 10 log BMHz
= -12 - 10 log(40)
= -28 dBW/MHz
GT
FMHz
Dkm
La
= 21 dBi
= 29 150
= 10
= atmospheric losses
= 0.1 dB/km

Then, the power flux density in dBW/m2 in 1 MHz (pfd) may be calculated as follows:

pfd
= Pat the U.S./Canada border - 10 log Ar
= (-149.7 - 10 log(8.429 x 10-6)) dBW/m2 in 1 MHz
= (-149.7 - (-50.7)) dBW/m2 in 1 MHz
= -99 dBW/m2 in 1 MHz
where: Ar
= area of an isotropic receiving antenna
= λ2/(4π)
= c2/(4πFHz2)
= (3x108)2/(4π x (29.15x109)2)
= 8.429 x 10-6m2
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Appendix D

The following technical limits have been developed in the ITU-R with the objective to provide adequate protection to the inter-satellite service from emissions from the fixed service in the band 27.35-27.5 GHz:

Stations of the inter-satellite service will operate in accordance with the provisions of Section V of Article S21 of the ITU Radio Regulations.

1. Transmitters of a hub station in a point-to-multipoint network:

1.1 The equivalent isotropic radiated power (e.i.r.p) spectral density for each transmitter of a hub station in a point-to-multipoint network will not exceed the following values in any 1 MHz band for the elevation angle q above the local horizontal planeFootnote 19:

+14 dB
dBW
for 0° ≤ θ ≤ 5°
+14-10log(θ/5)
dBW
for 5° < θ ≤ 90°

1.2 In the direction toward the geostationary (GSO) Data Relay Satellite (DRS) orbit locations of, 41°W, 46°W, 171°W, and 174°WFootnote 20, the e.i.r.p. spectral densityFootnote 21 of the emissions of a hub station shall not exceed +8dBW/MHz if the elevation angle above the local horizontal planeFootnote 22 is between 0° and 20°.

1.3 In the case of a hub-station employing single frequency operation in which the same frequency is used for both transmission and reception on a time division basis, the e.i.r.p. spectral density limit in 1.2 can be relaxed by 7 log (1/η) dB, where η (0< η <1) is the proportion of time when a hub-station is emitting transmitting signals. However, this relaxation should not exceed 3 dB even for a small η.

1.4 The hub station of a point-to-multipoint network may use Automatic Transmit Power Control (ATPC) to increase its transmitted power during rain faded condition, by an amount not exceeding the precipitation attenuation such that its e.i.r.p. spectral density in the direction of any GSO DRS orbit locations referenced above does not exceed +17 dBW in any 1 MHz band.

2. Transmitter of a subscriber station in a point-to-multipoint network, or transmitters of point-to-point fixed stations:

For the GSO DRS orbit locations referenced above:

2.1 As far as practicable, the e.i.r.p. spectral density of such a fixed service (FS) station in the direction of the above locations should not exceed +24dBW in any 1 MHz band.

2.2 During conditions when precipitation attenuation is experienced between the FS transmitting and receiving stations, the transmitting station may use ATPC to increase its transmitted power, by an amount not exceeding the precipitation attenuation such that its e.i.r.p. spectral density in the direction of the GSO locations referenced above does not exceed +33 dBW in any 1 MHz band.

2.3 When the atmospheric attenuation towards the GSO locations referenced above, calculated using the procedures in Annex 1 of Recommendation ITU-R P.676, taking into account the elevation angle towards these orbit locations, the altitude of the FS transmitting antenna and local information of average water vapor content in the driest month and of other meteorological parameters (see Annex 3 to Recommendation ITU-R F. 1249), exceeds 3 dB, this excess may be applied as an increase of the e.i.r.p. spectral density of the subscriber or point-to-point station.

2.4 When the Fresnel zones on the path from such a transmitting subscriber station or point-to-point station in the direction of the above orbit locations are completely or partially blocked, the e.i.r.p. density in this direction may be increased by an amount calculated using the methods of Recommendation ITU-R P.526 (see Annex 4 to Recommendation ITU-R F.1249) taking due account of atmospheric refraction on this path (see Recommendation ITU-R F.1333).


Return to footnote reference 1 This Arrangement applies to both new facilities and facilities in existence prior to the date of this Arrangement.

Return to footnote reference 2 The 29 GHz band is also designated for Non-Geostationary Orbit Mobile Satellite Service (NGSO MSS) feeder link systems in both the U.S. and Canada. This Arrangement does not apply to coordination with satellite systems in this band.

Return to footnote reference 3 This arrangement may be amended if Canada designates the 29 and 31 GHz bands for fixed service.

Return to footnote reference 4 The service area boundary for fixed and mobile applications operating in the U.S. in this band is defined as the U.S./Canada border.

Return to footnote reference 5 LMDS and LMCS systems can consist of one or more facilities, which may be implemented at different times. Sharing agreements can facilitate the implementation of such systems by allowing the licensees to establish how they will share in advance.

Return to footnote reference 6 In cases where both the U.S./Canada border and the neighboring service area lie within a body of water, the power flux density shall be calculated at the shoreline of the neighboring service area.

Return to footnote reference 7 The pfd B level has been selected on the basis that new systems, on the other side of the border, can be implemented with certain mitigation measures to avoid potential interference. It should be noted that potential interference into existing stations is a possibility, and therefore coordination is required.

Return to footnote reference 8 Existing systems include (1) systems that are operational prior to the date on which notification is received and (2) systems that have been successfully coordinated within the 6 months preceding that date.

Return to footnote reference 9 Any pfd value greater than pfd B may present potential interference into both existing, and/or planned systems, therefore successful coordination is required before deployment.

Return to footnote reference 10 Licensees on both sides of the border should recognize that the pfd level of –105 dBW/m2 in any 1 MHz band at the Canada/U.S. border is 10 dB higher than the value given in Section 4 for the 27 GHz band. Operators should take this into consideration in their system design to avoid any interference problems. Emissions of up to the –105 dBW/m2 in any 1 MHz band at the Canada/U.S. border will not be considered as interference.

Return to footnote reference 11 For the purposes of coordination with Canada, licensees should contact the Director, Space & International Regulatory Activities, Industry Canada.

Return to footnote reference 12 See Appendix A, note 14.

Return to footnote reference 13 In cases where both the U.S./Canada border and the neighboring service area lie within a body of water, the power flux density shall be calculated at the shoreline of the neighboring service area.

Return to footnote reference 14 BTAs are defined in the Rand McNally 1992 Commercial Atlas & Marketing Guide, 123rd Edition, at pages 38-39, which identifies 487 BTAs based on the 50 States. Further information on U.S. service areas and licensees is available at http://www.fcc.gov/wtb/uls.

Return to footnote reference 15 The Tier 3 service areas are described in the document, Service Areas for Competitive Licensing (Industry Canada, August 1998). LMCS Service areas are described in the document, Local Multipoint Communication Systems (LMCS) in the 28 GHz Range: Policy, Authorization Procedures and Evaluation Criteria. These service areas and Canadian licensee information are available on the World Wide Web by following the appropriate links at: http://www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Return to footnote reference 16 See supra notes 14-15.

Return to footnote reference 17 It should be noted that the example calculation assumes line of sight conditions due to the short path length and the height of the transmitting antenna. In other cases, where the distance is larger and/or the transmitting antenna height is small, line-of-sight conditions may not exist. In these cases, an appropriate propagation model that takes the non-line-of-sight situation into account should be used.

Return to footnote reference 18 It should be noted that the example calculation assumes line of sight conditions due to the short path length and the height of the transmitting antenna. In other cases, where the distance is larger and/or the transmitting antenna height is small, line-of-sight conditions may not exist. In these cases, an appropriate propagation model that takes the non-line-of-sight situation into account should be used.

Return to footnote reference 19 At elevation angles below the local horizontal plane no e.i.r.p. limitations, other than those specified in Article S21 of the ITU Radio Regulations apply.

Return to footnote reference 20 In the event that additional orbit locations are identified in applicable ITU-R Recommendations, this arrangement may be modified to include those orbit locations.

Return to footnote reference 21 The e.i.r.p. spectral density radiated towards a geostationary DRS location shall be calculated as the product of the transmitted power spectral density and the gain of the omnidirectional or sectoral antenna in the direction of the DRS. In the absence of a radiation pattern for the hub-station antenna, the reference radiation pattern of Recommendation ITU-R F.1336 should be used. The calculation should take into account the effects of atmospheric refraction and the local horizon. A method for calculating the separation angles is given in Annex 2 to Recommendation ITU-R F.[PMP26GHz].

Return to footnote reference 22 At elevation angles below the local horizontal plane no e.i.r.p. limitations, other than those specified in Article S21 of the ITU Radio Regulations apply.

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