Arrangement B

Arrangement for the exchange of frequency assignment information and engineering comments on proposed assignments along the Canada/United States borders in certain aviation bands

(Adopted Ottawa, March 1962; revised Washington, D.C., October 1964)

  1. This arrangement involves assignments in the frequency bands set forth in paragraph 8 hereof.
  2. In the interest of the planned use of the spectrum, information concerning future expansions and adjustments of the services allocated these bands, in coordination zones stipulated in the Appendices attached hereto, shall be exchanged to the maximum extent practicable.
  3. The Agency proposing to establish a new station, or to modify the basic characteristics of an existing station, shall furnish to the appropriate Agency the technical data necessary to complete coordination, in accordance with the attached Appendices.
  4. The Agency responsible for coordination shall examine the information provided and shall reply as soon as practicable advising whether or not a conflict is anticipated. If so, the detail of the conflict and the particulars of the station likely to experience interference shall be supplied. New proposals or discussions may be initiated with the object of resolving the problem.
  5. In the interest of planned use of the frequency bands allocated for use of space techniques in the Aeronautical Mobile (R) and Aeronautical Radionavigation Services, information concerning assignments to stations using space techniques in these bands shall be exchanged to the maximum extent practicable. This will involve assignments for:
    1. All spacecraft; and
    2. Transmitting stations and receiving stations which use space techniques.
  6. Whenever differences of opinion concerning the probability of harmful interference exist, which cannot be resolved otherwise, or in cases where the information available makes it difficult to determine whether harmful interference would be created by the proposed operation, mutual arrangement should be made for actual on-the-air tests to be observed by representatives of the U.S. agencies concerned and the Department of Transport. Should harmful interference be caused to the existing station, the Agency having jurisdiction over the proposed operation should be notified promptly so that the transmissions of the interfering stations may be halted.
  7. Neither the U.S. agencies concerned nor the Department of Transport shall be bound to act in accordance with the views of the other. However, to keep such instances to a minimum, each Agency should cooperate to the fullest extent practicable with the other by furnishing such additional data as may be required.
  8. The bands treated and the agreed action on each are as follows:

Agreed action
Frequency Bands Mc/s Authorized Coordination Agency Remarks
U.S. Canada
Note: "Coordination not required at this time" in the Remarks column indicates that the present use of these frequencies does not cause conflict in their application, either in the United States or Canada. However, authorized agencies are designated to coordinate any future use which may be capable of causing harmful interference.
74.6 - 75.4 FAA DOT Coordination not required at this time
108 - 117.975 FAA DOT See Appendix 1
117.975 - 121.975 FAA DOT See Appendix 2
121.975 - 123.075 FCC DOT Coordination not required at this time
123.075 - 123.575 FCC DOT Coordination not required at this time
123.575 - 128.825 FAA DOT See Appendix 2
128.825 - 132.025FCCDOTSee Appendix 3
132.025 - 135 FAA DOT See Appendix 2
135 - 136 FAA DOT See Appendix 4
328.6 - 335.4 FAA DOT See Appendix 1
960 - 1215 FAA DOT See Appendix 1
1540 - 1660 IRAC DOT Coordination not required at this time except for applications involving the use of space techniques
4200 - 4400 IRAC DOT Coordination not required at this time except for applications involving the use of space techniques
5000 - 5250 IRAC DOT Coordination not required at this time except for applications involving the use of space techniques
15.4 - 15.7 IRAC DOT Coordination not required at this time except for applications involving the use of space techniques

Appendix 1 to Arrangement B

Radionavigation - Aeronautical

ILS-LOC. 108–112 Mc/s; ILS-GP, 328.6–335.4 Mc/s; VOR, 108–117.975 Mc/s; DME, 960–1215 Mc/s.

Technical Data Required for Coordination

  1. Frequency
  2. Location name and geographical coordinates to the nearest second
  3. Class of emission and necessary bandwidth
  4. Transmitter mean power output (Peak for DME)
  5. Antenna azimuth and gain in the event of a directional antenna array
  6. Facility service volume in terms of altitude and radius protected

Coordinated Zones

The coordination zones shall be based on the geographical distance from the U.S./Canadian borders as follows:

ILS - 100 NM of U.S./Canadian borders
VOR/DME - 300 NM of U.S./Canadian borders

Note 1: DOT/FAA agree to exchange recapitulative records of assignments at intervals of 3 months.

Note 2: DME channels 1 through 16 and 60 through 69 are excluded from coordination between the DOT and FAA.

Note 3: The SSR frequencies 1030 and 1090 Mc/s are excluded from coordination between the DOT and FAA.

Note 4: When the possibility exists that assignments outside of the normal coordination zones might result in harmful interference to the radio services of the other country due to their peculiar circumstances i.e., antenna height, power, directive arrays and abnormal service volumes, the assignment of the frequencies involved may, to the extent practicable, be the subject of special coordination by the DOT and FAA.

Note 5: Coordination of airborne assignments is not required when use is an integral part of the Common Navigation System.


Appendix 2 to Arrangement B

Aeronautical Mobile (R) Service - Air Traffic Control

117.975–121.975 Mc/s; 123.575–128.825 Mc/s; 132.025–135.0 Mc/s.

Technical Data Required for Coordination

  1. Frequency
  2. Location name and geographical coordinates
  3. Class of emission and necessary bandwidth
  4. Transmitter mean power output
  5. Antenna gain and azimuth in the event of a directional antenna array
  6. Facility service volume and function, e.g., typical function service volumes:

Precision Approach Radar
30 NM up to 5,000 ft.

Helicopter control
30 NM up to 5,000 ft.

Local control and VFR Radar Advisory
30 NM up to 20,000 ft.

Approach control including radar
60 NM up to 25,000 ft.

Departure control including radar
60 NM up to 20,000 ft.

Low Altitude Enroute (United States)
60 NM up to 18,000 ft.

Low Altitude Enroute (Canada)
100 NM up to 23,000 ft.

High Altitude Enroute
150 NM up to 45,000 ft.

Coordination Zones

The coordination zones for terminal and low altitude facilities are within 400 NM of the borders. The coordination zones for high altitude facilities are within 600 NM of the borders. This is predicated upon the terminal assignments being placed between 117.975–126.975 Mc/s and the enroute assignments between 126.975–135.0 Mc/s. Exceptions should be handled in accordance with Note 7.

Note 1: DOT and FAA agree to exchange recapitulative records of assignments at intervals of three months.

Note 2:The frequency 121.5 Mc/s is excluded from coordination when used for emergency or distress and for SAR and scene of action functions. The frequency 121.6 Mc/s is excluded from coordination when used for SAR and scene of action functions.

Note 3: Coordination of airborne assignments is not required when use is an integral part of the Air Traffic Control Service.

Note 4: Protection is provided for the following fixed assignments in British Columbia:

133.65 Mc/s ± 75 kc/s
133.77 Mc/s ± 75 kc/s
134.43 Mc/s ± 150 kc/s

Note 5: The frequencies 134.05 and 134.15 Mc/s will not be assigned in order to provide protection to operations on the frequency 134.10 Mc/s.

Note 6: The frequencies 126.90, 127.10, 127.30 and 128.50 Mc/s will continue to be used by Canada for enroute operational control.

Note 7: When the possibility exists that assignments outside of the normal coordination zones might result in harmful interference to the radio services of the other country due to their peculiar circumstances, i.e., satellite relay stations, antenna height, power, directive arrays and abnormal service volumes, the assignment of the frequencies involved may, to the extent practicable, be the subject of special coordination by the DOT and FAA.


Appendix 3 to Arrangement B

Aeronautical Mobile (R) Service — Enroute Operational Control

128.825–132.025 Mc/s

Technical Data Required for Coordination

  1. Frequency
  2. Location name and geographical coordinates
  3. Class of emission and necessary bandwidth
  4. Transmitter mean power output
  5. Antenna gain and azimuth in the event of a directional antenna array
  6. Level of operations:

Low-Level (LL) - below 15,000 feet
Medium-Level (ML) - 15,000 to 24,000 feet
High-Level (HL) - above 24,000 feet

Coordination Zones

The coordination zones are within 400 NM of the borders for Low-Level (LL) and Medium-Level (ML) operations and 600 NM of the borders for High-Level (HL) operations, respectively. Exceptions should be handled in accordance with the provisions of Note 3.

Frequency Allotment Plans

The frequency allotment plan for the Aeronautical Mobile (R)/(Enroute) service in the band 128.825–132.025 Mc/s is shown for the United States in Attachment 1 hereto, and for Canada in Attachment 2. Case by case coordination effected subsequent to November 28, 1960, between FCC and the DOT is a part of the attached plans.

Note 1: DOT/FCC agree to exchange recapitulative records of assignments essentially within zones specified at intervals of three months.

Note 2: Coordination of airborne assignments is not required for enroute operational control communication assignments made in accordance with applicable rules and treaties.

Note 3: When the possibility exists that assignments outside of the normal condition zones might result in harmful interference to the radio service of the other country due to their peculiar circumstances, i.e., satellite relay stations, antenna height, power and directive antenna arrays, the assignments of the frequencies involved may, to the extent practicable, be the subject of special coordination between the DOT and the FCC.


Appendix 4 to Arrangement B

Aeronautical Mobile (R) Service — Enroute Operational Control and Air Traffic Control

135.0–136.0 Mc/s

Technical Data Required for Coordination

  1. Frequency
  2. Location name and necessary bandwidth
  3. Class of emission and necessary bandwidth
  4. Transmitter mean power output
  5. Antenna gain and azimuth in the event of a directional antenna array
  6. For air traffic control facilities the service volume and function, e.g., typical function service volume:

Precision Approach Radar
30 NM up to 5,000 ft.

Helicopter control
30 NM up to 5,000 ft.

Local control and VFR Radar Advisory
30 NM up to 20,000 ft.

Approach control including radar
60 NM up to 25,000 ft.

Departure control including radar
60 NM up to 20,000 ft.

Low Altitude Enroute (United States)
60 NM up to 18,000 ft.

Low Altitude Enroute (Canada)
100 NM up to 23,000 ft.

High Altitude Enroute
150 NM up to 45,000 ft.

For enroute operational control functions the level of operations:

Low-Level (LL) - below 15,000 feet
Medium-Level (ML) - 15,000 to 24,000 feet
High-Level (HL) - above 24,000 feet

Coordination Zones

The coordination zone is within 600 nautical miles of the borders. Exceptions should be handled in accordance with the provisions of Note 4.

Note 1: DOT and FAA agree to exchange recapitulative records of assignments at intervals of three months.

Note 2: Coordination of airborne assignments is not required when use is an integral part of the Air Traffic Control Service.

Note 3: Protection is provided temporarily for the existing fixed assignments on 136.03 Mc/s in British Columbia.

Note 4: When the possibility exists that assignments outside of the normal coordination zones might result in harmful interference to the radio services of the other country due to their peculiar circumstances, e.g., satellite relay stations, antenna height, power, directive arrays and abnormal service volumes, the assignment of the frequencies involved may, to the extent practicable, be the subject of special coordination by the DOT and FAA.

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