SRSP-371.0 — Technical Requirements for Fixed Line-of-Sight Radio Systems Operating in the Bands 71-76 GHz and 81-86 GHz

May 2017
Issue 1

Preface

Issue 1 of SRSP-371.0 has been developed to reflect Innovation, Science, and Economic Development Canada's spectrum utilization policy described in Spectrum Utilization Policy SP 70 GHz, Decisions on the Frequency Bands 71‑76 GHz, 81‑86 GHz and 92‑95 GHz.

Issued under the authority of
the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development

Martin Proulx
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch



1. Intent

This Standard Radio System Plan (SRSP) outlines the minimum technical requirements for the efficient use of the frequency bands 71‑76 GHz and 81‑86 GHz by point‑to‑point digital line‑of‑sight radio systems in the fixed service.

This SRSP is intended to be employed in the design and specification of radio systems and equipment. It specifies equipment characteristics relating to efficient spectrum usage only, and is not to be regarded as a comprehensive specification for equipment design and/or selection.


2. General

2.1 Revisions

Revisions will be made to this SRSP as required.

2.2 Spectrum licensing process

As described in Spectrum Utilization Policy SP 70 GHz, Decisions on the Frequency Bands 71-76 GHz, 81-86 GHz and 92-95 GHz, the interim link‑specific licensing process shall remain in force until such time that a formal area‑based spectrum licensing process is established. More specifically, see section 5 of SP 70 GHz for the licensing policy decisions in these bands.

Systems licensed under the interim licensing process must be coordinated domestically under the procedures applicable to radiocommunication station licences, as described in Radio Standards Procedure RSP-113, Application Procedures for Planned Radio Stations Above 960 MHz in the Fixed Service. The domestic coordination requirements in section 7 of this standard will only apply once the formal, area‑based, spectrum licensing process is established. The international coordination requirements described in section 9 apply to all licensed systems (including those under the interim licensing process).

2.3 Resolution of interference conflicts between radio systems

With respect to the resolution of interference conflicts between radio systems, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (hereinafter referred to as the Department), will only become involved for systems licensed under the interim licensing process. In this scenario, the Department must be advised when a potential conflict between radio systems cannot be resolved by the parties involved. After consultation with these parties, the Department will determine the modifications and schedule of modifications required to resolve the conflict. However, once the formal area‑based, spectrum licensing process is established, the licensees will be required to resolve interference conflicts between radio systems. The Department expects that the resolution of interference conflicts be achieved through good faith discussions and mutual agreements between affected parties.

2.4 Compliance of radio systems

Radio systems conforming to these technical requirements will be given priority in licensing over other non‑standard radio systems operating in these bands.

The arrangements for non‑standard systems are outlined in SP Gen, General Information Related to Spectrum Utilization and Radio Systems Policies.

Even though a radio system may be compliant with the requirements of this SRSP, modifications may be required to the system whenever there is harmful interference.Footnote 1 These modifications may include changes to the operating frequency channel, the transmitter and/or receiver antenna deployment characteristics (i.e. gain, backlobe and sidelobe discrimination, polarization, elevation angle, etc.), and the use of a receiver with improved selectivity characteristics.

2.5 Spectrum sharing

It should be noted that the fixed service shares this band with other services in accordance with the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations.

2.6 Arrangement of technical requirements

Some technical requirements in this standard are specified in accordance with the selection of other specific technical parameters used in the design of a radio system. Annex C provides a summary of these dependencies between technical requirements and parameters.


3. Related documents

Current issues of the following documents are applicable. Unless otherwise stated, they are available on the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Official publications page.










Acronyms

CPC — Client Procedures Circular

RIC — Radiocommunication Information Circular

SP — Spectrum Utilization Policy

SRSP — Standard Radio System Plan

TRC — Telecommunications Regulation Circular


4. Description of radio frequency channel arrangement

4.1 Radio frequency channel arrangements

The bands 71-76 GHz and 81-86 GHz are divided into 19 paired 250 MHz frequency channels, as shown in figure 1 and table 1.

The frequency channels are symmetrically paired with a common transmit/receive separation of 10 GHz to facilitate frequency division duplex (FDD) radio systems.

Time division duplex (TDD) systems may operate in any channel within the bands 74375 to 75875 MHz and 84375 to 85875 MHz, as shown in figure 1 and table 1.

When wider channels are required, consecutive 250 MHz channels may be aggregated into FDD or TDD channels, as defined in table 2. Provided the spectral efficiency requirement described in section 4.4 is maintained, channel aggregation, up to a maximum of 18 adjacent 250 MHz channels, is permitted for FDD systems and up to a maximum of 3 adjacent 250 MHz channels is permitted for TDD systems. annex B provides a graph summarizing the channel aggregation plan.

Fixed radio systems shall be assigned first in the 71-74 GHz and 81-84 GHz range. The frequency assignments within the 74-76 GHz and 84-86 GHz range may be employed only if all other channels are unavailable.

Figure 1 — 71-76 GHz and 81-86 GHz band plan and associated usage

Figure 1 — 71-76 GHz and 81-86 GHz band plan and associated usage (the long description is located below the image)
Description of figure 1

This figure illustrates the band plan and associated usage for the bands 71-76 and 81-86 GHz. The channel centre frequencies are also described in table 1 of section 4.1. The frequency ranges 71.125 to 74.375 GHz and 81.125 to 84.375 GHz provide for thirteen pairs of 250 MHz channels (A1/A1′ to A13/A13′) for systems employing FDD. The frequency ranges 74.375 to 75.875 GHz and 84.375 to 85.875 GHz provide for 6 pairs of 250 MHz channels (A14/A14′ to A19/A19′) for systems employing either FDD or TDD.

Table 1 — 71-76 GHz and 81-86 GHz band plan and associated usage for systems using 250 MHz wide channels
Channel Centre frequency (MHz) Duplex
A1/A1' 71250/81250 FDD
A2/A2' 71500/81500 FDD
A3/A3' 71750/81750 FDD
A4/A4' 72000/82000 FDD
A5/A5' 72250/82250 FDD
A6/A6' 72500/82500 FDD
A7/A7' 72750/82750 FDD
A8/A8' 73000/83000 FDD
A9/A9' 73250/83250 FDD
A10/A10' 73500/83500 FDD
A11/A11' 73750/83750 FDD
A12/A12' 74000/84000 FDD
A13/A13' 74250/84250 FDD
A14/A14' 74500/84500 FDD, TDD
A15/A15' 74750/84750 FDD, TDD
A16/A16' 75000/85000 FDD, TDD
A17/A17' 75250/85250 FDD, TDD
A18/A18' 75500/85500 FDD, TDD
A19/A19' 75750/85750 FDD, TDD
Table 2 — 71-76 GHz and 81-86 GHz band plan and associated usage for systems using aggregation of multiple 250 MHz wide channels
Channel Bandwidth (MHz) Centre frequency (MHz) Duplex
B1/B1' 500 71375 / 81375 FDD
B2/B2' 500 71875 / 81875 FDD
B3/B3' 500 72375 / 82375 FDD
B4/B4' 500 72875 / 82875 FDD
B5/B5' 500 73375 / 83375 FDD
B6/B6' 500 73875 / 83875 FDD
B7/B7' 500 74375 / 84375 FDD
B8/B8' 500 74875 / 84875 FDD, TDD
B9/B9' 500 75375 / 85375 FDD, TDD
C1/C1' 750 71500 / 81500 FDD
C2/C2' 750 72250 / 82250 FDD
C3/C3' 750 73000 / 83000 FDD
C4/C4' 750 73750 / 83750 FDD
C5/C5' 750 74500 / 84500 FDD
C6/C6' 750 75250 / 85250 FDD, TDD
D1/D1' 1000 71625 / 81625 FDD
D2/D2' 1000 72625 / 82625 FDD
D3/D3' 1000 73625 / 83625 FDD
D4/D4' 1000 74625 / 84625 FDD
E1/E1' 1250 71750 / 81750 FDD
E2/E2' 1250 73000 / 83000 FDD
E3/E3' 1250 74250 / 84250 FDD
F1/F1' 1500 71875 / 81875 FDD
F2/F2' 1500 73375 / 83375 FDD
G1/G1' 1750 72000 / 82000 FDD
G2/G2' 1750 73750 / 83750 FDD
H1/H1' 2000 72125 / 82125 FDD
H2/H2' 2000 74125 / 84125 FDD
I1/I1' 2250 72250 / 82250 FDD
I2/I2' 2250 74500 / 84500 FDD
J1/J1' 2500 72375 / 82375 FDD
K1/K1' 2750 72500 / 82500 FDD
L1/L1' 3000 72625 / 82625 FDD
M1/M1' 3250 72750 / 82750 FDD
N1/N1' 3500 72875 / 82875 FDD
O1/O1' 3750 73000 / 83000 FDD
P1/P1' 4000 73125 / 83125 FDD
Q1/Q1' 4250 73250 / 83250 FDD
R1/R1' 4500 73375 / 83375 FDD

4.2 Branching and spur route channels

The frequencies assigned to a main route should be reused on the branching and spur routes where possible. In order to obtain sufficient antenna discrimination at the branch‑off angle, the siting of repeater stations should be planned with this requirement in mind.

4.3 Closed loop

Systems must be designed so that any closed loop network contains an even number of hops.

4.4 Spectral efficiency

Listed below are the spectral efficiency requirements for radio systems using an RF channel bandwidth up to 2000 MHz and for those exceeding 2000 MHz. Specified also are requirements for radio systems using modulation or adaptive error‑correction coding.

4.4.1 Spectral efficiency requirements for radio systems using an RF channel bandwidth less than or equal to 2000 MHz

Digital systems shall achieve a minimum spectral efficiency of 1 bit/s/Hz within the allocated Radio Frequency (RF) channel bandwidth and on a single polarization.

4.4.2 Spectral efficiency requirements for radio systems using an RF channel bandwidth greater than 2000 MHz

Digital systems shall achieve a minimum spectral efficiency of 0.7 bit/s/Hz within the allocated RF channel bandwidth and on a single polarization.

4.4.3 Spectral efficiency requirements for radio systems using adaptive modulation or adaptive error‑correction coding

In the case of systems using adaptive modulation or adaptive error‑correction coding to maintain link availability during deep fading conditions, the spectral efficiency level may be temporarily lowered for a short period of time, provided that the link is designed to meet the minimum spectral efficiency requirements specified in the provisions above.


5. Transmitter characteristics

5.1 Transmitter characteristics for radio systems using an RF channel bandwidth less than or equal to 2000 MHz

Listed below are the specific transmitter characteristics for radio systems that use an RF channel bandwidth less than or equal to 2000 MHz.

5.1.1 Transmitter power

The transmitter power into the antenna shall not exceed 0 dBW.

The transmitter power spectral density (PSD) delivered to the antenna input shall not exceed −15 dBW/MHz.

5.1.2 Frequency stability

The transmitted frequency shall be maintained within ±0.015% of the assigned frequency.

5.1.3 Maximum equivalent isotropically radiated power

The maximum equivalent isotropically radiated power (e.i.r.p.) from the antenna must not, in any case, exceed +55 dBW per RF channel.

For transmitters employing an antenna having a gain of less than 55 dBi, the maximum e.i.r.p. limit of 55 dBW must be reduced by 1 dB for each dB of gain below 55 dBi, and by a further 2 dB for each dB of gain below 45 dBi. This requirement is further described by the equations in table 3 below.

Table 3 — Impact of RF channel bandwidth and antenna gain on maximum e.i.r.p. limits
Antenna gain Gant (dBi) Maximum e.i.r.p. limit (dBW)
Greater than or equal to 55 55
45 to 55 55 − (55 − Gant)
38 to 45 45 − 2 × (45 − Gant)

5.1.4 Automatic transmit power control

In the case of systems using automatic transmit power control (ATPC) to maintain link availability during deep fading conditions, the maximum transmitter power at the antenna port may be temporarily increased by a value corresponding to the ATPC range, up to a maximum of 5 dBW. However, the maximum e.i.r.p. limits specified in section 5.1.3 supersede this stipulation.

As a result, systems employing ATPC shall in no case or time have a transmitter power exceeding +5 dBW nor a maximum e.i.r.p. exceeding +55 dBW.

5.1.5 Transmitter unwanted emissions

The unwanted emissions shall be attenuated to meet the power spectral density (PSD) limits specified in table 4 and figure 2. The PSD limits are specified at frequencies removed from the assigned channel center frequency as a percentage of the channel bandwidth, and shall be applied at the antenna input. The channel bandwidth value to be applied for this requirement is based on the channel bandwidths provided in section 4 of this standard.

In the case of systems employing ATPC, the PSD limits specified in table 4 and figure 2 may temporarily be exceeded, during deep fading conditions, by a value corresponding to the ATPC range, up to the maximum limit permitted in section 5.1.4.

Figure 2 — Unwanted emission limits

Figure 2 — Unwanted emission limits (the long description is located below the image)
Description of figure 2

Line graph: Shows the unwanted emission limits in dBW/MHz. The y‑axis measures the power spectral density limit in dBW/MHz from −80 to 0. The x‑axis plots the frequency separation from the assigned channel center frequency as a percentage of the channel bandwidth from 50 to 250.

There is only one data line. The line ranges from −75 to −30 on the y‑axis. Several data points for the line are shown in table 4, with a straight line interconnecting each adjacent point. The measured power spectral density of the transmitter must be within these limits.

Table 4 — Unwanted emission limits
Maximum power spectral density (dBW/MHz) Frequency separation (% of channel bandwidth)
−30 50
−45 57.5
−45 70
−65 125
−75 250 or 150 + 500 MHz *
* The 250% value is applied for a channel bandwidth that is less than or equal to 500 MHz. For a bandwidth greater than 500 MHz, the 150%+500 MHz value is applied.

The power spectral density, delivered to the antenna input, outside the edges of the bands 71-76 GHz and 81-86 GHz shall be limited to a maximum of −55 dBW/MHz.

Additionally, emissions into the band 86-92 GHz are furthermore limited. The power spectral density, delivered to the antenna input, shall be limited to a maximum of −41 dBW/100 MHz at 86 GHz and reducing proportionally to −55 dBW/100 MHz at and beyond 87 GHz, as described in figure 3.

In frequency ranges and conditions where the requirements of section 5.1.5 are also applicable, the more stringent limits shall be applied.

Figure 3 — Out‑of‑band unwanted emission power spectral density, at the antenna port

Figure 3 — Out-of-band unwanted emission power spectral density, at the antenna port (the long description is located below the image)
Description of figure 3

Line graph: Shows the out‑of‑band unwanted emission limits in dBW/100 MHz, in the 86 to 92 GHz frequency range. The y‑axis measures the power spectral density limit in dBW/100 MHz from −60 to −35. The x‑axis plots the frequency in GHz from 86 to 92.

There is only one data line. The line ranges from −55 to −41 on the y‑axis. The line starts at a power density of −41 dBW/100 MHz at a frequency of 86 GHz, shift down linearly to −55 dBW/100 MHz at a frequency of 87 GHz, and finally remains straight at −55 dBW/100 MHz up to a frequency of 92 GHz. The measured power spectral density of the transmitter must be within these limits.

5.2 Transmitter characteristics for radio systems using an RF channel bandwidth greater than 2000 MHz

Listed below are the specific transmitter characteristics for radio systems that use an RF channel bandwidth greater than to 2000 MHz.

5.2.1 Transmitter power

The transmitter power into the antenna shall not exceed −10 dBW.

The transmitter power spectral density (PSD) delivered to the antenna input shall not exceed −46.5 dBW/MHz.

5.2.2 Frequency stability

The transmitted frequency shall be maintained within ±0.015% of the assigned frequency.

5.2.3 Maximum equivalent isotropically radiated power

The maximum equivalent isotropically radiated power (e.i.r.p.) from the antenna must not, in any case, exceed +45 dBW per RF channel.

For transmitters employing an antenna having a gain less than 55 dBi, the maximum e.i.r.p. limit of 45 dBW must be reduced by 1 dB for each dB of gain below 55 dBi, and by a further 2 dB for each dB of gain below 45 dBi. This requirement is further described by the equations in table 5 below.

Table 5 — Impact of RF channel bandwidth and antenna gain on maximum e.i.r.p. limits
Antenna gain Gant (dBi) Maximum e.i.r.p. limits (dBW)
Greater than or equal to 55 45
45 to 55 45 − (55 − Gant)
38 to 45 35 − 2 × (45 − Gant)

5.2.4 Automatic transmit power control

In the case of systems using automatic transmit power control (ATPC) to maintain link availability during deep fading conditions, the maximum transmitter power at the antenna port may be temporarily increased by a value corresponding to the ATPC range, up to a maximum of −5 dBW. However, the maximum e.i.r.p. limits specified in section 5.2.3 supersede this stipulation.

As a result, systems employing ATPC shall in no case or time have a transmitter power exceeding −5 dBW nor maximum e.i.r.p. exceeding +45 dBW.

5.2.5 Transmitter unwanted emissions

Radio systems operating with an RF channel bandwidth greater than 2000 MHz shall follow the unwanted emissions requirements specified in section 5.1.5.


6. Antenna characteristics

6.1 Antenna characteristics for radio systems using an RF channel bandwidth less than or equal to 2000 MHz

Listed below are the specific antenna characteristics for radio systems that use an RF channel bandwidth less than or equal to 2000 MHz.

  1. The minimum antenna gain shall be 38 dBi.
  2. An antenna gain less than 55 dBi (but greater than or equal to 38 dBi) is permitted only with a proportional reduction in maximum authorized e.i.r.p., as per section 5.1.3.

6.1.1 Radiation pattern envelope

The co‑polarized radiation pattern envelope in the horizontal plane of the antenna must remain within Envelope A shown in figure 4 and table 6, for both vertical and horizontal polarizations.

Deployments of radio systems with a co-polarized radiation pattern envelope which remains within Envelope B shown in figure 4 and table 6, for both vertical and horizontal polarizations, are permitted only if the antenna is deployed at a height of less than 15m above ground level.

The values for the radiation pattern envelopes shown in figure 4 and table 6 are specified as off‑axis antenna gain in units of dBi, as opposed to dBs of attenuation from the main lobe gain. In order to convert the pattern values to attenuation from the main lobe, the antenna main beam gain in dBi can be subtracted from the off‑axis dBi values of the applicable envelope.

6.2 Antenna characteristics for radio systems using an RF channel bandwidth greater than 2000 MHz

Listed below are the specific antenna characteristics for radio systems that use an RF channel bandwidth greater than 2000 MHz

  1. The minimum antenna gain shall be 38 dBi.
  2. An antenna gain of less than 55 dBi (but greater than or equal to 38 dBi) is permitted only with a proportional reduction in maximum authorized e.i.r.p., as per section 5.2.3.

6.2.1 Radiation pattern envelope

The co‑polarized radiation pattern envelope in the horizontal plane of the antenna must remain within Envelope A for both vertical and horizontal polarizations.

The deployment of a radio system using an RF channel bandwidth greater than 2000 MHz and an antenna radio pattern remaining within Envelope B is not permitted.

The values for the radiation pattern envelopes shown in figure 4 and table 6 are specified as off‑axis antenna gain in units of dBi, as opposed to dBs of attenuation from the main lobe gain. In order to convert the pattern values to attenuation from the main lobe, the antenna main beam gain in dBi can be subtracted from the off‑axis dBi values of the applicable envelope.

Figure 4 — Minimum antenna characteristics for point‑to‑point systems operating in the bands 71-76 GHz and 81-86 GHzFootnote 2

Figure 4 — Minimum antenna characteristics for point-to-point systems operating in the bands 71-76 GHz and 81-86 GHz (the long description is located below the image)
Description of figure 4

Line graph: Shows the antenna radiation pattern limits in dBi for azimuth separations from the main lobe between 0 and 180 degrees. The y‑axis measures antenna directivity in dBi from −30 to 30. The x‑axis plots azimuth in degrees from main lobe from 0 to 180.

There are two data lines. The data line for envelope A ranges from −17 to 16 on the y‑axis. The data line for envelope B ranges from −10 to 25 on the y‑axis. There is a scale change indicator at the 20 mark on the x‑axis. Several data points for the lines are shown in table 6. The measured radiation pattern in the horizontal plane must be within these limits for vertical or horizontal polarizations.

Table 6 — Minimum antenna characteristics for point‑to‑point systems operating in the bands 71-76 GHz and 81-86 GHz
Azimuth (in degrees) from main lobe peak Antenna directivity co‑polarization (dBi)
Envelope A Envelope B
16 25
10° 9 17.5
15° 5 10
20° 1 7
40° −0.33 2
50° −1 0.66
70° −4 −2
88.75° −16.18 −7
90° −17 −7
100° −17 −7
100° −17 −10
180° −17 −10

7. Domestic coordination and coexistence of fixed systems

As outlined in section 2.2, the domestic coordination requirements in section 7 of this standard shall not apply to systems licensed under the interim licensing process described in SP 70 GHz, until the licensing process for these bands has been established.

Licensees are responsible for coordinating directly with other licensees. To reduce the potential for interference, licensees are required to register their stations by entering and accurately maintaining up‑to‑date site‑specific data, as well as technical, operational and contact information in a database specified by the Department. The interference protection date is based on the date of registration of the station.

The Department requires all licensees to successfully complete frequency coordination prior to operating a new system or modifying an existing system. A licensee shall notify other licensed operators offering service in the same area and in neighbouring areas, at least six weeks prior to putting a station in service or making modifications to an existing station. Licensees are expected to cooperate and jointly resolve issues to ensure equitable access to the spectrum by all operators.

Licensees shall not begin operation of their systems until successful completion of both registration and coordination. Interference may still occur, even with the favorable propagation characteristics of these bands. However, the Department will not be directly involved in frequency assignment, station coordination, or the resolution of interference issues between fixed service licensees, even though the technical specifications of this SRSP are met. The resolution of potential interference conflicts should be achieved through good faith discussions and mutual agreement between the affected parties.

All licensees shall cooperate in the selection and use of channels. Licensees are expected to take full advantage of interference mitigation techniques, including:

  • using a higher gain transmit/receive antenna
  • changing polarization
  • changing operating frequencies
  • shielding
  • site selection and
  • power control.

More information on interference reduction techniques can be found in Appendix A of Radiocommunication Information Circular RIC‑67, Information for Operators of Digitally Modulated Radio Systems in Licence‑Exempt Radio Frequency Bands.

7.1 Coordination

The following coordination procedures are intended to be used between two licensees in the absence of another mutually agreed-upon standard to govern coordination of any proposed or modified transmitter. Licensees who propose transmitters that would normally trigger the current procedure, but who can mutually agree to an alternate coordination procedure, are not bound by this process. A copy of such mutual agreement must be kept by the licensee and made available to the Department upon request.

If a licence is transferred, the sharing agreement(s) developed between the former licensees shall remain in effect until superseded by a new agreement between the licensees.

7.1.1 General coordination trigger criteria

When a licensee seeks to install or modify facilities, successful completion of applicable coordination is required prior to activation. Coordination is required whenever a proposed transmitting station coordination footprint encompasses existing or previously notified receiving stations of another licensee.

The coordination footprint extends to the distances shown in figures 5 and 6 below.Footnote 3 Radio systems operating with an antenna that meets the radiation pattern of Envelope A in section 6 shall follow the coordination footprint specified in figure 5, while those meeting the radio pattern of Envelope B shall follow the coordination footprint specified in figure 6.

Figure 5 — Co‑channel frequency coordination footprint for point-to-point systems operating with an antenna meeting envelope A

Figure 5 — Co-channel frequency coordination footprint for point-to-point systems operating with an antenna meeting envelope A (the long description is located below the image)
Description of figure 5

This figure shows the co‑channel frequency coordination footprint for point‑to‑point systems operating with an antenna meeting envelope A. Coordination is required with all stations within a distance of 50 km where the off‑axis angle at the new station's boresite is less than or equal to 5 degrees. Coordination is required to a distance of 16 km where the off‑axis angle is greater than 5 degrees and less than or equal to 15 degrees. Coordination is required to a distance of 6.5 km where the off‑axis angle is greater than 15 degrees and less than or equal to 90 degrees. At off‑axis angles greater than 90 degrees, coordination is required within a distance of 0.5 km.

Figure 6 — Co‑channel frequency coordination footprint for point‑to‑point systems operating with an antenna meeting envelope B

Figure 6 — Co-channel frequency coordination footprint for point-topoint systems operating with an antenna meeting envelope B (the long description is located below the image)
Description of figure 6

This figure shows the co‑channel frequency coordination footprint for point‑to‑point systems operating with an antenna meeting envelope B. Coordination is required with all stations within a distance of 50 km where the off‑axis angle at the new station's boresite is less than or equal to 5 degrees. Coordination is required to a distance of 28 km where the off‑axis angle is greater than 5 degrees and less than or equal to 15 degrees. Coordination is required to a distance of 10 km where the off‑axis angle is greater than 15 degrees and less than or equal to 90 degrees. At off‑axis angles greater than 90 degrees, coordination is required within a distance of 2 km.

7.1.2 Notification and response process

If a proposed station triggers the coordination process, the licensee must notify all licensees concerned. The said notice shall include the applicant's interference analysis and all data required for the recipients to perform an interference analysis (see annex A for suggested parameters).

It is recommended that field tests be performed prior to commencement of operation of a radio system to determine whether interference caused by building reflections or other frequency sources, which was not anticipated during the interference calculations,Footnote 4 is detected at the proposed site while looking along the proposed azimuth.

7.1.2.1 Response time

Upon receipt of a coordination notice, a recipient shall have a maximum of 14 calendar days to submit an interference objection. This objection shall include the calculation details of all potential cases of unacceptable interference into and from facilities proposed in the notice. Failure to respond to a coordination notice within that time frame shall imply that the recipient has no interference objection(s) to the facilities proposed in the notice.

7.1.2.2 Expedited notification and response process

It may be necessary at times for licensees to deploy systems even more rapidly than the timeframe provided for in the notice and response procedure contained in this process. To do so, licensees shall be permitted to activate systems immediately once receipt of the coordination notice has been confirmed, provided that the notice clearly identifies a licensee's intent to do so. The notice must also include the activation date, the time, and a 24‑hour contact telephone number for notification, should an interference case occur.

Licensees activating facilities under this expedited procedure will be held entirely responsible for avoiding and/or resolving any cases of interference created by such activation. They will be required to cease transmission immediately upon receiving verbal and/or written notice from another licensee that interference has occurred. This requirement will remain in effect until the standard 14 calendar day coordination period has expired.

7.1.2.3 Construction / commencement of operation timeline

Upon successful resolution of all interference objections, the licensee will have 180 calendar days to construct and commence operation; otherwise, coordination must be re‑initiated, as per section 7.1.

7.1.2.4 Notice of operation / Notice of decommission

Within two business days of construction and initiation of operation of coordinated facilities, a licensee will notify all licensees who received a coordination notice that facilities contained in that notice are in permanent operation.

Upon decommission of previously operational facilities, a licensee shall notify all other affected parties that a particular facility will been permanently taken out of service within two business days of decommission. Affected parties are defined as those who would have received a coordination notice under this recommendation had this been a proposed activation.

In addition, the licensee shall update the database to reflect the commencement of operation or decommissioning of the link.


8. Coordination with radio astronomy and other in‑band services

As described in the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations 9 kHz to 275 GHz (2014 Edition), the fixed service shares the bands 71-76 GHz and 81-86 GHz with other services. Notably, the band 76-86 GHz includes allocations to the radio astronomy service, where the provisions for its protection from harmful interference under international footnote 5.149 apply. As a result, licensees proposing to operate transmitters in the bands 71-76 GHz and 81-86 GHz within 60 and 105 km, respectively, of radio astronomy observatories,Footnote 5 are required to notify and coordinate as soon as possible (minimum of six weeks) prior to deploying a station. They must also ensure that harmful interference is not caused. Licensees may contact the Department's regional or district officeFootnote 6 to obtain the contact information of the applicable radio astronomy operators.

As technical parameters of radio systems operating under other services in the bands 71-76 GHz and 81-86 GHz are not yet available or have not sufficiently matured, sharing criteria will be developed and incorporated into future revisions to this SRSP, as necessary. Licensees should be aware that the fixed‑satellite, mobile, mobile‑satellite, broadcast, broadcast‑satellite and radio astronomy services are allocated on a primary basis in various portions of the bands 71-76 GHz and 81-86 GHz.


9. International coordination

Usage of the bands 71-76 GHz and 81-86 GHz near the Canada‑United States border is subject to the provisions of Arrangement V.


10. Coexistence with systems operating in adjacent bands

Possible interference conflicts resulting from the operation of fixed systems and other services operating in the adjacent bands may occur, even though the technical specifications of this SRSP are met.

The resolution of interference conflicts should be achieved through good faith discussions and mutual agreement between the affected parties. When conflicts between systems cannot be resolved, the Department shall be so advised, whereupon, following consultations with the parties concerned, the Department will determine the necessary modifications.


Annex A — Parameters for frequency coordination

When coordination is required, it is suggested that the following parameters be provided for both transmitting and remote receiving stations of the radio system link:

  • contact information (corporate name/mailing address/telephone/fax/e‑mail)
  • location of station (community/province)
  • geographical coordinates of station antenna (latitude and longitude)
  • equivalent isotropically radiated power (dBW)
  • ground elevation and antenna height above ground (m)
  • radio channel centre frequency (MHz)
  • polarization
  • antenna pattern/tabulation of the pattern
  • azimuth of the maximum antenna gain
  • maximum antenna gain (dBi) and
  • bandwidth and emission designation.

Note:

More parameters can be provided for the coordination process if necessary.


Annex B — 70 GHz and 80 GHz high capacity frequency plan

Figure B1 — 71-76 GHz channeling plan summary

Figure B1 — 71-76 GHz channeling plan summary (the long description is located below the image)
Description of figure B1

This figure provides a chart summarizing the channelling plan. This plan is fully described in section 4.1.

Figure B2 — 81-86 GHz channeling plan summary

Figure B2 — 81-86 GHz channeling plan summary (the long description is located below the image)
Description of figure B2

This figure provides a chart summarizing the channelling plan. This plan is fully described in section 4.1.


Annex C — Summary of technical requirements specified in accordance with technical parameter selection

Tables C1 and C2 summarize the technical requirements of this standard which are prescribed in accordance with specific selection of other technical parameters in the design of a radio system.

Table C1 — Impact of RF channel bandwidth and antenna radio pattern envelope on antenna height, minimum coordination footprint, and minimum spectral efficiency
RF channel bandwidth (MHz) Minimum antenna radiation pattern envelope Antenna height requirement (m) * Minimum coordination footprint ** Minimum spectral efficiency (bit/s/Hz)
Less than or equal to 2000 Envelope B Less than 15 Figure 6 1.0
Envelope A No restriction Figure 5
Greater than 2000 Envelope A No restriction Figure 5 0.7
* Referenced above ground level (AGL).
** The specific requirements related to the minimum coordination footprint are described in section 7.1 of this standard.
Table C2 — Impact of RF channel bandwidth and antenna gain on maximum e.i.r.p. limits
RF channel bandwidth (MHz) Antenna gain Gant (dBi) Maximum e.i.r.p. limit (dBW)
Less than or equal to 2000 Greater than or equal to 55 55
45 to 55 55 − (55 − Gant)
38 to 45 45 − 2 × (45 − Gant)
Greater than 2000 Greater than or equal to 55 45
45 to 55 45 − (55 − Gant)
38 to 45 35 − 2 × (45 − Gant)

Footnotes

Footnote 1

For the purpose of this SRSP, "harmful interference" means interference which endangers the functioning of a radionavigation service or of other safety services, or seriously degrades, obstructs, or repeatedly interrupts a radiocommunication service operating in accordance with regulations and technical requirements enacted by Innovation, Science, and Economic Development Canada under the Radiocomunication Act.

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Footnote 2

The antenna radiation pattern envelopes A and B of this standard are aligned with the Class 3 and Class 2 specifications prescribed by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute standard ETSI EN 302 217-4-2 (V1.5.1), Fixed Radio Systems; Characteristics and requirements for point‑to‑point equipment and antennas; Part 4-2: Antennas; Harmonized EN covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of R&TTE Directive.

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Footnote 3

Should an operator use sites of very high elevations (relative to local terrain) that could produce interference for receiving stations beyond the distances shown in figures 5 and 6, the operator shall coordinate with the affected licensee(s). The distances shown in figure 5 are based on a maximum e.i.r.p. of +55 dBW, a channel bandwidth of 250 MHz, a victim receiver antenna gain of 55 dBi, and a −30 dB factor in order to account for the effects of victim receiver antenna discrimination or correlation between signal fading along desired signal paths and interference signal paths. Furthermore, a propagation model based on an antenna elevation of 30 m relative to an even terrain profile is used. Calculations for determining distances for which interference is produced should include accepted engineering practices, and should take into account factors such as propagation loss, atmospheric loss, antenna directivity and curvature of the earth.

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Footnote 4

Calculations shall be made in accordance with Technical Service Bulletin TSB-10F, Interference Criteria for Microwave Systems, available from the Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA), or other recognized coordination methodology and criteria.

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Footnote 5

Canada has two radio astronomy observatories, the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, located near Penticton, British Columbia (Latitude 49° 19′ 12″ North, Longitude 119° 37′ 12″ West), and the Algonquin Radio Observatory, located in Algonquin Provincial Park in Ontario (Latitude 45° 57′ 20″ North, Longitude 078° 04′ 23″ West).

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Footnote 6

A list of the Department's regional and district offices is provided in Radiocommunication Information Circular RIC-66, Addresses and Telephone Numbers of Regional and District Offices.

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