Archived—Proposed Revisions to the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations (2009 Edition)

Section A: Mobile, Aeronautical Mobile, Radiolocation and Radiolocation Services

A1 (AI 1.3) – Radiolocation Service in the 9 000 MHz Band

Background (A)

Upgrade of the Radiolocation Service in the Bands 9 000-9 200 MHz and 9 300-9 500 MHz

As identified in Resolution 747 (WRC-03), there is a need to provide contiguous primary spectrum around the 9 000 MHz band in order for existing and planned radiolocation systems to satisfy their required missions. Changes in technology and emerging requirements for increased image resolution and increased range accuracy necessitate wider contiguous emission bandwidths. Therefore, there is a need to upgrade the status of frequency allocations to the radiolocation service in the frequency range 9 000-9 200 MHz and 9 300-9 500 MHz.

The bands 9 000-9 200 MHz and 9 300-9 500 MHz are allocated on a primary basis to aeronautical radionavigation and radionavigation respectively. Radio Regulation No. 4.10 recognizes radionavigation as a safety service. The radiolocation services and the radionavigation service have demonstrated compatible operations over many years through the use of similar system characteristics such as low-duty cycle emissions, scanning beams and interference reduction techniques. For example, past operational experience in the band 2 900-3 100 MHz as found in Report ITU-R M.2032, Tests illustrating the compatibility between maritime radionavigation radars and emissions from radiolocation radars in the band 2 900-3 100 MHz, confirms that it is possible to mitigate interference from radiolocation radars to maritime radionavigation radars in the band.

Some completed studies within ITU-R WP 8B* characterize the technical performance and protection criteria of radiolocation and radionavigation systems that ensure compatible operations in the bands 9 000-9 200 MHz and 9 300-9 500 MHz. Recommendation ITU-R M.1313 contains the technical characteristics and protection criteria for maritime radars in the band 9 300-9 500 MHz, and Recommendation ITU-R M.1372 identifies interference reduction techniques that enhance compatibility among radar systems.

The completed ITU-R studies on radionavigation radars and emissions from radiolocation radars in the band 9 000-9 500 MHz illustrate compatibility between the two services in this band. These studies indicate that typical radionavigation radars can suppress emissions from other radars, even when the radar receivers operate with very high interference-to-noise (I/N) ratios if the unwanted pulsed waveform is asynchronous and has a low effective duty cycle. These study results support the successful historical sharing experience between the services in the 9 000-9 500 MHz band. Therefore, a primary allocation for radiolocation can be added to the 9 000-9 200 and 9 300-9 500 MHz bands.

Summary of Proposed Changes to the Canadian Table (A)

9 000-9 500 MHz
9 000-9 200 AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION 5.337
Radiolocation RADIOLOCATION

5.473A

9 200-9 300 MARITIME RADIONAVIGATION 5.472
RADIOLOCATION

5.474

9 300-9 500 EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)
Radiolocation RADIOLOCATION
RADIONAVIGATION 5.476
SPACE RESEARCH (active)

5.427 5.474 MOD 5.475 5.475A 5.475B MOD 5.476A

ADD 5.473A In the band 9 000-9 200 MHz, stations operating in the radiolocation service shall not cause harmful interference to, nor claim protection from, systems identified in No. 5.337 operating in the aeronautical radionavigation service, or radar systems in the maritime radionavigation service operating in this band on a primary basis in the countries listed in No. 5.471(WRC-07)
MOD 5.475 The use of the band 9 300-9 500 MHz by the aeronautical radionavigation service is limited to airborne weather radars and ground-based radars. In addition, ground-based radar beacons in the aeronautical radionavigation service are permitted in the band 9 300-9 320 MHz on condition that harmful interference is not caused to the maritime radionavigation service. In the band 9 300-9 500 MHz, ground-based radars used for meteorological purposes have priority over other radiolocation.devices. (WRC-07)
ADD 5.475A See Section A1-B.
ADD 5.475B In the band 9 300-9 500 MHz, stations operating in the radiolocation service shall not cause harmful interference to, nor claim protection from, radars operating in the radionavigation service in conformity with the Radio Regulations. Ground-based radars used for meteorological purposes have priority over other radiolocation uses. (WRC-07)
SUP 5.476 In the band 9 300-9 320 MHz in the radionavigation service, the use of shipborne radars, other than those existing on 1 January 1976, is not permitted until 1 January 2001.  (WRC-07)
ADD MOD 5.476A See Section A1-B.

Discussion

Given the potential allocation to other services in the upper band 9 300-9 500 MHz, and because of similarity of services in the two bands, the agenda item focused on the upgrade of radiolocation from the secondary to the primary status. Radiolocation systems in these bands have been operating compatibly with the radionavigation service, allocated on a primary basis as it is a safety of life service.

Canada joined the CITEL Inter-American Proposal (IAP) on this agenda item, which supported the upgrade to a primary status on condition that a new footnote be created to maintain the relative status between radiolocation and radionavigation, recognizing that radionavigation is used for safety of life.

Because the ITU-R studies and extensive experience had shown compatibility, there was opposition to establishing super-primary status. The agreed upon solution was to refer to systems of the service. This way, one service would not have a higher status, but specific systems could claim extra protection.

In the case of the band 9 000-9 200 MHz, systems that can be deployed are already limited to those listed in No. 5.337. The new footnotes also conveyed protection to the maritime radionavigation systems operating in this band under a primary allocation in specific countries. Consequently, new footnotes were created that provided the required protection for the specific systems under the radionavigation service.

Regarding the modification to No. 5.475, the priority of the meteorological ground-based radars is included in added provision No. 5.473B for housekeeping purposes.

Background (B)

200 MHz Extension of the Primary EESS (Active) and SRS (Active) Allocations

The band 9 500-9 800 MHz is allocated on a primary basis to the Earth exploration-satellite (EESS) (active), space research (SRS) (active), radiolocation and radionavigation services. In order to satisfy global environmental monitoring requirements for increased resolution, the EESS (active) and the SRS (active) allocations require an increase of 200 MHz.

The ITU-R studied the compatibility between the EESS (active) and the existing services in the two bands identified by Resolution 747 (WRC-03) for consideration as extension bands.
 
Results of ITU-R tests and measurements indicate that representative radiolocation and radionavigation radars do not suffer any performance degradation due to any of the representative EESS (active) waveforms. These various ITU-R compatibility studies combined with tests and measurements indicate that sharing is feasible in the additional 200 MHz of spectrum between the EESS (active) and existing services in either the 9 300-9 500 MHz band or the 9 800-10 000 MHz band. In addition, these studies demonstrate that narrow band (less than 300 MHz) synthetic aperture radars (SAR s) present higher interference potential compared to wide band (300 MHz or greater) SAR s extending over the whole 9 300-9 800 MHz band. With respect to sharing between the EESS (active) and the fixed service, ITU-R studies have shown that interference from a distribution of FS transmitters operating in the 9 800-10 000 MHz band did not exceed the interference threshold of a spaceborne SAR.

Recognizing further that narrow bandwidth (less than 300 MHz) SAR can operate in the existing frequency band (9 500-9 800 MHz) and that the requested extension is only justified for SAR systems requiring more than 300 MHz bandwidth, a limitation of such 200 MHz extension to these wideband (300 MHz or greater) SAR systems could limit the risk of interference to meteorological radars while responding to the need for 200 MHz EESS extension.

Given that the SRS (active) systems operate in the vicinity of planets and celestial bodies other than the Earth or as experimental platforms for future EESS (active) systems, SRS (active) systems were not studied for compatibility with any Earth-based systems. Another possible use of the SRS (active) is as an experimental platform for a future EESS (active) system. However, in this case, the SRS (active) system and the EESS (active) system would be essentially the same. With respect to other types of EESS (active) systems other than SAR s, it should be noted that precipitation radars and cloud profile radars cannot operate in this frequency range due to the physical characteristics of their intended applications. Altimeters, which are wideband EESS (active) systems operating at relatively low-power levels, have been shown to not cause interference to radiodetermination systems in the 9 500-9 800 MHz band. Results for any extension band should be analogous.

Summary of Proposed Changes to the Canadian Table (B)

9 300-10 000 MHz
9 300-9 500 EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)
Radiolocation RADIOLOCATION
RADIONAVIGATION 5.476
SPACE RESEARCH (active)

5.427 5.474 MOD 5.475 5.475A 5.475B MOD 5.476A

9 500-9 800 EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)
RADIOLOCATION
RADIONAVIGATION
SPACE RESEARCH (active)

MOD 5.476A

9 800-10 000 9 900 RADIOLOCATION
Earth exploration-satellite (active)
Fixed
Space Research (active)

5.478A 5.478B 5.479

9 900-10 000 RADIOLOCATION
Fixed

5.479

MOD 5.475 See Section A1-A.
ADD 5.475A The use of the band 9 300-9 500 MHz by the Earth exploration-satellite service (active) and the space research service (active) is limited to systems requiring necessary bandwidth greater than 300 MHz that cannot be fully accommodated within the 9 500-9 800 MHz band. (WRC-07)
ADD 5.475B See Section A1-A.
SUP 5.476 See Section A1-A.
MOD 5.476A In the band 9 5300-9 800 MHz, stations in the Earth exploration-satellite service (active) and space research service (active) shall not cause harmful interference to, or constrain the use and development of nor claim protection from, stations of the radionavigation and radiolocation services. (WRC-9707)
ADD 5.478A The use of the band 9 800-9 900 MHz by the Earth exploration-satellite service (active) and the space research service (active) is limited to systems requiring necessary bandwidth greater than 500 MHz that cannot be fully accommodated within the 9 300-9 800 MHz band. (WRC-07)
ADD 5.478B In the band 9 800-9 900 MHz, stations in the Earth exploration-satellite service (active) and space research service (active) shall not cause harmful interference to, nor claim protection from stations of the fixed service to which this band is allocated on a secondary basis. (WRC-07)

Discussion

This issue addressed the extension of the primary allocations to EESS (active) and SRS (active) for a total of 500 MHz of contiguous spectrum, for systems that could not be accommodated within the 300 MHz in 9 500-9 800 MHz because of an operating bandwidth greater than 300 MHz. The radionavigation and radiolocation services will continue to be protected from EESS (active) and SRS (active) systems.

The extension of these allocations up to 200 MHz, in the downward direction, was not controversial. However, the European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT) also wanted to extend the allocation by another 100 MHz from 9 800-9 900 MHz for the operation of a 600 MHz bandwidth satellite system, for better resolution. This was considered outside the scope of the agenda item and the WRC refused to address the issue until the very last days of the Conference. As a last-minute compromise, EESS and SRS were granted a secondary allocation that must also protect the status of the FS even though the FS is allocated a secondary status. This addition was supported by Canadian stakeholders who can make use of the data provided by this additional extension to EESS and SRS, while not harming the other services to which the band is allocated.


*As a result of ITU-R re-structuring, ITU-R WP 8B is now known as ITU-R WP 5B

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