Archived — Performance Report for the period ending March 31, 2006

Table 3.6: Details on Transfer Payments Programs (TPP) ($5 million and over)

A Fair, Efficient and Competitive Marketplace

International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Switzerland
Start Date: 1932–33
End Date: December 31, 2007
Purpose:
To secure Canada's rights in international communications matters affecting radiocommunication, standardization and development, consistent with the Minister of Industry's authority as stipulated in the Radiocommunication Act and the Department of Industry Act.
Expected Result(s):
Membership allows Canada to achieve results across a broad range of issues affecting the international management of radio frequency spectrum and satellite orbits, the efficient and timely production of international standards, and the facilitation of connectivity in developing countries to help bridge the digital divide.
Results Achieved:
Enables the Government of Canada, working with stakeholders, including Canadian telecommunications carriers, service providers and manufacturers, to use ITU processes, products and services to enhance Canada's competitiveness in telecommunications worldwide. Also ensures its communications connections to the world by assuring interconnectivity and interoperability of the Canadian infrastructure with global networks and services, and preventing harmful interference to the radio spectrum.
  Actual
Spending
2003–04
($000)
Actual
Spending
2004–05
($000)
2005–2006 ($000)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance Between Planned and Actual Spending
Program Activity: Spectrum, Information Technologies and Telecommunications Sector — Marketplace
Total Grants 6,757 6,707 6,808 6,808 6,655 153
Total Transfer Payments 6,757 6,707 6,808 6,808 6,655 153
Comments on Variances:
The variance is due to the fluctuation in the exchange rate between Swiss francs and Canadian dollars.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
None to report.


An Innovative Economy

The Medical and Related Sciences (MaRS) Discovery District
Note: Although this program was included in the 2005–06 RPP, funding had ended for the program so there were no activities or spending in 2005–06.


Commercializing Federally Sponsored Research in Universities and Research Hospitals*
Start Date: Not applicable
End Date: Not applicable
* The Memorandum to Cabinet was approved in May 2005. Based on the recommendation of an advisory committee, program parameters have been developed and are awaiting ministerial and Treasury Board approval. Development of communications products and other preparations have been undertaken that will facilitate a timely launch should the government approve proceeding with this program.
Purpose:
The main objective of the program is to promote the commercialization of research emanating from research hospitals, universities and government labs. Related objectives include helping to identify commercialization best practices that can be applied in other contexts, and setting and monitoring performance benchmarks to ensure that the program is effective and delivers benefits for Canadians.
Expected Result(s):
Increased commercialization of publicly funded research.
Results Achieved:
The program has not been launched, as two federal elections delayed the required approvals. The program is awaiting ministerial and Treasury Board approval.
  Actual
Spending
2003–04
($000)
Actual
Spending
2004–05
($000)
2005–2006 ($000)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance Between Planned and Actual Spending
Program Activity: Policy Sector — Science and Technology (S&T) and Innovation
Total Transfer Payments - - 10,000 - - 10,000
Comments on Variances:
The program has not been launched, as two federal elections delayed the required approvals. The program is awaiting ministerial and Treasury Board approval.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
Not applicable.


Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) — Research and Development Program
Start Date: March 11, 1996
End Date: December 31, 2006
Purpose:
Strategic investments in pre-competitive development projects for the economic, social and environmental benefit of all Canadians.
Expected Result(s):
  • Leverage of private sector R&D investment.
  • Increased skills, knowledge and competencies of Canadian companies.
  • Repayments recycled into program funds.
Results Achieved:
  • TPC contracted 56 projects valued at $414,243,661.
  • Aerospace and defence technologies: 9 projects for $341,404,035.
  • Enabling technologies: 3 projects for $21,450,825.
  • Environmental technologies: 1 project for $30,000,000.
  • TPC-IRAP: 43 projects for $21,388,801.
  Actual
Spending
2003–04
($000)
Actual
Spending
2004–05
($000)
2005–2006 ($000)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance Between Planned and Actual Spending
Program Activity: Technology Partnerships Canada
Total Contributions 311,818 304,036 319,728 299,355 283,858 35,870
Total Transfer Payments 311,818 304,036 319,728 299,355 283,858 35,870
Comments on Variances:
On September 20, 2005, it was announced that TPC would be phased out and that a new program would be developed. As a result of this announcement, TPC stopped accepting new applications for projects in the area of environmental and enabling technologies. This decision has had an impact on the program cash flow disbursements, which contributed to the program lapsing funds in 2005–06.

Another major factor of the 2005–06 lapse was that TPC-IRAP spent only about 52 percent of its total available budget, which contributed to close to $15 million in funds being lapsed. This is also attributable to the closure of TPC, resulting in a significant reduction in TPC-IRAP projects being approved in 2005–06.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
  • Review the balance, scope and focus of activities to ensure efficient use of funds (ongoing).
  • Review and revise the project selection process (now addressed).
  • Adjust the unrealistic 3-percent operating budget level to the higher level needed for the type of program (now addressed).
  • Develop better performance measures and communications to tell TPC's story (ongoing).
  • Library - TPC R&D Program Audit & Evaluation 2002–2003


Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) — Program for Strategic Industrial Projects (PSIP)
Start Date: October 31, 2005
End Date: March 31, 2011
Purpose:
PSIP provides a framework within which a variety of larger strategic investment projects may be administered, and will be normally individually funded, in whole or in part, from the fiscal framework. PSIP contributes to the achievement of Canada's objectives of increasing economic growth, creating jobs and wealth, and supporting sustainable development.
Expected Result(s):
  • Improved technological capability, and economic benefits to suppliers.
  • Sustainable industrial development in the automotive sector.
Results Achieved:
  • PSIP contracted two projects valued at $300 million.
  Actual
Spending
2003–04
($000)
Actual
Spending
2004–05
($000)
2005–2006 ($000)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance Between Planned and Actual Spending
Program Activity: Technology Partnerships Canada
Total Contributions - - 111,000 163,266 163,266 (52,266)
Total Transfer Payments - - 111,000 163,266 163,266 (52,266)
Comments on Variances:
PSIP received TBS approval only on October 5, 2005. The program is aimed at providing a framework within which a variety of large strategic investment projects may be administered. Initially for 2005–06, it was estimated that $111 million would be spent on projects under PSIP. This was subsequently increased to $160 million for the administration of two strategic investment projects. In total, the program spent $163 million on these two projects, for which the variance was cash managed within Industry Canada's reference level.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
  • Library - TPC R&D Program Audit & Evaluation 2002–2003


Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) — h2 Early Adopters Program
Start Date: October 9, 2003
End Date: March 31, 2008
Purpose:
  • Investments in new hydrogen technology demonstration projects that will lead to a hydrogen economy for Canada.
Expected Result(s):
  • Accelerate the market adoption of hydrogen and hydrogen-compatible technologies.
  • Leverage of private sector R&D investment.
Results Achieved:
  • h2EA: Two projects for $9,337,075.
  Actual
Spending
2003–04
($000)
Actual
Spending
2004–05
($000)
2005–2006 ($000)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance Between Planned and Actual Spending
Program Activity: Technology Partnerships Canada
Total Contributions - 2,811 17,825 5,102 4,512 13,313
Total Transfer Payments - 2,811 17,825 5,102 4,512 13,313
Comments on Variances:
Transfer of $10 million to Natural Resources Canada.
Department used $2.7 million to cash manage pressures within other programs.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
  • Library - TPC R&D Program Audit & Evaluation 2002–2003


Competitive Industry and Sustainable Communities

Aboriginal Business Canada (ABC) Program
Start Date: July 1989
End Date: June 30, 2008
Purpose:
  • Creation and expansion of viable businesses in Canada owned and controlled by Aboriginal peoples.
Expected Result(s):
  • Creation and expansion of viable businesses in Canada owned and controlled by Aboriginal peoples.
Results Achieved:
  • In 2005–06, direct equity investments by the program helped 289 clients to establish or acquire a business through contributions totalling $12.9 million. Support was provided to businesses in the following areas: tourism, manufacturing, business, professional, scientific or technical services, and businesses linked to specified major developments.
  • ABC helped 287 enterprises to expand their operation (this involves innovation or market expansion projects) or embark on new marketing initiatives with another $6.9 million.
  • ABC provided assistance to 458 firms with $2.9 million in contributions towards business planning and support projects.
  • The $22.7 million in direct equity investments made in the year just ended resulted in a total investment, from all sources, of $82.9 million in Aboriginal business growth, and in the Canadian economy overall.
  • In 2005, ABC gathered business performance information related to 273 establishment and acquisition projects. The data collected showed that 92.9 percent of these new businesses were still in operation after one year. While it can be expected that this proportion may decrease as supported businesses enter their second and subsequent years of existence, these preliminary results show that the vast majority of ABC clients successfully launch their business and survive through their critical first year of operation.
  • Experience has shown that ABC's emphasis on commercial viability when screening applicants, as well as additional business support provided by the program, enhance the survival rates of businesses supported.
  • ABC also provides support to a network of Aboriginal financial institutions (AFIs), which provide loans and business services to small and medium-sized Aboriginal firms. Loan capital is made available through a number of initiatives, including direct capital injections. In 2005–06, ABC invested $9.4 million in the network.
  • The yield on the Aboriginal Capital Corporations portfolio is currently 6.93 percent. This is up slightly from the previous year (6.84 percent) and results in a three-year average of 7.17 percent. These results are lower than the figures reported at the beginning of 2000 that saw yields in the 10-percent range. The reduction is reflective of a general trend down in interest rates and the costs associated with developmental lending.
  • ABC continues to provide support to 15 “external delivery organizations,” which are Aboriginal financial and development institutions, to assist in capacity development. Support for these organizations continues to result in increased business development and entrepreneurship capacity on the part of these organizations, and it extends the program's reach into more remote areas of Canada. This improves program availability.
  Actual
Spending
2003–04
($000)
Actual
Spending
2004–05
($000)
2005–2006 ($000)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance Between Planned and Actual Spending
Program Activity: Operations Sector — Economic Development
Total Contributions 39,481 38,055 37,250 37,543 37,226 24
Total Transfer Payments 39,481 38,055 37,250 37,543 37,226 24
Comments on Variances:
Not applicable
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
Summative and formative evaluation of the Aboriginal Business Canada program was completed in 2002 (Aboriginal Business Canada Web site). Next evaluation is planned for 2007.


Broadband for Rural and Northern Development Pilot Program
Start Date: September 5, 2002
End Date: March 31, 2007
Purpose:
  • Ensures Canadian communities and businesses have access to reliable, modern information and communications technologies (ICT) infrastructure by bringing broadband, or high-capacity, Internet to rural, remote, Northern and First Nations communities.
Expected Result(s):
  • Access by Canadian communities and businesses to reliable, modern ICT infrastructure by bringing broadband, or high-capacity, Internet to rural, remote, northern and First Nations communities.
Results Achieved:
  • The Broadband Pilot Program was originally estimated to connect 400 communities with broadband infrastructure. It is estimated that 896 communities will receive broadband service (3 projects are still under negotiation). The network is built and services are deployed to 294 of those communities.
  Actual
Spending
2003–04
($000)
Actual
Spending
2004–05
($000)
2005–2006 ($000)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance Between Planned and Actual Spending
Program Activity: Spectrum, Information Technologies and Telecommunications Sector — Economic Development
Total Contributions 5,010 20,969 51,500 37,900 37,517 13,983
Total Transfer Payments 5,010 20,969 51,500 37,900 37,517 13,983
Comments on Variances:
$10.9 million reprofiled to 2006–2007.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
Evaluation is under way. Results will be available in 2006–07.


Canada-Ontario Infrastructure Program (COIP)
Start Date: October 25, 2000
End Date: March 31, 2007
Purpose of Transfer Payments Program
  • Improved community infrastructure through investments in rural and municipal infrastructure in Ontario, with an emphasis on green municipal infrastructure, such as water and waste-water systems.
Expected Result(s)
  • Improved community infrastructure in Ontario.
Results Achieved:
  • For 2005–06, COIP announced 22 projects, with a federal contribution worth more than $32.5 million. Additionally, there were 44 milestone ceremonies, 23 project signs approved, and 22 permanent plaques approved. COIP staff completed 75 site visits and performed environmental assessment monitoring and claim processing for approved projects.
  Actual
Spending
2003–04
($000)
Actual
Spending
2004–05
($000)
2005–2006 ($000)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance Between Planned and Actual Spending
Program Activity: Operations Sector — Economic Development
Total Contributions 134,548 150,243 207,257 120,427 115,942 91,315
Total Transfer Payments 134,548 150,243 207,257 120,427 115,942 91,315
Comments on Variances:
Circumstances such as setbacks in construction timetables have caused delays in the receipt of project claims from municipalities and in the flow of funds to pay for those claims. In addition, in June 2005, the program was extended by two years, to 2008, providing municipalities with additional time to complete their COIP projects. Funds will flow in future fiscal years.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
Mid-term program evaluation performed by Infrastructure Canada.


Canadian Apparel and Textile Industries Program (CATIP)
Start Date: January 1, 2003
End Date: March 31, 2010
Purpose:
  • Work in partnership with apparel and textile companies so they can become more innovative and pursue market opportunities.
Expected Result(s):
  • Increased competitiveness of the Canadian apparel and textile industries.
Results Achieved:
  • National Initiatives have assisted apparel and textile associations with projects to introduce best practices in manufacturing and marketing, exploit leading-edge technology, and develop and implement global marketing strategies. In addition, an Apparel Business Centre was established this year. Its initial services included company diagnostics, supply chain management, and professional development seminars. Since the inception of the program, the national initiatives component has supported some 140 projects.
  • The CATIP firm component, aimed at both the textile and apparel industries, resulted in over 300 project approvals from throughout Canada (157 of these are from Quebec, through the Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions Agency [CED-Q]). The program helped the industry introduce best practices in manufacturing and marketing, exploit leading-edge technologies, develop and implement global marketing strategies, and evaluate and implement e-commerce initiatives. Delivery of the firm component of the program ended March 31, 2005.
  • Delivery of the Textile Production Efficiency Component of the program (known as CANtex) continued in 2005–06. CANtex, delivered in collaboration with CED-Q, is aimed at improving the productivity of textile producers and assisting them in transforming production towards higher-value-added textile products. Thus far, CANtex has resulted in approval of some 140 initiatives, about half of which are projects approved by CED-Q.
  Actual
Spending
2003–04
($000)
Actual
Spending
2004–05
($000)
2005–2006 ($000)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance Between Planned and Actual Spending
Program Activity: Industry Sector — Economic Development
Total Contributions 4,634 8,466 10,464 7,206 6,740 3,724
Total Transfer Payments 4,634 8,466 10,464 7,206 6,740 3,724
Comments on Variances:
Reprofiling of funds ($7.2 million) to the following two years, extension of CATIP as per TBS Submission 832179 (in the amount of $3,942,000), and a lapse due to project recipients facing unexpected business difficulties.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
  • Ongoing formative evaluation of CANtex (firm component).


Community Access Program (CAP)
Start Date: October 1994
End Date: March 31, 2007
Purpose:
  • Provides Canadians with affordable public access to the Internet and the skills they need to use it effectively. Helps Canadians, wherever they live, to take advantage of emerging opportunities in the new global, knowledge-based economy.
Expected Result(s):
  • Improved access to the Internet for Canadians most affected by the digital divide.
Results Achieved:
  • 3,930 community-based public Internet sites, in all parts of Canada, funded in 2005–06.
  • An estimated 15 million visitors a year were served at these sites, and 8 million were repeat users.
  • 68 percent were in rural, remote, northern and First Nations communities, and 32 percent were in urban communities.
  • 31 percent of CAP sites are located where no federal government presence exists.
  • Primary targets are youth, seniors and job-seekers.
  • 8 percent of sites are administered by Aboriginal organizations: 235 sites are on First Nations reserves, and 19 percent of sites serve Aboriginal communities.
  • Most frequent usage consists of training, job search services, and accessing government online services and email.
  Actual
Spending
2003–04
($000)
Actual
Spending
2004–05
($000)
2005–2006 ($000)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance Between Planned and Actual Spending
Program Activity: Spectrum, Information Technologies and Telecommunications Sector — Economic Development
Total Contributions 39,169 32,849 26,457 29,637 29,442* (2,985)
Total Transfer Payments 39,169 32,849 26,457 29,637 29,442* (2,985)
Comments on Variances:
The variance mainly results from one initiative that was initially to be delivered under the SchoolNet Youth Program but was moved to the Community Access Program for practical purposes midway through the fiscal year. A decision was made to report costs of this initiative under the CAP Program.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
The last CAP evaluation took place in January 2004.
  • Evaluation Study of the Community Access Program

* Includes $12.1 million for the Youth Employment Strategy, funded by Human Resources and Social Development Canada.


FedNor — Northern Ontario Development Program
Start Date: April 1, 1996
End Date: June 30, 2011
Purpose:
  • Regional and community development in Northern Ontario.
Expected Result(s):
  • Improved retention and development of youth to help increase business competitiveness as well as community capacity and response to local economic development opportunities and challenges.
  • Enhanced technology infrastructure and innovation through strategic and targeted support.
  • Improved business and trade skills through FedNor-supported counselling and training activities.
Results Achieved:
  • FedNor invested more than $8.5 million to support over 120 internships through its Youth Internship Program, providing recent graduates with valuable work experience that could lead to permanent employment in Northern Ontario.
  • FedNor helped connect Northern Ontario communities to the world by investing more than $11.9 million in 70 ICT projects in 2005–06, leading to increased opportunities for local business, and facilitating community economic development and access to services. FedNor invested more than $10.1 million in 50 innovation projects, helping strengthen the innovation capacity of Northern Ontario.
  • FedNor's International Business Centre helped Northern Ontario compete in the global economy by supporting 10 trade workshops and seminars, attended by more than 145 participants.
  Actual
Spending
2003–04
($000)
Actual
Spending
2004–05
($000)
2005–2006 ($000)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance Between Planned and Actual Spending
Program Activity: Operations Sector — Economic Development
Total Contributions 41,327 37,655 9,650 44,545 44,545 (34,895)
Total Transfer Payments 41,327 37,655 9,650 44,545 44,545 (34,895)
Comments on Variances:
Variance is due to additional funding approved in Budget 2005 and provided through Supplementary Estimates and funding reallocated from other Industry Canada programs.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
Results from an independent evaluation conducted on the Northern Ontario Development Program in 2005–06 were quite positive and concluded that the program is relevant, successful and cost-effective (URL not yet available).


FedNor — Community Futures (Ontario)
Start Date: 1986*
End Date: October 2, 2010
* Transferred to Industry Canada (FedNor) from Human Resources Development Canada in 1995.
Purpose:
  • Community economic development in rural Ontario.
Expected Result(s):
  • Improved SME access to capital and leveraged capital for higher-risk ventures through Community Futures Development Corporation (CFDC) investments in businesses.
Results Achieved:
  • Ontario CFDC investment of $47.4 million in more than 1,140 local businesses leveraged over $88 million from other sources.
  • Through CFDC investments, over 8,000 jobs were created or maintained within local businesses.
  Actual
Spending
2003–04
($000)
Actual
Spending
2004–05
($000)
2005–2006 ($000)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance Between Planned and Actual Spending
Program Activity: Operations Sector — Economic Development
Total Contributions 25,123 24,262 10,810 20,259 20,259 (8,781)
Total Transfer Payments 25,123 24,262 10,810 20,259 20,259 (8,781)
Comments on Variances:
Variance is due to additional funds approved in Budget 2005 and provided through Supplementary Estimates.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
The Community Futures Program was last evaluated March 31, 2003.
  • Evaluation of the Community Futures Program in Ontario


FedNor — Eastern Ontario Development Fund
Start Date: October 12, 2004
End Date: March 31, 2006
Purpose:
  • To promote rural socio-economic development in Eastern Ontario.
Expected Result(s):
  • Strengthened community capacity for economic development in Eastern Ontario, through community-based strategic economic planning and implementation, and through enhanced technology infrastructure.
  • Improved business competitiveness in Eastern Ontario, through support for initiatives to retain and expand existing businesses and encourage new start-ups, including business financing support and the development of human capital.
Results Achieved:
  • Improved competitiveness through the development of over 160 business plans.
  • Increased use of technology through the support of over 25 projects to improve technology infrastructure.
  • Retention and development of businesses through over 130 loans made to local SMEs, valued at over $2.8 million, which leveraged an additional $19.5 million.
  • Attraction, retention and development of human capital through the support of 230 youth internships.
  • Improved business and trade skills through skills-development training/counselling to 10,000 participants.
  Actual
Spending
2003–04
($000)
Actual
Spending
2004–05
($000)
2005–2006 ($000)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance Between Planned and Actual Spending
Program Activity: Operations Sector — Economic Development
Total Contributions - 5,600 6,000 11,950 11,950 (5,950)
Total Transfer Payments - 5,600 6,000 11,950 11,950 (5,950)
Comments on Variances:
The variance between planned and actual spending is a result of funding that was reprofiled from 2004–05 to 2005–06 through the Annual Reference Level Update process, additional funding approved in Budget 2005 and provided through Supplementary Estimates, and funding reallocated from other Industry Canada programs.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
A formative evaluation of the Eastern Ontario Development Fund was conducted in 2005–06. The evaluation concluded that the Eastern Ontario Development Fund was successful, cost-effective and relevant to the needs of Eastern Ontario communities. Results indicated that the program was showing evidence of achieving its intended outcomes (URL not yet available).


Information Highway Applications Branch — Youth Employment Strategy
Note: Although IHAB – YES was separately reported in the 2005–06 RPP, its activities and funding are included in the Community Access Program and, therefore, will not be tabled separately. For more information, see the Community Access Program table.


SchoolNet
Start Date: October 15, 1993
End Date: March 31, 2007
Purpose of Transfer Payments Program:
Works in collaboration with governments, non-profit organizations and the private sector to position Canada at the global forefront of e-learning readiness to support the innovative use of ICTs for lifelong learning and to promote the competitiveness of the e-learning industry. Works with the provinces and territories to develop and showcase best practices in the use of ICTs for learning, to improve connectivity and ICT skills development in First Nations schools, and to carry out research on the connectivity of Canadian society and on the use of ICTs for learning.
Expected Result(s)
  • Increased access to, and effective use of, ICTs and the ICT infrastructure by First Nations students and learners, other Canadian learners, and learning professionals.

  • Increased availability of learning resources that are online, multimedia and Canadian content–rich, and that can be re-used and/or re-purposed.
Results Achieved:
  • 88 percent of schools have been participating in the First Nations SchoolNet program; 41 percent of these schools have achieved adequate connectivity to enable e-learning applications. 80,000 students are now benefiting from the program; 29 percent of schools have video conferencing capability, and the computer-to-student ratio was lowered to 1:4.8 from 1:6.0.
  • The SchoolNet portal provides Canadian elementary and secondary students with access to online resources. The portal received 222,455 visits in 2005–06.
  • 113,411 computers have been refurbished and distributed to schools, libraries and not-for-profit learning organizations, thereby extending the useful life of the computers and diverting them from landfill sites.
  • 4500 tonnes of surplus ICT equipment was recycled or refurbished for further ICT applications and use.
  • To increase the safety and security of young Canadians using the Internet, Cyberwise.ca was developed and launched in partnership with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada. As of March 31, 2006, the site has attracted 80,700 visitors. In order to create awareness, 116,000 information/promotion items have been distributed to the public. Support was also provided to Child Find Manitoba to operate the Cybertip hotline, where Internet users can report abuses of the Internet.
  • Results of Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase II, which provides a benchmark for the status of the integration of ICTs and a basis for future programming, were released in fall 2005. The results are available online at the Young Canadians in a Wired World — Phase II Overview page.
  • 14 of Campus Canada's member institutions (colleges, universities and consortia) offer online post-secondary programs, and 89 Campus Connection participants (colleges and universities) offer online courses. 3,078 online post-secondary courses are available to users through Campus Connections.
  Actual
Spending
2003–04
($000)
Actual
Spending
2004–05
($000)
2005–2006 ($000)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance Between Planned and Actual Spending
Program Activity: Spectrum, Information Technologies and Telecommunications Sector — Economic Development
Total Contributions 42,776 19,738 23,766 20,126 20,124* 3,642
Total Transfer Payments 42,776 19,738 23,766 20,126 20,124* 3,642
Comments on Variances:
The variance mainly results from one initiative that was to be delivered initially under the SchoolNet Youth Program but was moved to the Community Access Program for practical purposes midway through the fiscal year. A decision was made to report costs of this initiative under the CAP Program.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
One mid-term evaluation of the First Nations SchoolNet Program was completed in 2005-06. Key findings indicate that the program continues to be relevant and necessary, that substantial progress has been made towards reaching its goals and objectives, and that the introduction of Regional Management Organizations (RMOs) in 2002 has proven to be an effective and efficient method of program delivery and will continue to be the primary method. Building local capacity was also noted as a very important factor contributing to the program's success.

Mid-Term Evaluation, First Nations SchoolNet Program (July 2005)

* Includes $3.2 million for the Youth Employment Strategy, funded by Human Resources and Social Development Canada.


Social Economy — Financing
Note: The Social Economy program was not implemented.


Softwood Industry Community Economic Adjustment Initiative
Note: Although included in the 2005–06 RPP, program funding ended March 31, 2005.


Structured Financing Facility (SFF)
Start Date: September 13, 2001
End Date: March 31, 2008
Purpose:
  • Stimulate economic activities in the Canadian shipbuilding and industrial marine industry by providing financial assistance to buyers/lessees of Canadian-built ships.
Expected Result(s):
  • Increased awareness/knowledge about SFF benefits.
  • Increased use of SFF by Canadian/foreign buyers or lessees.
Results Achieved:
  • To date, 29 projects have been contracted, representing $52 million of SFF disbursements, $440 million of shipyard sales, and 3,085 person years of employment.
  Actual
Spending
2003–04
($000)
Actual
Spending
2004–05
($000)
2005–2006 ($000)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance Between Planned and Actual Spending
Program Activity: Industry Sector — Economic Development
Total Contributions 3,270 9,455 39,311 16,026 16,025 23,286
Total Transfer Payments 3,270 9,455 39,311 16,026 16,025 23,286
Comments on Variances:
Reprofiling of funds ($22,685,226) to the following two years, $600,000 cash management with the Language Industries Initiative, and a lapse.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:

The program's effectiveness in capturing opportunities in domestic markets was diminished by terms and conditions that restricted access to accelerated capital cost allowance benefits. Nevertheless, stakeholders concluded that the SFF filled a need in the shipbuilding industry. Stakeholders also gave a positive evaluation to the program's management.

  • Interim Evaluation of the Structured Financing Facility (October 2004)


Details on Other Programs

Industry Canada is responsible for the Canada Small Business Financing (CSBF) Program. This program does not provide grants and contributions; therefore, it is not reported in the table “Details on Transfer Payments Programs.” The CSBF is included under the business line “Industry Sector Development.”

Canada Small Business Financing (CSBF) Program
Start Date: 1961
End Date: Ongoing
Purpose:
  • Administration of the Canada Small Business Financing Act (CSBFA) and the Small Business Loans Act.
Expected Result(s):
  • Access to debt financing for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).
Results Achieved:
  • Loans made:
    • A total of 10,864 loans, representing $1,097.4 million, were made to SMEs under the CSBF program in 2005–06.
    • A total of 438 capital leases, representing $38 million, were made to SMEs under the Capital Leasing Pilot Project in 2005–06.
  • Claims paid:
    • In 2005–06, 1,616 CSBFA claims totalling $72.5 million, 183 Small Business Loans Act claims totalling $5.2 million and 15 Capital Leasing Pilot Project claims totalling $426,000 were paid.
  Actual
Spending
2003–04
($000)
Actual
Spending
2004–05
($000)
2005–2006 ($000)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance Between Planned and Actual Spending
Program Activity: Operations Sector — Economic Development
Statutory Payments under the Small Business Loans Act 26,011 11,131 8,300 5,248 5,248 3,052
Statutory Payments under the Canada Small Business Financing Act 73,493 77,604 109,390 72,975 72,975 36,415
Total Other Payments 99,504 88,735 117,690 78,223 78,223 39,467
Comments on Variances:
There were fewer claim payments than anticipated in 2005–06.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:

In 2004–05, the CSBF Program was reviewed, covering the five-year period from April 1, 1999, to March 31, 2004.

The review concluded that the program was still relevant to the needs of small business, there are no attractive alternatives to it, and there is minimal overlap between it and other federal initiatives to support access to financing by small business.

Independent research and an outside evaluation of the CSBF Program under the direction of a public–private sector committee, based on a Result-Based Management and Accountability Framework, was completed to support this review.

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