RIC-8 — Advanced Qualification Question Bank for Amateur Radio Operator Certificate

A-007-01-01 (3)
For an antenna tuner of the "Transformer" type, which of the following statements is False?

  • The input is suitable for 50 ohm impedance
  • The output is suitable for impedances from low to high
  • The circuit is known as a Pi-type antenna tuner (transmatch)
  • The circuit is known as a transformertype antenna tuner (transmatch)

A-007-01-02 (4)
For an antenna tuner of the "Series" type, which of the following statements is False?

  • The circuit is known as a Series-type antenna tuner (transmatch)
  • The output is suitable for impedances from low to high
  • The input is suitable for impedance of 50 ohms
  • The circuit is known as a Pi-type antenna tuner (transmatch)

A-007-01-03 (3)
For an antenna tuner of the "L" type, which of the following statements is False?

  • The transmitter input is suitable for 50 ohms impedance
  • The antenna output is high impedance
  • The circuit is suitable for matching to a vertical groundplane antenna
  • The circuit is known as an L-type antenna tuner (transmatch)

A-007-01-04 (3)
For an antenna tuner of the "Pi" type, which of the following statements is False?

  • The transmitter input is suitable for impedance of 50 ohms
  • The antenna output is suitable for impedances from low to high
  • The circuit is a series-type antenna tuner (transmatch)
  • The circuit is a Pi-type antenna tuner (transmatch)

A-007-01-05 (3)
What is a pi-network?

  • An antenna matching network that is isolated from ground
  • A network consisting of four inductors or four capacitors
  • A network consisting of one inductor and two capacitors or two inductors and one capacitor
  • A power incidence network

A-007-01-06 (3)
Which type of network offers the greatest transformation ratio?

  • Chebyshev
  • Butterworth
  • Pi-network
  • L-network

A-007-01-07 (2)
Why is an L-network of limited utility in impedance matching?

  • It is thermally unstable
  • It matches only a small impedance range
  • It is prone to self-resonance
  • It has limited power handling capability

A-007-01-08 (3)
How does a network transform one impedance to another?

  • It produces transconductance to cancel the reactive part of an impedance
  • It introduces negative resistance to cancel the resistive part of an impedance
  • It cancels the reactive part of an impedance and changes the resistive part
  • Network resistances substitute for load resistances

A-007-01-09 (1)
What advantage does a pi-L network have over a pi-network for impedance matching between a vacuum tube linear amplifier and a multiband antenna?

  • Greater harmonic suppression
  • Higher efficiency
  • Lower losses
  • Greater transformation range

A-007-01-10 (3)
Which type of network provides the greatest harmonic suppression?

  • Inverse pi-network
  • Pi-network
  • Pi-L network
  • L-network
top of page

A-007-01-11 (3)
Which three types of networks are most commonly used to match an RF power amplifier to a transmission line?

  • T, M and Q
  • M, pi and T
  • L, pi and pi-L
  • L, M and C

A-007-02-01 (3)
What kind of impedance does a quarter wavelength transmission line present to the source when the line is shorted at the far end?

  • The same as the characteristic impedance of the transmission line
  • The same as the output impedance of the source
  • A very high impedance
  • A very low impedance

A-007-02-02 (4)
What kind of impedance does a quarter wavelength transmission line present to the source if the line is open at the far end?

  • A very high impedance
  • The same as the output impedance of the source
  • The same as the characteristic impedance of the transmission line
  • A very low impedance

A-007-02-03 (3)
What kind of impedance does a half wavelength transmission line present to the source when the line is open at the far end?

  • The same as the characteristic impedance of the transmission line
  • The same as the output impedance of the source
  • A very high impedance
  • A very low impedance

A-007-02-04 (3)
What kind of impedance does a half wavelength transmission line present to the source when the line is shorted at the far end?

  • A very high impedance
  • The same as the characteristic impedance of the transmission line
  • A very low impedance
  • The same as the output impedance of the source

A-007-02-05 (3)
What is the velocity factor of a transmission line?

  • The velocity of the wave on the transmission line multiplied by the velocity of light in a vacuum
  • The index of shielding for coaxial cable
  • The velocity of the wave on the transmission line divided by the velocity of light
  • The ratio of the characteristic impedance of the line to the terminating impedance

A-007-02-06 (4)
What is the term for the ratio of the actual velocity at which a signal travels through a transmission line to the speed of light in a vacuum?

  • Characteristic impedance
  • Surge impedance
  • Standing wave ratio
  • Velocity factor

A-007-02-07 (2)
What is a typical velocity factor for coaxial cable with polyethylene dielectric?

  • 0.33
  • 0.66
  • 0.1
  • 2.7

A-007-02-08 (4)
What determines the velocity factor in a transmission line?

  • The line length
  • The centre conductor resistivity
  • The terminal impedance
  • Dielectrics in the line

A-007-02-09 (4)
Why is the physical length of a coaxial cable shorter than its electrical length?

  • The surge impedance is higher in the parallel feed line
  • Skin effect is less pronounced in the coaxial cable
  • The characteristic impedance is higher in a parallel feed line
  • RF energy moves slower along the coaxial cable than in air
top of page

A-007-02-10 (1)
The reciprocal of the square root of the dielectric constant of the material used to separate the conductors in a transmission line gives the ________ of the line:

  • velocity factor
  • VSWR
  • impedance
  • hermetic losses

A-007-02-11 (1)
The velocity factor of a transmission line is the:

  • ratio of the velocity of propagation in the transmission line to the velocity of propagation in free space
  • impedance of the line, e.g. 50 ohm, 75 ohm, etc.
  • speed at which the signal travels in free space
  • speed to which the standing waves are reflected back to the transmitter

A-007-03-01 (4)
What term describes a method used to match a high-impedance transmission line to a lower impedance antenna by connecting the line to the driven element in two places, spaced a fraction of a wavelength on each side of the driven element centre?

  • The gamma match
  • The omega match
  • The stub match
  • The T match

A-007-03-02 (2)
What term describes an unbalanced feed system in which the driven element of an antenna is fed both at the centre and a fraction of a wavelength to one side of centre?

  • The omega match
  • The gamma match
  • The stub match
  • The T match

A-007-03-03 (1)
What term describes a method of antenna impedance matching that uses a short section of transmission line connected to the antenna feed line near the antenna and perpendicular to the feed line?

  • The stub match
  • The omega match
  • The delta match
  • The gamma match

A-007-03-04 (4)
What would be the physical length of a typical coaxial stub that is electrically one quarter wavelength long at 14.1 MHz? (Assume a velocity factor of 0.66)

  • 20 metres (65.6 feet)
  • 2.33 metres (7.64 feet)
  • 0.25 metre (0.82 foot)
  • 3.51 metres (11.5 feet)

A-007-03-05 (1)
The driven element of a Yagi antenna is connected to a coaxial transmission line. The coax braid is connected to the centre of the driven element and the centre conductor is connected to a variable capacitor in series with an adjustable mechanical arrangement on one side of the driven element. The type of matching is:

  • gamma match
  • lambda match
  • "T" match
  • zeta match

A-007-03-06 (3)
A quarter-wave stub, for use at 15 MHz, is made from a coaxial cable having a velocity factor of 0.8. Its physical length will be:

  • 12 m (39.4 ft)
  • 8 m (26.2 ft)
  • 4 m (13.1 ft)
  • 7.5 m (24.6 ft)

A-007-03-07 (1)
The matching of a driven element with a single adjustable mechanical and capacitive arrangement is descriptive of:

  • a "gamma" match
  • a "T" match
  • an "omega" match
  • a "Y" match

A-007-03-08 (1)
A Yagi antenna uses a gamma match. The coaxial braid connects to:

  • the centre of the driven element
  • the variable capacitor
  • the adjustable gamma rod
  • the centre of the reflector
top of page

A-007-03-09 (1)
A Yagi antenna uses a gamma match. The centre of the driven element connects to:

  • the coaxial line braid
  • the coaxial line centre conductor
  • the adjustable gamma rod
  • a variable capacitor

A-007-03-10 (2)
A Yagi antenna uses a gamma match. The adjustable gamma rod connects to:

  • the coaxial line centre conductor
  • the variable capacitor
  • an adjustable point on the reflector
  • the centre of the driven element

A-007-03-11 (4)
A Yagi antenna uses a gamma match. The variable capacitor connects to the:

  • an adjustable point on the director
  • center of the driven element
  • coaxial line braid
  • adjustable gamma rod

A-007-04-01 (4)
In a half-wave dipole, the distribution of ________ is highest at each end.

  • current
  • inductance
  • capacitance
  • voltage

A-007-04-02 (4)
In a half-wave dipole, the distribution of ________ is lowest at each end.

  • voltage
  • inductance
  • capacitance
  • current

A-007-04-03 (2)
The feed point in a centre-fed half-wave antenna is at the point of:

  • minimum current
  • maximum current
  • minimum voltage and current
  • maximum voltage

A-007-04-04 (4)
In a half-wave dipole, the lowest distribution of ________ occurs at the middle.

  • capacity
  • inductance
  • current
  • voltage

A-007-04-05 (3)
In a half-wave dipole, the highest distribution of ________ occurs at the middle.

  • inductance
  • voltage
  • current
  • capacity

A-007-04-06 (1)
A half-wave dipole antenna is normally fed at the point where:

  • the current is maximum
  • the voltage is maximum
  • the resistance is maximum
  • the antenna is resonant

A-007-04-07 (4)
At the ends of a half-wave dipole:

  • voltage and current are both high
  • voltage and current are both low
  • voltage is low and current is high
  • voltage is high and current is low
top of page

A-007-04-08 (3)
The impedance of a half-wave antenna at its centre is low, because at this point:

  • voltage and current are both high
  • voltage and current are both low
  • voltage is low and current is high
  • voltage is high and current is low

A-007-04-09 (3)
In a half-wave dipole, where does minimum voltage occur?

  • At the right end
  • It is equal at all points
  • The centre
  • Both ends

A-007-04-10 (1)
In a half-wave dipole, where does the minimum current occur?

  • At both ends
  • At the centre
  • It is equal at all points
  • At the right end

A-007-04-11 (2)
In a half-wave dipole, where does the minimum impedance occur?

  • It is the same at all points
  • At the centre
  • At the right end
  • At both ends

A-007-05-01 (4)
What is meant by circularly polarized electromagnetic waves?

  • Waves with an electric field bent into circular shape
  • Waves that circle the earth
  • Waves produced by a circular loop antenna
  • Waves with a rotating electric field

A-007-05-02 (3)
What is the polarization of an electromagnetic wave if its magnetic field is parallel to the surface of the Earth?

  • Elliptical
  • Circular
  • Vertical
  • Horizontal

A-007-05-03 (4)
What is the polarization of an electromagnetic wave if its magnetic field is perpendicular to the surface of the Earth?

  • Vertical
  • Circular
  • Elliptical
  • Horizontal

A-007-05-04 (2)
The polarization of a radio wave is taken as the direction of the lines of force in the ________ field:

  • force
  • electric
  • magnetic
  • electromagnetic

A-007-05-05 (1)
A transmitted wave is vertically polarized when:

  • its electrical component is vertical
  • the antenna is pointing north in the northern hemisphere
  • the antenna is parallel to the ground
  • its magnetic component is vertical

A-007-05-06 (4)
The polarisation of an antenna is the:

  • orientation of its radiated magnetic field
  • length of the radiating element
  • radiation angle
  • orientation of its radiated electric field
top of page

A-007-05-07 (4)
A parabolic antenna is very efficient because:

  • a dipole antenna can be used to pick up the received energy
  • no impedance matching is required
  • a horn-type radiator can be used to trap the received energy
  • all the received energy is focused to a point where the pick-up antenna is located

A-007-05-08 (1)
A helical-beam antenna with right-hand polarization will best receive signals with:

  • right-hand polarization
  • left-hand polarization
  • vertical polarization only
  • horizontal polarization

A-007-05-09 (1)
One antenna which will respond simultaneously to vertically-and horizontally-polarized signals is the:

  • helical-beam antenna
  • folded dipole antenna
  • ground-plane antenna
  • quad antenna

A-007-05-10 (1)
What precaution should you take whenever you make adjustments to the feed system of a parabolic dish antenna?

  • Be sure no one can activate the transmitter
  • Disconnect the antenna-positioning mechanism
  • Point the dish away from the sun so it doesn't concentrate solar energy on you
  • Be sure you and the antenna structure are properly grounded

A-007-05-11 (1)
Why should a protective fence be placed around the base of a ground-mounted parabolic dish transmitting antenna?

  • To reduce the possibility of persons being harmed by RF energy during transmissions
  • To reduce the possibility that animals will damage the antenna
  • To increase the property value through increased security awareness
  • To protect the antenna from lightning damage and provide a good ground system for the installation

A-007-06-01 (2)
A transmitter has an output of 100 watts. The cable and connectors have a composite loss of 3 dB, and the antenna has a gain of 6 dB. What is the Effective Radiated Power?

  • 350 watts
  • 200 watts
  • 400 watts
  • 300 watts

A-007-06-02 (4)
As standing wave ratio rises, so does the loss in the transmission line. This is caused by:

  • high antenna currents
  • high antenna voltage
  • leakage to ground through the dielectric
  • dielectric and conductor heat losses

A-007-06-03 (4)
What is the Effective Radiated Power of an amateur transmitter, if the transmitter output power is 200 watts, the transmission line loss is 5 watts, and the antenna power gain is 3 dB?

  • 197 watts
  • 228 watts
  • 178 watts
  • 390 watts

A-007-06-04 (1)
Effective Radiated Power means the:

  • transmitter output power, minus line losses, plus antenna gain
  • power supplied to the antenna before the modulation of the carrier
  • power supplied to the feedline plus antenna gain
  • ratio of signal output power to signal input power

A-007-06-05 (3)
A transmitter has an output power of 200 watts. The coaxial and connector losses are 3 dB in total, and the antenna gain is 9 dB. What is the approximate Effective Radiated Power of this system?

  • 3200 watts
  • 1600 watts
  • 800 watts
  • 400 watts
top of page

A-007-06-06 (3)
A transmitter has a power output of 100 watts. There is a loss of 1.30 dB in the transmission line, a loss of 0.2 dB through the transmatch, and a gain of 4.50 dB in the antenna. The Effective Radiated Power (ERP) is:

  • 800 watts
  • 400 watts
  • 200 watts
  • 100 watts

A-007-06-07 (3)
If the overall gain of an amateur station is increased by 3 dB the ERP (Effective Radiated Power) will:

  • decrease by 3 watts
  • remain the same
  • double
  • be cut in half

A-007-06-08 (4)
A transmitter has a power output of 125 watts. There is a loss of 0.8 dB in the transmission line, 0.2 dB in the transmatch, and a gain of 10 dB in the antenna. The Effective Radiated Power (ERP) is:

  • 1250
  • 1125
  • 134
  • 1000

A-007-06-09 (2)
If a 3 dB gain antenna is replaced with a 9 dB gain antenna, with no other changes, the Effective Radiated Power (ERP) will increase by:

  • 6
  • 4
  • 1.5
  • 2

A-007-06-10 (4)
A transmitter has an output of 2000 watts PEP. The transmission line, connectors and transmatch have a composite loss of 1 dB, and the gain from the stacked Yagi antenna is 10 dB. What is the Effective Radiated Power (ERP) in watts PEP?

  • 18 000
  • 20 000
  • 2009
  • 16 000

A-007-06-11 (3)
A transmitter has an output of 1000 watts PEP. The coaxial cable, connectors and transmatch have a composite loss of 1 dB, and the antenna gain is 10 dB. What is the Effective Radiated Power (ERP) in watts PEP?

  • 1009
  • 10 000
  • 8000
  • 9000

A-007-07-01 (1)
For a 3-element Yagi antenna with horizontally mounted elements, how does the main lobe takeoff angle vary with height above flat ground?

  • It decreases with increasing height
  • It increases with increasing height
  • It does not vary with height
  • It depends on E-region height, not antenna height

A-007-07-02 (3)
Most simple horizontally polarized antennas do not exhibit any directivity unless they are:

  • an eighth of a wavelength above the ground
  • a quarter wavelength above the ground
  • a half wavelength or more above the ground
  • three-eighths of a wavelength above the ground

A-007-07-03 (2)
The plane from which ground reflections can be considered to take place, or the effective ground plane for an antenna is:

  • as much as 6 cm below ground depending upon soil conditions
  • several centimeters to as much as 2 meters below ground, depending upon soil conditions
  • as much as a meter above ground
  • at ground level exactly

A-007-07-04 (2)
Why is a ground-mounted vertical quarter-wave antenna in reasonably open surroundings better for long distance contacts than a half-wave dipole at a quarter wavelength above ground?

  • The radiation resistance is lower
  • The vertical radiation angle is lower
  • It has an omnidirectional characteristic
  • It uses vertical polarization
top of page

A-007-07-05 (4)
When a half-wave dipole antenna is installed one-half wavelength above ground, the:

  • radiation pattern changes to produce side lobes at 15 and 50 degrees
  • side lobe radiation is cancelled
  • radiation pattern is unaffected
  • vertical or upward radiation is cancelled

A-007-07-06 (2)
How does antenna height affect the horizontal (azimuthal) radiation pattern of a horizontal dipole HF antenna?

  • Antenna height has no effect on the pattern
  • If the antenna is less than one-half wavelength high, reflected radio waves from the ground significantly distort the pattern
  • If the antenna is less than one-half wavelength high, radiation off the ends of the wire is eliminated
  • If the antenna is too high, the pattern becomes unpredictable

A-007-07-07 (2)
For long distance propagation, the vertical radiation angle of the energy from the antenna should be:

  • more than 45 degrees but less than 90 degrees
  • less than 30 degrees
  • 90 degrees
  • more than 30 degrees but less than 45 degrees

A-007-07-08 (2)
Greater distance can be covered with multiple-hop transmissions by decreasing the:

  • power applied to the antenna
  • vertical radiation angle of the antenna
  • main height of the antenna
  • length of the antenna

A-007-07-09 (1)
The impedance at the centre of a dipole antenna more than 3 wavelengths above ground would be nearest to:

  • 75 ohms
  • 25 ohms
  • 300 ohms
  • 600 ohms

A-007-07-10 (2)
What is the main reason why so many VHF base and mobile antennas are 5/8 of a wavelength?

  • The angle of radiation is high giving excellent local coverage
  • Most of the energy is radiated at a low angle
  • It's easy to match the antenna to the transmitter
  • It's a convenient length on VHF

A-007-07-11 (1)
The most important consideration when deciding upon an antenna for contacting stations at great distances (DX) is:

  • vertical angle of radiation
  • sunspot activity
  • impedance
  • bandwidth

A-007-08-01 (4)
What is meant by the radiation resistance of an antenna?

  • The resistance in the atmosphere that an antenna must overcome to be able to radiate a signal
  • The specific impedance of an antenna
  • The combined losses of the antenna elements and feed line
  • The equivalent resistance that would dissipate the same amount of power as that radiated from an antenna

A-007-08-02 (3)
Why would one need to know the radiation resistance of an antenna?

  • To measure the near-field radiation density from a transmitting antenna
  • To calculate the front-to-side ratio of the antenna
  • To match impedances for maximum power transfer
  • To calculate the front-to-back ratio of the antenna

A-007-08-03 (1)
What factors determine the radiation resistance of an antenna?

  • Antenna location with respect to nearby objects and the conductors length/diameter ratio
  • Transmission line length and antenna height
  • Sunspot activity and time of day
  • It is a physical constant and is the same for all antennas
top of page

A-007-08-04 (4)
What is the term for the ratio of the radiation resistance of an antenna to the total resistance of the system?

  • Beamwidth
  • Effective Radiated Power
  • Radiation conversion loss
  • Antenna efficiency

A-007-08-05 (2)
What is included in the total resistance of an antenna system?

  • Radiation resistance plus transmission resistance
  • Radiation resistance plus ohmic resistance
  • Transmission line resistance plus radiation resistance
  • Radiation resistance plus space impedance

A-007-08-06 (2)
How can the approximate beamwidth of a beam antenna be determined?

  • Draw two imaginary lines through the ends of the elements and measure the angle between the lines
  • Note the two points where the signal strength is down 3 dB from the maximum signal point and compute the angular difference
  • Measure the ratio of the signal strengths of the radiated power lobes from the front and side of the antenna
  • Measure the ratio of the signal strengths of the radiated power lobes from the front and rear of the antenna

A-007-08-07 (4)
How is antenna percent efficiency calculated?

  • (radiation resistance / transmission resistance) X 100
  • (total resistance / radiation resistance) X 100
  • (effective radiated power / transmitter output) X 100
  • (radiation resistance / total resistance) X 100

A-007-08-08 (1)
What is the term used for an equivalent resistance which would dissipate the same amount of energy as that radiated from an antenna?

  • Radiation resistance
  • "j" factor
  • Antenna resistance
  • "K" factor

A-007-08-09 (1)
Antenna beamwidth is the angular distance between :

  • the points on the major lobe at the halfpower points
  • the maximum lobe spread points on the major lobe
  • the 6 dB power points on the major lobe
  • the 3 dB power points on the first minor lobe

A-007-08-10 (3)
If the ohmic resistance of a half-wave dipole is 2 ohms, and the radiation resistance is 72 ohms, what is the antenna efficiency?

  • 74%
  • 72%
  • 97.3%
  • 100%

A-007-08-11 (2)
If the ohmic resistance of a miniloop antenna is 2 milliohms and the radiation resistance is 50 milliohms, what is the antenna efficiency?

  • 52%
  • 96.15%
  • 25%
  • 50%

A-007-09-01 (2)
Waveguide is typically used:

  • at frequencies above 2 MHz
  • at frequencies above 1500 MHz
  • at frequencies below 150 MHz
  • at frequencies below 1500 MHz

A-007-09-02 (3)
Which of the following is Not Correct? Waveguide is an efficient transmission medium because it features:

  • low radiation loss
  • low dielectric loss
  • low hysteresis loss
  • low copper loss
top of page

A-007-09-03 (2)
Which of the following is an advantage of waveguide as a transmission line?

  • Frequency sensitive based on dimensions
  • Low loss
  • Expensive
  • Heavy and difficult to install

A-007-09-04 (3)
For rectangular waveguide to transfer energy, the cross-section should be at least:

  • three-eighths wavelength
  • one-eighth wavelength
  • one-half wavelength
  • one-quarter wavelength

A-007-09-05 (2)
Which of the following statements about waveguide Is Not correct?

  • In the transverse electric mode, a component of the magnetic field is in the direction of propagation
  • Waveguide has high loss at high frequencies, but low loss below cutoff frequency
  • In the transverse magnetic mode, a component of the electric field is in the direction of propagation
  • Waveguide has low loss at high frequencies, but high loss below cutoff frequency

A-007-09-06 (3)
Which of the following is a major advantage of waveguide over coaxial cable for use at microwave frequencies?

  • Frequency response from 1.8 MHz to 24 GHz
  • Easy to install
  • Very low losses
  • Inexpensive to install

A-007-09-07 (2)
What is printed circuit transmission line called?

  • Dielectric substrate
  • Microstripline
  • Dielectric imprinting
  • Ground plane

A-007-09-08 (1)
Compared with coaxial cable, microstripline:

  • has poorer shielding
  • has superior shielding
  • must have much lower characteristic impedance
  • must have much higher characteristic impedance

A-007-09-09 (4)
A section of waveguide:

  • operates like a low-pass filter
  • operates like a band-stop filter
  • is lightweight and easy to install
  • operates like a high-pass filter

A-007-09-10 (4)
Microstripline is:

  • a small semiconductor family
  • a high power microwave antenna
  • a family of fluids for removing coatings from small parts
  • printed circuit transmission line

A-007-09-11 (2)
What precautions should you take before beginning repairs on a microwave feed horn or waveguide?

  • Be sure the weather is dry and sunny
  • Be sure the transmitter is turned off and the power source is disconnected
  • Be sure propagation conditions are unfavorable for tropospheric ducting
  • Be sure to wear tight-fitting clothes and gloves to protect your body and hands from sharp edge