SRSP-517 — Technical Requirements for Broadband Radio Service (BRS) in the Band 2500-2690 MHz

Preface

Standard Radio System Plan SRSP-517, Issue 1, Technical Requirements for Broadband Radio Service (BRS) in the Band 2500-2690 MHz, supersedes the documents entitled Guideline GL-07, Interim Technical Guidelines for the Operation of the Broadband Radio Service (BRS) in the Band 2500-2690 MHz, and Standard Radio System Plan SRSP-302.5, Issue 2, Technical Requirements for Stations in the Fixed Service Operating in the 2150 to 2160 MHz and 2500 to 2690 MHz Bands.

Issued under the authority of
the Minister of Industry

space to insert Daniel Duguay
Daniel Duguay
Acting Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch




1. Intent

1.1 This Standard Radio System Plan (SRSP) states the minimum technical requirements for the efficient use of the band 2500-2690 MHz by the broadband radio service (BRS).

1.2 This SRSP specifies the technical characteristics relating to efficient spectrum usage only, and is not to be regarded as a comprehensive specification for equipment design and/or selection.

1.3 This SRSP also sets out requirements for international and domestic coordination and requirements to mitigate interference which must be followed by all licensees in the frequency band.

2. General

2.1 This SRSP supersedes the documents entitled Guideline GL-07, Interim Technical Guidelines for the Operation of the Broadband Radio Service (BRS) in the Band 2500-2690 MHz, and Standard Radio System Plan SRSP-302.5, Issue 2, Technical Requirements for Stations in the Fixed Service Operating in the 2150 to 2160 MHz and 2500 to 2690 MHz Bands.

2.2 This SRSP is based on the current or planned technologies being considered by the service providers to implement BRS in Canada.

2.3 The arrangements for non-standard systems are outlined in the document Spectrum Utilization Policies SP-Gen, General Information Related to Spectrum Utilization and Radio Systems Policies.

2.4 Although a radio system conforms to the requirements of this SRSP, Industry Canada may require modifications to the station or system whenever harmful interferenceFootnote1 is caused to other radio stations or systems.

2.5 Industry Canada should be advised when potential conflict between radio systems cannot be resolved by the parties concerned. After consultation with these parties, Industry Canada will determine what modifications need to be made and establish a schedule for these modifications in order to resolve the conflict.

2.6 Industry Canada may require licensees to use system receiver selectivity characteristics that provide improved rejection of harmful interference.

2.7 BRS equipment must be certified in accordance with the most recent version of Radio Standards Specification RSS-199, Broadband Radio Service (BRS) Equipment Operating in the Band 2500-2690 MHz.

2.8 Equipment that has been previously certified in accordance with RSS-199, Issue 1, prior to the adoption of RSS-199, Issue 2, will be permitted to continue operating in the band 2500-2690 MHz, subject to the conditions defined in this SRSP.

2.9 Licensees are required to make available to Industry Canada, upon request, information on certain technical parameters of their radio systems.

2.10 Revisions to this SRSP will be made as required.

3. Related Documents

The current issues of the following documents are applicable and are available on the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website at http://www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

TRAA
Treaty Series 1962 No. 15 — Coordination and Use of Radio Frequencies, Exchange of Notes Between Canada and the United States of America

Arrangement M — Arrangement between the Department of Industry of Canada and the Federal Communications Commission of the United States of America concerning the use of the frequency bands 2155–2162 MHz and 2500-2690 MHz by terrestrial stations along the Canada-United States border

  • CPC — Client Procedures Circular
  • CTFA — Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations
  • DGSO — Canada Gazette Notice
  • GL — Guidelines
  • RP — Radio Systems Policy
  • RSP — Radio Standards Procedure
  • RSS — Radio Standards Specification
  • SMSE — Canada Gazette Notice
  • SP — Spectrum Utilization Policy
  • SRSP — Standard Radio System Plan
  • TRAA — Terrestrial Radiocommunication Agreements and Arrangements
  • TRC — Telecommunications Regulation Circular

4. Band Plan

4.1 The band 2500-2570 MHz paired with 2620-2690 MHz is divided into seven 10+10 MHz paired blocks with a frequency separation of 120 MHz for frequency division duplex (FDD)Footnote 2 use; and the band 2570-2620 MHz is divided into two 25 MHz unpaired blocks. The unpaired blocks each include a 5 MHz restricted band (RB) separating the paired and unpaired spectrum (i.e. 2570-2575 MHz and 2615-2620 MHz).

See Figure 1 and Table 1 for the band plan and block sizes respectively.

Figure 1 — BRS band plan
Figure 1 – BRS band plan (the long description is located below the image)
This chart shows the general band plan for Broadband Radio Service (BRS) in the band 2500-2690 MHz. The 10 MHz blocks A to G (2500 to 2570 MHz) are paired with the 10 MHz blocks A’ to G’ (2620 to 2690 MHz). Networks using frequency division duplex (FDD) technology will use channels A to G for the transmission of their subscriber station, whereas channels A’ to G’ will be used for the transmission of their base stations. The 25 MHz blocks H to I (2570 to 2620 MHz) are unpaired. The unpaired blocks H and I include a 5 MHz restricted band at 2570 MHz to 2575 MHz and 2615 MHz to 2620 MHz, respectively. Operation in the restricted bands is specified in document SMSE-005-11.

Table 1 — BRS Frequency Blocks
BlockFrequencies (MHz)Total Spectrum (MHz)Pairing
A / A’2500-2510 / 2620-263010+10paired
B / B’2510-2520 / 2630-264010+10paired
C / C’2520-2530 / 2640-265010+10paired
D / D’2530-2540 / 2650-266010+10paired
E / E’2540-2550 / 2660-267010+10paired
F / F’2550-2560 / 2670-268010+10paired
G / G’2560-2570 / 2680-269010+10paired
H2570-259525 (includes 5 MHz RB)unpaired
I2595-262025 (includes 5 MHz RB)unpaired

4.2 Various channel sizes may be used within the blocks based on the technology choices of the licensee.

4.3 For FDD operations in the paired spectrum, the subscriberFootnote3-to-base links are to be in the band 2500-2570 MHz, and the base-to-subscriber links are to be in the band 2620-2690 MHz.

4.4 Non-FDD operations by licensees within the bands 2500-2570 MHz and 2620-2690 MHz must be engineered to coexist with FDD systems. The operation of these non-FDD systems is subject to the operation and displacement policy in Decision 1-3 within Section 1.9 of SMSE-005-11.Footnote4

4.5 Time division duplex (TDD)Footnote5 systems may operate in the band 2570-2620 MHz.

4.6 TDD operations by licensees within the restricted bands 2570-2575 MHz and 2615-2620 MHz are permitted on a no-interference, no-protection basis with respect to FDD operations in the paired spectrum.Footnote6

5. Technical Criteria

5.1 Radiated Power Limits and Antenna Height Limits

5.1.1 Fixed and Base Stations

Fixed and base stations (except fixed subscriber stations) are limited to a maximum permissible equivalent isotropically radiated power (e.i.r.p.) of 1640 W/MHz (i.e. no more than 1640 W e.i.r.p. in any 1 MHz band segment) with an antenna height above average terrain (HAAT)Footnote 7 up to 300 metres. For all installations with antenna HAAT in excess of 300 metres, a corresponding reduction in e.i.r.p. according to Table 2 shall be applied.

Table 2 — Reduction to Maximum Allowable E.I.R.P. for HAAT > 300 m
HAAT (m)Reduction in maximum e.i.r.p. (dB)
300 < HAAT ≤5002
500 < HAAT ≤1,0005
1,000 < HAAT ≤1,5008
1,500 < HAAT ≤2,00010

5.1.2 Subscriber StationsFootnote 8

Maximum e.i.r.p. limits are specified in RSS-199, Issue 2, Broadband Radio Service (BRS) Equipment Operating in the Band 2500-2690 MHz. Subscriber stations should employ automatic transmit power control such that stations operate on the minimum required power.

5.2 Other Criteria

5.2.1 Power Measurement Settings

The specified power values in Section 5.1 shall be measured during any continuous transmission time with a measurement instrument calibrated in terms of root-mean-square (rms) equivalent voltage.

5.2.2 Stations with Multiple Antennas Using Multiple-input, Multiple-output (MIMO) Technology

If a fixed or base station is equipped with multiple antennas, the following rules regarding e.i.r.p. and antenna height shall apply:

5.2.2.1 E.i.r.p. for Correlated Transmission

When multiple antennas are used at a station to transmit the same digital data in a given symbol period (even with different coding or phase shifts) for transmit diversity or to steer signal energy towards a particular direction for enhanced directional gain (i.e. beamforming) or to devise any other transmission mode where signals from different antennas are correlated, the e.i.r.p. shall be calculated based on the aggregate power conducted across all antennas and resulting directional gain 10 log10(N) + Gmax dBi. Here, N is the number of antennas and Gmax is the highest gain in dBi among all antennas.

5.2.2.2 E.i.r.p. for Uncorrelated Transmission

When multiple antennas are used at a station in which each antenna transmits different digital data during any given symbol period (i.e., space-time codes) or independent parallel data stream over the same frequency bandwidth in order to increase data rates (i.e., spatial multiplexing), or forms any other transmission mode where signals from different antennas are completely uncorrelated, the e.i.r.p. shall be calculated based on the aggregate power conducted across all antennas and maximum antenna gain Gmax.

5.2.2.3 Antenna Height

The HAAT of a base or fixed station (except fixed subscriber stations) with multiple antennas shall be calculated with reference to the highest antenna.

5.2.3 Transmitter-Unwanted Emissions

Transmitter unwanted emissions are specified in RSS-199, Issue 2, Broadband Radio Service (BRS) Equipment Operating in the Band 2500-2690 MHz.

6. Treatment of Existing non-BRS Systems Operating in the Band 2500-2690 MHz

In accordance with the document entitled Decisions on a Band Plan for Broadband Radio Service (BRS) and Consultation on a Policy and Technical Framework to License Spectrum in the Band 2500-2690 MHz, all site-specific Multipoint Communication Service (MCS) licences in Manitoba are grandfathered. In addition, certain CRTC licence-exempt broadcasting stations are subject to transition. Furthermore, fixed-service licensees (non-BRS licensees) in Alberta, British Columbia and Quebec are subject to displacement. The specific policy provisions and information, including the locations of these systems, are provided in the aforementioned document, available at: http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/vwapj/brs-2500e.pdf/$FILE/brs-2500e.pdf. Also, an updated list of these systems can be found in the document entitled Consultation on a Licensing Framework for Broadband Radio Service (BRS) — 2500 MHz Band (DGSO-004-12), available at: http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf10471.html.

7. General Guidelines for Coexistence of Systems Operating in the Same Frequency Blocks and in Neighbouring Service Areas

7.1 The coordination requirements in this section apply to all BRS base and fixed stations (with the exception of fixed subscriber stations). A station that requires coordination shall not be placed in operation until an agreement has been reached.

7.2 Unless a sharing agreement is already in place, a licensee must coordinate with other licensees before deployment of its station if:

  • (a) the shortest distance between neighbouring licensed service area boundaries is less than 120 km; and
  • (b) the power flux density (pfd) produced by the licensee’s station at ground level anywhere in the neighbouring service areas exceeds −116 dBW/m2/MHz.

In this case, the deployment of BRS base or fixed stations (not fixed subscriber stations) is subject to successful coordination between affected licensees in accordance with the following process:

7.2.1 The licensee must notify the other licensee(s) of its intention to deploy the facility(ies), and submit the information necessary to conduct an interference analysis. A list of suggested data elements is given in Annex A.

7.2.2 Pfd is calculated using accepted engineering practices, taking into account factors such as propagation loss, antenna directivity toward the service area boundary, and curvature of the Earth.

7.2.3 Licensees are encouraged to arrive at mutually acceptable sharing agreements that would allow for the provision of service by each licensee within its service area to the maximum extent possible.

7.2.4 Licensees are expected to take full advantage of interference mitigation techniques, such as antenna discrimination, polarization, frequency offset, shielding, site selection, frequency selection and power control, to facilitate the coordination of systems.

7.2.5 If a licence is transferred, assigned or reissued, any existing agreement(s) that formed the basis of coordination shall continue to apply with respect to the new licensee unless a new agreement is reached.

7.2.6 In the event that a mutually acceptable agreement cannot be concluded between licensees, the licensee seeking coordination may ask the Department to facilitate resolution of the case. A station that requires coordination shall not be placed in operation until an agreement has been reached.

7.2.7 A pfd level of −116 dBW/m2/MHz may be exceeded at or beyond a licensee’s service area boundary on a provisional basis where there is no neighbouring licensee within 120 km from its service area boundary. However, in the event that a new licensee is authorized within 120 km of the service area boundary of an existing licensee, the latter will be required to meet the pfd at the new licensee’s service area boundary, unless otherwise agreed with the new licensee.

7.2.8 Any BRS base station or fixed station (not fixed subscriber station) will require further coordination with relevant licensees where any proposed modifications:

  • (a) result in a pfd at or beyond the other service area boundary exceeding a pfd level of −116 dBW/m2/MHz; or
  • (b) involve operation on frequencies not previously coordinated; or
  • (c) change the polarization.

7.2.9 System expansion measures such as the addition of cells, cell splitting and sectorization must not force major changes in the system of other licensees, except by mutual agreement between the affected parties. Changes that would have potential impacts on other licensees, including cell site locations, cell sectorization and cell splitting, require consultation with the other licensees.

7.2.10 All results of the analyses concerning the pfd and the agreements made between licensees must be retained by the licensees and made available to Industry Canada upon request.

8. General Guidelines for Coexistence of Systems Operating in Adjacent Frequency Blocks

8.1 Where an interference conflict resulting from the operation of two BRS systems operating in adjacent blocks occurs (even though the technical specifications of this SRSP and RSS-199 are being met), licensees are directed to resolve the conflicts through mutual arrangements between the affected parties following consultation and coordination.

8.2 When potential conflicts between systems cannot be resolved, Industry Canada shall be so advised, whereupon, following consultations with the parties concerned, the Department will determine the necessary modifications and/or schedule of modifications.

9. Coexistence with Systems in Adjacent Bands

9.1 Coordination may be required with licensees in adjacent bands. In this context, coordination involves consultation between licensees to ensure coexistence between systems in adjacent bands.

9.2 Where an interference conflict resulting from the operation of systems in the band 2500-2690 MHz and radio systems in adjacent bands occurs, licensees are directed to resolve the conflicts through mutual arrangements between the affected parties following consultation and coordination.

9.3 When potential conflicts between systems cannot be resolved in a timely fashion, Industry Canada shall be so advised; following consultations with the parties concerned, Industry Canada will determine the necessary course of action.

9.4 Radio Systems Operating Below 2500 MHz

9.4.1 Mobile-Satellite Service (MSS)

It is noted that there are mobile-satellite service (MSS) downlink operations in the band 2483.5-2500 MHz. Licensees in the band 2500-2690 MHz may be required to coordinate with licensed facilities of the mobile-satellite service.Footnote 9

9.5 Radio Systems Operating Above 2690 MHz

9.5.1 Radio Astronomy Service

Canada has two radio astronomy observatories: one in Penticton, British Columbia, and the other in Algonquin Park, Ontario. The radio astronomy service (RAS) has primary allocation in the band 2690-2700 MHz. Although technical requirements are not needed at this time to safeguard Canadian radio astronomy observatories operating in the band 2690-2700 MHz, BRS licensees in the band 2500-2690 MHz must ensure that these sites are protected from harmful interference should any future requirements emerge (e.g., BRS licensees may be required to coordinate with any fixed or base station within a specified distance from the observatories).

9.5.2 Radiodetermination Services

It is noted that ground-based radar operations for aeronautical radionavigation services or meteorological purposes are allowed in the band 2700-2900 MHz; and shore-based radar operations for maritime radionavigation services are allowed in the band 2850-2900 MHz. Licensees in the band 2500-2690 MHz may be required to coordinate with licensed radar facilities.

10. International Coordination

10.1 Canadian licensees in the frequency band 2500-2690 MHz which operate stations near the Canada-United States border are subject to requirements to coordinate with U.S. licensees. The current requirements are stated below. These requirements are subject to change from time to time in accordance with international agreements and arrangements.

10.2 The Coordination procedure is set out in Annex B of this SRSP. Licensees must carry out the coordination procedure with respect to any new station if:

  • (a) it is located at a distance less than 120 km from the Canada-United States border;Footnote 10 and
  • (b) the pfd produced by the station at ground level anywhere in the other country’s territory exceeds −116 dBW/m2/MHz.Footnote 11

10.3 Existing stations that were successfully coordinated or notified prior to June 25, 2002, shall be permitted to continue operations under the terms and conditions of those coordinations or notifications; and stations more than 80 km from the border that were licensed prior to June 25, 2002, may continue to operate in accordance with the parameters of their existing authorizations without further coordination requirements. However, coordination will be required if any change in polarization or other modifications to such stations increase the potential for interference to other stations.

10.4 Canadian licensees are encouraged to enter into agreements with U.S. licensees (Agreements) to facilitate coordination which should:

  • (a) allow for the reasonable and timely development of the respective systems of the licensees;
  • (b) allow for the provision of services by each licensee within its licensed service area to the maximum extent possible;
  • (c) utilize all available interference mitigation techniques where applicable, such as antenna directivity, polarization, frequency offset, shielding, site selection and/or power control; and
  • (d) continue to apply to any subordinate licensees or transferees.

10.5 Industry Canada requires any licensee that receives a licence by way of transfer or subordinate licence to comply with the terms of any Agreement relating to a station unless a new Agreement is reached.

10.6 Licensees must retain all data and calculations related to coordination of stations and/or Agreements and must provide Industry Canada with such data and calculations, along with other supporting documentation upon request.


Annex A — Parameters for Coordination Between BRS Licensees

List of parameters that should be provided:

  • licensee information (Corporate name/mailing address/telephone number/email);
  • licensed service areas;
  • point of contact;
  • location of transmitter (Community/Province/Territory);
  • geographic coordinates of transmitting antenna;
  • equivalent isotropically radiated power (e.i.r.p.) (dBW);
  • ground elevation and antenna height above ground (m);
  • centre frequency (MHz);
  • antenna polarization;
  • antenna pattern/tabulation of the pattern;
  • azimuth of the maximum antenna gain; and
  • bandwidth and emission designation.

Notes:

  1. These parameters are for the coordination of the base stations.
  2. The licensee could provide more parameters, if needed, for the coordination process.
  3. Interference mitigation may involve various techniques including those cited in Section 7.2.4.

Annex B — Coordination Procedure Near the Canada-United States Border

B.1 When coordination with U.S. licensees is required, Canadian licensees must complete the process outlined below.

B.2 The licensee seeking coordination shall determine the maximum power flux density (pfd) value at and beyond the border that could be produced by any single transmitting station. In making this determination (calculation), the licensee shall use good engineering practices and generally accepted terrain-sensitive propagation models.

B.3 The licensee must communicate with any affected U.S. licensee and either enter into an Agreement as defined in the SRSP or provide the U.S. licensee with a Coordination Request.

B.4 A Coordination Request shall set out the following information and parameters:

  • licensee information (Corporate name/mailing address/telephone number/email);
  • licensed service areas;
  • point of contact;
  • location of transmitter (Community/Province/Territory);
  • geographic coordinates of transmitting antenna;
  • equivalent isotropically radiated power (e.i.r.p.) (dBW);
  • ground elevation and antenna height above ground (m);
  • antenna polarization;
  • antenna pattern/tabulation of the pattern;
  • azimuth of the maximum antenna gain; and
  • bandwidth and emission designation.

B.5 The Coordination Request shall be sent by registered mail (or mutually acceptable method) and shall provide notification that the recipient may respond by registered mail (or mutually acceptable method) within 30 days of its receipt to state any objection to deployment of the proposed facilities. It should be noted that the date of postmark shall be taken as the date of response. If no objection is raised by the U.S. licensee within this time period, then the coordination process may be considered complete.

B.6 If a recipient of a Coordination Request raises an objection within 30 days of receipt of that request, licensees shall collaborate to develop a mutually acceptable solution to the potential interference problem (an Agreement).

B.7 In the event that the Canadian licensee and the U.S. licensee cannot reach an Agreement within 30 days of receipt of an objection, the licensee may request that Industry Canada facilitate resolution of the case with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the United States.

B.8 A station that requires coordination shall not be placed in operation until an Agreement has been reached between the relevant licensees or until the Industry Canada and the FCC have agreed on sharing terms.

B.9 In cases where there is no licensee within 120 km on the opposite side of the border, no station of the proposed system shall produce a pfd at or beyond the border that exceeds −116 dBW/m2/MHz, unless agreed to by both Industry Canada and the FCC.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

As defined in the Radiocommunication Act, harmful interference means an adverse effect of electromagnetic energy from any emission, radiation or induction that (a) endangers the use or functioning of a safety-related radiocommunication system, or (b) significantly degrades or obstructs, or repeatedly interrupts, the use or functioning of radio apparatus or radio-sensitive equipment.

Return to footnote 1referrer

Footnote 2

FDD is a duplexing technology which permits transmission and reception of signals on two different frequencies separated in the frequency spectrum by a predetermined value.

Return to footnote 2referrer

Footnote 3

See RSS-199 for the definitions of base station, subscriber, fixed subscriber and mobile subscriber equipment.

Return to footnote 3referrer

Footnote 4

In accordance with the band plan adopted in the SMSE-005-11, Decisions on a Band Plan for Broadband Radio Service (BRS) and Consultation on a Policy and Technical Framework to License Spectrum in the Band 2500-2690 MHz (see Figure 1), it is intended that FDD systems be deployed within the paired spectrum blocks. In SMSE-005-11, Industry Canada recognized that FDD operation could potentially be affected by non-FDD operation in the paired blocks. Industry Canada also recognized that some incumbent licensees have already deployed non-FDD systems in the paired blocks and that some of these operations are in near rural or remote areas where the probability of interference with other systems is relatively low.

It is the general policy of Industry Canada to effect the displacement of frequency assignments only when and where required, so as to minimize disruption. Therefore, the Department decided that incumbents may continue to operate their non-FDD systems in their existing licensed bands within the paired spectrum blocks subject to the policy provision contained in Decision 1-3 within Section 1.9 of SMSE-005-11. New non-FDD systems may be deployed within the paired spectrum blocks in exceptional cases and are also subject to the policy provisions contained in Decision 1-3 within Section 1.9 of SMSE-005-11.

Return to footnote 4referrer

Footnote 5

TDD is a duplexing technology which permits transmission and reception of signals on the same frequency by alternating time slots for transmission and reception.

Return to footnote 5referrer

Footnote 6

In accordance with the decisions announced in SMSE-005-11 [see footnote 4 above], licensees operating in the restricted bands (RB) may be required to modify or cease operation if they cause interference to FDD operations in the bands 2500-2570 MHz or 2620-2690 MHz.

Return to footnote 6referrer

Footnote 7

The height of the antenna above average terrain (HAAT) is the height of the centre of radiation of the antenna above the average elevation of the terrain between 3 and 16 km from the antenna, for an individual radial. The final HAAT (also known as the effective height of the antenna above average terrain (EHAAT)) is the average of the antenna heights above the average terrain (HAATs) for eight radials spaced every 45 degrees of azimuth starting with true north.

Return to footnote 7referrer

Footnote 8

See footnote 3, page 5.

Return to footnote 8referrer

Footnote 9

A Standard Radio System Plan (SRSP) for Ancillary Terrestrial Component (ATC) Mobile Services operating in the adjacent band, 2483.5-2500 MHz, may be developed in the future.

Return to footnote 9referrer

Footnote 10

Stations located at high elevations and at distances greater than 120 km and less than 160 km from the border are subject to international coordination if they have a radio line-of-sight path to any point on the surface of the earth at or beyond the border and if they produce a power flux density (pfd) at ground level anywhere in the other country’s territory that exceeds −116 dBW/m2/MHz.

Return to footnote 10referrer

Footnote 11

Ibid.

Return to footnote 11referrer

  • Email
  • RSS
Help us improve
Back to "Help us improve" section.
  
Back to "What's the problem?" section.
Got it, thanks!
Um, you didn't enter anything.
Date modified: