2016–17 Departmental Results Report – Supplementary Information Tables

Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More

Program: Spectrum, Telecommunications and the Digital Economy

General Information
Name of transfer payment program International Telecommunication Union, Geneva, Switzerland
Start date 1932–33
End date Ongoing
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2010–11
Strategic Outcome The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Spectrum, Telecommunications and the Digital Economy
Sub-Program: Spectrum and Telecommunications Policy and Legislation
Description Canada is signatory to the ITU treaty agreement negotiated every four years at a plenipotentiary conference, in accordance with its treaty obligations of the ITU Constitution and Convention. Canada's membership, contribution and participation in the ITU allows us to achieve results internationally across a broad range of issues affecting radiocommunication, standardization and telecommunication development. Canada's contribution to the ITU is commensurate with its international standing and commitment to the United Nations and UN specialized agencies.
Results achieved Lead Government of Canada engagement at the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) in order to ensure the continued growth, innovation and international competitiveness of Canada's telecommunication sector:
  • ISED has identified its key priorities for the 2019 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-19), which include spectrum for enhanced mobile broadband, spectrum for global aeronautical safety and distress systems, and revised technical rules to improve Wi-Fi services. ISED participated in ITU Radiocommunication sector (ITU-R) working party meetings, successfully presenting and defending Canadian positions on these high priority issues. Canada was also named the Chair of a new task group which is studying spectrum above 24 GHz for 5G mobile broadband. Following our yearly strategy and work plans, Canada submitted twenty contributions to the two CITEL meetings in 2016 to provide frameworks for discussion and to promote preliminary views on Canadian priorities.
  • ISED participated in the World Telecommunication Standardization Assembly (WTSA-16) held October 25-November 3, 2016. All key Canadian objectives set for the WTSA-16 were met. Canadian industry and public-sector stakeholders were satisfied with the results. Canada was able to strengthen its leadership in the ITU-T with the appointment of industry members as Chairs and Vice-Chairs of Study Groups. As a result of these objectives being met, Canada will benefit from standards that support secure and reliable communication while protecting personal data and privacy, policies that promote an open Internet, lower costs for testing of telecommunications equipment and a more cost-effective standardization processes that support a bottom-up approach to technical standardization for industry.
  • At the ITU Council meeting in spring 2016, and Council Working Group (CWG) meetings in fall 2016 and early 2017, ISED successfully advanced Canadian priorities on ensuring continued efficiencies, transparency and accountability in the financial and human resource administration of the ITU. At these meetings, ISED countered proposals aimed at broadening the mandate of the CWG on Internet issues to include producing concrete outcomes and recommendations on internet governance and cybersecurity matters that are outside the remit of the ITU.
Comments on variances In 2016–17, actual spending higher than originally planned due to higher exchange rates for converting Canadian dollars to Swiss francs. As a result, funding of $0.8M was internally reallocated to ITU.
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation was completed in 2015.
Engagement of applicants and recipients The ITU, a United Nations Specialized Agency, is the sole eligible recipient. Engagement is outlined in the 'Description' and 'Results Achieved' Sections.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total grants 5,420,367  5,725,000 4,808,000 5,608,000 5,608,000 800,000
Total program 5,420,367  5,725,000 4,808,000 5,608,000 5,608,000 800,000

Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) – SD Tech Fund™
Start date March 26, 2001
End date Ongoing
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity
Sub-program: Science and Technology Partnerships
Description To support the development and demonstration of innovative Canadian technological solutions that address issues related to climate change, clean air, clean water and clean soil.  This transfer payment program provides non-repayable contributions.
Results achieved In 2016–17, SDTC, under the SD Tech Fund, achieved the expected results of reducing CO2e emissions and leveraging funding to clean technology projects. 
Comments on variances On November 4, 2015, an Order in Council named the Minister of ISED as the designated Minister responsible for SDTC. As such, financial authorities were transferred to ISED in 2016–17.
Audits completed or planned The Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development is completing the performance audit on Funding Clean Energy Technologies, which includes the oversight and management of the SD Tech Fund funding program. The Commissioner's report will be published in 2017.
Evaluations completed or planned ISED is scheduled to conduct an evaluation of the SD Tech Fund by March 2018.
Engagement of applicants and recipients SDTC undertakes outreach activities to attract more eligible recipients and to improve the quality and viability of project proposals. Effective July 2016, SDTC adopted a continuous intake model. As a result of this change, applicants will be able to apply to SDTC for funding 365 days of the year and 24 hours a day.  SDTC also established partnerships with the province of Ontario and British Columbia to streamline and harmonize the application process. These partnerships followed successful partnerships established with the province of Alberta in 2015–16. 
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions - - - 57,758,760 57,758,760 57,758,760
Total program - - - 57,758,760 57,758,760 57,758,760
General Information
Name of transfer payment program Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund
Start date April 14, 2016
End date December 31, 2019
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity
Sub-program: Science and Technology Partnerships
Description The Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund's objective is the acceleration of strategic construction, repair and maintenance activities at universities and colleges across Canada to generate direct economic activity and to enhance the research infrastructure at post-secondary institutions so as to strengthen capacity for research and innovation and industry-related training and to support environmental sustainability.
Results achieved The Program has received a total of 643 applications, requesting approximately $4.2 billion in funding. A total of 299 projects were approved through the signing of contribution agreements with 13 provincial and territorial jurisdictions and three bilateral agreements, for an overall investment of over $1.9 billion. As of March 31, 2017, 198 of these projects have been publicly announced.
Comments on variances As part of Budget 2016, funding was accessed in Supplementary Estimates for a new Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund (SIF) to support infrastructure projects at post-secondary institutions and affiliated organizations.
This initiative aims to enhance and modernize research and commercialization facilities on Canadian campuses.
Audits completed or planned As per the Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund's Risk Based Audit Framework, a total of 15 projects have been identified with a “high risk score” and will be audited by the program in 2017–18. Additional projects may be identified for audit later on in the implementation phase.
Evaluations completed or planned A program evaluation is planned for 2018–19.
Engagement of applicants and recipients
  • 299 approved projects.
  • 13 contribution agreements implemented with provincial and territorial governments, and three bilateral agreements.
  • $1.9 billion in funding commitment to post-secondary institutions all across Canada.
  • 198 projects publicly announced.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions - - - 740,930,030 740,926,765 740,926,765
Total program - - - 740,930,030 740,926,765 740,926,765
General Information
Name of transfer payment program Canada Foundation for Innovation
Start date April 25, 1998
End date March 31, 2023
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2015–16
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity
Sub-Program: Science and Technology Partnerships
Description The Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) is an independent non-profit corporation created by the Government of Canada to fund research infrastructure. The CFI's mandate is to strengthen the capacity of Canadian universities, colleges, research hospitals and non-profit research institutions to carry out world-class research and technology development that benefits Canadians.
Results achieved The CFI continued to support world-class research through funding for infrastructure and associated operating costs.
Results from 2016–17 include:
  • Merit review for the 2017 Innovation Fund competition with a budget of $425 million, to be awarded in June 2017.
  • Award of $20 million through the Cyberinfrastructure Initiative for Canada's high-performance computing platform.
  • Funding decisions made and announced for the 2017–22 Major Science Initiatives Fund, with a budget of up to $400 million over five years.
  • Continuation of John R. Evans Leaders Fund competitions, with $84.7 million in project funding to 479 projects across Canada.
  • Funding of six projects under the College-Industry Innovation Fund Stream 1 ($5.4 million) and four under Stream 2 ($3.8 million).
  • Adjudication of Governor General's Innovation Awards.
Comments on variances N/A
Audits completed or planned A compliance audit was undertaken in 2016–17.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation was completed in 2015–16. A program evaluation is planned for 2019–20.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains an ongoing dialogue with the CFI and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that CFI submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of its funding agreements. Government officials also attend CFI Board of Directors meetings as observers.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions 168,200,000  177,100,000 198,550,000 198,550,000  198,550,000 -
Total program 168,200,000  177,100,000 198,550,000 198,550,000  198,550,000 -
General Information
Name of transfer payment program Canadian Institute for Advanced Research
Start date 1986
End date March 31, 2017
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2012
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity
Sub-Program: Science and Technology Partnerships
Description The Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) is a not-for-profit organization that supports networks of Canadian and international researchers who conduct long-term research on important scientific, social and economic issues. Promoting world-class research partnerships on these issues helps build research capacity in Canada. At present, CIFAR supports 14 research programs with 349 researchers in a range of areas, including experience-based brain and biological development, nanoelectronics, and quantum information processing.
Results achieved In 2016–17, CIFAR:
  • Supported the work of 345 researchers and 69 advisory committee members across its existing 14 research programs, in 16 countries;
  • Supported 18 early-career researchers in its CIFAR Azrieli Global Scholars program, including research funding and leadership training and held 3 summer schools for young researchers;
  • Leveraged $14.7 million from non-federal sources (provincial governments, research partners and private donors);
  • Engaged with seven foreign research institutes spanning five countries to co-sponsor and support CIFAR program meetings and workshops in Canada and internationally; and
  • Engaged more than 1,125 leaders in business, academia, government and NGO's through 12 outreach events in Canada and abroad.
Comments on variances N/A
Audits completed or planned No audits planned or completed
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation was conducted in 2016–17.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains ongoing dialogue with CIFAR and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that CIFAR submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the funding agreement.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual
spending
2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Planned
spending
2016–17 Total
authorities available for use
2016–17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions 5,000,000  5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000   5,000,000  -
Total program 5,000,000  5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000   5,000,000  -
General Information
Name of transfer payment program Genome Canada
Start date March 27, 2000
End date March 31, 2020
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2012–13
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity
Sub-Program: Science and Technology Partnerships
Description Genome Canada is a not-for-profit corporation that supports six independently incorporated regional Genome Centres across Canada. With the Genome Centres and other partners, Genome Canada invests in large-scale research projects, leading-edge technology platforms, and translation of research into applications, in key areas such as health, agriculture, the environment, fisheries, aquaculture, forestry, mining, and energy. Genome Canada also supports research projects aimed at studying and analyzing the ethical, environmental, economic, legal, and social issues related to genomics (GE3LS).
Results achieved In 2016–17, Genome Canada:
  • Launched in January 2017 a large-scale research competition applied to precision health with up to $70.5 million available in funding ($44 million from Genome Canada and $26.5 million from Canadian Institutes of Health Research);
  • Awarded $32 million to 13 large-scale genomics research projects applied to Canada's energy and environment sectors, $9.1 million to 25 projects for disruptive innovation in genomics, $4 million to 16 projects in bioinformatics and computational biology, and $11.3 million to 11 projects to translate genomics discoveries into applications for the public and private sectors;
  • Supported national and international strategic partnerships in genomics research, including the Structural Genomics Consortium, E-Rare 3, and the Cancer Stem Cell Dream Team;
  • Provided genomics researchers with access to leading-edge technology and expertise through the ten nodes of the nation-wide Genomics Innovation Network; and
  • Provided ongoing management and monitoring of funded research projects.
Comments on variances In 2016–17, Genome Canada project delays resulted in reduced program spending for an overall lapse of $6.1 million as compared to the original planned spending. As a result of these delays, lapsed funding was reprofiled to 2017–18 to better reflect the real funding requirements of the multi-year research projects supported under this program.
Audits completed or planned Genome conducted a performance audit in 2015–16. A compliance audit is planned for 2016–17.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation was completed in 2015–16.
An evaluation is planned for 2019–20.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains an ongoing dialogue with Genome Canada and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that Genome Canada submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the funding agreements Government officials also attend Genome Canada Board of Directors meetings as an observer.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total grants 200,000 7,400,000 6,200,000 4,500,000 4,500,000 (1,700,000)
Total contributions 69,600,000 60,000,000 66,800,000 62,400,000 62,400,000 (4,400,000)
Total program 69,800,000 67,400,000 73,000,000 66,900,000 66,900,000 (6,100,000)
General Information
Name of transfer payment program Mitacs Inc.
Start date April 1, 2012
End date March 31, 2021
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2012–13
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity
Sub-Program: Science and Technology Partnerships
Description Mitacs Inc. (Mitacs) is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to promoting high-quality research and innovation by building linkages between academia and industry, and strengthening linkages between researchers and students in Canada and abroad across all academic disciplines. Through its Accelerate program, Mitacs provides opportunities for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows to apply their expertise to business-related research challenges through four- to six-month internships with companies and not-for-profit corporations. Through its Globalink program, Mitacs provides short-term research internships in Canada for foreign senior undergraduate and/or graduate students from priority countries, short-term research internships in priority countries for Canadian senior undergraduate and/or graduate students, and graduate fellowships for top international alumni of the research internships who pursue graduate studies in Canada. Through its Elevate program, Mitacs provides postdoctoral fellows with industry-relevant research experience and training that help them develop the skills necessary to lead and manage research and development projects within industry.
Results achieved In 2016–17:
  • The target number of Accelerate fellowships was 3,445, but as of March 21, 2017, this forecast is now set at 3,745;
  • The target number of Elevate fellowships is 180, which will be supported by ISED funding; and
  • Mitacs delivered 522 Globalink Research Internships, 90 Globalink Graduate Fellowships and 160 Globalink Research Awards.
Comments on variances Additional funding of $24.9M was received in Supplementary Estimates for the renewal of Mitacs Globalink program to support the delivery of international internships and fellowships (Budget 2016) and for the Accelerate program to provide industrial research internships for postgraduates (Budget 2015). Additional funding of $2.1M was also internally reallocated towards Mitacs to meet requirements.
Audits completed or planned A recipient compliance audit is planned for 2018–19.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation was conducted in 2016–17.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains an ongoing dialogue with Mitacs and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that Mitacs submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the contribution agreements. An ISED official attends Mitacs Board of Directors meetings as an observer.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions 18,975,000  19,000,000 11,900,000 38,900,000 38,900,000 27,000,000
Total program 18,975,000  19,000,000 11,900,000 38,900,000 38,900,000 27,000,000
General Information
Name of transfer payment program Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics
Start date April 1, 2007
End date July 31, 2017
Fiscal year for terms and conditions N/A
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity
Sub-Program: Science and Technology Partnerships
Description The Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics is a not-for-profit research institute devoted to foundational issues in theoretical physics at the highest levels of international excellence. The Institute pursues scientific research and engages in educational outreach activities, bringing together international scientists to push the limits of understanding of physical laws and develop new ideas about the essence of space, time, matter and information. The Institute provides a multi-disciplinary environment to foster research in cosmology, particle physics, quantum foundations, quantum gravity, quantum information, superstring theory and related areas.
Results achieved As of 2016–17, the Perimeter Institute:
  • Advanced fundamental research through the publication of 325 high-calibre papers;
  • Appointed two new Perimeter Research Chairs;
  • Built additional research capacity through the recruitment of three new full-time faculty members, two associate faculty members, six Distinguished Visiting Research Chairs, seven Visiting Fellows, and 23 postdoctoral researchers;
  • Completed advanced training of 28 master's students in the Perimeter Scholars International program (PSI), and 60 PhD students in residence;
  • Recruited 31 new PSI students from nearly 600 applications;
  • Hosted 450 scientific visits involving 399 visiting scientists;
  • Hosted 16 conferences and workshops supporting research at regional, national, and international levels; and
  • Reached thousands on-site and online through eight talks and events in the Perimeter Public Lecture Series.
Comments on variances N/A
Audits completed or planned A compliance audit was completed in 2011.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation was conducted in 2016–17.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains ongoing dialogue with the Perimeter Institute and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that the Perimeter Institute submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the funding agreement. Site visits and ISED attendance at Perimeter events are used to provide direct experience of the Institute's performance and activities for ISED employees engaged in providing oversight.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions 10,000,000  10,000,000  10,000,000  10,000,000    10,000,000   -
Total program 10,000,000  10,000,000  10,000,000  10,000,000    10,000,000   -
General Information
Name of transfer payment program CANARIE Inc.
Start date 1993
End date March 31, 2020
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2014/15.
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity
Sub-program: Science and Technology Partnerships
Description Established in 1993, CANARIE is a non-profit corporation, with the major investment in its programs and activities provided by the Government of Canada. CANARIE operates and develops the backbone of Canada's advanced, high-speed research network, and facilitates and supports publicly funded research and innovation. In partnership with regional advanced networks, the CANARIE network connects Canadian research facilities, universities, educational institutions, hospitals and other science facilities as well as links them to their international peers. It is an essential tool for researchers, innovators and educators. The federal government has supported CANARIE since 1993, with a total investment of $634.5 million, including the $105 million announced in Budget 2015 for 2015-2020.
Results achieved In 2016–17, CANARIE:
  • Successfully managed nearly 200,000 terabytes of data traffic across the CANARIE network;
  • In partnership with regional network partners, took steps towards improving connectivity and resiliency on existing network corridors including 6 projects undertaken to upgrade equipment/infrastructure to ensure that the network stays current with respect to technology, and three projects that provided infrastructure expansion/extension;
  • Launched a $2 million Research Software Program competition that resulted in 69 notifications of intent (NOIs) and 34 full proposals for a total ask of $13.7 million, indicating broad visibility and interest in the program;
  • Increased the number of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) accelerating product development timelines through its DAIR program by 205 users, from 648 in 2015–16 to 853 in 2016–17; and
  • Expanded its participation in the Canadian Access Federation from 131 to 145 organizations
Comments on variances CANARIE required fewer funds in 2016–17 due to unforeseen delays in the implementation of certain activities, particularly in the areas of Network Operations and Technology Innovation where the timing for project spending varied from CANARIE's original estimates. However, available authorities were internally reallocated towards other programs to support research activities (Mitacs, Council of Canadian Academies, Stem Cell Network).
Audits completed or planned A compliance audit was conducted in 2016–17.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation was completed in 2014–15.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintained ongoing dialogue with the recipient and reviewed the Annual Business Plan and Annual Report that CANARIE submitted to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results as well as compliance with the terms and conditions of the Contribution Agreement. A government official also attends CANARIE Board of Directors meetings as an observer.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions 26,400,000  15,000,000 23,500,000 20,627,923 20,000,000 (3,500,000)
Total program 26,400,000  15,000,000 23,500,000 20,627,923 20,000,000 (3,500,000)
General Information
Name of transfer payment program Institute for Quantum Computing
Start date April 2, 2009
End date March 31, 2017
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2014–15
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity
Sub-program: Science and Technology Partnerships
Description The Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) is a research institute based at the University of Waterloo. The IQC's mission is to be the world leader in the development of quantum technologies, and its objective is to create a supportive environment for physicists, mathematicians, engineers and computer scientists to advance the fields of quantum information science.
Results achieved In 2016–17, the IQC:
  • Published 141 papers in prominent scientific publications that were cited by other researchers a total of 25,426 times (as of March 31, 2017). This number grew by approx. 1,000 citations per quarter;
  • Supported the creation of seven spinoff companies;
  • Granted degrees to eleven master's students and ten PhD students, bringing the total of IQC student alumni since inception to 180; and
  • Supported the research of seven Research Chairs.
Comments on variances N/A
Audits completed or planned A compliance audit was conducted in 2016–17.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation was completed in 2013–14.
An evaluation is planned for 2018–19.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains ongoing dialogue with the IQC and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that the IQC submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the funding agreement.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total grants 5,000,000 4,975,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 -
Total program 5,000,000 4,975,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 -
General Information
Name of transfer payment program Stem Cell Network
Start date July 22, 2016
End date Contribution
Fiscal year for terms and conditions Appropriated annually through Estimates
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity
Sub-Program: Science and Technology Partnerships
Description The Stem Cell Network (SCN) is a national not-for-profit corporation dedicated to enabling the translation of stem cell research into clinical applications, commercial products and public policy.  It was first established in 2001 as one of the Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCE).  SCN links to 27 Canadian universities and hospitals, and international collaborators from 39 institutions in eight countries.  The contribution to SCN is non-repayable.
Results achieved In 2016–17, the Stem Cell Network:
  • Awarded $9 million to 17 impact research projects, 8 disease team projects and 6 clinical trials;
  • Hosted the Till and McCulloch Meeting, which attracted approximately 400 participants.
Comments on variances As part of Budget 2016, $6 million was accessed in Supplementary Estimates to support Stem Cell Network in strengthening Canada's international leadership in Stem Cell research. 
Additional funding of $0.8 million was also internally reallocated towards the program to meet requirements.
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed.
Evaluations completed or planned None planned or completed.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains an ongoing dialogue with Stem Cell Network and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that Stem cell Network submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions - - - 6,794,532 6,794,532 6,794,532
Total program - - - 6,794,532 6,794,532 6,794,532

Program: Industrial Research and Development Financing

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative
Start date April 2, 2007
End date Ongoing
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Industrial Research and Development Financing
Sub-program: Aerospace and Defence Innovation
Description The Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI) encourages the development of innovative products, processes and services; enhances the competitiveness of Canadian aerospace, defence, space and security (A&D) firms; and fosters collaboration among research institutes, universities, colleges and the private sector. SADI is a component of the government's science and technology strategy, which aims to mobilize science and technology to Canada's competitive advantage. SADI acts as a catalyst for new A&D investments by providing repayable contributions to Canadian A&D companies for strategic industrial research and pre-competitive development.
Results achieved Continued support of innovative and collaborative research and development activities of Canadian companies in aerospace, defence, space and security sectors through the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI).

Innovation

  • $176 million was disbursed to program recipients in 2016–17. From April 1, 2007 to March 31, 2017 the program cumulatively leveraged $2.1 billion from the disbursed $1.23B million against eligible claims.
  • Contracted two projects in 2016–17 for a total of $270 million in new authorized assistance that is expected to create new or improved products, services and processes. One project will support a Vancouver-based company develop new technologies that will equip satellites for Earth observation and make data and high-resolution images of the planet easier to use for its customers, while another will fund further research and development of new business and medium range jet platforms.
  • As of March 31, 2017, 35out of 41 projects have developed new or improved products, services or processes.

Competitiveness

  • As of March 31, 2017, 26 out of 41 projects have commercialized new or improved products, services and processes.

Collaboration

  • As of March 31, 2017, 37 out of 41 projects have established a collaborative relationship with post-secondary educational institutions.
  • Budget 2017 announced the creation of a $1.26 billion five-year Strategic Innovation Fund (SIF), a key deliverable under the Inclusive Innovation Agenda. This new fund consolidates and simplifies existing business innovation programming, particularly SADI, the Technology Demonstration Program, the Automotive Innovation Fund (AIF), and the Automotive Supplier Innovation Program (ASIP), while also expanding to other dynamic and emerging sectors, such as clean technology and agri-food.
Comments on variances Actual spending in 2016–17 was less than originally planned due to delays in the level of R&D work performed on SADI projects, resulting in the need to shift the cash flow expected to be disbursed in 2016–17 into 2017–18.
However, available authorities of $36.9 million were internally reallocated towards the C Series program, as per Cabinet decision.
Audits completed or planned A program audit was completed in 2016–17.
Evaluations completed or planned A program evaluation was completed in 2016–17. 
Engagement of applicants and recipients In light of the nature of research and development cycle times, an outreach plan to attract high-quality proposals for SADI funding is developed annually. 
Activities carried out in 2016–17 include:
  • Increasing awareness through participation in over 13 industry events;
  • Information sharing and coordinating with industry and regional associations; and
  • Reinforcing existing client relationships and developing new ones through individual company discussions.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions 147,860,478  122,576,689 188,340,000 155,268,849 152,757,470 (35,587,530)
Total program 147,860,478  122,576,689 188,340,000 155,268,849 152,757,470 (35,587,530)
General Information
Name of transfer payment program Technology Demonstration Program
Start date September 4, 2013
End date 2013–14
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Industrial Research and Development Financing
Sub-program: Aerospace and Defence Innovation
Description The Technology Demonstration Program (TDP) provides non-repayable contributions in support of large-scale research and development technology demonstration projects in the aerospace, defence, space and security (A&D) sectors. Projects will be led by an Original Equipment Manufacturer or Tier 1 integrator, collaborating with small and medium-sized firms and post-secondary institutions. Projects funded through this program are expected to be the basis for next-generation manufacturing and services in Canada. The program supports technological development in areas that have significant potential for broad-based and long-term economic benefits for Canada.
Results achieved The department launched the third round of call for proposals to support large-scale demonstration projects in areas that have significant potential for broad-based and long-term economic benefits under the Technology Demonstration Program. Full proposals have been received and are being evaluated. A third TDP project will be announced in 2017.
2016–17 saw continued support to the Consortium for Aerospace Research and Innovation in Canada (CARIC), an industry-led network dedicated to aerospace innovation and the promotion of collaboration in aerospace research by strengthening linkages between researchers in industry, academia and research institutes in Canada and abroad.
Budget 2017 announced the creation of a $1.26 billion, five-year Strategic Innovation Fund (SIF), a key deliverable under the Inclusive Innovation Agenda. This new fund consolidates and simplifies existing business innovation programming, particularly Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI), TDP, the Automotive Innovation Fund (AIF), and the Automotive Supplier Innovation Program (ASIP), while also expanding to other dynamic and emerging sectors, such as clean technology and agri-food.
Comments on variances As a result of changes to TDP project funding requirements, the program was only able to disburse $28.4 million to eligible projects, which resulted in a variance of $18.5 million when compared to the original planned spending total. 
However, available authorities of $18.5 million were internally reallocated towards the C Series program, as per Cabinet decision.
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed.
Evaluations completed or planned No evaluation planned. Budget 2017 announced the creation of a $1.26 billion five-year Strategic Innovation Fund (SIF). This new fund consolidates and simplifies existing business innovation programming including TDP,
Engagement of applicants and recipients In light of the nature of research and development cycle times, an outreach plan to attract high-quality proposals for SADI funding is developed annually. 
Activities carried out in 2016–17 include:
  • Increasing awareness through participation in over 13 industry events;
  • Information sharing and coordinating with industry and regional associations; and
  • Reinforcing existing client relationships and developing new ones through individual company discussions.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions 2,578,000  15,067,258 46,882,120 28,397,628 28,397,628 (18,484,492)
Total program 2,578,000  15,067,258 46,882,120 28,397,628 28,397,628 (18,484,492)
General Information
Name of transfer payment program Automotive Innovation Fund
Start date May 9, 2008
End date March 31, 2021
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Industrial Research and Development Financing
Sub-Program: Automotive Innovation
Description The Automotive Innovation Fund (AIF) supports strategic, large-scale research and development projects to develop innovative, greener and more fuel-efficient vehicles.
Results achieved In 2016–17, the AIF has supported ten active projects focusing on innovative fuel-efficient technologies and processes.
Budget 2017 announced the creation of a new program called the Strategic Innovation Fund (SIF). SIF will incorporate the Automotive Innovation Fund, the Automotive Supplier Innovation Program, the Technology Development Program and the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative.

The agreements provided the following benefits: (1) installation of flexible engine assembly plants and the development of more energy efficient engines; (2) assembly of more fuel-efficient vehicles; (3) increased production capacity of assembly plants leading to long-term economic benefits including job creation and retention; (4) manufacturing of hybrid and battery-electric vehicles; (5) installation of state-of-the-art paint shops; (6) development and commercialization of products focused on light-weight, renewable materials and more energy efficient system; and (7) investments in advanced automotive and communication technologies.

To date, $7.21 of investment has been leveraged per dollar of federal disbursements for AIF related projects.

Comments on variances In 2016–17, the overall lapse against total year-end authorities for this program is $43.7 million. This amount was entirely reprofiled into 2017–18 in order to align the program resources with anticipated project's needs.
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation is planned for 2017–18.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Potential applicants and recipients are engaged on a regular basis by ISED officials through periodic project reviews and meetings to discuss proposed investments. To date, this engagement has resulted in 10 successful applications.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions 60,069,858  92,266,600 64,700,099 65,827,599 22,127,500 (42,572,599)
Total program 60,069,858  92,266,600 64,700,099 65,827,599 22,127,500 (42,572,599)
General Information
Name of transfer payment program Automotive Supplier Innovation Program
Start date June 3, 2015
End date March 31, 2020
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2015–16
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Industrial Research and Development Financing
Sub-Program: Automotive Innovation
Description The Automotive Supplier Innovation Program (ASIP) is a five-year, $100 million program that provides non-repayable contributions to support technology demonstration and prototyping activities of Canadian-based suppliers developing innovative products and/or processes in the automotive sector.
Results achieved In 2016–17, ASIP supported 12 projects focusing on innovative fuel-efficient technologies and processes.
ASIP contribution agreements support R&D activities in innovative technologies undertaken by recipients. Overall, ASIP is strengthening the Canadian automotive industry capacity to develop innovation new products and process which lead to improved productivity, and enhanced employment prospects for Canadians.
To date, $1.07 of investment was leveraged per dollar of federal disbursements for ASIP related projects.
Comments on variances As a result of project delays related to the due diligence process, ASIP was only able to disburse $14.6 million to eligible projects, which resulted in a variance of $1.9 million when compared to the original planned spending and an overall lapse of $4.4 million against total year-end authorities, which will be reprofiled to 2017–18.
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed.
Evaluations completed or planned None planned or completed. Budget 2017 announced the creation of a $1.26 billion, five-year Strategic Innovation Fund (SIF). This new fund consolidates and simplifies existing business innovation programming, including ASIP.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Potential applicants and recipients are engaged on a regular basis by ISED officials to discuss proposed R&D projects, and to discuss project progress through periodic reviews for applications that successfully obtain funding. To date, this engagement has resulted in 21 successful applications.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions 4,031,418 16,545,128 18,998,338 14,631,036 (1,914,092)
Total program 4,031,418 16,545,128 18,998,338 14,631,036 (1,914,092)
General Information
Name of transfer payment program Bombardier CSeries Program
Start date September 2008
End date 2034
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Industrial Research and Development Financing
Sub-Program: Aerospace and Defence Innovation
Description On February 7, 2017, the Government of Canada announced that it would provide $372.5 million in repayable contributions to Bombardier Inc. $120 million is allocated to ongoing activities related to the development of the company's C Series aircraft, while the remaining amount funds research and development for the Global 7000 business jet. This funding is provided over four years and will support middle-class jobs, strengthen the long-term competitiveness of Bombardier and help build the aircraft of the future.
Results achieved The program supports the successful development and launch of new fixed-wing commercial aircraft in the 100 to 160 seat segment.
Comments on variances Funding of $55.4 million was internally reallocated from SADI and TDP to support R&D activities under the Bombardier CSeries program.
Audits completed or planned An internal audit was conducted in 2014–15.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation was conducted in 2013–14.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED and Bombardier engage regularly on the status of projects.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions - - - 55,447,443 55,447,443 55,447,443
Total program - - - 55,447,443 55,447,443 55,447,443

Program: Small Business Research, Financing and Services

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Canada Small Business Financing Program
Start date 1961
End date Ongoing
Fiscal year for terms and conditions Ongoing (Statutory program)
Strategic Outcome Canadian businesses and communities are competitive
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Small Business Research, Financing and Services
Sub-Program: Small Business Financing and Growth
Description The Canada Small Business Financing Program (CSBFP) helps Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) access financing that would not otherwise be available or would be available only under less favourable terms. It is a loan loss-sharing program involving partnerships with financial institutions. To be eligible, SMEs must be for-profit businesses with revenues under  $10 million per year. Under the program, financial institutions can make term loans  for real property, leasehold improvements and equipment. In the event that a registered loan defaults, the government pays 85 percent of net eligible losses. CSBFP is a national program that operates in all provinces and territories.
Results achieved
  • Facilitated access to 5,189 loans representing over $971 million in debt financing to small businesses.
  • Conducted training sessions, webinars and provided promotional educational tools to help financial institutions and small business support organizations.
  • Continued communicating with financial institutions to improve program delivery and efficiencies.
For additional information on the administration of the CSBFP including historical data tables, please visit Canada.ca/csbfp.
Comments on variances The difference between planned and actual spending in 2016–17 reflects a drop in claims received and payments made for defaulted loans. This was driven primarily by a reduction in loans made in recent years.
Audits completed or planned An audit was completed in 2013–14.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation was completed in 2014–15.
An evaluation is planned for 2019–20.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada will continue to collaborate with lenders, other federal/provincial government departments, and business support organizations in order to improve their knowledge of the CSBFP.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions 66,374,591  62,699,806 77,908,000 63,079,579 63,079,579 (14,828,421)
Total program 66,374,591  62,699,806 77,908,000 63,079,579 63,079,579 (14,828,421)
General Information
Name of transfer payment program Futurpreneur Canada
Start date April 1, 2015
End date March 31, 2017
Fiscal year for terms and conditions  2016-2017
Strategic Outcome Canadian businesses and communities are competitive
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Small Business Research, Financing and Services
Sub-program: Small Business Financing and Growth
Description Futurpreneur Canada supports young Canadian entrepreneurs aged 18-39 who see entrepreneurship as a viable career option and want to start their own businesses but who would not typically be supported by traditional lending institutions. Futurpreneur provides loans of up to $15,000 and two years of mandatory mentoring. Futurpreneur also provides business planning support.
Results achieved Futurpreneur loan recipients must agree to work with an experienced business mentor for at least two years. In 2016–17, 1,068 new mentorships were established, bringing the total number of mentorships established over the two-year cycle to 2,074.
Comments on variances N/A
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation is planned for 2018–19.
Engagement of applicants and recipients There is only one applicant, Futurpreneur Canada. Futurpreneur Canada is the sole recipient of Government of Canada funding to that organization.
Following the execution of the Contribution Agreement, Futurpreneur Canada met all reporting requirement by providing four quarterly reports and a final annual report for 2016–17.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions 9,000,000  7,000,000 7,000,000 7,000,000  7,000,000 -
Total program 9,000,000  7,000,000 7,000,000 7,000,000  7,000,000 -

Program: Community Economic Development

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Computers for Schools
Start date 1993
End date March 31, 2018
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2013–14
Strategic Outcome Canadian Businesses and Communities are Competitive
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Community Economic Development
Sub-Program: Computer and Internet Access
Description Through the Computers for Schools (CFS) program, surplus computers donated by federal, provincial and territorial government departments, and private donors are refurbished by program partners across the country. Once refurbished, they are distributed to schools, libraries, not-for-profit organizations and Indigenous communities across Canada. Through a national partnership-based network, the program continues to meet the ongoing demand for computers, ensuring improved access for Canadians to computer technology. The Technical Work Experience Program is also delivered by CFS affiliates; however, results and spending stemming from TWEP are reported by ESDC under the Youth Employment Strategy. Under TWEP, eligible youth are given valuable work experience through internships targeted to develop and enhance information and communications technology (ICT) skills.
Results achieved In 2016–17, the program distributed 74,896 computers.
Comments on variances N/A
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation was conducted in 2016–17.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Recipients are engaged through regular monitoring. All recipients participate in bi-monthly teleconferences, site visits and an annual meeting to discuss issues, trends and the future of the program.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions (Computers for Schools) 4,629,713  5,523,922 5,250,000 6,238,000 5,684,811 434,811
Total contributions (Technical Work Experience Program) 3,479,270 3,625,484 3,200,242 4,149,742 4,008,678 808,436
Total program 8,108,983 9,149,406 8,450,242 10,387,742 9,693,489 1,243,247
General Information
Name of transfer payment program Connecting Canadians Program
Start date June 5, 2014
End date March 31, 2019
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2014–15
Strategic Outcome Canadian Businesses and Communities are Competitive
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Community Economic Development
Sub-Program: Computer and Internet Access
Description This program funds the extension or enhancement of broadband infrastructure to reach previously underserved communities in rural and northern Canada. It is also responsible for maintaining current maps of broadband coverage across Canada and for working with other government partners to coordinate support for broadband infrastructure.
Results achieved As of March 31, 2017, 87 projects have been announced under the Connecting Canadians program. With a Government of Canada investment of approximately $200 million, once completed, these 87 projects will connect approximately 300,000 households across the country.
Comments on variances In 2016–17, the program accessed additional funding of $8.3 million via Supplementary Estimates in reprofiled resources from 2015–16.
As a result of weather and regulatory delays, the program was only able to disburse $70 million to eligible projects, which resulted in a variance of $6 million when compared to the original planned spending total and an overall lapse of $14 million against total year-end authorities. Of this lapse, $10.4 million is planned for reprofile to 2017–18.
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation is planned for 2019–20.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Applicants and recipients were engaged throughout the year. The Program worked with selected applicants to finalize contribution agreements and announce last projects, and has continued to engage them throughout the monitoring of contribution agreements. The Program has sought ongoing feedback regarding the efficacy of its processes and tools.
The Program also conducted further outreach to interested stakeholders, including provincial and territorial governments and other organizations, to discuss remaining underserved areas within their respective jurisdictions and a way forward, including potential projects of interest.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions 66,980,458 76,000,000 84,300,000 69,975,121 (6,024,879)
Total program 66,980,458 76,000,000 84,300,000 69,975,121 (6,024,879)
General Information
Name of transfer payment program Youth Internships Program
Start date October 1994
End date March 31, 2017
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2012–13
Strategic Outcome Canadian Businesses and Communities are Competitive
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Community Economic Development
Sub-Program: Computer and Internet Access
Description This national initiative provides funding to recipients located across Canada who work with not-for-profit organizations in their respective province and territory to provide internship opportunities for youth to expand their knowledge and develop their abilities in the field of Information and Communications Technology (ICT). Experience gained and skills developed during these internships provide youth with the tools needed to be productive and competitive in a digital and knowledge-based economy and more successful in the job market.
Results achieved In 2016–17, the Youth Internships program provided funding to support approximately 840 interns.
Comments on variances In 2016–17, the program received total authorities of $9.8 million via the Supplementary Estimates and from internal reallocations in order to provide internship opportunities in the field of digital technology.
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed.
Evaluations completed or planned The Youth Internships Program is a component of the Youth Employment Strategy. Employment and Social Development Canada is leading a horizontal evaluation of the Youth Employment Strategy and ISED is participating in that evaluation, to be completed in 2019–20.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Program officers are in regular contact with their recipients to enter claims, answer questions and to obtain progress reports throughout the fiscal year. Site visits have been undertaken since in 2015–16 and will continue into the next fiscal year.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions 9,185,399  8,960,435 - 9,738,746 9,030,235 9,030,235
Total program 9,185,399  8,960,435 - 9,738,746 9,030,235 9,030,235
General Information
Name of transfer payment program Community Futures Program
Start date 1986
End date Ongoing
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2010–11
Strategic Outcome Canadian Businesses and Communities are Competitive
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Community Economic Development
Sub-Program: Northern Ontario Economic Development
Description The Community Futures (CF) Program is a national program administered by FedNor in Northern Ontario and the regional development agencies in the rest of Canada. The ultimate objectives of the program are to foster economic stability, growth and job creation; help create diversified and competitive local rural economies; and help build sustainable communities. FedNor provides financial support to 24 CFDCs in Northern Ontario, that are incorporated, not-for-profit, community-based development organizations, each governed by a local volunteer board of directors. They offer a variety of products and services to support small business growth and community economic development, including access to capital, strategic community planning and socio-economic development; support for community-based projects and special initiatives; and business information, planning and support services. FedNor provides financial contributions to support the ongoing operations of individual CFDCs through either one, three or five-year agreements.
Results achieved Through the Community Futures Program, FedNor engaged the 24 Northern Ontario Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) to foster economic stability, growth and job creation, help create diversified and competitive local rural economies and build economically sustainable communities in Northern Ontario. In 2016–17, Northern Ontario CFDCs invested $21.9 million in SMEs, leveraging $22.4 million. As a result of this lending activity, 918 businesses were assisted, started, expanded and/or maintained, creating and/or maintaining 1,311 jobs.
Comments on variances N/A
Audits completed or planned An audit was completed in 2014–15.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation was completed in 2014–15.
An evaluation is planned for 2018–19.
Engagement of applicants and recipients FedNor continued to engage Community Futures Organizations, including Community Futures Development Corporations, their regional networks and provincial association, through various activities including outreach/liaison, capacity building, program and policy development, referrals, compliance monitoring in regard to contribution agreements, and other collaborative activities.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions 8,360,008  8,360,008  8,360,008  8,360,008    8,360,008   -
Total program 8,360,008  8,360,008  8,360,008  8,360,008    8,360,008   -
General Information
Name of transfer payment program Northern Ontario Development Program
Start date April 1, 1996
End date Ongoing
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2011–12
Strategic Outcome Canadian Businesses and Communities are Competitive
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Community Economic Development
Sub-Program: Northern Ontario Economic Development
Description The Northern Ontario Development Program (NODP) is administered by FedNor. The NODP's objective is to promote economic development, economic diversification, job creation and sustainable, self-reliant communities in Northern Ontario. This is achieved by providing financial support, through transfer payments, to small and medium-sized enterprises and not-for-profit organizations, including municipalities, municipal organizations, community development organizations and research institutions, in three priority areas: community economic development, business growth and competitiveness, and innovation.
Results achieved In 2016-17, through the Northern Ontario Development Program, FedNor authorized $33.98 million, leveraging $68.84 million. During this period, 1,017 jobs were created and maintained and 858 businesses were created, expanded or maintained.
Comments on variances N/A
Audits completed or planned An audit was completed in 2013–14.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation was completed in 2016–17.
Engagement of applicants and recipients FedNor continued to collaborate and engage key partners to enhance economic impacts in Northern Ontario including: proactive alignment with other Regional Development Agencies priorities, programs and processes; the establishment of a working group with provincial counterparts to identify areas of increased collaboration; continued co-leadership of federal efforts in support of Ring of Fire development; support for efforts on the Canada Ontario Committee; and consultations with key stakeholders regarding innovation opportunities and issues pertaining to Northern Ontario.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total contributions 35,500,400  35,279,600 31,840,000 31,540,000 31,540,000 (300,000)
Total program 35,500,400  35,279,600 31,840,000 31,540,000 31,540,000 (300,000)

Internal Audits and Evaluations

Internal Audits Completed in 2016–17
Title of internal audit Internal audit type Completion date
Audit of the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI) Compliance and Management Control Framework January 2017
Audit of Measurement Canada Compliance and Management Control Framework February 2017
Evaluations in Progress or Completed in 2016–17
Title of evaluation Status Deputy head approval date Link to the organization's program(s)
Evaluation of the Northern Ontario Development Program Completed May 2016 Northern Ontario Development Program
Evaluation of the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI) Completed May 2017* Strategic Aerospace Defense Initiative (SADI)
Horizontal Evaluation of the Economic Development Initiative (EDI) Completed May 2017* Economic Development Initiative (EDI)
Evaluation of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics Completed May 2017* Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics
Evaluation of Mitacs Completed May 2017* Mitacs
Evaluation of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) Completed May 2017* Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR)
Evaluation of Computers for Schools Completed May 2017* Computers for Schools
Evaluation of the Competition Bureau`s Advocacy Unit Completed May 2017* Competition Bureau
Evaluation of the Canadian Intellectual Property Office's (CIPO) Patent Services Completed May 2017* Canadian Intellectual Property Office
Evaluation of the Certification and Engineering Bureau (CEB) Completed May 2017* Certification Engineering Bureau
*These evaluations were completed in 2016–17 and were considered by the Performance Measurement and Evaluation Committee but were formally approved by the Deputy Minister in the first quarter of 2017–18

Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits

Response to parliamentary committees

PACP examined the Office of the Auditor General of Canada's (OAG) Spring 2016 Report 1 – Venture Capital Action Plan. ISED participated in a PACP meeting on September 29, 2016, with the OAG and officials from the Department of Finance Canada and the Business Development Bank of Canada. ISED provided a Government Response to the PACP report.

PACP examined the Office of the Auditor General of Canada's (OAG) Spring 2016 Report 3 – The Governor in Council Appointment Process in Administrative Tribunals. ISED participated in a PACP meeting on November 17, 2016, with the OAG and officials from Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, Indian Affairs and Northern Development and the Privy Council Office. ISED provided a Government Response to the PACP report.

Response to the Auditor General (including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

Office of the Auditor General (OAG) – 2016 Spring Reports

Report 1 – Venture Capital Action Plan

The objective was to examine whether the Department of Finance Canada, the Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC), and Innovation, Science and Economic Development (ISED), consistent with their roles and responsibilities, properly assessed the policy need for, designed, and implemented the Action Plan in order to meet its stated objectives. In addition, the audit examined whether the Department of Finance Canada, BDC, and ISED, consistent with their roles and responsibilities, measured and monitored the performance of the Action Plan against the stated objectives and intended outcomes. The audit led to three recommendations, which have all been agreed to by the agencies involved, including ISED.

Report 3 – The Governor in Council Appointment Process in Administrative Tribunals

The objective of this audit was to determine if timely appointments of qualified individuals were being made to selected administrative tribunals to maintain continuity of service to Canadians. The audit led to three recommendations, which have all been agreed to by the agencies involved, including ISED.

Response to external audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

No external audits were conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Commissioner of Official Languages in FY 2016–17 involving ISED.

Up-Front, Multi-Year Funding

General Information
Name of recipient Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation
Start date March 31, 2002
End date Ongoing endowment in perpetuity
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to the organization's programs Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity
Description The Trudeau Foundation supports research and disseminates research findings in the following humanities and social sciences: Canadian studies, history, international relations, journalism, law, peace and conflict studies, philosophy, political economy, political science, sociology, and urban and community studies.
Using a peer review process, the Trudeau Foundation offers three types of awards: scholarships awarded to doctoral candidates, fellowships awarded to established researchers at Canadian universities, and mentorships awarded to seasoned professionals who are able to counsel the scholars. The Foundation also administers the Public Interaction Program (PIP), which communicates the work of the Foundation through conferences, lectures and symposia.
Comments on variances The Government of Canada provided the Foundation with $125 million in March 2002. No additional funding has been provided since that time.
Significant audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan A compliance audit was conducted in 2015–16.
Significant evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan None planned or completed.
Summary of results achieved by the recipient In 2016–17, the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation earned interest on its endowment and anticipates using $6.5 million to support its objectives.
In 2016–17 the Foundation:
  • Appointed 11 new mentors for their mentorships program;
  • Appointed 15 new scholars for their scholarship program;
  • Appointed 5 new fellows for their fellowship program; and
  • Hosted eight public interaction events and supported eight other events organized by Foundation community members. In 2016–2017, the Foundation invested $1.4 million in the Public Interaction Program.
Performance Information (dollars)
2014–15 Actual
spending
2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17
Total
authorities available for use
2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
- - - - - -
General Information
Name of recipient Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) for the NextGen Biofuels Fund™
Start date April 1, 2007
End date Final project disbursements by March 31, 2017.
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to the organization's programs Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity
Description SDTC manages the NextGen Biofuels Fund™ (NGBF), which was designed to provide conditionally repayable contributions toward first-of-kind, large-scale demonstration, next-generation renewable fuel production facilities. The NGBF is winding down, and no longer accepting applications.
Comments on variances Funding totals reflect the amount under the responsibility of ISED following the transfer of financial responsibility in 2016–17.
Significant audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan None planned or completed.
Significant evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan A final evaluation is being led by Sustainable Development Technology Canada, to be completed in 2017–18.
Summary of results achieved by the recipient SDTC contributed an aggregate of $80.2 million to support the construction and start-up of two approved projects.
Performance Information (dollars)
2014–15 Actual
spending
2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17
Total
authorities available for use
2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
- - - 27,476,242 27,476,242 27,476,242

User Fees, Regulatory Charges and External Fees

Program: Marketplace Frameworks and Regulation

Sub-program: Trade Measurement

Measurement Canada
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Device Approval and Measurement Standard Certification
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Weights and Measures Act
Year introduced Exact year is unknown. Fees for device approval and measurement standard certification have been in existence for over 35 years.
Year last amended 1993
Performance standard Notice of Approval issued between 30 and 120 calendar days depending on complexity of submission. Certificate of Calibration issued in 60 calendar days. Service standards and associated performance targets published on Measurement Canada's website
Performance results Performance standard met, on average, 95% of the time for device approvals and 97% of the time for measurement standard certifications.
Other information Revenue generated is solely dependent on client demand for services and complexity of device approvals and measurement standard certifications requested during the fiscal year.
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
175,000 149,071 638,984
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 175,000 750,125
2018–19 175,000 750,125
2019–20 175,000 750,125
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Measurement Canada: Device Approval and Measurement Standard Certification
Service standard Notice of Approval issued between 30 and 120 calendar days depending on complexity of submission. Certificate of Calibration is issued in 60 calendar days. Service standards and associated performance targets published on Measurement Canada's website.
Performance results Performance standard met, on average, 95% of the time for device approvals and 97% of the time for measurement standard certifications.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
Consultation with clients is ongoing. Clients are given the opportunity to express their views concerning laboratory services during and at the conclusion of their device approval or measurement standard certification request via an online service feedback form found at www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/mc-mc.nsf/frm-eng/TGOD-7TXGJ6. Feedback is analyzed for trends and changes in business processes and procedures instituted to improve service performance.
Other information Revenue generated is solely dependent on client demand for services and complexity of device approvals and measurement standard certifications requested during the fiscal year.
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Device Inspection
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Weights and Measures Act
Year introduced Exact year is unknown. Fees for device inspections have been in existence for over 35 years.
Year last amended 1993
Performance standard Mandatory inspections of devices before they are first placed into service are performed within 10 calendar days of client's request. Service standard published on Measurement Canada's website.
Performance results Performance standard met, on average, 95% of the time.
Other information Revenue generated is solely dependent on client demand for service. The majority of device inspections for which a fee is prescribed by regulation are performed by Measurement Canada authorized service providers (private sector organizations recognized by Measurement Canada to perform inspections). Measurement Canada performs this type of inspection when there are no authorized service providers qualified to inspect the device type. Fees for inspections performed by authorized service providers are determined by market forces and the organization performing the work, not Measurement Canada.
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
100,000 60,947 261,244
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 75,000 321,482
2018–19 75,000 321,482
2019–20 75,000 321,482
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Measurement Canada: Device Inspection
Service standard Mandatory inspections of devices before they are first placed into service are performed within 10 calendar days of client's request. Service standard published on Measurement Canada's website.
Performance results Performance standard met, on average, 95% of the time.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
Clients are provided with continuous opportunity to express their views through an online service feedback form. Feedback received is analyzed for trends and changes in business processes instituted to improve service performance.
Other information Revenue generated is solely dependent on client demand for service. The majority of device inspections for which a fee is prescribed by regulation are performed by Measurement Canada authorized service providers (private sector organizations recognized by Measurement Canada to perform inspections). Measurement Canada performs this type of inspection when there are no authorized service providers qualified to inspect the device type. Fees for inspections performed by authorized service providers are determined by market forces and the organization performing the work, not Measurement Canada.
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Electricity and Natural Gas Meter Inspection
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Electricity and Gas Inspection Act
Year introduced Exact year is unknown. Fees for meter inspections have been in existence for over 30 years.
Year last amended 1995
Performance standard Mandatory inspections of meters for which a fee applies are performed within 10 calendar days of client's request. Service standard published on Measurement Canada's website.
Performance results Performance standard met, on average, 93% of the time.
Other information Revenue generated is solely dependent on client demand for service. The majority of meter inspections for which a fee is prescribed by regulation are performed by Measurement Canada authorized service providers (private sector organizations recognized by Measurement Canada to perform inspections). Measurement Canada performs this type of inspection when there are no authorized service providers qualified to inspect the meter type. Fees for inspections performed by authorized service providers are determined by market forces and the organization performing the work, not Measurement Canada.
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
80,000 79,008 338,660
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 80,000 342,914
2018–19 80,000 342,914
2019–20 80,000 342,914
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Measurement Canada: Electricity and Natural Gas Meter Inspection
Service standard Mandatory inspections of meters for which a fee applies are performed within 10 calendar days of client's request. Service standard published on Measurement Canada's website.
Performance results Performance standard met, on average, 93% of the time.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
Clients are provided with continuous opportunity to express their views through an online service feedback form. Feedback received is analysed for trends and changes in business processes instituted to improve service performance.
Other information Revenue generated is solely dependent on client demand for service. The majority of meter inspections for which a fee is prescribed by regulation are performed by Measurement Canada authorized service providers (private sector organizations recognized by Measurement Canada to perform inspections). Measurement Canada performs this type of inspection when there are no authorized service providers qualified to inspect the meter type. Fees for inspections performed by authorized service providers are determined by market forces and the organization performing the work, not Measurement Canada.
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Electricity and Natural Gas Meter Approval and Measuring Apparatus Certification
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Electricity and Gas Inspection Act
Year introduced Exact year is unknown. Fees for meter approvals and measuring apparatus certifications have been in existence for over 30 years.
Year last amended 1995
Performance standard Notice of Approval issued between 30 and 120 calendar days depending on complexity of submission. Certificate of Calibration issued in 60 calendar days. Service standards and associated performance targets published on Measurement Canada's website
Performance results Performance standard met, on average, 93% of the time for device approvals and 92% of the time for measurement standards certifications.
Other information Slight decrease in service performance may be attributed to training and mentoring required for new metrologists.
Revenue generated is solely dependent on client demand for services and complexity of meter approvals and measuring apparatus certifications requested during the fiscal year.
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
240,000 306,561 1,314,054
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 300,000 1,285,928
2018–19 300,000 1,285,928
2019–20 300,000 1,285,928
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Measurement Canada: Electricity and Natural Gas Meter Approval and Measuring Apparatus Certification
Service standard Notice of Approval issued between 30 and 120 calendar days depending on complexity of submission. Certificate of Calibration issued in 60 calendar days. Service standards and associated performance targets published on Measurement Canada's website
Performance results Performance standard met, on average, 93% of the time for device approvals and 92% of the time for measurement standards certifications.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
Consultation with clients is ongoing. Clients are given the opportunity to express their views concerning laboratory services during and at the conclusion of their meter approval or measuring apparatus certification request via an online service feedback form found at www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/mc-mc.nsf/frm-eng/TGOD-7TXGJ6. Feedback is analyzed for trends and changes in business processes and procedures instituted to improve service performance.
Other information Slight decrease in service performance may be attributed to training and mentoring required for new metrologists.
Revenue generated is solely dependent on client demand for services and complexity of meter approvals and measuring apparatus certifications requested during the fiscal year.
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Electricity and Natural Gas Accreditation (initial and renewal)
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Electricity and Gas Inspection Act
Year introduced Exact year is unknown. Fees for electricity and natural gas accreditation (initial and renewal) have been in existence for nearly 30 years.
Year last amended 1995
Performance standard Granting of accreditation involves the successful completion of several phases.  Measurement Canada will issue a document review report within 6 weeks of receiving all required documents and an audit report within 4 weeks of the last onsite audit.  Accreditation recognition will be granted within three weeks of confirming successful implementation of accepted procedures and confirmation of compliance with requirements. Service standard published on Measurement Canada's website.
Performance results Performance standard met, on average, 98% of the time.
Other information Revenue generated is based on the number of private sector organizations seeking to become recognized by Measurement Canada to certify electricity and natural gas meters and the number of authorized service providers who choose to renew their accreditation status.
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
55,000 56,500 242,183
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 55,000 235,754
2018–19 55,000 235,754
2019–20 55,000 235,754
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Measurement Canada: Electricity and Natural Gas Accreditation (initial and renewal)
Service standard Granting of accreditation involves the successful completion of several phases.  Measurement Canada will issue a document review report within 6 weeks of receiving all required documents and an audit report within 4 weeks of the last onsite audit.  Accreditation recognition will be granted within three weeks of confirming successful implementation of accepted procedures and confirmation of compliance with requirements. Service standard published on Measurement Canada's website.
Performance results Performance standard met, on average, 98% of the time.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
Clients are given continuous opportunity to provide feedback through an online service feedback form and as part of regular performance evaluations. Feedback is analyzed for trends and changes in processes to improve service performance considered and implemented as part of quality management system mid-year and year-end management reviews.
Other information Revenue generated is based on the number of private sector organizations seeking to become recognized by Measurement Canada to certify electricity and natural gas meters and the number of authorized service providers who choose to renew their accreditation status.

Sub-program: Insolvency

Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Filing Fee
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act (BIA) and Rules
Year introduced 1992
Year last amended 2001
Performance standard Registration of new estates: 90% of the time within two days.
Performance results The two-day registration performance standard was met 98.94% of the time.
Other information N/A
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
10,700,500 11,913,327 15,211,482
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 11,913,327 14,424,631
2018–19 11,913,327 14,424,631
2019–20 11,913,327 14,424,631
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy: Filing Fee
Service standard Registration of new estates: 90% of the time within two days.
Performance results The two-day performance standard was met 98.94% of the time.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
Consultations that focused on proposed changes to regulations were concluded with stakeholders in 2001.
Other information N/A
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Superintendent Levy
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act (BIA) and Rules
Year introduced 1949
Year last amended 2001
Performance standard Letters of Comment: Issued 90% of the time within 21 business days of receipt of Statement of Receipts and Disbursements.
Performance results The 21 business day performance standard was met 98.51% of the time.
Other information N/A
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
42,650,187 41,652,362 53,183,647
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 43,311,571 53,714,507
2018–19 43,311,571 53,714,507
2019–20 43,311,571 53,714,507
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy: Superintendent Levy
Service standard Letters of Comment: issued 90% of the time within 21 business days of receipt of the Statement of Receipts and Disbursement.
Performance results The 21 business day performance standard was met 98.51% of the time.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
Consultations that focused on proposed changes to regulations were concluded with stakeholders in 2001.
Other information N/A
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Trustee Licence Fee
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act (BIA) and Rules
Year introduced 1992
Year last amended 2001
Performance standard N/A
Performance results N/A
Other information The implementation of the next phase of a self-serve, web-based trustee licence administration portal is expected in 2017–18, which will enhance the integrity and efficiency of licence administration and renewal. Associated service standards are in development.
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
1,077,750 1,071,100 1,367,630
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 1,071,100 1,328,366
2018–19 1,071,100 1,328,366
2019–20 1,071,100 1,328,366
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy: Trustee Licence Fee
Service standard N/A
Performance results N/A
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
Consultations that focused on proposed changes to regulations were concluded with stakeholders in 2001.
Other information The implementation of the next phase of a self-serve, web-based trustee licence administration portal is expected in 2017–18 which will enhance the integrity and efficiency of licence administration and renewal. Associated service standards are in development.
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Name Search Fee
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act (BIA) and Rules
Year introduced 1992
Year last amended 1998
Performance standard Faxes answered within 24 hours.
Performance results The 24-hour performance standard was met 100% of the time.
Other information Over 90% of Insolvency Record searches are completed online by users.
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
3,220,540 3,440,934 4,393,542
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 3,440,934 4,267,406
2018–19 1,071,000 4,267,406
2019–20 1,071,000 4,267,406
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy: Name Search Fee
Service standard Faxes answered within 24 hours.
Performance results The 24-hour performance standard was met 100% of the time.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
Consultations that focused on proposed changes to regulations were concluded with stakeholders in 1999.
Other information Over 90% of Insolvency Record searches are completed online by users.

Sub-program: Federal Incorporations

Corporations Canada
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Corporations Canada has several product offerings, including name searches, and filing articles of incorporation, articles of continuance, statements of revocation of intent to dissolve, and of annual returns
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Canada Business Corporations Act (CBCA), Canada Corporations Act (CCA), Canada Cooperatives Act (COOP)
Year introduced User fees were introduced in 2001 for CBCA and COOP, and 1979 for CCA.
Year last amended No recent activity for CBCA, CCA and COOP
Performance standard Performance Standard 1:
Online incorporation applications received by 1:00 p.m. EST are processed by 5:00 p.m. EST (CBCA).
Performance Standard 2:
Non-online incorporation applications are processed within five business days (CBCA, CCA and COOP Act).
Performance Standard 3:
Annual returns are processed and available on the Corporations Canada website within five business days (CBCA and COOP Act).
Performance Standard 4:
Provision of other online services. A complete listing of other online services and related standards are available on the Corporations Canada website (CBCA).
Performance Standard 5:
Provision of other non-online services. A complete listing of other non-online services and related standards are available on the Corporations Canada website (CBCA, CCA and COOP Act).
Performance results Performance Standard 1: 97.5%
Online incorporation applications received by 1:00 p.m. EST are processed by 5:00 p.m. EST (CBCA).
Performance Standard 2: 94.5%
Non-online incorporation applications are processed within five business days (CBCA, CCA and COOP Act).
Performance Standard 3: 99.5%
Annual returns are processed and available on the Corporations Canada website within five business days (CBCA and COOP Act).
Performance Standard 4: 100%
Provision of other online services. A complete listing of other online services and related standards is available on the Corporations Canada website (CBCA).
Performance Standard 5: 100%
Provision of other non-online services. A complete listing of other non-online services and related standards is available on the Corporations Canada website (CBCA, CCA and COOP Act).
Other information N/A
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
14,991,581 15,094,432 14,076,624
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 14,820,392 14,336,585
2018–19 14,820,392 14,336,585
2019–20 14,820,392 14,336,585
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Corporations Canada has several product offerings, including name searches, and filing articles of incorporation, letters patent, articles of continuance, statements of revocation of intent to dissolve, and of annual returns
Service standard Performance Standard 1:
Online incorporation applications received by 1:00 p.m. EST are processed by 5:00 p.m. EST (CBCA).
Performance Standard 2:
Non-online incorporation applications are processed within five business days (CBCA, CCA and COOP Act).
Performance Standard 3:
Annual returns are processed and available on the Corporations Canada website within five business days (CBCA and COOP Act).
Performance Standard 4:
Provision of other online services. A complete listing of other online services and related standards are available on the Corporations Canada website (CBCA).
Performance Standard 5:
Provision of other non-online services. A complete listing of other non-online services and related standards are available on the Corporations Canada website (CBCA, CCA and COOP Act).
Performance results Performance Standard 1: 97.5%
Online incorporation applications received by 1:00 p.m. EST are processed by 5:00 p.m. EST (CBCA).
Performance Standard 2: 94.5%
Non-online incorporation applications are processed within five business days (CBCA, CCA and COOP Act).
Performance Standard 3: 99.5%
Annual returns are processed and available on the Corporations Canada website within five business days (CBCA and COOP Act).
Performance Standard 4: 100%
Provision of other online services. A complete listing of other online services and related standards are available on the Corporations Canada website (CBCA).
Performance Standard 5: 100%
Provision of other non-online services. A complete listing of other non-online services and related standards are available on the Corporations Canada website (CBCA, CCA and COOP Act).
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
The most recent consultations on the regulations;
Consultations on the fee regulations under the CBCA and COOP Act were in 2001.
Consultation questions were posted online and submitted via mail or email for CBCA and COOP. The type of consultation held for CCA is unknown.
CBCA
Published in The Gazette in 2001.
COOP Act
Published in The Gazette in 2001 (Publication in The Gazette regarding the Repeal of the Cooperatives Tariff of Fees in 2007).
CCA
Published in The Gazette in 1978.
Other information N/A
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Corporations Canada has several product offerings under the Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Act, including filing articles of incorporation, articles of continuance, statements of revocation of intent to dissolve, and of annual returns
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Act (NFP Act)
Year introduced User fee was introduced in 2011
Year last amended 2011
Performance standard Performance Standard 1:
Online incorporation applications received by 1:00 p.m. EST are processed by 5:00 p.m. EST (NFP Act).
Performance Standard 2:
Non-online incorporation applications are processed within five business days (NFP Act).
Performance Standard 3:
Annual returns are processed and available on the Corporations Canada website within five business days.
Performance Standard 4:
Provision of other services for NFP Act corporations. A complete listing of other services and related standards are available on the Corporations Canada website.
Performance results Performance Standard 1: 95.9%
Online incorporation applications received by 1:00 p.m. EST are processed by 5:00 p.m. EST (NFP Act).
Performance Standard 2: 95%
Non-online incorporation applications are processed within five business days (NFP Act).
Performance Standard 3: 98.8%
Annual returns are processed and available on the Corporations Canada website within five business days.
Performance Standard 4: 100%
Provision of other services for NFP Act corporations. A complete listing of other services and related standards is available on the Corporations Canada website.
Other information N/A
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
1,008,419 1,201,420 1,120,409
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 1,179,608 1,141,100
2018–19 1,179,608 1,141,100
2019–20 1,179,608 1,141,100
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Corporations Canada has several product offerings under the Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Act, including filing articles of incorporation, articles of continuance, statements of revocation of intent to dissolve, and of annual returns
Service standard Performance Standard 1:
Online incorporation applications received by 1:00 p.m. EST are processed by 5:00 p.m. EST (NFP Act).
Performance Standard 2:
Non-online incorporation applications are processed within five business days (NFP Act).
Performance Standard 3:
Annual returns are processed and available on the Corporations Canada website within five business days.
Performance Standard 4:
Provision of other services for NFP organizations. A complete listing of other non-online services and related standards are available on the Corporations Canada website.
Performance results Performance Standard 1: 95.9%
Online incorporation applications received by 1:00 p.m. EST are processed by 5:00 p.m. EST (NFP Act).
Performance Standard 2: 95%
Non-online incorporation applications are processed within five business days (NFP Act).
Performance Standard 3: 98.8%
Annual returns are processed and available on the Corporations Canada website within five business days.
Performance Standard 4: 100%
Provision of other services for NFP organizations. A complete listing of other non-online services and related standards are available on the Corporations Canada website.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
The most recent consultation on user fees for the NFP Act was in 2010 via an online consultation.
Other information N/A

Program: Marketplace Frameworks and Regulation

Sub-program: Intellectual Property

Canadian Intellectual Property Office
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO)
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Financial Administration Act, Patent Act, Trade-marks Act, Copyright Act, Industrial Design Act, Integrated Circuit Topography Act, Department of Industry Act
Year introduced CIPO has always had user fees which are captured in the Framework Document, 1993 page 7.
Year last amended 2004
Performance standard See CIPO Client Service Standards
Performance results Performance Measurements achieved 94% of the time.
Other information In 2014, the Government of Canada amended Canada's intellectual property (IP) laws in order to join five IP treaties administered by the World Intellectual Property Organization. In 2015, the Government passed additional amendments to trademark and patent laws. Implementation of these amendments requires modifications to portions of CIPO's fee structure as it relates to trademarks and to patents.

CIPO held consultations on the patent and trademark fee-for-service proposals in the summer of 2016 and these were tabled in Parliament in November 2016. The Senate Standing Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce approved the user fee proposal in February, 2017.

Final approval of the fee changes will be sought as part of regulatory amendment packages for implementation of the treaties. It is anticipated that the amended fee regime and associated service standards will take effect in early 2019.

Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
152,697,643 158,251,714 151,797,361
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 156,013,320 168,591,294
2018–19 159,504,389 168,722,725
2019–20 170,831,681 175,055,679
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO)
Service standard See CIPO Client Service Standards.
Performance results Performance Measurements achieved 94% of the time.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
In 2016–17, CIPO consulted on proposed trademark and patent fees as they relate to the implementation of the IP treaties. Consultations were held with stakeholders on the new service offerings (e.g. renewals, amendments, etc.) that will be provided with the implementation of the IP treaties, as well as their associated fees and service standards.

The organization did not consult with stakeholders on its existing organizational service standards.

Other information CIPO has committed to proactively engage and consult with clients on service standards in 2017–18.

Program: Marketplace Competition and Investments

Sub-program: Competition Law Enforcement

Competition Bureau
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Pre-Merger Notification and Advance Ruling Certificate (ARC) requests
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Department of Industry Act
Competition Bureau Fees and Service Standards Policy for Mergers and Merger-Related Matters
Year introduced 1997
Year last amended 2010
Performance standard Non-Complex: 14 calendar days
Complex: 30 or 45 calendar days where a supplementary information request has been issued
Performance results Non-Complex: 99%
Complex: 74%
Other information N/A
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
10,500,000 10,774,985 18,955,834
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 10,500,000 18,800,321
2018–19 10,500,000 18,800,321
2019–20 10,500,000 18,800,321
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Pre-Merger Notification and Advance Ruling Certificate (ARC) requests
Service standard Non-Complex: 14 calendar days.
Complex: 30 or 45 calendar days where a supplementary information request has been issued.
Performance results Non-Complex: Out of 169 non-complex matters concluded, 168 were met within the service standard.
Complex: Out of 53 complex matters concluded, 39 were met within the service standard.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
Merger roundtables occur annually in May, and are mainly attended by lawyers that interface with competition law (e.g. represent merging parties for merger reviews). The most recent roundtable was held in May 2016. At that time, the Bureau presented its Merger Review Performance Report, which includes key merger review performance statistics for the fiscal year 2015–16. Included in such statistics are indicators of how well the Bureau is meeting service standards for non-complex and complex merger reviews. Participants at the roundtable have the opportunity to provide feedback on the service standards and the Bureau's performance in respect of meeting service standards.
Other information In 2017–18, the Bureau will be submitting a User Fee Proposal to increase the fee for pre-merger notifications and Advancing Ruling Certificate requests.
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Written Opinions
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Department of Industry Act
Competition Bureau Fee and Service Standards Policy
Year introduced 1997
Year last amended Written Opinions relating to Part IX of the Act: 2010
Written Opinions relating to other parts of the Act: 2011
Performance standard
  • Part IX of the Act:
    • Non-Complex: 14 days
    • Complex: 28 days
  • Other parts of the Act:
    • Sections 45 to 49, 79 and 90.1:
      • Non-Complex: 6 weeks
      • Complex: 10 weeks
    • Sections 52, 52.1, 53, 54, 55, 55.1, 74.01(1)(a), 74.01(1)(c), 74.01(2), 74.01(3), 74.02, 74.04, 74.05 and 74.06:
      • Non-Complex: 2 weeks
      • Complex: 6 weeks
  • Written Opinions with respect to any other provision except mergers and merger-related matters:
    • Non-Complex: 4 weeks
    • Complex: 8 weeks
Performance results Non-Complex: N/A
Complex: 60%
Other information All written opinions issued in 2016–17 were designated as complex.
Due to the complexity and the additional reviews required to complete the requests, 10 of the 17 complex written opinions issued during 2016–17 were not met within the service standards.
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
50,000 18,000 268,072
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 25,000 253,689
2018–19 25,000 253,689
2019–20 25,000 253,689
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Written Opinions
Service standard
  • Part IX of the Act:
    • Non-Complex:14 days
    • Complex: 28 days
  • Other parts of the Act:
    • Sections 45 to 49, 79 and 90.1:
      • Non-Complex: 6 weeks
      • Complex: 10 weeks
    • Sections 52, 52.1, 53, 54, 55, 55.1, 74.01(1)(a), 74.01(1)(c), 74.01(2), 74.01(3), 74.02, 74.04, 74.05 and 74.06:
      • Non-Complex: 2 weeks
      • Complex: 6 weeks
  • Written Opinions with respect to any other provision except mergers and merger-related matters:
    • Non-Complex: 4 weeks
    • Complex: 8 weeks
Performance results Out of 17 complex Section 55.1 written opinions, 10 were met within the service standard.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
N/A
Other information N/A
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name CA Numbers
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Department of Industry Act
Year introduced 1972
Year last amended 1986
Performance standard Online application: 5 Business days
(use of web form and credit card payments)
Application by mail: 20 Business days, which includes validation of payment
(sent by mail with cheque or money order included)
The performance target for this service standard is 90% of completed applications that are processed within the advertised processing times.
Performance results 98%
Other information N/A
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
72,900 90,300 334,896
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 72,900 292,366
2018–19 72,900 292,366
2019–20 72,900 292,366
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name CA Numbers
Service standard Online application: 5 Business days
(use of web form and credit card payments)
Application by mail: 20 Business days, which includes validation of payment
(sent by mail with cheque or money order included)
Performance results Of 969 applications, 98% were met within the service standard.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
N/A  
Other information N/A

Program: Spectrum, Telecommunications and the Digital Economy

Spectrum, Information Technologies and Telecommunications

Radio and Terminal Equipment Approval
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Registration Fee
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Radiocommunication Act, section 6(1)
Department of Industry Act, sections 18, 19, 20
Financial Administration Act, section 19.1
Year introduced 2004
Year last amended 2007
Performance standard Processing time of two business days per transaction.
Performance results Service standard was met 100% of the time.
Other information Full cost and estimated full cost is broken down per fee. Full cost and estimated full cost shown here is for registration fee.
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
130,000 127,500 283,823
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 130,000 285,394
2018–19 130,000 285,394
2019–20 130,000 285,394
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Registration Fee
Service standard Processing time of two business days per transaction.
Performance results Service standard was met 100% of the time.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
Consultation on this fee took place in 2004 and the fee was established in 2007.
Other information Full cost and estimated full cost is broken down per fee. Full cost and estimated full cost shown here is for registration fee.
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Listing Fee
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Radiocommunication Act, section 6(1)
Department of Industry Act, sections 18, 19, 20
Financial Administration Act, section 19.1
Year introduced 2004
Year last amended 2007
Performance standard Processing time of two business days per transaction.
Performance results Service standard was met 100% of the time.
Other information Full cost and estimated full cost is broken down per fee. Full cost and estimated full
cost shown here is for listing fee.
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
375,000 464,450 1,033,867
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 475,000 1,042,944
2018–19 475,000 1,042,944
2019–20 475,000 1,042,944
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Listing Fee
Service standard Processing time of two business days per transaction.
Performance results Service standard was met 100% of the time.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
Consultation on this fee took place in 2004 and the fee was established in 2007.
Other information Full cost and estimated full cost is broken down per fee. Full cost and
estimated full cost shown here is for listing fee.
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Assessment Fee
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Radiocommunication Act, section 6(1)
Department of Industry Act, sections 18, 19, 20
Financial Administration Act, section 19.1
Year introduced 2004
Year last amended 2007
Performance standard Processing time of 14 calendar days per transaction.
Performance results Service standard was met 100% of the time.
Other information This fee is not subject to the User Fee Act, as similar services are available from
private certification bodies.
Full cost and estimated full cost is broken down per fee. Full cost and estimated full
cost shown here is for assessment fee.
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
10,000 6,000 13,434
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 5,000 11,166
2018–19 5,000 11,166
2019–20 5,000 11,166
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Assessment Fee
Service standard Processing time of 14 calendar days per transaction.
Performance results Service standard was met 100% of the time.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
Consultation on this fee took place in 2004 and the fee was established in 2007.
Other information This fee is not subject to the User Fee Act, as similar services are available
from private certification bodies.

Full cost and estimated full cost is broken down per fee. Full cost and estimated full cost shown here is for assessment fee.

Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Technical Expertise Fee
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Radiocommunication Act, section 6(1)
Department of Industry Act, sections 18, 19, 20
Financial Administration Act, section 19.1
Year introduced 2004
Year last amended 2007
Performance standard Not subject to performance standards as the time required to provide this service is case-specific.
Performance results Not applicable.
Other information This fee is not subject to the User Fee Act, as similar services are available from private certification bodies.

Full cost and estimated full cost is broken down per fee. Full cost and estimated full
cost shown here is for the Technical Expertise Fees.

Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
5,000 13,650 30,355
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 10,000 21,981
2018–19 10,000 21,981
2019–20 10,000 21,981
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Technical Expertise Fee
Service standard Not subject to performance standards as the time required to provide this service is case specific.
Performance results Not subject to performance standards, as the time required to provide this service is case-specific.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
Consultation on this fee took place in 2004 and the fee was established in 2007.
Other information This fee is not subject to the User Fee Act, as similar services are available from private certification bodies.

Full cost and estimated full cost is broken down per fee. Full cost and
estimated full cost shown here is for the Technical Expertise Fees.

Radiocom:

Full Costs for RADIOCOM (New and Amended Radio Licences):
Radio and spectrum licences fees are for the right and privilege to exploit spectrum. These fees do not recover administrative costs of issuing radio or spectrum licences. As such, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada has not established administrative processes to track actual costs on this basis.

2016–17 Full costs and future year Estimated full costs are provided for the total of RADIOCOM new and amended radio licences (including the Mobile Public Safety Communications 4.9GHz fee).

The tables below for RADIOCOM do not include revenues from the renewal of existing licences under the Radiocommunication Act, Department of Industry Act and Financial Administration Act. These amounts are reported in the Public Accounts of Canada 2017.

Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name New and Amended Radio Licences for:
  • Fixed Parameter Radio Stations
  • Mobile Radio Stations
  • Microwave Stations
  • Earth Stations
  • Space Stations
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Radiocommunication Act, section 6(1)
Department of Industry Act, sections 18, 19, 20
Financial Administration Act, section 19.1
Year introduced 2000
Year last amended 2000 - Radio Authorization Fees
Performance standard Service standard to be met is 90%.
Performance results Service standard was met at 90.4%.
Other information Total fees reported pertain to all new licences issued across the five types of radio licences. Performance standards and results are a total of all received applications regardless of category.
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
6,500,000 9,143,380 Not applicable. See note regarding Full costs for RADIOCOM above.
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 6,500,000 Not applicable. See note regarding Estimated full costs for RADIOCOM above.
2018–19 6,500,000 Not applicable. See note regarding Estimated full costs for RADIOCOM above.
2019–20 6,500,000 Not applicable. See note regarding Estimated full costs for RADIOCOM above.
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name New or Amended Licences
Service standard 90%
Performance results Service standard was met at 90.4%.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
No fees for these licences have been introduced or amended since 2000.
Other information N/A
General Information
Fee name Mobile Public Safety Communications 4.9GHz
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Radiocommunication Act, section 6(1)
Department of Industry Act, sections 18, 19, 20
Financial Administration Act, section 19.1
Year introduced 2008
Year last amended 2008 - Mobile Public Safety Communications 4.9GHz
Performance standard Service standard to be met is 90%.
Performance results No service standards were applicable, as no licences were issued in the 4.9 GHz band in 2016–17.
Other information Note: This fee is the first fee that program introduced under the User Fees Act.  
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
1,000 0 N/A
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 1,000 N/A
2018–19 1,000 N/A
2019–20 1,000 N/A
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Mobile Public Safety Communications 4.9GHz
Service standard 90%
Performance results No service standards were applicable, as no licences were issued in the 4.9 GHz band in 2016-17.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
No fees for these licences have been introduced or amended since 2008.
Other information N/A

Program: Small Business Research, Financing and Services

Sub-program: Small Business Financing and Growth

Small Business, Tourism and Marketplace Services
Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Canada Small Business Financing Program (CSBFP)
(registration and administration fees)
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Canada Small Business Financing Act (CSBF Act)
Year introduced Fees were established in 1999
Year last amended Fees were last amended in 1999
Performance standard Two days or less to register a loan.
Twenty days or less to process a claim.
Performance results In 2016–17, the standard of 2 days or less to register a loan was met 99% of the time.
On average, the time required to process a claim was 15 days upon receipt of all required documentation. The standard of 20 days or less to process a claim was met 65% of the time.
Other information The actual revenue amount represents the registration and administration fees for loans made under the CSBFP. Full cost figures represent the operating cost of the Small Business Financing Directorate to administer the CSBFP. Full cost does not include expenses associated with claim payments made to financial institutions as a result of defaulted loans. These expenses are covered in the “Details on Transfer Payment Programs” section of this report.
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
49,914,439 53,776,056 4,223,479
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 53,044,000 4,662,452
2018–19 55,312,000 4,841,777
2019–20 56,104,000 4,841,777
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Canada Small Business Financing Program (CSBFP)
(registration and administration fees)
Service standard Two days or less to register loans.
Twenty days or less to process claims.
Performance results The standard of 2 days or less to register a loan was met 99% of the time.
On average, the time required to process a claim was 15 days upon receipt of all the required documentation. The standard of 20 days or less to process a claim was met 65% of the time.
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
During 2016–17, discussions with key lenders indicated general satisfaction with the current performance results.
Throughout 2016–17, the CSBFP continued to collaborate with lenders by holding regular webinar training sessions, conducting discussions on various policy issues and providing support/educational products to stakeholders.
The CSBFP's current service standards remain accessible to the public on the ISED and CSBFP websites.
Other information Additional information on the administration of the CSBFP, including loan registrations, revenues and claim expenses is available at Canada.ca/csbfp.

Program: Internal Services

Office of the Corporate Secretary

Reporting on the User Fees Act
General Information
Fee name Fees charged for the processing of access requests filed under the Access to Information Act (ATIA)
Fee type Regulatory (R)
Fee-setting authority Access to Information Act
Year introduced 1992
Year last amended 2006
Performance standard On-time compliance or meeting of statutory deadlines is defined by responses provided within 30 days following receipt of requests and/or within statutory deadlines. Response time may be legally extended pursuant to section 9 of the ATIA. Notice of extension is sent within 30 days after receipt of request.
The ATIA provides more complete details.
Performance results Statutory deadlines were met 93% of the time in 2016–17.
Other information The ATIA states that all formal requests submitted must be accompanied by a $5.00 application fee and is to be payable to the Receiver General of Canada. All other fees prescribed and received pursuant to the ATIA are returned to the Consolidated Revenue Fund. All fees collected and waived under the ATIA are detailed in the department's annual report to Parliament on the ATIA.
The ATIA permits the waiving of fees when deemed to be in the public interest or if under $25. The fees collected during the reporting period totalled $3,635. In accordance with government policy, it is the Department's practice to waive fees where the total owing per request is less than $25. Fees waived during 2016–17 amounted to $1,470 for application and/or reproduction costs less than $25.
The trend in waiving fees continues, particularly with the use of CDs and other electronic means of disseminating information to requesters.
Financial Information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
3,000 3,635 2,052,831
Financial Information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 3,000 2,096,586
2018–19 3,000 2,096,586
2019–20 3,000 2,096,586
Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees
General Information
Fee name Fees charged for the processing of access requests filed under the Access to Information Act (ATIA)
Service standard Response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; the response time may be extended pursuant to section 9 of the ATIA. Notice of extension to be sent within 30 days after receipt of request.
The ATIA provides more complete details.
Performance results Statutory deadlines were met 93% of the time in 2016–17. 
Stakeholder consultation in
2016–17 or prior fiscal years
This service standard is established under the Access to Information Act and the Access to Information Regulations. Consultations with stakeholders were undertaken for amendments completed in 1986 and 1992. The ATIA and regulations fall under the responsibility of the Treasury Board Secretariat.
Other information The ATIA states that all formal requests submitted must be accompanied by a $5.00 application fee and is to be payable to the Receiver General of Canada. All fees prescribed and received pursuant to the ATIA are returned to the Consolidated Revenue Fund. All fees collected and waived under the ATIA are detailed in the department's annual report to Parliament on the ATIA.
The ATIA permits the waiving of fees when deemed to be in the public interest or if under $25. The fees collected during the reporting period totalled $3,635. In accordance with government policy, it is the Department's practice to waive fees where the total owing per request is less than $25. Fees waived during 2016–17 amounted to $1,470 for application and/or reproduction costs less than $25.
The trend in waiving fees continues, particularly with the use of CDs and other electronic means of disseminating information to requesters.

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Overview of the federal government's approach to sustainable development

The 2013–16 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada's sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, ISED supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities described in this supplementary information table.

2. Our Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

This Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy describes ISED's actions in support of Theme I: addressing climate change and air quality, Theme III: protecting nature and Canadians, and Theme IV: shrinking the environmental footprint, beginning with government. The report for 2016–17 presents a high‑level overview of results and is the final report under the 2013–16 FSDS. Last year's report is available on the departmental website.

3. Departmental performance highlights

Theme I: Addressing climate change and air quality

Under Theme I, the ISED contributed to the 2013–16 FSDS through six implementation strategies for Goal 1: Climate Change: Reduce greenhouse gas emission levels to mitigate the severity and unavoidable impacts of climate change.

Implementation strategies: performance summary
Implementation Strategy 1.1.4

Continue to implement the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative in support of strategic research and development projects that contribute to new aerospace and defence technologies, and may lead to the reduction of GHG emissions and produce new energy efficiencies.

Performance Summary

Although environment and sustainable development are not explicit objectives of the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative, a long term outcome of the program is to contribute to the achievement of broader technological, economic, environmental and social benefits for Canadians.

As of March 31, 2017, recipients of the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative have reported environmental benefits such as a reduction in material waste, energy efficiency and conservation of natural resources for 25 of 41.

Implementation Strategy 1.1.5

Continue to support the development and promote the use of corporate social responsibility (CSR) management tools by industry and the use of CSR standards in the Canadian marketplace in support of sustainable consumption and production, innovation and competitiveness.

Performance Summary

In 2016–17, ISED published a Canada Business Network blog post on the social responsibility standard ISO 26000 that is now a National Standard of Canada. 

Implementation Strategy 1.1.8

Continue to work with key stakeholders to ensure that consumers have the information and tools needed to protect their interests, while engaging in, and supporting, research and policy development on consumer issues such as sustainable consumption.

Performance Summary

In 2016–17:

Implementation Strategy 1.1.10

Continue to advance environmental sustainability through support to co-operatives as businesses with economic, environmental and social sustainability goals by identifying and addressing barriers and opportunities to co-operative growth, and enabling access to emerging market opportunities.

Performance Summary

In 2016–17, ISED continued to promote increased uptake by entrepreneurs of the co-operatives business model by: raising awareness of the advantages of the model; continuing to enable co-operatives' access to government programs and services in order to capture market opportunities; and publishing material on the ISED website. In particular, ISED posted: the 2012 Co-operatives in Canada reports; a blog post on the Canada Business Network website promoting the release of the 2012 report; and data tables on total non-financial co-operative incorporations and new incorporations from 2009–2016. ISED officials also participated in outreach to co-operatives stakeholders through: the 2016 International Summit of Co-operatives in Québec City in October 2016, to which it provided $1 million in financial support from Canada Economic Development for the Quebec Regions (CEDQ); and the 2016 Co-operatives and Mutuals Canada Co-operatives Congress held in Ottawa in November 2016.

Implementation Strategy 1.1.28

Continue to implement the Automotive Innovation Fund (AIF) in support of strategic, large-scale research and development projects leading to innovative, greener and more fuel-efficient vehicles.

Performance Summary

In 2016–17, the AIF has supported 10 active projects focusing on innovative fuel-efficient technologies and processes.

Budget 2017 announced the creation of a new organization called Strategic Innovation Fund (SIF). SIF will incorporate the Automotive Innovation Fund, the Automotive Supplier Innovation Program, the Technology Development Program and the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative.

The agreements provided the following benefits: (1) installation of flexible engine assembly plants and the development of more energy efficient engines; (2) assembly of more fuel-efficient vehicles; (3) increased production capacity of assembly plants leading to long-term economic benefits including job creation and retention; (4) manufacturing of hybrid and battery-electric vehicles; (5) installation of state-of-the-art paint shops; (6) development and commercialization of products focused on light-weight, renewable materials and more energy efficient system; and (7) investments in advanced automotive and communication technologies.

To date, $7.21 of investment has been leveraged per dollar of federal disbursements for AIF related projects.

Implementation Strategy 1.1.29

Continue to implement the Automotive Supplier Innovation Program (ASIP) to support automotive parts suppliers, especially small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs), in the development and potential commercialization of the next generation of automotive technologies, products and processes which may have environmental benefits such as producing new energy efficiencies and lightweighting materials potentially resulting in a reduction of GHG emissions.

Performance Summary

In 2016–17, the ASIP supported 21 projects focusing on innovative fuel-efficient technologies and processes.

ASIP contribution agreements support R&D activities in innovative technologies undertaken by recipients. Overall, ASIP is strengthening the Canadian automotive industry capacity to develop innovation new products and process which lead to improved productivity and enhanced employment prospects for Canadians.

To date, $1.07 of investment was leveraged per dollar of federal disbursements for ASIP related projects.

Theme III: Protecting nature and Canadians

Under Theme III, the ISED contributed to the 2013–16 FSDS through three implementation strategies for Goal 4: Targets to conserve and restore ecosystems, wildlife and habitat, and targets to protect Canadians.

Implementation Strategy 4.3.8

Develop and apply models to assess the ecological, sociocultural and economic value of natural capital and ecosystem services. Provide expert scientific advice related to natural capital and ecosystem services (from natural and social sciences including economics) to help inform environmental, economic and social policy decisions. Continue to develop the statistical infrastructure on land cover and land use to assist in this analysis.

Performance Summary

No changes since last fiscal year.

Implementation Strategy 4.7.4

In accordance with mandated responsibilities, provide environmental and/or other information to reduce the risk of, and advice in response to, the occurrence of events such as polluting incidents, wildlife disease events or severe weather and other significant hydro-meteorological events as applicable.

Performance Summary

The emergency response plan has been reviewed and updated.

Implementation Strategy 4.8.4

Continue to co-operate with partners across Canada to implement the Computers for Schools program to divert electronic equipment from landfills thus protecting nature, preventing water pollution and providing economic and social benefits to Canadians.

Performance Summary

No changes since last fiscal year.

Theme IV: shrinking the environmental footprint, beginning with government

Under Theme IV, the ISED contributed to the 2013–16 FSDS through five implementation strategies for Goal 6: GHG Emissions and Energy and Goal 7: Waste and Asset Management.

Theme IV: shrinking the environmental footprint, beginning with government
FSDS goal FSDS target FSDS performance indicator FSDS performance results
Goal 6: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions and Energy
Reduce the carbon footprint and energy consumption of federal operations
Target 6.1: GHG emissions reduction
The Government of Canada will reduce greenhouse gas emissions from its buildings and fleets by 17% below 2005 levels by 2020
Departmental GHG emission reductions from building and fleets relative to fiscal year 2005–06, expressed as a percentage 41.97% reduction
Goal 7: waste and asset management
Reduce waste generated, and minimize the environmental impacts of assets throughout their life cycle.
Target 7.2: green procurement
As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.
Departmental approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place Yes
Number and percentage of specialists in procurement and/or material management who have completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course or equivalent, in the given fiscal year. Number: 30
100%
Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution toward green procurement, in the given fiscal year Number 6:
100%
Dollar value of departmental purchases of audio visual equipment that meet the target objective relative to the total dollar value of all audio visual equipment purchased in the year in question. 93.48%
    Number of vehicle purchases that meet the target objective relative to the total number of vehicle purchases during the fiscal year in question. 100%
    Dollar value of departmental purchases of computers and monitors that meet the target objective relative to the total dollar value of the computers and monitors purchased in the year in question. 98.29%
   

4. Report on Strategic Environmental Assessment

During the 2016–17 reporting cycle, ISED considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, as part of its decision-making processes. Through the Strategic Environmental Assessment process, departmental proposals were found to have positive effects on progress toward the 2013–16 FSDS goals and targets in Theme I: Addressing climate change and air quality, Theme III: Protecting nature and Canadians, and Theme IV: Shrinking the environmental footprint, beginning with government.

Additional information on the results of the Strategic Environmental Assessment is available on the departmental website.

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