Archived — 1998-99 Estimates—Report on Plans and Priorities

1998-99 Estimates: Part III - Report on Plans and Priorities

Contents

Section I: Industry Canada: Minister's Message

Section II: Industry Canada: Making a Difference

Section III: Industry Canada: A Look Ahead

Section IV: Industry Canada and the Industry Portfolio:
Building Jobs and Growth through Innovation and Partnerships

Section V: Supplementary Information

Annex A: Performance Management

Section I: Minister's Message

A new global economy based on knowledge and innovation is rapidly emerging. Canada has the opportunity to position itself as a world leader in this knowledge-based economy, and the Industry Portfolio plays a key role in the government's strategy to seize this opportunity. Bringing together 13 departments and agencies responsible for science and technology, regional development, marketplace services and micro-economic policy, the Industry Portfolio is a powerful toolkit to help Canada make a smooth transition to the economy of the 21st century.

Since the creation of the Industry Portfolio, my priority has been to ensure that the Portfolio focusses on helping Canadian businesses fulfil their potential to innovate, grow and create jobs. Portfolio members work together and with other partners to narrow Canada's gaps in the areas of innovation, trade, investment, human resources and community economic development, helping to create jobs and wealth in all sectors of the economy and in all regions. In so doing, we are helping Canadian businesses position themselves at the forefront of the knowledge-based economy.

The Portfolio members' Reports on Plans and Priorities collectively illustrate how the Portfolio is meeting the challenges of the knowledge-based economy through our focus on: promoting innovation through science and technology; encouraging trade and investment; helping small and medium-sized enterprises grow; promoting economic growth in Canadian communities; improving the coordination of Portfolio communications; realizing the potential of the Portfolio's people; and measuring the Portfolio's performance. The Portfolio is strongly committed to achieving these objectives and has a strong sense of accountability to Canadians for their delivery. We are also committed to measuring the success of our performance and to reporting on our accomplishments in future performance reports.

Working together, we will make a difference to the economic and social fabric of Canada and ensure our success in the global, knowledge-based economy.

John Manley
Minister of Industry

The Industry Portfolio is …

  • Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
  • Business Development Bank of Canada*
  • Canadian Space Agency
  • Competition Tribunal
  • Copyright Board Canada
  • Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (formerly the Federal Office of Regional Development (Quebec))
  • Industry Canada
  • National Research Council Canada
  • Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada
  • Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada
  • Standards Council of Canada*
  • Statistics Canada
  • Western Economic Diversification Canada.

* Not required to submit Reports on Plans and Priorities.

Section II: Making a Difference

A. Mandate, Roles and Responsibilities

The knowledge-based economy, led by rapid advancements in information and communications technologies and driven by globalization, is becoming the key to economic success for individuals, businesses, communities, regions and countries. In the knowledge-based economy, the ability to generate and use knowledge to innovate is not only the determinant of wealth, but also the basis of comparative advantage. Knowledge is the fundamental factor in improving the efficiency of production and distribution processes, improving the quality and quantity of products, and increasing the selection of products and services available to consumers and producers.

Knowledge is now recognized as being at least as important as physical capital, financial capital and natural resources as a source of economic growth.

The Knowledge-Based Economy and Society

In a knowledge-based economy, our most important resources are ideas and people. Innovation and human capital create comparative advantage and drive jobs, growth and productivity. This is true for all sectors and all areas of the economy and society, which need to seize the economic, cultural, social and educational opportunities the new technologies offer us.

The sectors and industries that succeed will be those that develop new ideas, employ new processes, manufacture new products and deliver new services. Investments in knowledge contribute directly to the development of the manufacturing and service industries through their demand for leading-edge goods and services, and they also maintain demand and jobs in the primary sectors of the economy such as agriculture and natural resources. Output is expanding fastest in the high-knowledge part of manufacturing (Figure 1), and knowledge-intensive industries are creating the most jobs (Figure 2).

Canada is well positioned to be a leader in this new, global, knowledge-based economy. We have put our fiscal house in order, interest rates are at historic lows, and our inflation rate is among the lowest in the industrialized world. From a trade standpoint, we are one of the most open economies in the world.

In short, Canada has an opportunity to build upon its economic foundation to create a knowledge economy for the 21st century. We have the people, the institutions and the research excellence, but we need to mobilize our resources toward a clear objective of what it takes to be the best in the global knowledge economy.

Figure 1: Output Growth, by Knowledge Intensity, 1986-96



Figure 2: Employment Growth, by Knowledge Intensity, 1986-96

The key for Canada is to turn our competitiveness potential into a reality. We face five key challenges, shared by all industrial countries (Figure 3). Like the leading industrial countries, we need to complement strong macro-economic fundamentals with a micro-economic strategy to build competitive advantage through innovation, trade and investment, human capital and productivity enhancement.

Figure 3: Five Key Challenges
Productivity Growth The key to long-run competitiveness and real wage growth
Innovation Gap The need to close innovation gaps in research and development and technology adoption/dissemination with respect to key competitors
Human Resources Gap The need for skills to match tomorrow's needs, and the need to make lifelong learning a reality
Trade Gap The need for more Canadian firms to trade in more sectors and in more markets
Global Investment Gap The need to attract and retain more global knowledge-based multinational enterprises

Industry Canada, with its mandate to help make Canada more competitive in the knowledge-based economy, will play a key role in making this micro-economic strategy to build jobs and growth a reality. Since its creation in 1993, Industry Canada has helped Canadians build a stronger, more innovative economy.

Industry Canada Mission

Fostering a growing, competitive, knowledge-based Canadian economy that:

  • provides more and better-paying jobs for Canadians
  • supports stronger, sustainable business growth and innovation
  • gives consumers, businesses and investors confidence that the marketplace is fair and efficient.

Industry Canada has a wide range of micro-economic instruments to help promote the growth of the rapidly evolving, knowledge-based economy and promote sustainable development. These instruments include activities such as industrial and technological development, the fostering of scientific research, the setting of telecommunications policy, investment promotion, trade development and small business development.

Marketplace framework laws and services are also a key component of the micro-economic instruments used by the department. The department is responsible for a wide range of regulatory laws and services that support the effective and efficient operation of the marketplace. Some 20 legislative acts set the policy and regulatory framework in such areas as intellectual property, bankruptcy and insolvency, weights and measures, competition and the restraint of trade, incorporation and corporate governance, packaging and the performance of non-food consumer products and spectrum management. Having the most up-to-date and innovative marketplace laws and services can significantly improve the competitive capacity of businesses — an edge in today's knowledge-based economy — and thereby lay the foundation for increased investment in the economy.

Through its various activities, Industry Canada serves a diverse client base, but always from the perspective of helping to build a competitive, knowledge-based economy. Clients range from firms in such sectors as telecommunications, aerospace, forestry and manufacturing, to a variety of service sector activities, small businesses in all sectors of the economy, Aboriginal entrepreneurs, science and academic communities, consumer organizations and professional groups. Industry Canada clients also include the individuals and communities we serve by connecting rural and remote communities through public access sites across Canada, and connecting schools, libraries and community centres to the Internet.

With its broad mandate and diverse client base, Industry Canada's policies and activities can have a real impact on Canada's future competitiveness. Industry Canada's actions in such areas as trade, technology, investment, innovation, marketplace laws and services, and the Information Highway affect all segments of Canadian society and serve to build horizontal linkages among Canadians.

Industry Canada reaches out to serve its clients in new, innovative ways. Our most important innovation is Strategis. Industry Canada's flagship Web site, Strategis is a powerful, one-stop access point for Canadian businesses and consumers in all provinces and territories. Strategis streamlines access to the department by unifying its full range of information resources, services and interactive tools under a single umbrella. Complementing this tool are other sites such as the Canadian Business Map, a dynamic navigational tool to assist business users to find their way through sites at all government levels, and ExportSource.

Strategis offers a wealth of information and intelligence for clients to self-serve seven days a week, 24 hours a day. In an effort to further improve service to its clients and reduce paperburden, Industry Canada will soon integrate onto Strategis electronic commerce pilot projects to provide electronic service for trade-mark applications, filings under the Investment Canada Act or the Canada Business Corporations Act, spectrum licences and databases, and national insolvency searches.

Section II: Making a Difference

B. Strategic Objectives

The key factors leading to Canada's economic turnaround are the dramatic improvement in Canada's macroeconomic environment, combined with the increasing strength of micro-economic factors supporting knowledge-based growth. In recent years, important steps were taken to promote innovation, investment and trade development, and to modernize and make Canada's marketplace laws and services more effective. But there is more to do to build a more productive, competitive economy (Figure 4). With partners and stakeholders, Industry Canada will continue to help improve the climate for economic growth and job creation in Canada by focussing on five key strategic objectives:

  • increasing Canada's share of global trade
  • improving conditions for investment
  • improving Canada's innovation performance and the transition to the knowledge-based economy
  • making Canada the most connected nation in the world
  • building a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace.

Figure 4: Total Factor Productivity (TFP) Growth in G-7 Countries

Increasing Canada's share of global trade

Great potential for creating long-lasting, high-quality jobs results from increasing the number of exporting firms, especially small and medium-size enterprises (SMEs), in all sectors and diversifying the markets to which they export. And succeeding globally usually means a firm is more competitive at home.

One in three Canadian jobs depends on trade. It is estimated that every $1 billion increase in exports generates about 6,000 — 8,000 new jobs. Canada's prosperity and its ability to create jobs are directly linked to how well it capitalizes on international opportunities.

Canada has become a world-class trading nation — we are the most trade-oriented of all G-7 countries. However, we are not yet a nation of traders. Large firms account for a disproportionate share of our export activity — the top five exporters account for 22 percent of Canadian exports. Fewer than 10 percent of SMEs now take advantage of globalization; trade success is concentrated in too few sectors; and our trade shares have slipped in Asia-Pacific and Europe (Figure 5).

Figure 5: Concentration of Merchandise Exports by Number of Firms, 1994

Collaboration and expansion of business opportunities will be enhanced by the creation of Team Canada Inc, led by three core departments — the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT), Industry Canada and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC).

Improving conditions for investment

Improving conditions for investment, both foreign and domestic, contributes strongly to economic growth. Investment in research and development (R&D) is required to create the new products and processes that will increase productivity and make Canada more competitive internationally. Foreign direct investment (FDI) brings not only immediate jobs and growth, but also access to global technology pools and management expertise.

Industry Canada, working with other federal departments, provinces and the private sector, is committed to making Canada a location of choice for global investment. FDI in Canada has more than doubled over the past 10 years to $180 billion, but we have lost in relative terms. Canada's share of global FDI has halved over the past 10 years (Figure 6). FDI provides a powerful stimulus to economic growth and job creation. It is estimated that a $1 billion increase in FDI creates about 45,000 new jobs and increases real gross domestic product (GDP) by about $4.5 billion over a five-year period.

Figure 6: Canada's FDI Inward Stock as a Share of World Total

With its improved economic fundamentals, Canada has again become a more attractive place to invest. But success will require investment attraction strategies, sector by sector.

Improving Canada's innovation performance and the transition to the knowledge-based economy

Innovation creates jobs and wealth for all sectors of the economy, from primary resources to service industries, from manufacturing to high-tech. Increasingly, success is based on products and services that are knowledge-intensive, not resource-intensive. People and innovation have become the keys to jobs and growth.

A failure to fully capitalize on innovation has been a major reason for Canada's relatively slow productivity growth over the past two decades. In making the transition to the new economy, Canada must innovate on all fronts — adopting not only the "hard" technologies such as information and communication technologies, but also the more flexible organizational structures, new management strategies and innovative human resource developments that are needed to make the hard technologies work. Failure to adopt these complementary innovations has meant failure to realize the productivity potential of the new technologies.

Without innovation, real income growth will not meet Canadians' expectations. Innovation activities include research carried out in universities and public laboratories (e.g. National Research Council Canada (NRC), Communications Research Centre (CRC)), development of a skilled scientific and technical work force, R&D conducted by large and small firms to develop new products, application of leading-edge technologies in the workplace, and building of the Canadian information and communications infrastructure.

On all fronts, progress has been made in recent years. However, our competitors are also focussing on innovation. Analyses by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) suggest that Canada has an "innovation gap" relative to our competitors, and that important elements of this gap include:

  • a smaller share of high-tech manufacturing than in any other G-7 country (14 percent compared with 24 percent in the U.S., for example)
  • low R&D spending as a percentage of GDP, particularly by the private sector, despite our more generous tax incentive system (Figure 7)
  • weak technology diffusion and adoption, particularly among small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) (Figure 8).

Figure 7: Expenditure on R&D as a Share of GDP

Figure 8: Technology Adoption in Canada and the U.S., 1993

Successful countries in the global, knowledge-based economy will be those whose micro-economic fundamentals are sound and who invest in knowledge, life-long learning and innovation. The government has contributed to building a national system of innovation. It has supported innovation through a number of key initiatives, such as the Canada Foundation for Innovation, Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC), Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCE), expanded funding for the Granting Councils, and additional funding for the Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP). The government believes more must be done by all partners to support innovation and risk taking in Canada. It is committed to building creative partnerships between the private and public sectors to accelerate the adoption of innovative technologies in all sectors of the economy. With targeted growth strategies, the government will help build those knowledge-intensive sectors where Canada is strong and where the opportunities for growth and global leadership is highest. Examples are aerospace, bio-pharmaceuticals, biotechnology in agriculture and fisheries, and the environmental, information and telecommunications technologies.

Making Canada the most connected nation in the world

The objective of "making Canada the most connected country in the world," will promote a more innovative and competitive economy. Canadian individuals and firms will be better positioned to capitalize on existing and new economic and market opportunities in the knowledge-based economy. It will enhance Canada's ability to attract investment from home and abroad.

In practical terms, connectedness means we want to make a leading-edge knowledge infrastructure readily accessible to all Canadians. It builds on our successes and aims at providing all Canadians accessibility to powerful knowledge tools. Connecting Canadians is a multi-year vision to brand Canada as a leading, global knowledge-based economy:

  • Canada On-line: providing Canadians with opportunity of access to a world-leading Information Highway infrastructure and to the learning network
  • Smart Communities: encouraging communities to become leading-edge users of information technologies for their economic and social development by connecting them to governments, learning institutions, businesses, citizens, and health and social services through the use of leading-edge technologies
  • Canadian Content On-line: making Canada a world leading-edge supplier of digital learning materials and multimedia content
  • Electronic Commerce: creating a legal and regulatory framework that will make Canada a global centre of excellence
  • Canadian Governments On-line: Connecting citizens and governments through integrated, client focussed, and interactive services
  • Connecting Canada to the World: promoting a connected Canada to the world as a leading 21st century learning society.

Connecting Canadians: Making Canada the Most Connected Country in the World by the Year 2000

The objective is to make the information and knowledge infrastructure accessible to all Canadians by the year 2000, making Canada the most connected nation in the world. This will provide individuals, schools, libraries, small and large businesses, rural and Aboriginal communities, public institutions, and all levels of government with new opportunities for learning, interacting, transacting business and developing their social and economic potential.

A connected nation is more than wires, cables and computers. It is a nation in which citizens have the access to skills and knowledge and information infrastructure. It is also a nation whose people are connected to each other.

Speech from the Throne, September 23, 1997

The main responsibility for building the Information Highway resides with the private sector. The government can help create the environment for innovation and growth, provide leadership, and innovate in new areas to ensure affordable access. Over the last four years, the government has moved ahead on a connectedness agenda to develop a leading-edge Information Highway in Canada, by putting in place a competitive policy framework and regulations, and ensuring that citizens have access to the Information Highway and to the learning opportunities it will provide. For example, through the Community Access Program (CAP), we are connecting 5,000 rural and remote communities through public access sites across Canada to give them the tools to advance their economic and social development. Through SchoolNet, we are working to connect all 20,000 of Canada's schools and libraries to the Internet by the end of 1998-99. And through the Canadian Network for the Advancement of Research, Industry and Education (CANARIE), the government has invested in an industry-led partnership of some 120 private and public sector organizations to develop new networking technologies and applications using an evolutionary, high-speed broadband test network.

SchoolNet

Canada's SchoolNet, a leading edge on-line learning service, will facilitate access to the Internet for all Canada's 16,500 schools and 3,400 libraries by the end of 1998-99. SchoolNet is fostering the development of skills young people need to compete in the knowledge-based economy.

In partnership with the Assembly of First Nations and Stentor, all First Nations schools of the 450 under federal jurisdiction that wanted to be connected to the Internet have been connected, as part of the SchoolNet First Nations Program. First Nations school students are learning a wide range of skills that will serve them in the future, and local businesses are gaining a global presence for their products and services.

Through the SchoolNet Web site, educators and learners have access to more than 1,000 exciting, innovative, award-winning, Internet-based educational resources, services and power learning tools from a single platform.

We have gone on-line with new Internet information resources such as Strategis and ExportSource, beginning to put government information and services on-line and re-engineered from a client perspective. We will stimulate the demand for, use of and access to information technologies and facilitate communications between government and citizens.

CANARIE

  • Connecting research scientists, academics, and engineers throughout Canada, CANARIE has enabled over 360 organizations to collaborate on 122 projects since 1993.
  • The CANARIE upgrades made between 1993 and March 1997 created a thousand-fold improvement in the transmission capacity of the National Test Network (NTN). Implementation of the Next Generation Internet network, the CA*Net 2, is near completion, and will link 14 regional advanced networks that CANARIE, in cooperation with the provinces, also sponsored.
  • The NTN reach is international and expanding. Foriegn research networks are linked via the Teleglobe CANTAT-3 cable or the Transit Access Point in Chicago. As examples, the CA*Net 2 connects to advanced research networks in Russia, Germany, the U.K., France, Singapore, Japan and several advanced networks in the U.S., to name but a few.
  • CANARIE has demonstrated over 50 projects internationally, promoting Canadian advanced networking capabilities and technology as well as distance learning/telehealth/electronic commerce/multimedia and emerging new media applications and services.


CAP — Next Phase

As a result of the 1998 Federal Budget, over the next three years, the Community Access Program (CAP) will be expanded to help create a National Access System to:

  • bring on-line by the year 2000 an additional 5,000 community access centres in urban areas
  • make all 10,000 CAP sites self-sustaining within four years to provide for lifelong learning opportunities and to encourage electronic commerce
  • upgrade the CAP site bandwidth and technological infrastructure to provide greater transmission integrity, more powerful learning tools and content, and rapid exchange of electronic goods and services
  • implement a Francophone Intranet that would serve Francophone communities throughout Canada, especially those outside Quebec
  • accelerate the development of new educational products and services by the private sector and domestic firms.


SchoolNet — Next Phase

As a result of the 1998 Federal Budget, SchoolNet will expand, working with the provinces, learning institutions and the private sector to:

  • begin to extend broadband connectivity from the school into every classroom
  • support classroom learning projects and on-line learning products and services that help students to acquire new skills, and teachers and courseware producers to develop new media materials
  • challenge, through the Computers for Schools program, Canadian businesses and governments to provide 250,000 used or refurbished computers for use in classrooms across the country and enable every young Canadian to experience the full benefit of information technologies for learning.


Next Generation Learning Network

The 1998 Federal Budget provides for an investment of $55 million in CANARIE to build the next generation learning network. CA*Net 3 will equip Canada with a coast-to-coast, high-performance network that is faster than its American counterpart; ensure that Canadian universities have access to the high-speed capacity that they need for collaborative research; provide SchoolNet and the Community Access Program sites with the broadband platform needed to deliver cutting-edge learning and multimedia applications; and make Canada an attractive location for developing next-generation applications in telelearning and electronic commerce.

The 1998 Federal Budget has provided additional resources to extend SchoolNet and the Community Access Program, and to build the New Generation Learning Network through CANARIE.

Building a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace

A fair, efficient and competitive marketplace is the foundation for investment, innovation, trade and economic growth, benefiting both producers and consumers. It provides the stability and efficiency required to conduct business while maintaining confidence of consumers in the products, services and transactions of the marketplace.

Marketplaces Matter

A fair, efficient, and competitive marketplace:

  • helps to attract foreign investment
  • fosters competitiveness through mechanisms such as standards measures and intellectual property management
  • promotes connectivity to enable information exchange
  • enhances and protects innovation through intellectual property frameworks
  • enhances the confidence of Canadians to participate in the economy and improves access to the market.

In order for Canada to become the location of choice for investment, to make innovation its strength and to become a nation of traders, Canada needs to ensure that its regulatory objectives are achieved in the most efficient and effective ways. Global, knowledge-based firms have considerable latitude in choosing where they do business. Industry Canada is committed to build a marketplace environment that attracts and retains the world's best firms while meeting Canadian consumers' objectives.

Electronic Commerce has the potential to revolutionize how business is conducted. It refers to all forms of commercial activities and transactions that are based upon the processing and transmission of digitized information including data, text, sound and visual images, using computer and telecommunications networks. Electronic commerce has the potential to develop new products and services, improve business efficiency, create innovative jobs and generate export and investment opportunities.

Our goal is to make Canada a world leader in electronic commerce by the year 2000 by working with the private sector to create the right conditions for its growth, including a stable and predictable environment (see also Annex A). Industry Canada, with other departments will:

  • develop legislation to protect personal information in the private sector
  • set out consumer protection guidelines
  • clarify trade and tax policies
  • develop legislation for the legal recognition of electronic signatures
  • establish a new cryptography policy
  • implement a Public Key Infrastructure and develop an authentication and certification policy
  • promote the use of electronic commerce to business and citizens.


Section II: Making a Difference

C. Financial Spending Plan

Figure 9: Financial Spending Plan

(millions of dollars)

Forecast Spending 1997-98*

Planned Spending 1998-99

Planned Spending 1999-00

Planned Spending 2000-01

Gross Program Spending 1,283.1 1,185.3 1,030.5 994.3

Less:
Revenue Credited to the Vote

78.6 80.9 81.4 81.4
Net Program Spending 1,204.5 1,104.4 949.1 912.9

Less:
Revenue Credited to the Consolidated Revenue Fund

204.1 206.0 215.3 209.6

Plus:
Non-budgetary

0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8

Plus:
Cost of Services Provided by Other Departments

51.2 56.5 56.5 56.5

Net Cost of the Department

1,052.4 955.7 791.1 760.6


Financial Spending Plan by Business Line

(millions of dollars)

Forecast Spending 1997-98*

Planned Spending 1998-99

Planned Spending 1999-00

Planned Spending 2000-01

Micro-Economic Policy

54.8 51.6 42.1 43.5

Marketplace Rules and Services

196.1 179.9 192.3 193.3

Industry Sector Development

872.6 785.8 621.8 596.2

Tourism**

70.6 69.4 68.8 53.8

Corporate and Management Services

89.0 98.6 105.5 107.5

Gross Program Spending

1,283.1 1,185.3 1,030.5 994.3

* Reflects the best forecast of the total planned spending to the end of the fiscal year but excludes $800 million associated with a payment for the Canada Foundation for Innovation which was expensed in the previous year.

** Plans and Priorities information for Tourism appears with Industry Sector Development in this document.

Section III: A Look Ahead

In this section, and in accordance with the Improved Reporting to Parliament initiative, we set out a multi-year course for Industry Canada, include highlights of departmental priorities, and provide an overview of how we plan to meet our goals. Our plan is a work in progress: we will continuously work toward improved reporting in order to set out performance expectations and to report on our success in meeting them. Annex A highlights some of the work that has been initiated to improve performance management within the department.

This section is a look ahead at how Industry Canada will make a difference. In so doing, we have articulated the expected results we anticipate from the delivery of our programs and services in order to illustrate their impact. We have attempted to identify the intended beneficiaries of our programs and the organizations with whom we partner to maximize the efficiency of program delivery (see Section V, Figure 24).

A. Summary of Priorities

Jobs and Growth Agenda

  • Economic Growth
  • Employment Growth
  • Income Growth

Strategic Objectives

Trade

Investment

Innovation

Connectedness

Marketplace

Working with Canadian companies to increase Canada's share of global trade.

Improving conditions for investment in the Canadian economy.

Improving Canada's innovation performance and the transition to a knowledge-based economy.

Making Canada the most connected nation in the world.

Building a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace for businesses and consumers.

Working with Industry Canada's Clients and Partners
Our Performance Goals by Business Line

Micro-Economic Policy

Industry Sector Development

Marketplace Rules and Services

  • Conduct and support leading-edge research and analysis on strategic micro-economic issues as a basis for current and future policy decisions
  • Develop modern and effective marketplace framework laws and policies
  • Participate in the development and implementation of investment and trade policies
  • Design policy and regulatory frameworks for the Information Highway that support competition
  • Implement the federal Science and Technology Strategy and other science and technology initiatives
  • Increase the number of exporting firms and diversity markets
  • Attract new foreign direct investment and retain existing investment
  • Encourage and influence technological innovation
  • Develop and deliver sectoral policies and strategies to support the competitiveness of industry
  • Connect Canadians to the Information Highway
  • Create leading-edge information products for Strategis
  • Improve SME access to capital and information
  • Improve economic development for targeted groups/regions
  • Market Canada as a desirable tourist destination
  • Deliver information and services that enable businesses and consumers to contribute to, and benefit from, an efficient marketplace and respond to changing conditions
  • Develop standards and regulations that encourage a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace
  • Administer and enforce marketplace laws and regulations to maintain business and consumer confidence
  • Promote international acceptance of Canadian marketplace standards to help Canadian businesses compete internationally

Corporate and Management Services
  • Manage and control departmental funds
  • Increase efficiency by developing new ways of interacting with clients
  • Streamline management practices and improve risk management, performance measurement and accountability
  • Renew and revitalize the work force to provide the best possible service to Canadians
  • Communicate to Canadians what Industry Canada does
  • Promote the highest standard of public service

B. Details by Business Line

Micro-Economic Policy

Micro-economic policy develops the policies, strategies and frameworks needed to improve Canada's productivity growth and to help Canadians take advantage of the knowledge-based economy. Policy activities focus on the research, analysis and development of policy and legislative frameworks that encourage increased investment, innovation, the transition to a knowledge-based economy, development of a world-leading Information Highway, stronger and more diversified trade, and a healthy marketplace climate.

The objective of the micro-economic policy line of business is to address the major structural economic development issues in the Canadian economy in a manner that will increase productivity and competitiveness, thereby enhancing growth and job creation.

Conduct and support leading-edge research and analysis on strategic micro-economic issues as a basis for current and future policy decisions …

… with these results:

  • a better understanding of the challenges and opportunities for Canadian industries
  • strategic, up-to-date information to assist in the policy development process
  • meaningful work experiences and skills development opportunities for youth, and financial assistance for education costs.
  • Conduct world-class micro-economic research and analysis on measures that will facilitate the successful transition to the knowledge-based economy; stimulate economic growth; encourage trade diversity; stimulate investment and trade; improve Canada's productivity level; and assist in the competitiveness and success of Canadian firms.

Policy Research

Industry Canada will undertake strategic analysis and leading-edge research on key issues for improving employment and income growth in the Canadian economy, and will produce the following:

  • a volume of conference papers, Financing Growth in Canada
  • research papers on investment, innovation, technology, infrastructure, industrial performance, productivity, international trade, small and medium-sized firms, human resources, financing and taxation, and their relationship to the competitiveness of the Canadian economy
  • Monthly Economic Indicators, a monthly newsletter providing a current view of what is happening in the Canadian economy along with special features on selected topics
  • The Micro-Economic Monitor, a public quarterly update on Canada's economic performance with special features
  • MICRO, a quarterly newsletter highlighting leading-edge micro-economic activities at Industry Canada and providing summaries of the department's research publications
  • a major workshop in September 1998 and research volume on doing business in the knowledge-based economy in 1999
  • a research volume on the Canadian economy in the 21st century by 1999
  • a conference in 1998 and report on progress in connecting Canadians by spring 1999.
  • Continue to develop as the centre of excellence for strategic micro-economic information. Special attention will be given to examining the causes of Canada's weak productivity growth, the nature of the innovation gap in Canada and how to address it, the policy environment for electronic commerce, factors to encourage trade and trade diversity, and the encouragement of increased investment.

Industry Canada, in partnership with the Centre inter-universitaire de recherche en analyse des organisations, is researching how the knowledge-based economy will affect the long-term success of Canadian firms. The results will be presented at an international conference in Montreal in September 1998.

  • Conduct research and develop new initiatives that enhance technological and entrepreneurial skills of young Canadians, and offer new programs and services that provide youth with meaningful work experiences in a setting likely to lead to longer-term employment.

Develop modern and effective marketplace framework laws and policies …

… with these results:
  • marketplace framework laws and policies that promote business competitiveness and consumer confidence
  • strengthened federal-provincial cooperation on standards policy issues.
  • Amend the Small Business Loans Act (SBLA), and regulations to respond to the concerns of SMEs about access to financing.
  • Amend the Canada Business Corporations Act (CBCA), to ensure that it remains a competitive framework law that encourages investment and sound corporate decision-making.
  • Undertake research toward possible amendments to federal non-profit corporations law (Canada Corporations Act, Part II, the Boards of Trade Act and the Pension Fund Societies Act); continue modernization and review of intellectual property protection (including patents, copyright, trade-marks, geographical indications, industrial design, integrated circuits and topographies); review issues pertaining to the Internet and the Information Highway; and consider further Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act and Competition Act amendments.
  • Contribute to the government-wide initiative to improve regulatory policies, practices and procedures, by completing implementation of the Regulatory Process Management Standards within the department by 1999.
  • Coordinate federal contributions to the Standards Council of Canada's efforts for improving the services provided by the National Standards System to the private sector in support of federal and provincial microeconomic policies.

Participate in the development and implementation of investment and trade policies …

… with these results:

  • increased number of Canadian exporters
  • increased market access for Canadian exporters
  • increased investment in Canada
  • protection for Canadian investment abroad
  • barrier-free mobility of persons, goods, services and investments within Canada.
  • Improve and strengthen the International Business Development (IBD) strategy and its implementation. IBD is a strategy to build a cooperative Team Canada approach to create jobs and prosperity by helping Canadian firms take full advantage of international business opportunities and by facilitating investment and technology flows. This is expected to:
    • improve market access
    • increase the number of exporters
    • broaden our product range
    • export beyond the U.S. market
    • improve our share of global investment
    • fully exploit the potential of Team Canada missions
    • encourage greater participation and success by SMEs.
  • Participate in World Trade Organization (WTO) activities, negotiate a binding multilateral investment treaty among OECD members and move ahead with implementation of trade agreements, for example, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and trade agreements with Israel and Chile.
  • Work with the provinces to implement outstanding commitments in the Internal Trade Agreement (ITA) and to enhance it. This will position Canadian businesses to compete nationally and internationally, improve the investment climate within Canada, reduce the costs of government by constraining inefficient procurement practices and investment subsidies, and enable Canadians to more easily move to and/or work in other provinces. Priorities are to negotiate improved procedures for decision-making and dispute settlement; extend the coverage of the general rules; reduce exemptions; and accelerate work on compliance with the labour mobility provisions of the agreement.

Design policy and regulatory frameworks for the Information Highway that support competition …

… with these results:

  • an accelerated shift to electronic commerce
  • an internationally harmonized regulatory and policy framework
  • a federal legislative framework for the protection of personal information by the year 2000
  • a balanced cryptography policy
  • introduction of new telecommunications services
  • greater choice in telecommunications suppliers
  • allocation of spectrum and orbit resources to permit operation of new services, while protecting existing investments.
  • Provide a clear and visionary national strategy for a policy and regulatory framework that will make Canada a location of choice for the conduct of electronic commerce by the year 2000. The Electronic Commerce Task Force will develop the framework with the support of other government departments, other levels of government and the private sector. The task force will advance Canada's positions on electronic commerce in international fora so that they are harmonized with and recognized by other jurisdictions. The development of intellectual property framework policies will continue to be supplemented by Canada's ongoing participation in international fora such as the World Intellectual Property Organization, the WTO, the OECD and Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC).

Year 2000 Computer Problem

The Year 2000 Task Force, chaired by Mr. Jean Monty and supported by the Industry Canada Y2K Secretariat, has made a major contribution to making the year 2000 computer date problem a Canadian business priority. Over the next phase, there will be a major awareness campaign, co-sponsored by the private sector task force and Industry Canada, and a major follow-up survey of the state of business preparedness to be conducted by Statistics Canada later this year.



Establishing Global Frameworks for Electronic Commerce: the Ottawa-OECD Ministerial Meeting on Electronic Commerce, October 7-9, 1998

Canada will host a meeting of OECD Ministers in Ottawa from October 7 to 9, 1998, which will also include the private sector and the heads of international organizations. The meeting will be a major milestone in creating the global frameworks required for the continued growth of electronic commerce and for maximizing economic and social benefits from its use.

Key issues requiring international attention include privacy, consumer protection, taxation, and the use of digital signatures and authentication/certification. At the conclusion of the meeting, it is expected that Ministers will articulate a plan for action for the OECD, other international organizations and the private sector.

Leading up to the ministerial meeting, Canada will be developing a Canadian electronic commerce strategy: Building Canada's Information Economy and Society. The strategy will be the basis for Canada's participation at the OECD meeting and will continue to be implemented thereafter.

  • Pursue the government's domestic policy agenda of competition and convergence in the delivery of all communications services through regulatory oversight and policy development, supported by communications R&D, for the telecommunications infrastructure, in particular, new wireless technologies and new content-based services. The government's 1996 convergence policy set the stage for competition and convergence in local telecommunications and broadcasting distribution. The objective is to have the framework implemented, beginning in 1998.
  • Ensure that Canada's international telecommunications activities promote Canada's interests in international organizations such as the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) and the World Radiocommunications Conference (WRC 99). Canada is well respected in international fora and plays a disproportionally important role in international negotiations, a fact that usually leads to outcomes supporting Canadian objectives.
  • Clarify with interested domestic stakeholders Canada's position regarding Internet content liability and digital copyright issues, and represent the positions in the international fora.
  • Encourage the private sector, through Industry Canada's policy and regulatory reform, to develop a world-leading Information Highway infrastructure and networking applications for lifelong learning, telehealth, electronic commerce and multimedia.

Implement the Federal Science and Technology (S&T) Strategy and other science and technology initiatives …

… with these results:

  • increased emphasis on and more strategic management of S&T issues across the federal government
  • increased international technology collaboration between Canadian and foreign partners.
  • Lead the preparation of the government-wide annual report to Parliament on federal S&T.
  • Support the work of the Prime Minister's Advisory Council on Science and Technology, implement relevant Cabinet decisions from its first set of recommendations and develop a second set of recommendations to the Cabinet Committee on the Economic Union.
  • Implement international S&T arrangements that provide opportunities for firms to partner in international R&D consortia; implement the Canada-European Union S&T Cooperation Agreement; and work to enhance industrial S&T cooperation under APEC, the Organization of American States and various bilateral agreements.
  • Launch a business diagnostics and bench-marking tools directory on Strategis that will assist firms in pinpointing technological managerial strengths and weaknesses and help them to take corrective action to improve their competitiveness.

Industry Sector Development

The objective of the industry sector development line of business is to help businesses compete, through strategic approaches to trade, investment, technology, human resources development and sustainable development, and to provide focussed support for Aboriginal businesses, Northern Ontario, small businesses and the Information Highway.

A broad range of services, information products and sector policies and strategies are designed to achieve this objective. Industry Sector Development promotes job creation, economic growth and the sustainable development of Canadian industries and sectors. By working jointly and in partnership with businesses, labour and other stakeholders and by connecting Canadians, this line of business helps identify new markets and opportunities for businesses, provides access to new learning and training opportunities, develops the skilled work force and innovation needed to succeed in the knowledge-based economy and attracts investment from around the world.

Increase the number of exporting firms and diversify markets …

… with these results:

  • increased number of new exporters and markets, improved product mix, and improved market share
  • increased awareness of international trade opportunities
  • improved access to export-related counselling
  • enhanced awareness by foreign governments and businesses of Canadian trade concerns and capabilities
  • seamless delivery of government export-related information resources
  • improved access to information 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
  • Renew, with greater focus on objectives, National Sector Teams consisting of private and public sector representatives who develop business plans for their sectors within the framework of Canada's International Business Strategy (CIBS).
  • Support trade development activities to advance sectoral objectives, including incoming and outgoing missions, domestic and foreign trade shows, conferences and seminars, targeted dissemination of sector and market products intelligence, and development of information.
  • Identify and match Canadian sources of supply, in particular small businesses, with foreign trade opportunities through the International Business Opportunities Centre.
  • Improve service to business clients at the local level by linking federal and provincial government departments and agencies and the private sector through Regional Trade Networks (RTNs), a key component of the domestic Team Canada strategy. These networks build on various federal-provincial agreements on trade and investment and provide services to both active and potential exporters. Key services include: exporter preparation, market information and intelligence, export counselling and information on international financing.

Team Canada Inc

Team Canada Inc, recently announced by Minister Marchi at the annual general meeting of the Alliance of Manufacturers and Exporters Canada (AMEC), is the new network of international business development service providers to the export community. It will eventually expand to include federal departments, provinces, municipalities and the private sector. Industry Canada, along with DFAIT (lead department), and AAFC, are the three core federal departments leading Team Canada Inc. The three departments have created a single, integrated business plan. Team Canada Inc will work hand-in-hand with the private sector through the new Team Canada Inc Advisory Board. It will also link domestic Team Canada initiatives (such as export preparedness) with global Team Canada initiatives.

  • corporate headquarters located in Pearson Building, 125 Sussex Drive, Ottawa ON K1H 0G2
  • secretariat staff to support Team Canada Inc management while assisting Canadian businesses and visitors
  • fast and easy access to all Team Canada Inc services through a toll-free number (1-888-576-4444) and ExportSource
  • an advisory board will assist in determining strategic directions and priorities for the IBD function, developing a three-year business plan, defining performance standards and measuring progress.
  • Provide information to both export-ready and new-to-exporting Canadian businesses through ExportSource, the federal government's on-line resource for export information and an initiative of Team Canada Inc. ExportSource provides a single access to all trade-related government departments and agencies. The site offers information on everything from foreign markets, trade statistics and export financing to the logistics of delivery, trade shows, export missions and sources of assistance. ExportSource was developed through a partnership between Industry Canada, DFAIT and AAFC in cooperation with eight other departments including the regional development agencies.

ExportSource is a "virtual export office" that never closes and has been described as a "must" for exporters. It is a key example of information technology as a means of improving service to Canadians.

  • Provide export counselling services to export-ready SME exporters and play a lead role in the RTN partnerships through the International Trade Centres (ITCs). ITCs are an integral part of Industry Canada and are closely linked to the Trade Commissioner Service of DFAIT. The network of ITCs across Canada works to ensure that export-ready companies receive the most pertinent information on exporting requirements. The ITCs offer a range of IBD services such as export counselling, access to export programs and services, referral to other services, and on-line information. ITCs are located in all 10 provinces and provide experienced exporters with IBD services focussed on their individual client needs.

Attract new foreign direct investment and retain existing investment …

… with these results:

  • focussed, targeted investment promotion
  • improved availability of information for investment decision making
  • increased awareness of Canada's investment climate and assets
  • increased number of international strategic alliances for Canadian SMEs in all regions of Canada
  • increased incremental investment by international investors.
  • Implement this new federal international investment strategy by focussing on:
    • Brand Image: international marketing of Canada's advantages as an investment site
    • International Partnering: assisting SME growth through international investment partnerships
    • Investment Climate: improving the competitiveness of the investment climate and responding to impediments to investment
    • Targeted Investment Promotion: targeting and customized servicing of specific multinational enterprises in priority sectors
    • New Federal/Provincial/Territorial/Municipal Partnerships: forging new partnerships across all levels of government and the private sector.

Investment Partnerships Canada (IPC), a joint Industry Canada-DFAIT initiative, targets specific "high yield" multinational enterprises in priority countries and sectors, using carefully crafted investment campaigns. IPC supports deputy ministers, each of whom has been assigned responsibility to lead in meeting with foreign multinational enterprises as part of country campaigns to promote investment in Canada. The campaigns are designed to increase awareness of Canada as an investment location of choice and to secure strategic investments in Canada's high growth sectors. The goal of a focussed investment promotion strategy is to increase Canada's market share for global foreign direct investment.

Consistent with a strategic and targeted approach to promoting investment in Canada, priority markets and priority sectors have been identified. Priority markets include Japan, France, the U.K., Germany, and the United States. A second tier includes Sweden and the Netherlands. The countries collectively account for over 90 percent of investment in Canada. Priority sectors include information technology and telecommunications, life sciences, agri-food, automotive, forest products, aerospace, chemicals, and mining and mineral processing.

Encourage and influence technological innovation …

… with these results:

  • generation of quality jobs and economic growth
  • development and commercialization of new and innovative products and processes
  • improved competitiveness
  • identification of market needs and new technologies to be developed
  • influence on government policy development
  • increased productivity
  • leveraging of private sector R&D spending and related downstream investment
  • increased awareness of the importance of S&T to Canada.
  • Develop Technology Roadmaps initiatives (seven are currently under way: Geomatics, Wood-based Panels, Electrical Power Equipment and Services, Freight Transportation, Medical Imaging, Aircraft Design, Manufacturing, Repair and Overhaul, and Forestry).

Technology Roadmaps are mechanisms to identify and develop new, critical technologies required by specific sectors to meet future market demands in the knowledge-based economy. Private sector firms, industry associations, research organizations and academia team up, with support from Industry Canada, to chart out future technologies that will keep Canadian industry at the forefront of innovation and competitiveness.

  • Promote strategic innovation, commercialize R&D, leverage investment and create jobs through Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC). TPC makes investments in technology development to support new environmental and enabling technologies, aerospace and defence industries, including defence conversion.

Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) plays a critical role in promoting the development and commercialization of innovative technologies. For example:

  • a $60 million investment with Pasteur Mérieux Connaught Canada (PMCC) will position Canada as a world leader in cancer vaccine research, creating over 500 new jobs at PMCC and in research centres, universities, hospitals and SMEs across Canada
  • Vancouver-based Ballard Power Systems credited TPC's $30 million investment in the company's environmentally-friendly PEM fuel cell stationary power systems project as a critical factor in helping secure GEC Alsthom's $83 million investment in Ballard Generation Systems, the subsidiary established to market and manufacture power systems
  • with an $8.4 million investment in Orenda Aerospace Corporation, TPC enabled Orenda to proceed with its new high performance reciprocating civil aircraft engine development program. As a result, Orenda will establish a manufacturing facility at the former Canadian Forces base in Debert, Nova Scotia. This project will create 110 jobs locally and provide significant benefits to suppliers throughout Atlantic Canada's growing aerospace industry.

In its first two years of operation (1996-97 and 1997-98), TPC expects to place investments in excess of $500 million which are expected to leverage some $2.3 billion in private sector innovation spending; projects are forecasted to generate sales of more than $60 billion and create or maintain close to 14,000 high-quality jobs.

  • Develop sector innovation strategies such as the Next Generation Manufacturing Strategy in collaboration with the Alliance of Manufacturers and Exporters Canada to identify technology priorities and projects that will strengthen Canadian knowledge-based manufacturing, contribute to improving productivity and reduce the innovation gap.
  • Participate in the United States Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles and lever this participation into a higher rate of Canadian-based, automotive-related technology development.
  • Continue to contribute through the Communications Research Centre to technical issues concerning the management of the radio frequency spectrum, the deployment of wireless communications and broadcast services, and new technologies and know-how for exploitation by individual Canadians and by Canadian industry. CRC is the federal government's main laboratory for demonstrating novel high bandwidth applications for the Information Highway through its BADLAB and associated testbeds. CRC's work is critical to ensuring that Canadians are "connected." The CRC has developed its research and development plan in the context of recommendations put forward by the Information Highway Advisory Council (IHAC) in its final report Preparing Canada for a Digital World. The CRC will priorize its efforts and resources around those areas of critical importance to securing the competitive position of Canada's high technology sector:
    • emerging wireless broadband services such as local multipoint communications services and digital radio broadcasting
    • delivery of multimedia services to remote regions by satellite
    • applications of photonics to increase network capacity and versatility
    • components and subsystems for wireless broadband hardware
    • demonstration of applications with national and international partners.

The Communications Research Centre (CRC) has established a new testbed to conduct advanced technical and applications experiments in wireless broadband communications. This testbed, accessible to industry and other communications organizations, concentrates on the interworking of wired and wireless networks and will demonstrate novel methods of connecting Canadians to the Information Highway by radio and communications satellite.

A new facility is being considered for Innovation Centre clients who are commercializing CRC technology, in conjunction with the Certification and Engineering Bureau, which is relocating from the Clyde Avenue laboratories in Ottawa. This combined facility will improve public access and visibility on the CRC campus.

Further information about CRC is available on its Web site: http://www.crc.ca/

  • Stimulate through the Networks of Centres of Excellence program internationally competitive, leading-edge research in areas critical to Canadian economic and social development; develop and retain world-class scientists and engineers; create nation-wide research partnerships; and accelerate the exchange of results within the networks and the use of this knowledge by Canadian organizations.

Develop and deliver sectoral policies and strategies to support the competitiveness of industry …

… with these results:

  • increased growth and competitiveness of Canadian industry
  • enhanced knowledge base and innovation capacity of Canadian industries
  • improved awareness and understanding of sustainable development
  • improved understanding of climate change-related business opportunities at home and abroad
  • accelerated "climate friendly" technology, R&D and capital stock turnover.
  • Provide timely, in-depth sectoral competitiveness analyses through the Sector Competitiveness Frameworks (SCF) initiative. In 1998-99, a number of new SCF Overview and Prospects documents are planned. These reports will identify sources of competitive strengths and weaknesses, highlight resulting challenges and opportunities and assess the prospects of Canadian industries in achieving competitiveness. As a follow-up, Frameworks for Action (joint action plans based on partnerships with the private sector and other departments) will also be prepared to resolve competitiveness issues, particularly in priority sectors, including the telehealth industry, environmental industries, aerospace and defence electronics, and advanced manufacturing technologies.

Sector Competitiveness Frameworks (SCFs) provide an economic analysis of the sector, focussing on recent performance, future prospects and factors affecting competitiveness. So far, 17 overview and prospects documents have been published, and another eight are close to being released. Distribution includes sending copies to Members of Parliament, senators, media and key decision makers in industry and government (both federal and provincial). All SCFs are available electronically on Strategis. More than 50,000 accesses, or about 800 page viewings per week, have been recorded on Strategis since the launch of the initiative in October 1996.

  • Lead an automotive competitiveness review along with the Department of Finance and DFAIT to ensure that the business climate continues to support the competitiveness of the Canadian automotive industry.
  • Coordinate the federal initiative to renew the Canadian Biotechnology Strategy. This interdepartmental effort will include broad-based public consultations as well as federal-provincial discussions focussing on the development of a new policy framework, an advisory body to ministers, and public participation and information needs.
  • Implement Industry Canada's sustainable development strategy and action plan by working with industry to develop new, innovative sustainable development technologies; identifying and promoting innovative tools and practices to improve business and environmental performance; promoting the development and diffusion of cleaner production and enabling technologies; and promoting trade and investment in Canadian knowledge, products, practices and technologies that support sustainable development.

Industry Canada and Environment Canada are working with SMEs to create an Internet-based Virtual Office, which will provide SMEs with industry-specific information on how to improve their environmental performance and realize new business opportunities. The Canadian Business Environment Performance Office was launched in November 1997, and was awarded Yahoo Canada's "pick of the week" in January 1998. The Business Environment Performance Office currently is servicing 20 industry subsectors, with another 10 expected to come on-line by April 1, 1998.

  • Contribute to the government's efforts to meet new commitments under the Kyoto Climate Change Protocol by working in partnership with the private sector and horizontally with Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada, DFAIT and the Department of Finance to identify the technological challenges and opportunities associated with cleaner technologies in key sectors and industries.

Connect Canadians to the Information Highway …

… with these results:

  • 5,000 community access centres in urban areas and 5,000 centres in rural and remote communities brought on-line by the year 2000
  • all 10,000 Community Access Program (CAP) sites become self-sustaining within four years to provide for lifelong learning opportunities and to encourage electronic commerce
  • the CAP bandwidth and technological infrastructure upgraded to provide greater transmission integrity, more powerful learning tools and content, and rapid exchange of electronic goods and services
  • a Francophone Intranet implemented that would serve Francophone communities throughout Canada, especially those outside Quebec
  • accelerated development of new educational products and services by the private sector and domestic firms
  • broadband connectivity extended from the school into every classroom
  • classroom learning projects and on-line learning products and services that help students to acquire new skills, and teachers and courseware producers to develop new media materials
  • 250,000 used or refurbished computers provided for use in classrooms across the country to enable every young Canadian to experience the full benefit of information technologies for learning
  • build the next-generation Internet (CA*Net 3), the world's first all-optical, broadband network, through funding to CANARIE
  • 10,000 voluntary organizations, from across Canada, linked to the Internet and to each other.
  • Connect 5,000 rural and remote communities and 5,000 urban areas to the Information Highway by the year 2000 through the Community Access Program (CAP). This program will increase the awareness within Canada of the opportunities and benefits available through Information Highway technologies and services. Many Canadians will acquire the basic knowledge and skills to use the Internet and communicate electronically with others. The electronic exchange of ideas, information, learning tools and services will expand jobs and growth and create opportunities for local entrepreneurs, employees, educators, students and others to improve their information management, networking and computer skills. These communities will be able to make the most of their existing resources to tap new markets and create new job opportunities for their citizens.
  • Connect all 16,500 Canadian schools and 3,400 libraries to the Internet by the end of 1998-99, facilitated by Canada's SchoolNet, working in partnership with the telecommunications sector and the regulatory bodies to provide affordable connectivity solutions; and extend broadband connectivity from the school into every classroom.
  • Connect all 450 First Nations schools under federal jurisdiction to the Internet by providing them with DirecPC equipment and a computer, together with free satellite channels and financial assistance toward their telecommunications costs.
  • Give Canadians aged 15 to 30 years entrepreneurial and technology-based job experience through programs such as SchoolNet Digital Collections, where they convert collections of significant Canadian material into digital form for display on the Internet, and provide them with work experiences related to the Information Highway. This will greatly increase their chances of obtaining long-term, meaningful employment in a knowledge-based economy.
  • Demonstrate to Canada's business managers how using the Internet will make their SMEs more competitive through the Student Connection Program (SCP).

Through the Student Connection Program, university and college students design hands-on, customized Internet training for their business clients. With the program:

  • more than 2,000 university and college students will become Internet trainers
  • up to 50,000 business managers will learn that using the Internet as a business tool will give them a competitive advantage
  • we have designed an interactive on-line business tool — bringing the best business sites together onto one site
  • you can contact an Internet trainer simply by calling the toll-free line: 1-888-807-7777.
  • Promote the concept of transferring surplus, but still valuable, computers from governments, businesses and individuals to schools and libraries across Canada, and build the structure and mechanisms required to collect, renovate, and redistribute information technology across Canada in cooperation with partners and beneficiaries, through the Computers for Schools program.

Computers for Schools

The Computers for Schools Program helps schools and libraries take full advantage of the information age by channelling surplus computers and word-processing software into classrooms and public libraries across Canada. In partnership with the business community, Computers for Schools will deliver 250,000 computers to Canadian schools and libraries by the year 2000.

  • Help young Canadians graduating from colleges and universities find work through on-line job matching with employers through the National Graduate Register (NGR) and Campus Worklink; establish the NGR/Campus Worklink as the lead on-line tool for recruiting new graduates to the federal public service; and commercialize NGR/Campus Worklink as a saleable software to market domestically and internationally.
  • Provide support to the Canadian assistive devices industry in order to increase domestic and international awareness of Canadian capabilities; increase awareness by Canadian companies of international trade opportunities; and increase the number of new Canadian assistive devices.
  • Sponsor the building of the advanced Internet infrastructure that underlies all parts of the connectedness agenda through support of the CANARIE program. The goal is to encourage both the accelerated innovation of essential new services and their implementation in the world marketplace by stimulating: the R&D on high-capacity Internet networks; related applications and technology; and advanced applications in such fields as distance learning, telehealth and medicine, electronic commerce and multimedia content delivery.

Create leading-edge information products for Strategis …

… with these results:

  • 3 million visits and 20 million documents will be delivered to clients in 1998-99
  • any Industry Canada client wishing to transact business with us electronically will be able to do so by 1999
  • all of Industry Canada's business information will be available on-line in three years.
  • Transform the way we relate to our clients by using leading-edge communications tools such as Strategis. Through Strategis, users can access the latest information on trade data, micro-economic policy, the marketplace, emerging technologies, and how to manage a business. Industry Canada will build on the success and popularity of Strategis by:
    • generating, in 1998-1999, 3 million visits to the site, and using it to deliver 20 million documents to our clients
    • introducing 15 electronic commerce services so that, by 1999, any Industry Canada client wishing to transact business with us electronically will be able to do so
    • adding to the range of information made available on Strategis to the point that, in three years, all of Industry Canada's business information is available on-line
    • providing significantly expanded access to strategic business information through enhanced partnerships with public and private sector organizations
    • continuously improving the customer support and quality arrangements upon which Strategis relies
    • maintaining leading edge functionality, look and feel on the site through continuous investment in technology.

Strategis, our interactive and dynamic Web site for business and consumer information, is proving to be a market success, with more than 1.3 million visits and 12.2 million documents accessed in 1997-98. Strategis is:

  • Canada's largest business information Web site, with close to 2 million electronic documents
  • available 24 hours a day, seven days a week
  • a client-oriented service, allowing users to contact knowledgeable help-desk staff over the telephone, fax or e-mail for the assistance they require
  • an evolving collection of more than 70 information products (as of January 1998), with thousands of links to other useful sites around the world
  • saving users time and money.

Recent additions to Strategis include the Canadian Business Map, a powerful pathfinder to federal, provincial and municipal information for businesses.

Improve SME access to capital and information …

… with these results:

  • more job creation
  • greater awareness of and access to sources of risk capital by growth-oriented businesses
  • integrated government business information services
  • improved awareness by SMEs and start-up enterprises of government services, programs and selected regulations
  • enhanced service.
  • Administer the Small Business Loans Act. The program is administered by the Industry Canada Small Business Loans Administration on behalf of Industry Canada (for Ontario, Northwest Territories and Yukon), Western Economic Diversification Canada (WD), Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED) and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA). In 1998-99, loan insurance will be provided to 30,000 small businesses, representing business investments of $2 billion across Canada. Industry Canada will conduct a comprehensive review of the Act and Regulations to address issues raised by the Auditor General in his report on the program tabled in December 1997 and, based on the results of this review, a new legislative framework will be developed for 1999. The comprehensive review will also contribute to the development of a detailed and updated evaluation framework, including additional relevant performance indicators related to the results and impacts of the program. Information gathered through a recently enhanced program information system will be used in evaluating the program, monitoring of the Small Business Loans Administration cost recovery policy and reporting to Parliament.
  • Improve access to information on programs, services and regulations for business and contribute to the formation and growth of small businesses, as the lead federal department for the Canada Business Service Centres (CBSCs) in Ontario, Yukon and the Northwest Territories. The Ontario regional network of over 60 sites, when fully operational in 1998-99, is expected to serve over 60,000 clients per year and complement the toll-free telephone and fax services. The CBSCs are operated in various cost-sharing arrangements. The CBSC partners in Ontario with the Ministry of Economic Development, Trade and Tourism, in the Yukon with the territorial government (Ministry of Economic Development) and the Yukon Chamber of Commerce, and in the Northwest Territories with the Ministry of Resources, Wildlife and Economic Development. The National CBSC Secretariat provides support to the national network of 12 CBSCs across the country, maintains the central database of business programs, services and regulations, and manages a central CBSC information technology budget.
  • Assist communities to work with growth-oriented businesses to access existing local, regional and national sources of risk capital, through the Canada Community Investment Plan.

Canada Business Service Centre Internet Addresses

  • Canada Business Service Centre (Newfoundland)
  • Canada-Prince Edward Island Business Service Centre
  • Canada Nova Scotia Business Service Centre
  • Canada/New Brunswick Business Service Centre
  • Info entrepreneurs
  • Canada-Ontario Business Call Centre
  • Canada Manitoba Business Service Centre
  • Canada-Saskatchewan Business Service Centre
  • The Business Link
  • Canada/British Columbia Business Service Centre
  • Canada/Yukon Business Service Centre
  • Canada/Northwest Territories Business Service Centre

Improve economic development for targeted groups/regions …

… with these results:

  • increased access to capital
  • improved access to new technology
  • increased number of exporters and export markets
  • improved access to information
  • improved telecommunications services to remote and rural communities
  • improved awareness of business applications to the Information Highway
  • enhanced community partnerships
  • enhanced community-based economic development and diversification
  • strengthened tourism industry.
  • Ensure effective management of the Canada–Ontario Infrastructure Works program for the ongoing delivery of the $153 million "top-up" phase, which commenced in 1997, and the wind-down of the original phase of the program.
  • Support community-based economic development in rural Ontario through 52 Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs).
  • Improve economic development in Northern Ontario through the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario (FedNor) by assisting in the development of competitive suppliers; undertaking supplier awareness activities; encouraging the development of business networks; encouraging technology diffusion and innovation; supporting national and regional export trade initiatives; encouraging the upgrade of telecommunications infrastructure to enable all communities to connect to the Information Highway; fostering a culture of continuous improvement and self-reliance in CFDCs; and supporting enhanced integration and coordination of community-based economic development efforts. The 1998 Federal Budget renewed its commitment to FedNor by maintaining its funding at the current level of $20 million. As a result, FedNor will not sunset on March 31, 1999, as originally planned.

FedNor is increasing access to capital by leveraging $41 million in new commercial lending to small business through partnerships with the Business Development Bank of Canada, the Royal Bank of Canada, and the CFDCs, as well as providing direct assistance to emerging and innovative businesses for pre-commercial R&D and marketing.

  • Promote the growth of Aboriginal businesses in Canada by providing business services, support, advocacy and information products, primarily to Aboriginal SMEs. This includes an emphasis on capacity building in the Aboriginal private sector. Work is under way that will develop the Aboriginal tourism sector. Similarly in trade and market expansion, Aboriginal Business Canada and its partners are already supporting efforts by Aboriginal firms and organizations to implement strategies that will increase sales by Aboriginal firms to untapped domestic and export markets. In the areas of finance and business management, measures will be taken to increase access to capital, and strengthen access for Aboriginal entrepreneurs to management information and services. The department will also seek to improve the participation by Aboriginal firms in the Portfolio's programs, service and initiatives. Aboriginal Business Canada works increasingly via partnerships within the Industry Portfolio and with other departments and agencies, Aboriginal organizations and the non-Aboriginal private sector. Working with the National Aboriginal Economic Development Board, Aboriginal Business Canada will focus on strategic priority areas of trade and market expansion and Aboriginal tourism, stimulation of innovation and technology enhancement and youth entrepreneurship development, and strengthening of Aboriginal financial and business institutions.

Aboriginal Business Canada (ABC): Delivering a High Return on Investment

  • Since 1989, ABC has supported more than 5,000 clients, with investments totalling $366 million.
  • These investments have levered almost $700 million in investment from other sources, resulting in a direct impact on the Canadian economy of more than $1 billion.
  • Firm survival rates are high and compare favourably with rates for Canadian SMEs overall.
  • Considering reduced welfare and unemployment costs, return on each $1 invested in ABC projects averages $1.20.

Market Canada as a desirable tourist destination, and provide timely and accurate information to the tourism industry …

… with these results:

  • increased market share for Canada of the overseas long-haul market
  • expansion in established markets and development of new markets
  • fully partnered marketing programs for all overseas markets
  • outbound travel maintained at current levels
  • increased U.S. leisure and business travel revenues
  • increased number of first-time U.S. leisure visitors
  • increased quality of tourism products
  • strategy for mega-destination development
  • broadened product mix.
  • Raise awareness and stimulate consumer and trade interest in Canadian products/destinations through partnered programs in overseas markets.
  • Attract more first-time U.S. leisure visitors, put Canada on meetings and incentive travellers' buyers lists and encourage outbound Canadians to vacation at home.
  • Assist the tourism industry in product development that meets global demand, and address challenges facing the industry that impact on product development.

The Canadian Tourism Commission (CTC) actively promotes the growth and profitability of Canada's $42 billion tourism industry which employs more than 500,000 Canadians.

In 1996, international tourism revenue reached $12.1 billion, a record high. Working with its private and public sector partners, the CTC aims to increase these revenues by almost 25 percent, to $15.1 billion by the year 2000.


Marketplace Rules and Services

The objective of the marketplace rules and services line of business is to promote a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace for businesses and consumers in Canada and promote Canadian marketplace standards internationally. Confidence in the marketplace creates a positive environment for investment and innovation, leading to improved trade performance. By providing information and services and by developing and administering marketplace laws and standards, this line of business enables businesses and consumers to contribute to and benefit fully from a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace.

Components of this line of business include:

  • bankruptcy and insolvency supervision
  • competition law administration
  • consumer information and marketplace analysis
  • consumer labelling and advertising regulation
  • corporation regulation
  • intellectual property protection and dissemination
  • measurement regulation
  • spectrum management.

Deliver information and services that enable businesses and consumers to contribute to, and benefit from, an efficient marketplace and respond to changing conditions …

… with these results:

  • improved and expanded information services and products to clients
  • reduced cost of transactions
  • simplified filing applications and compliance through initiatives such as electronic filing and a reduction in the number of filings through single filing notices
  • reduced turnaround time on key processes
  • improved stakeholder awareness of services and knowledge of how to access them
  • increased public availability of information on intellectual property
  • introduction of new communications services
  • better information on financial service charges and accuracy of claims
  • raised public and industry awareness of competition and consumer protection issues
  • full implementation of digital broadcasting services
  • better-informed and knowledgeable consumers
  • increased awareness of credit issues.
  • Increase client access to electronic services and strategic bankruptcy information by securing the services of a private sector service provider, adding electronic commerce capacity to the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy's Name Search service, further developing its site on Strategis, and by identifying and developing information sources needed to support the Five Year Legislative Review of the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act.
  • Ensure that federal incorporation is considered attractive and accessible to a broad range of entrepreneurs and not-for-profit organizations; provide for the receipt, review, approval or rejection of incorporation submissions, including name approval and other services that support the corporation during its life span; and provide for the retention and public dissemination of statutory information respecting specific federal incorporations.
  • Promote the new Small Business Guide to Federal Incorporation and other existing guides and policies.
  • Develop a marketing plan and strategy to increase awareness and understanding of Measurement Canada's services and the agency's role in ensuring a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace; and establish a continuous process to monitor and evaluate client satisfaction and client expectations with respect to the type, level and quality of agency services.

Marketplace Service organizations contribute to Canada's march toward a knowledge-based economy and the opportunities inherent in connectivity. Priorities include:

  • commercialization of bankruptcy information dissemination, Name Search and Web site improvement, including the establishment of a national help desk in order to improve turnaround times and realize efficiency savings
  • introduction of facsimile and electronic filing services to the Corporations Directorate's clients as a means of increasing speed of service and accessibility.
  • Use Strategis to provide, for the first time, equitable access for all Canadians, regardless of location, to the extensive holdings of trade-marks and patent information of the Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO). This will be done by continuing to improve the search facilities of the Trade-marks database made available on Strategis during the past fiscal year, and by making available on Strategis during the current fiscal year a full Canadian Patent database using CIPO's TECHSOURCE platform.
  • Conduct research to assess technological advances in the Spectrum Management Program, leading to new applications and services such as local multipoint communications services (LMCS), cellular and personal communications systems and to more efficient use of land mobile technology and wireless technology.
  • Build content and further develop interactive components on financial services and consumer scams and frauds in Consumer Connection on Strategis, and distribute Consumer Quarterly to consumers, scholars, industry and policy makers to provide timely information and analysis on consumer issues that cut across various sectors.
  • Develop the consumer perspective and chart a strategic direction for future consumer research, policy development, communications and partnerships on consumers' awareness and acceptance of biotechnology as part of the Canadian Biotechnology Strategy, through a biotechnology publication and other documents that discuss and disseminate expert papers and other research findings to a wide range of interests.
  • Maintain already achieved internationally competitive standards in turnaround times for various components in the processing of patent and trade-mark intellectual property rights.
  • Prepare discussion papers on the consumer issues raised by information asymmetries, market failures and consumer acceptance/demand for new technologies and products.
  • Undertake research in the area of financial investments, investment agents and use of inheritances to identify marketplace trends and potential problems for consumers as well as inform consumers on how to identify various forms of financial product risk.
  • Provide comparative information through the Credit Card Costs Quarterly report about costs associated with credit card use.

The Competition Bureau has implemented fees for certain services and regulatory processes under the Competition Act, specifically premerger notification requests, advance ruling certificates, advisory opinions, and photocopies. As part of this, program service standards have been developed in consultation with stakeholders. The benefits are clear timeframes, improved service, and performance measured against the standards annually. The Competition Bureau has set a number of key results it plans to achieve, including: improved efficiency through established performance measurement criteria (in consultation with private sector users); improved merger review turnaround time by 20 percent; more certainty for the private sector by issuing clearer, less qualified, advisory opinions; additional transparency through the publication of complete or generic advisory opinions; annual consultation fora, evaluation leaflets, and a complaints resolution system.

  • Develop an integrated Web site that will provide clients of the Competition Bureau with electronic access to the Complaints and Public Enquiries Centre; promote in-house corporate compliance programs and facilitate conformity with the law; update information products designed for SMEs; and develop new products that focus on the information needs of the consumer.

Develop standards and regulations that encourage a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace …

… with these results:

  • a simple, fair, flexible, non-broadcast, spectrum licence fee structure
  • introduction of new communications services
  • prevention of interference to the radio spectrum
  • improved compliance and system efficiency
  • improved administration framework for Canadian corporate law
  • regulations that clearly interpret and elaborate on the intent of the law and are easy for clients to comply with
  • fairness and certainty in the system due to consistent and predictable application of the law
  • better-informed, more self-sufficient and more active individual consumers and consumer organizations.
  • Explore a competitive bidding process for use in future spectrum licensing initiatives, including a possible auction of the next LMCS spectrum allocation, as a pilot, and draft regulations accordingly.
  • Revise selected radiocommunication and broadcasting regulations, technical standards and regulatory procedures necessary for the introduction of digital radio and television broadcasting, personal communication radio equipment, multipoint communications systems, low-power wireless broadband systems and LMCS systems.
  • Provide fully cost-recovered certification and testing services for both radio and terminal equipment to ensure it meets minimum technical requirements.
  • Improve debtor and trustee compliance activities by commercializing most of the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy (OSB) non-core activities; supporting client and stakeholder implementation of new provisions of the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act coming into force in April 1998; implementing a mediation program to assist clients in resolving certain issues out of court; re-engineering OSB's compliance framework; and completing a study of alternative ways to fund trustee discipline and conservatory measures.
  • Review the Canada Business Corporations Act (CBCA), define regulatory implications of CBCA reform, complete electronic filing regulations and implement the new Canada Cooperatives Act (CCA).
  • Implement modifications to the Competition Act that respond to the changing needs for more effective competition law enforcement tools.

Changing needs that require more effective competition law enforcement tools:

  • deceptive telemarketing: amendments will create a new hybrid criminal offence that applies to "interactive telephone communications" for the purpose of promoting a product or any business interest. The new law provides a guide to consumers about behaviour that telemarketers should exhibit during calls, and enables consumers to better protect themselves against this type of practice. It will also foster a healthier marketplace environment for legitimate operators
  • misleading advertising: amendments will change the focus of the misleading advertising and deceptive market provisions, from punishment to quick and efficient compliance, through the creation of a criminal/civil regime
  • interception of private communications: will provide another tool to combat the growing problem of deceptive telemarketing.
  • Consult with industry, standards writing organizations, consumers and other governments on consumer compliance issues. For example, an action plan developed with Canadian retailers to encourage the promotion of price accuracy in optical scanning systems will result in consumer redress policies, industry guidelines to help ensure consumers are paying advertised prices, and a brochure to educate consumers. Participation in standards writing organizations will result in international harmonization of ISO and ASTM Care Labelling Standards.

Standards and regulations are principal instruments to achieve a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace. In this light, priorities include:

  • the introduction by the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy of a proactive program to improve the effectiveness of existing and new compliance programs and services (e.g. mediation)
  • the reform of regulations to permit facsimile and other forms of electronic filing
  • the introduction by Measurement Canada of innovative regulatory approaches that reflect new, emerging technologies (such as multiple customer electricity measuring systems) and new business practices that encourage innovation and reduce technical barriers to trade for Canadian businesses.
  • Develop regulations and specifications relating to trade measurement, particularly framework standards and requirements for trade measurement that instil confidence in the integrity and accuracy of measurement in Canada, reflect changing technology and new business practices, encourage innovation, do not impose undue cost or unnecessary regulatory burden, and reduce technical barriers to trade and enhance Canadian businesses' opportunities for growth and export.
  • Determine, through public consultations, how best to apply the analytical framework in the merger enforcement guidelines to transactions that are likely to occur among Schedule I banks.
  • Study input from the public, key stakeholders and business clients on possible intellectual property legislative and regulatory changes that will continue the process of modernizing and updating Canada's intellectual property laws and that will simplify administrative requirements (e.g. filing) and harmonize various requirements in different statutes.
  • Formulate cooperative enforcement strategies for consumer protection between the federal and provincial jurisdictions and across provinces, and finalize the Cost of Credit Disclosure Rules, which will standardize and bring certainty to consumers in the negotiation of a wide range of financial products (personal loans, leasing, mortgages). Also, deliver a consumer awareness campaign with the provinces and territories in the areas of telemarketing and loan broker fraud.
  • Explore the appropriateness of various dispute resolution mechanisms as alternatives to the traditional court system for consumer redress and identify the required formalization of a dispute resolution system.
  • Conduct research and work with consumer groups and provinces on the consumer representation, redress, fairness and protection issues raised by changes in electricity generation and distribution and other energy sectors.

Administer and enforce marketplace laws and regulations to maintain business and consumer confidence …

… with these results:

  • defined levels of compliance and responsiveness that are respected
  • quality, interference-free spectrum
  • rights and interests of shareholders and stakeholders balanced in a manner that benefits the competitiveness of Canadian companies
  • improved processing and client satisfaction
  • domestic and international confidence in the integrity and accuracy of trade measurement in Canada.
  • Strengthen investor confidence through using ongoing monitoring and enforcement (compliance with annual return, annual summary, and financial statement filing provisions of the CBCA and CCA, Part II) techniques designed to increase transparency and predictability and to balance the rights and interests of shareholders and other stakeholders.
  • Ensure compliance with the Radiocommunication Act and Radiocommunication Regulations by ticketing violations pertaining to the unauthorized use of the spectrum.
  • Continue to ensure compliance with the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act and, in doing so, prepare for the five-year legislative review of the Act, which is required by Parliament in 2002. And, as required in recent changes to the Act, establish and offer a new mediation program to assist creditors, debtors and trustees resolve certain issues.
  • Administer Canada's intellectual property system (patent and industrial design applications, trade-mark applications, copyrights and integrated circuit topographies registration).

The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) intends to enhance service delivery over the planning period, extending on-line dissemination of trade-marks and patent information through Strategis and developing intellectual property application/processing systems to support electronic commerce. Work is under way to connect CIPO product-line services to the Information Highway as part of the department's connectedness strategy.

  • Provide directly, or through monitoring and auditing, measurement standards calibration and certification, measuring instrument prototype evaluation and approval, measuring instrument inspection and certification, net quantity verification of measured goods and services, and complaint investigation and dispute resolution.

Measurement Canada will implement an Intervention Model that will provide an objective basis for determining the appropriate level of intervention necessary to ensure trade measurement accuracy and equity. Model evaluation criteria and stakeholders' informed views will play a key role in establishing the appropriate level of intervention within a particular trade sector. One of the first of its kind, the use of the Intervention Model represents the agency's move away from traditional, government-funded means of regulating marketplace behaviour to increased use of stakeholders' informed views, alternative service delivery and private sector partnerships to achieve desired results.



The Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy (OSB) will use commercialization and connectivity strategies to strengthen service delivery and client access. It will negotiate an agreement with a private sector service provider in 1998 for the provision of electronic bankruptcy registration services as well as management of bankruptcy information services and products, including maintenance of its Web site. Implementation will occur over the following three planning years. Furthermore, it will expand its on-line Name Search service by adding an electronic commerce component. This fee-based service will assist clients and the general public to ascertain insolvency status.

  • Ensure compliance with and implement new provisions of the Competition Act, which will benefit the Canadian public by reducing deceptive telemarketing through enforcement of new criminal provisions, providing stricter disclosure requirements to help potential victims of telemarketing fraud make informed decisions, and providing faster and more effective resolution of misleading advertising and deceptive marketing practices. This will also benefit Canadian businesses by improving the administration of the pre-merger notification process while reducing the regulatory paperburden. These measures will improve efficiency by expanding the tools available to the courts to address criminal conduct through consent resolutions and directive orders following convictions and will allow judicially authorized interceptions, without consent, of private communications as an investigative tool to tackle the most serious cases under the Competition Act.

Promote international acceptance of Canadian marketplace standards to help Canadian businesses compete internationally …

… with these results:

  • sharing of information, expertise and best practices
  • reduced technical barriers to trade
  • increased global competitiveness and opportunities for growth and export of Canadian businesses
  • raised profile and influence of Canada in development of international standards
  • strengthened and harmonized intellectual property protection, enforcement and administration around the world
  • enhanced consumer protection
  • access to radio spectrum secured for Canada
  • unrestricted usage of Global Mobile Personal Communications System telephones and terminals worldwide.
  • Participate in the International Association of Insolvency Regulators and in a preliminary joint study with the private sector on the possible creation of an International Insolvency Centre.
  • Participate in international fora such as the International Organization of Legal Metrology, Asia-Pacific Legal Metrology Forum and the United States Conference on Weights and Measures; participate on international committees responsible for development of international requirements; and harmonize technical requirements and establish mutual recognition agreements with major trading partners (i.e. the United States).
  • Represent Canada in various international intellectual property and related trade fora including the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA) and Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC).
  • Sponsor with the Standards Council of Canada and provide backup support to the Canadian Standards Association's (CSA) submission of its model Privacy Code to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) for adoption as an international standard on privacy. This will also promote greater consistency and a more level playing field within Canada. Inconsistent and incompatible consumer protection and redress mechanisms across provinces affect cross-border trade. Greater uniformity will facilitate internal trade within Canada and trade with other countries.
  • Advance the interests of Canadians through participation at the World Intellectual Property Organization, including contributing to industrial property harmonization and industrial property information.
  • Work with Canadian industry, consumer organizations and the provinces and with our major trading partners through the OECD to promote consumer protection standards and compliance approaches needed to foster greater confidence in electronic commerce. Privacy is a key consumer security issue that is gaining prominence with the advancement of technology and electronic commerce. We will bring the consumer perspective early into the development of policy, either directly or by working with partners (e.g. the provinces, consumer groups, industry) to represent the consumer interest.
  • Prepare and participate in the World Radiocommunications Conference (WRC 99), the International Telecommunications Union and subcommittees, the Inter-American Telecommunications Commission and the International Special Committee on Radio Interference in order to secure access for Canada to radio spectrum that will enable the radiocommunications industry to develop new services and equipment, be highly competitive in the world market and protect existing uses of the spectrum. Participation in these fora will also ensure that Canadian standards are accepted and recommended by these international bodies, and the rules for sharing spectrum meet Canadian requirements.
  • Pursue an international memorandum of understanding under the auspices of the International Telecommunications Union to provide unrestricted usage and free movement of Global Mobile Personal Communications System telephones and terminals to people around the world.
  • Lead the Mutual Recognition Agreements negotiations on telecommunications, information technology and radio equipment and electromagnetic compatibility in order to allow Canadian industry to have better access to international markets and to help eliminate barriers to trade.
  • Work in partnership with the WTO's Working Group on Trade and Competition Policy to promote harmonization of marketplace standards to ensure international mechanisms are developed that do not disadvantage Canadian firms.
  • Participate in such fora as APEC and FTAA to ensure that sound competition framework law is in existence in these organizations' member countries to support Canadians doing business in the Pacific Rim and the Americas.

Corporate and Management Services

Most Industry Canada employees deliver the department's programs and services through its three lines of business. They are supported by the employees of Corporate and Management Services whose objective is to support Industry Canada organizations through the provision of corporate financial, administrative and advisory services. Corporate and Management Services provides relevant, timely and credible information that supports the decision-making process of Industry Canada and ensures the transparency of the decision-making process of the Government of Canada.

Support is provided to Industry Canada lines of business through a diverse complement of employees:

  • Human Resources Branch
  • Communications Branch
  • Informatics Corporate Support
  • Comptroller's Branch
  • Facilities Management
  • Management Consulting Centre
  • Regional Corporate Services
  • Audit and Evaluation Branch
  • Ethics Counsellor
  • Executive Services.

This dedicated work force is responsible for developing new ways of interacting with clients using information technology; streamlining management practices and improving risk management, performance measurement and accountability; renewing and revitalizing the work force; managing and controlling departmental funds; communicating to Canadians what the department does; and promoting the highest standard of public service to ensure that all public office holders are in compliance with the Conflict of Interest and Post-Employment Code for Public Office Holders.

Working together with their colleagues from all sectors, regions and programs of the department, Corporate and Management Services will provide support to a number of major, departmental initiatives …

… with these results:

  • improved service to departmental clients
  • increased accessibility to Industry Canada programs and services
  • introduction of new business processes
  • modernized comptrollership
  • recruitment, retention and development of a knowledge-based work force
  • informed Canadians.
  • Implement the People Management Plan, Industry Canada's basis for Human Resources Management for the years to come. Our performance goal for the next three years is to renew, retain, represent and recruit the work force we need to provide the best possible service to Canadians. The department is committed to a range of activities designed to make it an employer of choice, an organization that offers a strong sense of purpose and a positive work environment, supports career development, captures the benefits of a diverse work force, and recruits highly capable people. Priorities for the short term include following up on the departmental employee survey, revisiting and refocussing the objectives of developmental and assignment programs, more broadly implementing 360-degree feedback, moving toward competency-based management, and continuing efforts to help employees move to more challenging occupations through bridging programs.

People Management Plan

Industry Canada has a vision of becoming the employer of choice within the federal government. To achieve this vision, based on an analysis of our strengths, needs and values, we have set four priorities in our People Management Plan:

  • renewal and revitalization of our existing workforce
  • retention of key staff
  • representation of women and designated groups, because diversity reflects our clients and our country
  • focussed recruitment of a knowledge-based workforce.
  • Communicate with Canadians to raise awareness of the connectedness agenda and its benefits. The department will convey the messages that a connected Canada will create markets and new opportunities for businesses and communities, give all Canadians access to new learning and training opportunities, help develop the skilled work force and expertise we need to succeed in the knowledge-based economy and to attract investment from around the world, and allow citizens to interact with each other and their governments with unprecedented ease.
  • Develop a strategy for client outreach to ensure that clients' needs and views are understood and respected by all Industry Canada employees and that they are reflected in the programs and services offered by the department.
  • Implement a secure electronic commerce technical infrastructure to enhance the delivery of departmental services and to promote its use in Canada. Electronic data interchange will introduce efficiencies and streamline business processes. It will also offer new ways of interacting with our clients, allowing for the receipt of electronic payments for a broad range of services, including direct debit service for clients wishing to make recurring payments, and for expedited payment to our suppliers.
  • Be Year 2000 compliant so that no critical information technology or system failures are experienced. For example, the implementation of a new Integrated Financial and Material System will introduce technological efficiencies and integrate internal processes while meeting the requirements for Year 2000 compliance.
  • Undertake a full review of the information technology infrastructure in Industry Canada, which will improve internal data management and data sharing; improve communications with other government departments and our partners; improve public access to our strategic information; increase end-user efficiency and improve functionality; improve information technology management in the department; and maintain our leadership role in information technology within the federal government.
  • Strengthen the culture and capacity for modern comptrollership within the department to ensure that the department's comptrollership profile is aligned with best practices in comptrollership.
  • Mitigate financial and operational risk through studies such as the Performance Management Baseline Study, which assesses the status of departmental efforts to develop and implement performance management practices and which will propose means to strengthen corporate management and reporting.

Section IV: Industry Canada and the Industry Portfolio:

Building Jobs and Growth through Innovation and Partnerships

The Industry Portfolio brings together 13 departments and agencies uniquely positioned to further the government's goal of building a knowledge-based economy in all regions of Canada and to advance the government's jobs and growth agenda.

The transition to a knowledge-based economy may not always be smooth, but an economy based on knowledge leads to higher incomes and more jobs. The knowledge-based economy is where growth is happening — output and employment are growing faster in high-technology and high-knowledge industries. The government's challenge is to work in more creative and effective ways, and build organizational capacity to develop a world-class, knowledge-based economy in Canada.

The Industry Portfolio

  • Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)
  • Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC)
  • Canadian Space Agency
  • Competition Tribunal
  • Copyright Board Canada (CB)
  • Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED)
  • Industry Canada
  • National Research Council Canada (NRC)
  • Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)
  • Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)
  • Standards Council of Canada (SCC)
  • Statistics Canada
  • Western Economic Diversification Canada (WD).

The Industry Portfolio contains key departments and agencies with responsibilities for science and technology (S&T), innovation, industrial and economic development, and the Canadian marketplace. With many of the micro-economic levers available to the government and a large proportion of science and technology funding, the Industry Portfolio, working together in partnership, will help Canada make the transition to a knowledge-based economy and to the 21st century.

Industry Canada works in partnership with other members of the Industry Portfolio, leveraging resources and exploiting synergies, in a number of specific areas:

  • Promoting innovation through science and technology: turning ideas into new products and/or services faster
  • Encouraging trade and investment: helping more firms in more sectors to export to more markets and expanding Canada's share of foreign direct investment
  • Helping small and medium-sized enterprises to grow: access to capital, information and services
  • Promoting economic growth in Canadian communities: new approaches to community economic development based on community strengths and information infrastructures.

Through focussing on these specific areas for Portfolio coordination, Industry Canada is contributing to improving the services offered to our clients. For example: 29 SME Info-Fairs attended by 51,000 people providing government business information in one place; Canada Business Service Centres bringing government services into the communities; new financial products for knowledge-based firms from the Business Development Bank, ACOA, CED and WD, and innovative programs services on line, such as Strategis and ExportSource.

Promoting innovation through science and technology

The Industry Portfolio is focussing its efforts to help position Canada as a world leader in the development, adaptation and diffusion of S&T, and in capturing and exploiting international advances in S&T. Science and technology was the first major area of Portfolio coordination. The Portfolio played a major role in developing Science and Technology for the New Century: A Federal Strategy, released in March 1996. At the same time, as part of the federal strategy, the Portfolio produced the Industry Portfolio S&T Action Plan. The Portfolio will maintain its integrated approach to S&T and will work to complete the tasks set out in the S&T Action Plan. A major activity will be to develop a performance measurement system for the Portfolio's S&T activities.

Portfolio partners will place a strong emphasis on supporting innovation and risk-taking in Canada by helping industry obtain access to needed financing. This will involve refining the spectrum of financial assistance products aimed at stimulating research and development, with particular emphasis on the pre-start-up phase of promising technologies.

Industry Canada, along with its Portfolio partners, has set up targeted initiatives to help youth develop skills required to succeed in the knowledge-based economy:

  • Technology Internships in SMEs: employ recent graduates to work with SMEs and fully utilize their technical, business or marketing training and expertise
  • National Information Highway Science and Entrepreneurship Camps: foster an innovative culture by encouraging youth to pursue careers in science, engineering and technology-related fields
  • Science Collaborative Research Internships: match students with Canadian SMEs involved in collaborative research at the NRC
  • Student Connection: hire students to train business managers on how to use the Internet
  • CAP: hire students to help rural and remote communities connect to the Internet.

The Portfolio is putting in place internships for young Canadians in "new economy" businesses and in science and technology. The programs will create first-job experiences for young Canadians in many SMEs, and benefit both employers and employees.

The 1998 Federal Budget restored the funding of federal granting councils to 1994-1995 levels. These amounts will be increased up to 2000-2001, to support graduate students engaged in research and to expand existing partnership programs between university researchers and the private sector. These measures will ensure that Canadians have the skills and knowledge they need to foster innovation in Canada well into the new millennium.

The National Research Council's Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) was expanded under the 1998 Federal Budget to provide greater support to Canadian small businesses in adopting new technologies and developing new products and processes for commercial markets. IRAP funding was increased by $34 million to $130 million per year.

Encouraging trade and investment

Promoting trade and investment is a high priority for the Portfolio. Industry Canada, Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions, Western Economic Diversification Canada and Business Development Bank of Canada are key members of the domestic arm of Team Canada, working closely with the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) and Agriculture and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) in opening up new markets and developing the export potential of Canadian firms. Portfolio partners, led by Industry Canada, will partner with DFAIT and AAFC to make government support for international business development better coordinated and more effective, working to implement Team Canada Inc., a national network of federal and provincial government trade services. The goal is to double the number of exporting companies by the year 2000.

Portfolio members are actively involved in creating Regional Trade Networks (RTNs) across the country to build on federal-provincial agreements on trade and investment and improve services to business clients at the local level. The RTNs will be strengthened to focus on and coordinate IBD efforts in the regions. Portfolio partners will target services and products to exporters to assist them in improving their success in foreign markets.

Last year, the RTNs developed the first Regional Trade Plans, covering a three-year period. The 10 plans represent an important mechanism for developing exporting capacity and identifying opportunities at a regional level. Each plan sets out national objectives and regional targets to the year 2000, along with key commitments and deliverables in a number of important areas. Portfolio partners will build on the experience of the Regional Trade Plans to develop a coordinated approach to attracting foreign direct investment.

Helping small and medium-sized enterprises grow

SMEs are the primary engine of economic growth and job creation in the Canadian economy. The 2.3 million SMEs in Canada are responsible for about half of all private sector employment and economic output. The Industry Portfolio has intensified its efforts to provide SMEs with the information and key advice they need to make a success of their ventures.

Portfolio partners will work to improve SME access to capital. Financing support to them will be made more flexible and responsive to emerging clients needs. For example, the administration of the Small Business Loans Act will be re-engineered; a new legislative framework will be developed by Industry Canada; the BDC will extend its activities with new product lines and services that meet the changing needs of small business; and the regional agencies will continue to develop their capital services.

In collaboration with other stakeholders, Portfolio partners are developing an agenda to guide SME research over the medium term. Activities will include analytical research and projects, gathering and disseminating information, facilitating consultation and discussion with domestic and international players, producing information products and developing policy advice.

Promoting economic growth in Canadian communities

Canadians want to be able to take advantage of the economic potential of their communities, regardless of where they are located. They want to expand local economic opportunities so that they and their families can thrive. The Portfolio partners, notably the regional agencies, are involved in measures that foster innovation, entrepreneurship and networking, to assist regions in the adaptation to a knowledge-based economy.

One of the main instruments in promoting local and regional economic development is the Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs). Industry Canada, ACOA, CED and WD take a grassroots approach to community economic development, focussing on areas outside major urban centres. CFDCs deliver a variety of services such as local strategic economic planning, technical and advisory services to businesses, loans to SMEs, self-employment assistance programs, and employment programs targeted at youth.

In partnership with commercial financial institutions, ACOA, CED, FedNor and WD offer tailored investment support that builds on the unique conditions in Canada's regional economies. To help SMEs develop new markets, Industry Canada through the regional International Trade Centres, and CED through its regional offices, assist DFAIT in delivering the Program for Export Market Development. The BDC, focussing on growth-oriented, export-oriented and knowledge-based SMEs, has introduced a variety of creative financial products including venture loans, patient capital and funds directed to micro-businesses, tourism, youth, Aboriginal businesses and infant technologies. In addition, the Canada Community Investment Plan, launched by Industry Canada in 20 locations, aims to help communities work with growth-oriented businesses to obtain access to existing local, regional and national sources of risk capital.

Modern information technology is critical to community development. Most of the new jobs and economic opportunities of the 21st century will flow from communities with dynamic entrepreneurial spirit, and which have a concentration of intellectual resources, high-tech facilities, finance, and marketing and business skills. Industry Canada's Community Access Program and SchoolNet are playing a vital role in linking Canadian communities, their educational institutions and libraries to the Information Highway. Similarly, the National Research Council's Industrial Research Assistance Program and the Canadian Technology Network are helping to ensure that information on technology and other forms of assistance is available to Canadians to overcome the barriers to identification, development, adoption and adaptation of new technologies.

Portfolio partners also play a role in supporting entrepreneurship and self-reliance among Canadians who have taken their search for stable employment into their own hands. Portfolio programs help would-be entrepreneurs develop and implement their business plans and, in some instances, offer financial support during the time required to get their enterprises up and running.

Section V: Supplementary Information

Figure 10: Spending Authorities
Ministry Summary Part II of the Estimates

Vote

(thousands of dollars)

1998-99 Main Estimates

1997-98 Main Estimates

 

Industry Canada Program

1

Operating Expenditures

426,162 430,141
5

Grants and Contributions

473,012 409,039
(S)

Minister of Industry — Salary and motor car allowance

49 49
(S)

Insurance payments under the Enterprise Development Program and guarantees under the Industrial and Regional Development Program

10,000 10,000
(S)

Canadian Intellectual Property Office Revolving Fund

(4,864) (4,373)
(S)

Liabilities under the Small Business Loans Act

65,200 47,000
(S)

Contributions to employee benefit plans

45,309 30,811
 

Total Budgetary

1,014,868 922,667
L10

Payments pursuant to subsection 14(2) of the Department of Industry Act

300 300
L15

Loans pursuant to paragraph 14(1)(a) of the Department of Industry Act

500 500
 

Total Non-budgetary

800 800
 

Total Program

1,015,668 923,467

Figure 11: Industry Canada Portfolio Organizational Structure

Figure 11: Industry Portfolio Organizational Structure

Section V: Supplementary Information

Figure 12: Planned Full Time Equivalents (FTEs) by Business Line
  Forecast 1997-98 Planned 1998-99 Planned 1999-00 Planned 2000-01
Micro-Economic Policy 310 311 307 312
Marketplace Rules and Services 2,220 2,228 2,246 2,236
Industry Sector Development 1,386 1,390 1,438 1,431
Tourism 70 142 142 142
Corporate and Management Services 818 821 812 808
Total FTEs 4,804 4,892 4,945 4,929

Figure 13: Details of FTE Requirements
Salary Ranges Forecast
1997-98
Planned
1998-99
Planned
1999-00
Planned
2000-01
<$30,000 964 980 991 989
$30,000 – 40,000 912 915 906 902
$40,000 – 50,000 1,097 1,109 1,146 1,142
$50,000 – 60,000 566 568 562 559
$60,000 – 70,000 619 666 690 690
$70,000 – 80,000 491 492 487 485
>$80,000 155 162 163 162
Total FTEs 4,804 4,892 4,945 4,929

Figure 14: Departmental Summary of Standard Objects of Expenditure
Appropriation
(millions of dollars) Forecast Spending 1997-98 Planned Spending 1998-99* Planned Spending 1999-00* Planned Spending 2000-01*

* Allocation of the 1998 Budget has been made on a provisional basis in this and subsequent tables.

Personnel
Salaries and wages 234.6 224.2 226.5 227.8
Contributions to employee benefit plans 30.8 45.3 44.3 44.1
Total 265.4 269.5 270.8 271.9
Goods and Services
Transportation and communications 37.8 34.1 23.2 21.2
Information 55.4 49.1 33.2 31.0
Professional and special services 148.6 157.7 182.4 182.3
Rentals 6.5 5.7 3.8 3.6
Purchased repairs and maintenance 9.9 8.4 5.5 5.1
Utilities, materials and supplies 23.4 22.6 15.9 14.9
Construction/acquisition of machinery and equipment 13.2 12.5 8.7 8.4
Other subsidies and payments 1.0 11.5 20.3 21.6
Total 295.8 301.6 293.0 288.1
Transfer Payments
Voted 588.0 488.2 351.7 336.9
Statutory 84.4 75.2 64.2 46.6
Total 672.4 563.4 415.9 383.5
Gross Expenditures 1,233.6 1,134.5 979.7 943.5
Less: Revenues credited to the Vote 24.7 25.2 25.7 25.7
Net Budgetary Expenditures (Surplus) 1,208.9 1,109.3 954.0 917.8
Non-budgetary (Loans and Investment) 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8
Total Net Expenditures 1,209.7 1,110.1 954.8 918.6

Figure 15: Department Summary of Standard Objects of Expenditure
Revolving Fund
(millions of dollars) Forecast Spending 1997-98 Planned Spending 1998-99 Planned Spending 1999-00 Planned Spending 2000-01
Personnel
Salaries and wages 26.6 27.5 27.5 27.5
Contributions to employee benefit plans 6.0 7.0 7.0 7.0
Total 32.6 34.5 34.5 34.5
Goods and Services
Transportation and communications 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.4
Information 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6
Professional and special services 7.7 7.4 7.4 7.4
Rentals 3.5 3.4 3.4 3.4
Purchased repairs and maintenance 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7
Utilities, materials and supplies 1.4 1.2 1.2 1.2
Construction/acquisition of machinery and equipment 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6
Other subsidies and payments
Total 16.9 16.3 16.3 16.3
Transfer Payments
Voted
Statutory
Gross Expenditures 49.5 50.8 50.8 50.8
Less:
Revenues credited to the Vote
53.9 55.7 55.7 55.7
Net Budgetary Expenditures (Surplus) (4.4) (4.9) (4.9) (4.9)

Figure 16: Program Resources by Business Line for the Estimates Year
(millions of dollars) Budgetary Non-budgetary Loans, Investments and Advances Gross Planned Spending Less: Revenue Credited to the Vote Net Planned Spending
FTE Operating* Grants and Contributions** Gross Voted

* Includes contributions to employee benefit plans and Minister's allowances.

** Includes statutory item amounts of $10 million for insurance payments under the Enterprise Development Program and guarantees under the Industrial and Regional Development Program, and $65.2 million for liabilities under the Small Business Loans Act.

*** Includes the Canadian Intellectual Property Office Revolving Fund.

Micro-Economic Policy

311

38.2

13.4

51.6

51.6

51.6

Marketplace Rules and Services***

2,228

178.9

1.0

179.9

179.9

71.7

108.2

Industry Sector Development

1,390

236.8

549.0

785.8

0.8

786.6

9.2

777.4

Tourism

142

69.4

69.4

69.4

69.4

Corporate and Management Services

821

98.6

98.6

98.6

98.6

Total

4,892

621.9

563.4

1,185.3

0.8

1,186.1

80.9

1,105.2


Figure 17: Details of Transfer Payments by Business Line
(thousands of dollars) Forecast Spending 1997-98 Planned Spending 1998-99 Planned Spending 1999-00 Planned Spending 2000-01

* Section 14 of the Industrial and Regional Development Act states that an annual report to Parliament, on the administration of the IRDP, should be tabled by the first day of the month of June following the close of each fiscal year. Since there is no new activity to report for the IRDP, Industry Canada is fullfilling its reporting requirements for fiscal year 1997-98, under the provisions of the Main Estimates — Report on Plans and Priorities, rather than in a separate annual report.

The IRDP terminated on June 30, 1988, and since that time, no further applications for assistance under the program have been accepted. All pending applications and offers of assistance were disposed of prior to 1997-98. Further details on the disposition of applications received and commitments made under the program may be found in the annual report tabled for 1996-97. All financial commitments by Industry Canada under the IRDP have now been fully expended.

Grants by Business Line/Activity
Industry Sector Development
Grants under the Canada Scholarships Program 3,200 700
Grant to the Canadian Network for the Advancement of Research, Industry and Education (CANARIE) 55,000
Sub-total 58,200 700
Marketplace Rules and Services
Grants to various organizations working in the consumer interest 150
Grant to the Radio Advisory Board of Canada 45 45 45 45
Sub-total 195 45 45 45
Total Grants 58,395 745 45 45
Contributions by Business Line/Activity
Micro-Economic Policy
Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research 3,500 3,500 3,500
Contribution to the Internal Trade Secretariat 500 550 550
Contributions under the National Business Networks Demonstration Project 1,980
Contribution to the International Telecommunications Union,
Geneva, Switzerland
6,200 6,808 6,808 6,808
Contributions under the Canada Community Investment Plan 1,821 2,540 2,500 6,300
Contributions to non-profit organizations to promote economic cooperation and development 100
Sub-total 14,101 13,398 13,358 13,108
Marketplace Rules and Services
Contributions to various organizations working in the consumer interest 850 1,000 1,000 1,000
Sub-total 850 1,000 1,000 1,000
Industry Sector Development
Contributions to organizations, associations, and individuals for projects to promote public education and awareness of science and technology 1,991 1,891
Contribution to Bombardier/
de Havilland
7,040
Contributions under Sector Campaigns 913 250
Contributions to Strategic Technologies 10,469 13,609 4,871 7,092
Contributions to the Canadian Network for the Advancement of Research, Industry and Education (CANARIE) 22,332 20,293 19,600 19,600
Contributions under the Canadian Environmental Industry Strategy 1,250 200
Contributions under the Community Futures Program 11,010 10,810 10,810 10,810
(S) Insurance payments under the Enterprise Development Program and guarantees under the Industrial and Regional Development Program* 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000
Contributions under the Technology Outreach Program 8,079 4,044 1,296
Contributions under the Ontario Base Closures Program 3,300 3,000 750 250
Contributions under sub-agreements made pursuant to Economic and Regional Development Agreements/General Development Agreements with provinces 239
Contribution to the Communications Technology Research and Development Incentive Program 53
Contributions under the Aboriginal Business Canada Program 36,700 35,800 30,800 30,800
Contributions under the Northern Ontario Development Fund 12,825 27,550 14,000 14,000
Contributions to the Province of Ontario under the Canada Infrastructure Works Agreement 128,201 78,020
(S) Liabilities under the Small Business Loans Act 74,400 65,200 54,200 36,600
Contributions under the Technology Partnerships Canada Program 242,899 229,901 235,468 237,164
Contribution to the Ottawa Heart Institute Research Corporation 2,500
Contributions under the Canada-Quebec Subsidiary Agreement on Industrial Development 17,340 29,898 6,170 1,057
Contributions under the SchoolNet/Community Access Program 3,500 10,500 13,500 2,000
Contributions under the Information Highway, Science and Entrepreneurship Camps Program 345 345
Contributions under the Horizons Plus Program 2,700 5,758
Contributions for the orderly winding down of the Centre for Information Technologies Innovation 980 1,200
Sub-total 599,066 548,269 401,465 369,373
Total Contributions 614,017 562,667 415,823 383,481
Total Grants and Contributions 672,412 563,412 415,868 383,526


Figure 18: Details of Revenues by Business Line
Revenue Credited to the Vote
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Revenue 1997-98 Planned Revenue 1998-99 Planned Revenue 1999-00 Planned Revenue 2000-01
Revenue Credited to the Vote by Business Line/Activity
Marketplace Rules and Services
Bankruptcy and Insolvency Supervision 16.0 16.0 16.0 16.0
Intellectual Property Protection and Dissemination Revolving Fund 53.9 55.7 55.7 55.7
Total 69.9 71.7 71.7 71.7
Industry Sector Development
Communications Research 8.7 9.2 9.7 9.7
Total Credited to the Vote 78.6 80.9 81.4 81.4
Revenue Credited to the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF) by Business Line/Activity
Marketplace Rules and Services
Bankruptcy and Insolvency Supervision 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4
Corporations Regulation 11.2 11.3 11.5 11.5
Measurement Regulation 6.8 6.7 6.7 4.7
Consumer Labelling and Advertising Regulation 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
Spectrum Management 161.4 170.7 180.9 180.9
Total 179.9 189.2 199.6 197.6
Industry Sector Development
Refund on previous year's expenditures
Return on investment
Development 1.9 1.7 1.4 1.2
Small Business Loans Act service fees 22.3 15.1 14.3 10.8
Total 24.2 16.8 15.7 12.0
Total Credited to the CRF 204.1 206.0 215.3 209.6
Total Program Revenues 282.7 286.9 296.7 291.0

Figure 19: Net Cost of Program for 1998-99
(millions of dollars) Industry Canada
Gross Planned Spending 1,186.1
Plus:
Services Received Without Charge
Accommodation provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) 36.9
Contributions covering employees' share of insurance premiums and costs paid by Treasury Board Secretariat 17.2
Employee compensation payments provided by Human Resources Development Canada 0.5
Salary and associated costs of legal services provided by Justice Canada 1.9
Total 56.5
Total Cost of Program 1,242.6
Less:
Revenue Credited to the Vote 80.9
Revenue Credited to the CRF 206.0
Total 286.9
Net Cost of Program 955.7
1997-98 Estimated Net Program Cost 1,052.4

Figure 20:
Revolving Fund Financial Statements
Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) Revolving Fund Statement of Operations
(millions of dollars) Forecast 1997-98 Planned 1998-99 Planned 1999-00 Planned 2000-01

This table refers to the fund's operating profit and loss, not to cash requirements for the fiscal year. The operating profit or loss that the fund will realize is calculated through accrual accounting. Therefore, some cash expenditures in the estimates do not affect the operating balance, and other items that must be considered when calculating the profit or loss do not require a direct cash outlay. The two can be reconciled as follows:

Revenue 55.0 57.0 57.0 57.0
Expenses
Operating:
Salaries and employee benefits 32.7 34.5 34.5 34.5
Amortization 10.7 11.0 11.0 11.0
Repairs and maintenance 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7
Administrative and support services 13.2 13.6 13.6 13.6
Utilities, materials and supplies 1.4 1.2 1.2 1.2
Marketing
Interest
Total Expenses 58.7 61.0 61.0 61.0
Surplus (Deficit) (3.7) (4.0) (4.0) (4.0)


Statement of Changes in Financial Position
(millions of dollars) Forecast 1997-98 Planned 1998-99 Planned 1999-00 Planned 2000-01
Revenues 55.0 57.0 57.0 57.0
Expenses 58.7 61.0 61.0 61.0
Surplus (Deficit) (3.7) (4.0) (4.0) (4.0)
Add items not requiring use of funds:
Depreciation/amortization 10.7 11.0 11.0 11.0
Changes in working capital (1.0) (1.2) (1.2) (1.2)
Investing activities:
Acquisition of depreciable assets (1.6) (0.9) (0.9) (0.9)
Cash surplus (requirement) 4.4 4.9 4.9 4.9


Projected Use of Revolving Fund Authority
(millions of dollars) Forecast 1997-98 Planned 1998-99 Planned 1999-00 Planned 2000-01

Note: $15 million is the maximum amount that may be drawn down from the CRF at any time.

Authority 15.0 15.0 15.0 15.0
Drawdown:
Balance as of April 1 6.3 10.7 15.6 20.5
Projected surplus (drawdown) 4.4 4.9 4.9 4.9
  10.7 15.6 20.5 25.4
Projected Balance at March 31 25.7 30.6 35.5 40.4

Figure 21: Loans, Investments and Advances by Business Line
(millions of dollars) Forecast Spending 1997-98 Planned Spending 1998-99 Planned Spending 1999-00 Planned Spending 2000-01
Industry Sector Development 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8
Total 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8

Figure 22: Acts and Regulations

22.1 Acts under the Responsibility of the Minister of Industry

Departmental Legislation

Department of Industry Act, S.C. 1995, c. 1

Telecom Legislation

Radiocommunication Act, R.S. 1985, c. R-2
Telecommunications Act, S.C. 1993, c. 38
Teleglobe Canada Reorganization and Divestiture Act, S.C. 1987, c.12 (specified functions)
Telesat Canada Reorganization and Divestiture Act, S.C. 1991, c. 52 (policy role)

Marketplace and Trade Regulation

Agreement on Internal Trade Implementation Act, S.C. 1996, c.17
Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act, R.S. 1985, c. B-3
Boards of Trade Act, R.S. 1985, c. B-6
Canada Business Corporations Act, R.S. 1985, c. C-44
Canada Cooperative Associations Act, R.S. 1985, c. C-40
Canada Corporations Act, R.S.C. 1970, c. C-32
Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act, R.S. 1985, c. C-36
Competition Act, R.S. 1985, c. C-34
Government Corporations Operation Act, R.S. 1985, c. G-4
Investment Canada Act, R.S. 1985, c. 28 (1st Supp.)
Lobbyists Registration Act, R.S. 1985, c. 44 (4th Supp.)
Small Business Loans Act, R.S. 1985, c. S-11 (Ontario)
Winding-Up and Restructuring Act, R.S. 1985, c. W-11 (Part I only)

Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) Legislation

Copyright Act, R.S. 1985, c. C-42
Patent Act, R.S. 1985, c. P-4
Trade-marks Act, R.S. 1985, c. T-13
Industrial Design Act, R.S. 1985, c. I-9
Integrated Circuit Topography Act, S.C. 1990, c. 37
Public Servants Inventions Act, R.S. 1985, c. P-32

Consumer Legislation

Bills of Exchange Act, R.S. 1985, c. B-4 (Part V: Consumer Bills and Notes)
Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act, R.S. 1985, c. C-38
Electricity and Gas Inspection Act, R.S. 1985, c. E-4
Precious Metals Marking Act, R.S. 1985, c. P-19
Textile Labelling Act, R.S. 1985, c. T-10
Timber Marking Act, R.S. 1985, c. T-11
Weights and Measures Act, R.S. 1985, c. W-6

Registrar General Functions

Public Documents Act, R.S. 1985, c. P-28
Public Officers Act, R.S. 1985, c. P-31
Seals Act, R.S. 1985, c. S-6
Trade Unions Act, R.S. 1985, c. T-14

Portfolio and Agency Legislation

Business Development Bank of Canada Act, S.C. 1995, c. 28
Canada Foundation for Innovation: Part I and XI of the Budget Implementation Act, 1997, S.C. 1997, c. 26
Canadian Space Agency Act, S.C. 1990, c. 13
Copyright Board: sections 66 ff. of the Copyright Act, R.S. 1985, c. C-42
Competition Tribunal Act, R.S. 1985, c. 19 (2nd Supp.)
National Research Council Act, R.S. 1985, c. N-15
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council Act, R.S. 1985, c. N-21
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Act, R.S. 1985, c. S-12
Standards Council of Canada Act, R.S. 1985, c. S-16
Statistics Act, R.S. 1985, c. S-19

Largely Inactive or Minimal Involvement

Atlantic Fisheries Restructuring Act, R.S. 1985, c. A-14 (in respect of certain companies)
Agricultural and Rural Development Act, R.S. 1985, c. A-3
Bell Canada Act, S.C. 1987, c. 19 (private act)
British Columbia Telephone Company Act, S.C. 1916, c. 66 (private act)
Corporations and Labour Unions Returns Act, R.S. 1985, c. C-43
Employment Support Act, S.C. 1970-71-72, c. 56
Industrial and Regional Development Act, R.S. 1985, c. I-8
Pension Fund Societies Act, R.S. 1985, c. P-8 (ss. 4, 6 and 7)
Regional Development Incentives Act, R.S.C. 1970, c. R-3
Small Business Investment Grants Act, S.C. 1980-81-82-83, c. 147
Special Areas Act, R.S. 1985, c. S-14 (Ontario and Quebec)

Regional Agency Legislation

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

The Minister of Industry is also currently the Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency and is responsible for the following:

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency Act, Part I of the Government Organization Act, Atlantic Canada, 1987, R.S. 1985, c. 41 (4th supp.)
Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation Act, Part II of the Government Organization Act, Atlantic Canada, 1987, R.S. 1985, c. 41 (4th supp.)
Small Business Loans Act, R.S. 1985, c. S-11 (Atlantic provinces)

Western Economic Diversification Canada

The Minister of Industry is also currently the Minister of Western Economic Diversification Canada and is responsible for the following:

Western Economic Diversification Act, R.S. 1985, c. 11 (4th supp.)
Small Business Loans Act, R.S. 1985, c. S-11 (Western provinces)

Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

The Minister of Industry is also currently the Minister responsible for Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions and is responsible for the following:

Part II of the Department of Industry Act, S.C. 1995, c. 1 (Regional Economic Development in Quebec)
Small Business Loans Act, R.S. 1985, c. S-11 (Quebec)

22.2 Regulations Currently in Force*

Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act

Bankruptcy and Insolvency Rules C.R.C., vol. IV, c. 368
Orderly Payment of Debts Regulations C.R.C., vol. IV, c. 369

Canada Business Corporations Act

Canada Business Corporations Regulations SOR/79-316

Canada Cooperative Associations Act

Cooperatives Tariff of Fees C.R.C., vol. IV, c. 418

Canada Corporations Act

Canada Corporations Regulations C.R.C., vol. IV, c. 424

Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act

Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Rule SOR/92-580

Competition Act

Notifiable Transactions Regulations SOR/87-348

Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act

Consumer Packaging and Labelling Regulations C.R.C., vol. IV, c. 417

Copyright Act

Certification of Countries Granting Equal Copyright Protection Notice C.R.C., vol. IV, c. 421
Copyright Fees Order SOR/78-665
Copyright Rules C.R.C., vol. IV, c. 422
Definition of "Small Cable Transmission System" Regulations SOR/94-755
Definition of Small Retransmission Systems Regulations SOR/89-255
Local Signal and Distant Signal Regulations SOR/89-254
Programming Undertaking Regulations SOR/93-436
Period for Royalty Entitlements of Non-members of Collecting Bodies — Regulations Establishing SOR/97-164
Retransmission Royalties Criteria Regulations SOR/91-690

Electricity and Gas Inspection Act

Electricity and Gas Inspection Regulations SOR/86-131

Industrial Design Act

Industrial Designs Rules C.R.C., vol. X, c. 964

Integrated Circuit Topography Act

Integrated Circuit Topography Regulations SOR/93-212
List of Countries to which Canada Accords Reciprocal Protection under the Act SOR/93-282
List of Countries to which Canada Accords Reciprocal Protection under the Act SOR/94-677
Order According Reciprocal Protection to Switzerland under the Act SOR/94-27

Investment Canada Act

Investment Canada Regulations SOR/85-611

Lobbyists Registration Act

Lobbyists Registration Regulations SOR/95-579

Patent Act

Manufacturing and Storage of Patented Medicines Regulations SOR/93-134
Patent Rules SOR/96-423
Patented Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Regulations SOR/93-133
Patented Medicines Regulations, 1994 SOR/94-688

Precious Metals Marking Act

Precious Metals Marking Regulations C.R.C., vol. XIV, c. 1303

Public Officers Act
Seals Act

Formal Documents Regulations, C.R.C., vol. XIV, c. 1331

Public Servants Inventions Act

Public Servants Inventions Regulations C.R.C., vol. XIV, c. 1332

Radiocommunication Act

Radiocommunication Regulations SOR/96-484

Small Business Loans Act

Small Business Loans Regulations, 1993 SOR/93-169
Small Business Loans Regulations C.R.C., vol. XVII, c. 1501

Telecommunications Act

Canada Telecommunications Common Carrier Ownership and Control Regulations SOR/94-667
External Submarine Cable Regulations, C.R.C., vol. XVII, c. 1515
Telecommunications Fees Regulations, 1995 SOR/95-157

Textile Labelling Act

Textile Labelling and Advertising Regulations C.R.C., vol. XVIII, c. 1551

Trade-marks Act

Trade-marks Regulations (1996) SOR/96-195

Trade Unions Act

Trade Unions Regulations C.R.C., vol. XVIII, c. 1560

Weights and Measures Act

Weights and Measures Fees Regulations C.R.C., vol. XVIII, c. 1606
Weights and Measures Regulations C.R.C., vol. XVIII, c. 1605

* This list of regulations reflects only those for which Industry Canada has direct responsibility to administer and does not incorporate those pertaining to the Industry Portfolio. Information regarding regulations to Acts for which Industry Portfolio members have administrative responsibility can be found in the Report on Plans and Priorities produced by that department or agency.

22.3 Regulatory Proposals

Current

Bankruptcy

Bankruptcy and Insolvency — Levy Adjustment … carryover from 1996

Bankruptcy and Insolvency — Rules … to be promulgated in 1998

Bankruptcy and Insolvency — Fees payable to trustees for summary proceedings and consumer proposals … to be promulgated in 1998

Bankruptcy and Insolvency — Orderly payment of debts — Provincial levy … to be promulgated in 1998

Bankruptcy and Insolvency — New Legislation … to be promulgated in 1998

Intellectual Property Policy Directorate

Copyright Regulations — Wireless Transmission System … to be promulgated in 1998 (joint proposal with Heritage Canada)

Copyright Regulations — Regulations Prescribing Cinematographic Works … to be promulgated in 1998 (joint proposal with Canadian Heritage)

Copyright Regulations — Regulations defining "prescribed network" … to be promulgated in 1998 (joint proposal with Canadian Heritage)

Copyright Regulations — Regulations related to non-profit libraries, museums and archives … to be promulgated in 1998 (joint proposal with Canadian Heritage)

Copyright Regulations — Regulations on the parallel importation of books … to be promulgated in 1998 (joint proposal with Canadian Heritage)

Copyright Regulations — Regulations on taping and performance of communications to the public by educational institutions … to be promulgated in 1998 (joint proposal with Canadian Heritage)

* Patented Medicines Regulations — Regulations Amending the Patented Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Regulations … to be promulgated in 1998

Canadian Intellectual Property Office

Trade-marks Regulations (1996) — Amendments to facilitate electronic commerce … to be promulgated in 1998

Trade-marks Regulations (1996) — Opposition Procedures and Geographical Indication Objection Procedures … to be published in Canada Gazette Part I in 1998

Industrial Design Regulations … to be promulgated in 1998

Intellectual Property (Fee Changes) … carryover from 1997

Competition

Competition Act — Notifiable Transactions Regulations … to be published in Canada Gazette Part I in 1998

Consumer Packaging and Labelling Regulations — Establishment of a Sunset Date to Repeal Section 36, Standardized Container Sizes for Wine, Peanut Butter and Refined Sugar Syrups … to be published in Canada Gazette Part I in 1998

Corporations/Cooperatives

Canada Business Corporations Act — Insider Trading, Proxy and Proxy Solicitation, Financial Disclosure and Takeover Bids (Securities Regulations) … to be promulgated in 1998

Canada Business Corporations Act — Fees — Application for Exemption … to be promulgated in 1998

Canada Business Corporations Act — Combined Annual Return and the Corporate Income Tax Return … to be promulgated in 1998

Regulations under the Canada Cooperatives Act … to be promulgated in 1998

Investment

Investment Canada Act — Transportation Services … to be promulgated in 1998

Measurement Canada

Electricity and Gas Inspection Regulations (technical) … to be published in Canada Gazette Part I in 1998

Weights and Measures Regulations — Specification for Non-automatic Weighing Devices … to be promulgated in 1998

Weights and Measures Regulations — Harmonization of Technical Standards … to be promulgated in 1998

Weights and Measures Regulations (Minor and Technical) … to be published in Canada Gazette Part I in 1998

Radiocommunications

Aircraft, Ship and Amateur Radio Stations — Licensing Modifications … to be published in Canada Gazette Part I in 1998

* Radiocommunication Regulations — Non-Broadcast Radio Licensing Fee Reform … to be promulgated in 1998

Regulations Amending the Radiocommunication Regulations I … to be promulgated in 1998

Miscellaneous Amendments Regulations II … to be promulgated in 1998

Regulations Amending the Radiocommunication Regulations II … to be published in Canada Gazette Part I in 1998

Telecommunications

International Submarine Cable Regulations … to be published in Canada Gazette Part I in 1998

Future

Corporations

Canada Business Corporations Act — Electronic Filing … to be promulgated in 1999

Measurement Canada

Weights and Measures Regulations — Load Cell Standards … to be initiated in 1998

Weights and Measures Regulations — Diamonds and Gemstones … to be initiated in 1999

Weights and Measures Regulations — Specifications for Metrological Audit Trails … to be initiated in 1999

Weights and Measures Regulations — Specifications for Electromagnetic Compatibility … to be initiated in 1999

Weights and Measures Regulations — Specifications for Mass Flow Meters … to be initiated in 1999

Small Business Loan

Small Business Loans Regulations, 1993 … to be initiated in 1998

Spectrum

Telecommunication Apparatus Assessment and Testing Fees … to be published in Canada Gazette Part I in 1999

Broadcasting Technical Data Services Fees Order … to be published in Canada Gazette Part I in 1999

* This is a significant regulatory proposal; please see the definition in Section 22.4.

Figure 22.4:
Significant Regulatory Proposals
Regulations Expected Results

Regulations Amending the Patented Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Regulations — Proposed amendments to the Patented Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Regulations respond to the government's commitment to consider regulatory changes in response to the April 1997 recommendations of the Standing Committee on Industry following its review of the Patent Act Amendment Act, 1992 (Bill C-91).

A: The changes to the regulations are designed to further reduce delays in getting generic drugs to the market, to discourage litigation and to make the system fairer, while maintaining effective patent protection.

Non-Broadcast Radio Licensing Fee Reform — A new licence fee structure for non-broadcast spectrum must be put in place because new technology has dictated the need for a change.

B: There will be a new licence fee structure for non-broadcast spectrum that is simple, flexible and fair for all applicants.


Figure 22.5: Regulations Contact List

Bankruptcy

Office of the Deputy Superintendent
Programs, Standards and Regulatory Affairs
Deputy Superintendent
Jean Edmonds Tower South
365 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa ON K1A 0C8
Telephone: 613-946-2166
Fax: 613-941-2168

Competition

Compliance and Operations Branch
Deputy Director of Investigation and Research
Place du Portage Phase I
50 Victoria Street
Hull QC K1A 0C9
Telephone: 819-953-7942
Fax: 819-953-5013

Consumer

Fair Business Practices Branch
Deputy Director of Investigation and Research
Place du Portage Phase I
50 Victoria Street
Hull QC K1A 0C9
Telephone: 819-997-1231
Fax: 819-953-2757

Corporations

Compliance and Exemptions Section, Corporations
Senior Compliance Officer
Jean Edmonds Tower South
365 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa ON K1A 0C8
Telephone: 613-941-5720
Fax: 613-941-5781

Intellectual Property Office

Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO)
Planning, International and Regulatory Affairs
Director
Place du Portage Phase I
50 Victoria Street
Hull QC K1A 0C9
Telephone: 819-994-0418
Fax: 819-953-6977

Intellectual Property Policy Directorate

Intellectual Property Policy Directorate
Director
C.D. Howe Building
235 Queen Street
Ottawa ON K1A 0H5
Telephone: 613-952-2527
Fax: 613-952-1980

Investment Canada

Investment Review
Director
C.D. Howe Building
235 Queen Street
Ottawa ON K1A 0H5
Telephone: 613-954-1887
Fax: 613-996-2515

Lobbyists Registration

Lobbyists Registration Branch
Director
66 Slater Street
Ottawa ON K1A 0C9
Telephone: 613-957-2762
Fax: 613-957-3078

Measurement Canada

Program Development
Vice President
Holland Cross Building, Tower A
11 Holland Avenue
Ottawa ON K1A 0C9
Telephone: 613-952-4285
Fax: 613-952-1736

Radiocommunications

Regulatory Policy and Planning
Director
Jean Edmonds Tower North
300 Slater Street
Ottawa ON K1A 0C8
Telephone: 613-990-2785
Fax: 613-993-4433

Small Business Loan

Programs and Services Branch
Small Business Loans Administration
Director
C.D. Howe Building
235 Queen Street
Ottawa ON K1A 0H5
Telephone: 613-952-7339
Fax: 613-952-0290

Telecommunications

Industry Framework Policy
Senior Financial Economist
300 Slater Street
Ottawa ON K1A 0C8
Telephone: 613-954-3470
Fax: 613-952-0567

Headquarters

Industry Canada
235 Queen Street
Ottawa ON  K1A 0H5
Telephone: 613-954-2788
Fax: 613-954-1894

Atlantic Region

Industry Canada
10th Floor
John Cabot Building
10 Barter's Hill
St. John's NF  A1C 6M1
Telephone: 709-772-4866
Fax: 709-772-5093

Industry Canada
2nd Floor
75 Fitzroy Street
P.O. Box 1115
Charlottetown  PE C1A 7M8
Telephone: 902-566-7443
Fax: 902-566-7450

Industry Canada
1801 Hollis Street
P.O. Box 940, Station M
Halifax NS  B3J 2V9
Telephone: 902-426-3458
Fax: 902-426-2624

Industry Canada
4th Floor, Unit 103
1045 Main Street
Moncton NB  E1C 1H1
Telephone: 506-851-6530
Fax: 506-851-6502

Quebec Region

Industry Canada
7th Floor
5 Place Ville-Marie
Montréal QC  H3B 2G2
Telephone: 514-496-1797
Fax: 514-283-2247

Ontario Region

Industry Canada
151 Yonge Street
Toronto ON  M5C 2W7
Telephone: 416-973-5000
Fax: 416-973-8714

Northern Ontario Region

FedNor
Room 407
30 Cedar Street
Sudbury ON  P3E 1A4
Telephone: 705-671-0711
1-800-461-4079 (Ontario and Quebec only)
Fax: 705-671-0717

FedNor
302 Queen Street East
Sault Ste. Marie ON  P6A 1Z1
Telephone: 705-942-1327
1-800-461-6021 (Ontario and Quebec only)
Fax: 705-942-5434

FedNor
Room 201
201 North May Street
Thunder Bay ON  P7C 3P4
Telephone: 807-626-1800
1-800-465-6870 (Ontario and Quebec only)
Fax: 807-623-5392

Prairies and Northwest Territories Region

Industry Canada
4th Floor
400 St. Mary Avenue
Winnipeg MB  R3C 4K5
Telephone: 204-983-4395
Fax: 204-984-4329

Industry Canada
7th Floor
123 Second Avenue South
Saskatoon SK S7K 7E6
Telephone: 306-975-5313
Fax: 306-975-6727

Industry Canada
Suite 725
9700 Jasper Avenue
Edmonton AB  T5J 4C3
Telephone: 403-495-2951
Fax: 403-495-4582

Pacific and Yukon Region

Industry Canada
Suite 2000
300 West Georgia Street
Vancouver BC  V6B 6E1
Telephone: 604-666-5000
Fax: 604-666-8330

Section V: Supplementary Information

Industry Canada Summary of Beneficiaries, Partners and Co-deliverers

Figure 24.1: Micro-Economic Policy
Beneficiaries Partners and Co-deliverers
Conduct and support leading-edge research and analysis on strategic micro-economic issues as a basis for current and future policy decisions
  • business
  • research institutes
  • industry associations
  • Canadians under 30
  • communities
  • other federal departments and agencies
  • other governments
  • private sector
  • academic associations
Develop modern and effective marketplace framework laws and policies
  • business
  • consumers
  • other federal departments, such as Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) (lead on RPMS), Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT), Privy Council Office, and Justice Canada
  • Standards Council of Canada
Participate in the development and implementation of investment and trade policies
  • Canadian firms and employees
  • Canadian investors
  • DFAIT, AAFC and other federal departments
Design policy and regulatory frameworks for the Information Highway that support competition
  • Canadian businesses
  • SMEs
  • consumers
  • Canadian telecom system operators
  • telecom sector
  • more than 20 federal departments and agencies
  • provincial and territorial governments
  • private sector
Implement the federal Science and Technology Strategy and other S&T initiatives
  • Canadians
  • Parliament
  • Canadian high technology companies
  • SMEs
  • science-based departments and agencies
  • TBS
  • DFAIT


Figure 24.2: Industry Sector Development
Beneficiaries Partners and Co-deliverers
Increase the number of exporting firms and diversify markets
  • Canadians
  • Canadian firms
  • national and provincial associations, councils and institutes
  • SMEs
  • other governments
  • other federal departments
  • Environment Canada
  • Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC)
  • Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)
  • Transport Canada
  • Fisheries and Oceans
  • DFAIT
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)
  • industry associations
  • provincial and municipal governments
  • National Sector Teams
Attract new foreign direct investment and retain existing investment
  • targeted sectors
  • SMEs
  • multinational enterprises
  • provinces, territories and municipalities
  • DFAIT, AAFC, NRCan, TBS, Canadian Heritage, HRDC
  • other federal departments
Encourage and influence technological innovation
  • Canadian industry
  • government
  • associations
  • universities
  • research organizations
  • communications sector
  • Canadian industry
  • federal departments
  • universities
  • communications manufacturing and service provider industries
Develop and deliver sectoral policies to support the competitiveness of industry
  • Canadian firms
  • federal and provincial governments
  • Canadians
  • SMEs
  • national and provincial associations
  • other governments
  • Finance Canada
  • Environment Canada
  • Health Canada
  • AAFC
  • NRCan
  • Fisheries and Oceans
  • DFAIT
  • Transport Canada
  • industry associations
  • provincial government
  • HRDC
  • National Quality Institute
Connect Canadians to the Information Highway
  • youth
  • rural and remote communities
  • industry
  • schools
  • libraries
  • universities and colleges
  • research community
  • businesses
  • other government departments
  • other governments
  • federal, provincial and territorial governments
  • education sector
  • libraries
  • museums and archives officials across Canada
  • the private sector
  • non-profit organizations
Improve SME access to capital and information
  • Canadian SMEs
  • federal departments and agencies
  • other levels of government
  • communities
  • educational institutions
  • health care facilities
  • Canadian lending institutions
  • municipal governments
  • chambers of commerce
  • territorial/provincial government departments
Improve economic development for targeted groups/regions
  • business and communities in Northern Ontario (FedNor)
  • Aboriginal businesses, communities and people (on and off reserves) (ABC)
  • Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC)
  • Royal Bank of Canada
  • caisses populaires
  • Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs)
  • National Research Council Canada
  • Northern Centre for Advanced Technology
  • Ontario Centre for Environmental Technology Advancement
  • National Aboriginal Economic Development Board
  • Aboriginal capital corporations
  • other federal departments
Market Canada as a desirable tourist destination
  • Canadian tourism industry
  • communities
  • tourism industry businesses and associations
  • local, provincial and territorial governments
  • other federal departments


Figure 24.3: Marketplace Rules and Services
Beneficiaries Partners and Co-deliverers
Deliver information and services that enable business and consumers to contribute to, and benefit from, an efficient marketplace and respond to changing conditions
  • entrepreneurs (CORPS)
  • corporations (CORPS)
  • measuring instrument manufacturers, owners and users (Measurement Canada)
  • buyers and sellers of measured goods and services (Measurement Canada)
  • purchasers and vendors of electricity and gas (Measurement Canada)
  • current and future creators of intellectual property (CIPO)
  • the employers of intellectual property (CIPO)
  • all parties involved in the bankruptcy or insolvency, and potential investors and lenders (OSB)
  • the Crown (CORPS)
  • private sector (Measurement Canada)
  • trustees and courts (OSB)
Develop standards and regulations that encourage a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace
  • Canadians
  • those involved in bankruptcy and insolvency (OSB)
  • entrepreneurs (CORPS)
  • corporations (CORPS)
  • provincial/territorial corporate law administrators (CORPS)
  • measuring instrument manufacturers, owners and users (Measurement Canada)
  • buyers and sellers of measured goods and services (Measurement Canada)
  • purchasers and vendors of electricity and gas (Measurement Canada)
  • current and future creators of intellectual property (CIPO)
  • users of intellectual property (CIPO)
  • agents that facilitate acquisition of IPRs
  • joint committees with trustees, creditor and debtor representatives, all participants in the bankruptcy or insolvency (OSB)
  • securities commissions (CORPS)
  • IP Community (CIPO)
Administer and enforce marketplace laws and regulations to maintain business and consumer confidence
  • those involved in bankruptcy and insolvency (OSB)
  • lenders and creditors (OSB)
  • federally incorporated businesses investors (CORPS)
  • provincial/territorial corporate law administrators (CORPS)
  • creators of intellectual property (CIPO)
  • buyers and sellers of measured goods and services (Measurement Canada)
  • all trustees, debtors and creditors involved in the bankruptcy or insolvency (OSB)
  • measuring instrument manufacturers, owners and users (Measurement Canada)
  • federal, provincial and municipal governments and agencies (Measurement Canada)
  • trustees, proposal administrators, courts, RCMP and Justice Canada (OSB)
  • private sector organizations accredited to provide services on Measurement Canada's behalf
  • some government departments and agencies (e.g. DND, NRC) who calibrate and certify measurement standards (Measurement Canada)
Promote international acceptance of Canadian marketplace standards to help Canadian businesses compete internationally
  • international corporate law administrators (CORPS)
  • Canadian businesses (Measurement Canada)
  • industry (Measurement Canada)
  • creators of intellectual property (CIPO)
  • users of intellectual property (CIPO)
  • DFAIT (CIPO)
  • International Association of Insolvency Regulators (IAIR) members, and Insolvency Institute members (OSB)


Figure 24.4: Corporate and Management Services
Beneficiaries Partners and Co-deliverers
Provide the infrastructure and support required to deliver the best possible service to Canadians
  • clients of Industry Canada
  • employees
  • central agencies
  • Parliament
  • Canadians
  • central agencies
  • other federal departments
  • private sector


Figure 25: Management Representation Statement

Report on Plans and Priorities 1998-99

The 1998-99 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP) for Industry Canada is submitted for tabling to Parliament.

To the best of my knowledge (and subject to the qualifications outlined below), the information:

  • accurately portrays the department's mandate, plans, priorities, strategies and expected key results of the organization;
  • is consistent with Treasury Board policy, instructions, and the disclosure principles contained in the Guidelines for Preparing 1998-99 Estimates — A Report on Plans and Priorities;
  • is comprehensive and accurate;
  • is based on sound underlying departmental information and management systems;

and I am satisfied as to the quality assurance processes and procedures used for the RPP's production.

The Planning and Reporting Accountability Structure (PRAS) on which this document is based has been approved by Treasury Board Ministers and is the basis for accountability for the results achieved with the resources and authorities provided.



_________________________________
Name

___________ 19___.
Date



Annex A: Performance Management

In the 1997-98 Estimates, Part III, Industry Canada noted that it would take "steps to strengthen its management processes with more explicit statements of the results it expects to achieve, improved means to track progress toward the expected results and better use of performance information to improve client service."

This annex addresses some of the work that has been initiated to improve performance management within the department. Much of the work is still being developed and will be refined and modified over the coming years. Still, progress has been made on several fronts.

This annex has been organized to illustrate how the expected results of Industry Canada programs link to the five strategic objectives of the department and support their realization. As the Summary of Priorities indicates, these five strategic objectives in turn support the broad government agenda of jobs and growth.

Trade

Increasing Canada's share of global trade provides great potential for creating long-lasting, high-quality jobs one in three Canadian jobs depends on trade, and it is estimated that every $1 billion increase in exports generates about 6,000 to 8,000 new jobs.

International Business Development initiatives contribute directly to increasing Canada's share of global trade. A framework has been developed by the federal partners (the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT), Agriculture and Agri-food Canada (AAFC), and Industry Canada) that enunciates expected results, performance indicators, performance measures and performance targets for our work in the area of international business development. An extract from this framework is included below to illustrate the areas in which Industry Canada will focus its efforts:

Export Capability and Preparedness
Expected Results Performance Targets
Expanding awareness of global market opportunities
  • recognition in business, particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) of exports as a growth option
  • firms increasingly focus on exporting as a major business objective
  • tourism industry decision makers using credible research-based business intelligence
  • greater export orientation of firms
  • increased number of export-ready firms
  • strong level of awareness of global market opportunities
Engaging strategic partners in exporter preparation
  • more federal departments, provinces and business associations providing front-line exporter services, and who are active partners in Regional Trade Networks and National Sector Teams with seamless delivery of services among partners
  • high level of use of Team Canada Inc services
Targeting Team Canada Inc services to meet exporter needs
  • increased awareness of, and use of, Team Canada Inc exporter support services
  • new Internet-based information sources with 24-hour access (e.g. ExportSource and Strategis) that include tools for customization to meet individual needs
  • toll free 1-888 number with direct links to more Team Canada partners
  • export-readiness training targeted to firms with exporter potential
  • project-specific financing and advisory support
  • majority of Team Canada Inc partners' information in ExportSource
Broadening and diversifying exporter base with particular emphasis on SMEs
  • increased number of export-ready/export-oriented firms, including small firms, ethnic groups, Aboriginal enterprises, and women entrepreneurs, with focus given to firms in priority sectors and those interested in priority markets
  • broader range of sectors recognizing export opportunities
  • increased range of products and services exported


International Market Development
Expected Results Performance Targets
Expanding the Team Canada network
  • partnerships promoted with the provinces, business associations and other private sector constituencies through Team Canada Inc to secure more international business for Canada
  • double the number of active exporters to 10,000 by the year 2000
Improving accessibility of programs and services for exporters
  • Internet access: 24-hour access service on a single Web site (ExportSource) to be expended to include other service providers
  • national call number: toll-free 1-888 number to expand access to more Team Canada service providers
  • International Business Opportunities Centre: distribute export leads from posts abroad to 10,000 WIN Exports suppliers across Canada
  • Trade Commissioner Services Outreach Program: "exporter awareness" initiative to send 150 officers to meet 600 firms in 45 cities across Canada
  • market studies: identify product and service opportunities in key overseas markets
  • baseline for hits on ExportSource and the 1-888 number
  • 10,000 leads distributed by the International Business Opportunities Centre
  • 250 market studies

Investment

Improving conditions for investment, both foreign and domestic, contributes strongly to economic growth. With its improved economic fundamentals, Canada has again become a more attractive place to invest. But success will require aggressive investment attraction strategies.

International Business Development initiatives also contribute directly to improving the conditions for investment. An extract from the framework developed by DFAIT, AAFC and Industry Canada is included below to illustrate the expected results and performance targets which Industry Canada initiatives will influence:

Investment
Expected Results Performance Targets
Marketing Canada as a place to invest
  • increased promotion of Canada's investment strengths by the Prime Minister, First Ministers and Ministers of Canada
  • promotion of Canada as the investment gateway to NAFTA
  • reduced perception/reality gap on Canada's international competitiveness ranking and as a cost-competitive site for investment
  • increased Canadian share of world foreign direct investment flows
Improving investment climate
  • benchmarking Canada against the competition regarding perceived regulatory barriers
  • examination of investment attraction strategies of key competitors
  • progress towards resolution of key impediments to investment
 
Increasing investment by multinational enterprises (MNEs)
  • DM Country Champions Program for targeted MNEs to build relationships with key executives
  • sector-specific campaigns in: information technologies and telecommunications (including semi-conductors), life sciences, agri-food and other priority sectors
  • facilitation of the international expansion of globalizing Canadian MNEs
 
Increasing SME partnering
  • venture capital missions undertaken to the U.S., Asia, Europe
  • increased use of intra-government expertise in identifying partnership-ready Canadian SMEs
 
Promoting new partnerships in federal/provincial/municipal investments efforts
  • establishment of a domestic database profiling Canadian municipalities for local/foreign site selectors
 

Investment Partnerships Canada (IPC), a joint Industry Canada–DFAIT initiative, is designed specifically to improve the conditions for investment. It targets specific "high yield" multinational enterprises in priority countries and sectors, using carefully crafted investment campaigns. IPC targets are indicated in the following table:

Objective: increase awareness of Canada as an investment location of choice and secure strategic investments in Canada's high growth sectors

Key Result: increase Canada's share of global foreign direct investment

Targeted Markets: Japan, France, the U.K., Germany and the United States; second tier: Sweden and the Netherlands (collectively, these countries account for over 90 percent of investment in Canada)

Targeted Sectors: information technology and telecommunications, life sciences, agri-food, automotive, forest products, aerospace, chemicals, and mining and mineral processing

A performance framework is being developed for investment initiatives at Industry Canada which will tie in with the International Business Development framework to measure the impact of investment initiatives as shown in the chart below:

Immediate Results Intermediate/Long-term Results
Research and analysis
  • availability and use of information regarding investment
  • understanding of investment process, needs, opportunities, advantages, impediments, etc.
  • sound decisions, strategies, plans and initiatives
Communications and marketing
  • awareness of and interest in:
    • Canada as a desirable location
    • investment opportunities
  • decisions to consider Canada as an investment location
  • investigation of investment opportunities
  • investment (new, increased, retained) in Canada
  • plant expansion and/or modernization
  • world mandates in Canada
  • increased growth, jobs, research and development, sales and competitiveness
  • attractive investment climate
Investment prospecting and investor servicing
  • matching of potential investment supply and demand
  • client satisfaction levels
Investment climate advocacy
  • awareness of impediments and their impacts
  • decisions to reduce investment impediments
  • actions to remove impediments
  • attractive investment climate
Management
  • more efficient and effective partnerships and initiatives
  • more coherent and streamlined approach to investment development


Innovation

Innovation creates jobs and wealth for all sectors of the economy. A failure to capitalize on innovation has been a major reason for Canada's relatively slow productivity growth over the past two decades. In making the transition to a knowledge-based economy, Canada must innovate on all fronts.

Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) is one example of an Industry Canada program that is intended to improve Canada's innovation performance. TPC plays a critical role in promoting the development and commercialization of innovative technologies. Over the next three fiscal years, TPC expects to enter into new investment agreements with upwards of 250 private sector partners, the vast majority of which will be SMEs. The related projects are expected to involve some $640 million in TPC multi-year commitments. Based on TPC's experience to date, these investments are projected over their economic lives to do the following:

Projections

  • leverage $4.25 of additional private sector innovation investments for every dollar of TPC contributions or $2.7 billion
  • generate sales in the order of $65 billion, the vast majority of which will be exports
  • create or maintain 15,000 direct high-quality jobs

Technology Roadmaps (TRMs) are an example of an Industry Canada pilot program to promote innovation. TRMs are mechanisms to identify and develop new critical technologies required by an industry to meet future market demands in the knowledge-based economy. The TRM initiative is a key component of how Industry Canada will interact in upcoming years with industry, academic institutions, research organizations, and other governments. The following table articulates the intended results of the three phases of a Technology Roadmap:

Technology Roadmaps: Identify and develop new, critical technologies

Phase I
Intended Results

Phase II
Intended Results

Phase III
Intended Results

Industry embraces TRM concept and develops its roadmaps feasibility analysis

  • Industry Canada has developed an interest in pursuing a TRM for a specific industry, and has developed an initial approach for contracting and involving industry

Industry's implementation of the first TRM projects are defined and initiated

  • culture of partnering has become more acceptable to industry
  • industry has committed to action related to the TRM
  • other stakeholders have become involved

Generating knowledge-based, self-sustaining future iterations, TRMs evolve and become self-sustaining

  • industry has continued to refine the TRM based on the results and other information from the first iteration
  • the TRM document has been updated

Results are systematically monitored and measured

  • results from TRMs are being measured and the information is being used by industry in the development of subsequent roadmaps

Connectedness

The government has set the goal to make Canada the most connected country in the world by the year 2000, with the objective of making the information and knowledge infrastructure accessible to all Canadians. This is a multi-year, multi-element agenda. Industry Canada has received funding to expand a number of programs and will address two pillars of the government's connectedness agenda, Canada On-line and Electronic Commerce. Specific targets for reaching this goal are set out below:

Canada On-Line: Provide all Canadians with the opportunity of access to a world-leading Information Highway infrastructure and to the learning networks.
Program Target
Community Access Program (CAP)
  • 5,000 rural and remote communities and 5,000 urban centres brought on-line by the year 2000
  • all 10,000 sites become self-sustaining within four years to provide for lifelong learning opportunities and to encourage electronic commerce
SchoolNet
  • 16,500 schools and 3,400 libraries connected to the Internet by the end of 1998-99
  • broadband connectivity extended from the school into every classroom by the year 2000
  • connect all 450 First Nations schools under federal jurisdiction to the Internet
  • support the development of the multimedia learnware sector
Computers for Schools
  • 250,000 used or refurbished computers provided for use in classrooms across the country to enable every young Canadian to experience the full benefit of information technologies for learning
VolNet
  • 10,000 volunteer organizations, from across Canada, linked to the Internet and to each other by the year 2000
CANARIE
  • build the next generation learning network by the year 2000, that will equip Canada with a coast-to-coast, high-performance network that is faster than its American counterpart


Electronic Commerce: Create a legal and regulatory framework that will make Canada a global centre of excellence.

Domestic Agenda

Key Results Targets
Cryptography: balance between business/consumer use and law enforcement access; export controls; standards and cross-certification of certification authorities
  • cryptography policy in 1998
Protection of personal information in the private sector: legal status of self-regulatory codes; oversight agency powers and authority; harmonized federal/provincial-territorial legislative approach
  • agreement on national standard followed by legislation for industries under federal jurisdiction in 1998
Consumer protection: role of voluntary codes and guidelines
  • policy paper in summer 1998, followed by Canadian consumer guidelines in fall 1998
Intellectual property: database protection; support for technical measures that protect intellectual property; implementation of World Intellectual Property Organization agreements
  • discussion paper and consultations in 1998-99
Legal framework: encourage provinces to modernize legislation in areas of provincial jurisdiction; harmonization with and between provinces, territories
  • legislation for federal electronic service delivery/digital signatures 1998-99
Standards: effective coordination of private/public sector standards; influence in the development of international standards, Internet governance processes to conform to Canadian interests
  • develop Canadian electronic commerce standards framework (roadmap) in 1998
  • work towards fair and transparent international rules for Internet governance
  • consultations on Domain Names System in 1998
Awareness and skills development: broadening skills base and digital literacy
  • promote digital literacy through SchoolNet and CAP
  • SME requirements study (Canadian Federation of Independent Business/Industry Canada)
Ottawa-OECD Ministerial Meeting (October 1998):
Public Sector Lead
Key Results Targets
Privacy protection: interoperability between legislated and unlegislated privacy regimes; need to determine adequacy of protection
  • agreement on need for international standard or other mechanism to improve adequacy and compliance
Consumer-related issues: interjurisdictional protection
  • consumer protection guidelines: fraudulent and misleading commercial conduct; dispute resolution and redress
Digital signatures, authentication/certification: harmonization of standards and practices; cross-certification harmonization
  • endorsement of UNCITRAL Model Law on Electronic Commerce and convention to promote interoperability in 1998-99


Marketplace

Ensuring the necessary foundations are in place to facilitate broad participation of producers, consumers and investors in the economy is imperative. With increasing global competitive pressures and a need to ease uncertainty around the transition to a knowledge-based economy, marketplace services will continue to play a central role, ensuring a competitive, fair and efficient marketplace through the delivery and administration of marketplace frameworks, laws, regulations and policies. This is an essential and valuable function of the department as long-term expected results associated with a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace include:

  • enhanced confidence of Canadians to participate in the economy
  • improved access to the market
  • increased interest in foreign direct investment in Canada
  • strengthened competitiveness through mechanisms such as standards, measures and intellectual property management
  • improved information exchange and access to information
  • an environment more conducive to innovation activities through intellectual property frameworks.

To complement these broad expected results, marketplace service organizations have also placed emphasis on client focus and service delivery. To this end, sets of client service standards have been developed by several organizations within the marketplace rules and services line of business. Client service standards are not the beginning of a process or an isolated action related to carrying out given program activity within the public service. They are the final visible sign that an organization has the basic infrastructure in place and is ready to make a commitment to those that it serves about the timeliness and quality of its services.

Client service, meeting the expectations of those that we serve, is all part of the new accountability framework of the public service. Client service standards give everyone common, consistent goals to move towards and a sense of common purpose.

Client service standards developed by several organizations within the marketplace rules and services line of business are listed below:

Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy
Service Client Service Standard

Insolvency registration

  • the proceedings will be registered within two business days of receiving completed documents

Debtor assistance

  • bankruptcy registration forms will be forwarded to a licensed trustee within two business days; access to the bankruptcy process within 30 days

Complaints and inquiries

  • written complaints acknowledged within three business days of receipt; resolution of complaint within 30 days; advise of additional time requirement to resolve complex complaint within 30 days

Name Search service

  • account holders will receive on-line response seven days a week, 24 hours a day, coast to coast
  • account holders will receive response to telephone requests immediately, and confirmation by fax within one business day of the search; written requests will be processed within one business day of receipt


Canadian Intellectual Property Office
Service Client Service Standard
Public (Patent) Search Room services
  • public access to patent reference documents

— stored in Patent Search Room
— stored in Canadian Search Files Area
— stored in Place du Centre
— stored in Archives

  • access to Search Information Officer
  • access to Automated Search Tools
  • Magnetic Card Service

— access to photocopiers
— access to computer printers
— refunds (less than $10)
— refunds (more than $10)




— 15 minutes
— 15 minutes
— within 1 hour
— 2 working days

  • 5 minutes
  • workstation availability

— photocopier availability
— printer availability
— on request
— on request

Trade-mark services
  • acknowledge correctly filed new applications
  • approve acceptable applications
  • issue first examination reports for unacceptable applications
  • advertise marks in the Trade-marks Journal
  • allow unopposed marks where no examination report was needed
  • allow unopposed marks where one or more examination reports were needed
  • issue registration certificates
  • issue assignment recordals for correctly filed assignment requests
  • issue renewal certificates
  • within 15 working days of filing date
  • within 4 months of filing date
  • within 4 months of filing date
  • within 6 weeks of approval
  • within 9 months of filing date
  • within 17 months of filing date
  • within 15 working days
  • within 6 weeks of departmental receipt
  • within 15 working days of departmental receipt of fees
Public (Trade-marks) Search Room services
  • public access to new pending subject cards from date of filing
  • written enquiries reply
  • photocopies

— less than 500 pages
— more than 500 pages

  • certified copies

— files in the office
— files in Public Archives

  • 15 working days
  • 7 working days


— 2 working days
— 5 working days



— 2 working days
— 5 working days

Information Branch, Enquiries Section services
  • response to calls
  • access to Information Officer (on site)
  • acknowledgement of voicemail requests, e-mail, Internet, fax
  • general correspondence request
  • Patent Act (Section 11 search)
  • kit mail-out
  • request to register as a Patent Agent
  • copy of Patent Agent Certificate in good standing
  • immediate
  • 10 minutes
  • 1 working day
  • 5 working days
  • 5 working days
  • 1 working day
  • 1 working day
  • 2 working days
Patent Branch services
  • acknowledge patent applications that include self-addressed return card
  • issue filing certificate for patent applications meeting filing requirements
  • issue an ownership registration certificate on receipt of documentation meeting registration requirements
  • provide substantive examination on receipt of an examination request filed after August 1, 1996
  • state all known objections to patentability in the first examiner's report
  • issue a patent
  • within 10 working days from the date of receipt of the application
  • within 12 weeks from the date of receipt of the application
  • within 12 weeks from the date of receipt of documentation
  • within 24 months from the date of receipt of an examination request
  • at the time of examination
  • within 12 weeks after receipt of final fees
Reproduction and sales services
  • over-the-counter copies

— small order (less than 5 patents from microfiche)
— large order (more than 5 patents)

  • certified copies
  • regular mail


— 30 minutes (before 3:30 p.m.)
— 1 working day

  • 3 working days
  • 5 working days
Copyright services
  • regular process

— forward to reviser for examination

— check application for accuracy
— assign copyright registration number, print registration certificate, carry out quality control check
— mail registration certificate to applicant

  • accelerated action

— undertake process upon receipt of request and date of court appearance in writing; inform applicant by telephone

  • assignments and licensing: verify authenticity of documents and issue file number upon receipt of original document (or the certified true copy) to be registered; mail registration and assignment document to applicant
  • copies or register extracts
  • certified copies


— 2 weeks from receipt of application
— 1 week
— 1 week


— 4 weeks from receipt of application


— 10 working days from receipt of request


  • 4 weeks

  • 2 working days
  • 3 working days
Industrial design services
  • regular process
    - receive application; check completeness; assign filing date and application number; prepare filing certificate or letter indicating incompleteness
    - classify article of design

    - examine application for registrable subject matter; search prior art; prepare examiner's report
    - allow application for registration; mail certificate
  • abandonment and reinstatement
    - issue notification of abandonment

    - return file to regular process upon request
  • assignment: mail certificate and assignment document
  • maintenance registration


- within 4 weeks of receipt of application



- within 2 weeks of preliminary classification
- within 9 months of receipt of application

- within 3 weeks of allowance

- within 2 weeks of files so identified
- within 2 weeks of request

  • within 1 week of receipt of assignment
  • within 1 week of receipt of fee


Competition Bureau
(These service standards were implemented on November 3, 1997, and will be reviewed with stakeholders in the winter of 1998.)
Service Client Service Standard
Mergers (notifiable transactions and advance ruling certificates)
  • non-complex
  • complex
  • very complex
  • 14 days
  • 10 weeks
  • 5 months
Advisory opinions
  • Sections 52 to 60: misleading advertising and deceptive marketing practices
    - non-complex
    - complex
  • other provisions
    - non-complex
    - complex




- 8 days
- 30 days

- 4 weeks
- 8 weeks


Corporations Directorate
Service Client Service Standard
Canada Business Corporations Act (CBCA) articles of incorporation
  • visitors
  • batch
  • by hand
  • mail
  • 1 hour
  • 1 day
  • 3 days
  • 5 days
Other articles
  • CBCA
  • non-profit incorporation
  • arrangements
  • name decisions
  • corrections
  • 6 days
  • 10 days
  • 5 days
  • 1 day
  • 20 days
Name confusion cases
  • response
  • decision
  • 6 days
  • 15 days
Information
  • written requests
  • telephone requests
  • 5 days
  • 70 seconds
Copies
  • copies and certificates
  • 1 day
Enforcement
  • proxies
  • takeovers
  • 8 days
  • 7 days
Preliminary enquiries
  • acknowledgement
  • initial letter
  • follow-up
  • 5 days
  • 20 days
  • 30 days
Exemptions
  • 15 days


Spectrum Management
Service Client Service Standard
Telephone service
  • direct caller to the right person
  • return all telephone messages
  • if the person requested is away

  • respond to most information requests
  • on first referral
  • within 1 working day
  • suggest another contact or have original contact return call within 1 working day upon returning to the office
  • immediately, or explain the reason for the delay and provide estimate of how long the wait will be; delay will not normally be more than 5 working days
Counter service
  • during office hours, within 10 minutes
Approval of applications for radio licences: if the submitted application is complete and includes the correct licence fees, we will issue the authorization within the time indicated
  • fixed parameter stations (aircraft, ship, amateur, radiotelephone stations, and mobile stations added to an existing fleet when no frequency selection is required)
  • land mobile stations
    - if international coordination is not required
    - if international coordination is required
  • microwave and earth stations

  • if we cannot meet our standards and client's in-service date
  • within 3 weeks







— 7 weeks

— 13 weeks
  • before the proposed in-service date or according to the standards described in Radio Station Standards Procedures (RSP-113 and RSP-114)
  • advise at least 2 weeks before the expected authorization date, explain the delay, give a new date, and provide the opportunity to discuss the matter
Investigating interference to radiocommunications systems (applies to harmful interference only)
  • provide advice
  • identify the source of interference and advice of the results of investigation
  • if we cannot meet our standards
  • within 1 week of receipt of report of harmful interference
  • within 2 weeks

  • advise within 2 days of date described above

Strategis

Industry Canada has established concrete targets Strategis, our interactive and dynamic Web site. With 1.3 million visits and 12.2 million documents accessed in 1997-98, Strategis is transforming the way we relate to our clients. The performance targets illustrate our commitment to build on the success and popularity of this tool:

Targets

  • in 1998-99, Strategis will generate 3 million visits and deliver 20 million documents to our clients
  • by 1999, Industry Canada clients wishing to transact business with us electronically will be able to do so
  • in three years, all of Industry Canada's business information will be available on-line

Canadian Tourism Commission

Key results, targets and performance indicators have been developed for the Canadian Tourism Commission (CTC), as depicted in the following table:

Key Results/Targets

Raise awareness and stimulate consumer and trade interest in Canadian products/destinations through partnered programs in overseas markets

  • generate revenues of $1.3 billion from Europe and $2.4 billion from Asia–Pacific by the year 2000
  • increase market share for Canada of the overseas long-haul market
  • expansion in established markets and development of new markets
  • fully partnered marketing program for all overseas markets

In the North American market, attract more first-time United States leisure visitors, put Canada on meetings and incentive travellers buyers' list and encourage outbound Canadians to vacation at home

  • maintain outbound travel at current level
  • increase United States leisure and business travel revenues
  • increase number of first-time U.S. leisure visitors

Assist industry in product development that meets global demand and address challenges facing the industry that impact on product development

  • improved quality of tourism products
  • strategy for mega-destination development
  • broadened product mix

Deliver credible research-based business intelligence to Canadian tourism industry decision makers through traditional and innovative electronic channels

  • increased industry awareness, use of and satisfaction with CTC-provided intelligence
  • increased number, availability, timeliness and usefulness of industry information products
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