Departmental Performance Report for the period ending March 31, 2009

Departmental Performance Report, For the period ending March 31, 2009

Statement of Management Responsibility

Section 3: Supplementary Information

3.3 Other Items of Interest

3.4 Additional Information for Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

3.5 Expected Results Information for Program Sub-Activities and Sub-Sub-Activities by Strategic Outcome

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Department of Industry (033)

Statement of Management Responsibility

Responsibility for the integrity and objectivity of the accompanying financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2009 and all information contained in this report rests with departmental management. These statements have been prepared by management in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies, which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector.

Management is responsible for the integrity and objectivity of the information in these financial statements. Some of the information in the financial statements is based on management’s best estimates and judgement and gives due consideration to materiality. To fulfil its accounting and reporting responsibilities, management maintains a set of accounts that provides a centralized record of the Industry Canada’s financial transactions. Financial information submitted to the Public Accounts of Canada and included in Industry Canada’s Departmental Performance Report is consistent with these financial statements.

Management maintains a system of financial management and internal control designed to provide reasonable assurance that financial information is reliable, that assets are safeguarded and that transactions are in accordance with the Financial Administration Act, are executed in accordance with prescribed regulations, within Parliamentary authorities, and are properly recorded to maintain accountability of Government funds. Management also seeks to ensure the objectivity and integrity of data in its financial statements by careful selection, training and development of qualified staff, by organizational arrangements that provide appropriate divisions of responsibility, and by communication programs aimed at ensuring that regulations, policies, standards and managerial authorities are understood throughout Industry Canada.

The financial statements of Industry Canada have not been audited.

The paper version was signed by
Richard Dicerni, Deputy Head
Ottawa, Canada
The paper version was signed by
Mitch Davies, A/CFO
 

 

Industry Canada Statement of Operations (Unaudited) For the period ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars)
  2009 2008
  Marketplace Science, technology & innovation Economic development Total Total
Expenses          
Transfer Payments          
Industry (2) 163,804 358 164,160 122,843
Other 7,588 82,700 247,172 337,460 486,988
Total Transfer Payments 7,586 246,504 247,530 501,620 609,831
Operating expenses          
Salaries and employee benefits 335,498 90,357 113,595 539,450 500,647
Professional and special services 63,279 14,590 29,939 107,808 96,899
Accommodation 30,451 12,005 14,092 56,548 55,454
Travel 11,480 2,045 4,524 18,049 17,817
Amortization 9,720 4,287 1,096 15,103 15,440
Communication 7,438 1,091 3,557 12,086 13,039
Furniture and equipment 6,784 4,840 1,727 13,351 13,087
Equipment repair and maintenance 5,789 2,456 2,451 10,696 10,786
Rental 9,662 297 847 10,806 10,511
Utilities, materials and supplies 3,367 3,875 1,369 8,611 9,921
Postage 1,394 171 290 1,855 1,902
Loss on disposal of capital assets 20 118 5 143 198
Other operating expenses 1,287 1,671 5,733 8,691 12,257
Total operating expenses 486,169 137,803 179,225 803,197 757,958
Total expenses 493,755 384,307 426,755 1,304,817 1,367,789
Revenues          
Sales of services 704,981 13,384 53,368 771,733 680,915
Dividends - - 16,488 16,488 21,482
Revenue from fines 14,597 - - 14,597 14,969
Amortization of discounts 171 67 3,537 3,775 8,630
Other revenue 311 526 417 1,254 1,204
Gains on disposal of assets 171 26 3 200 346
Total revenues 720,231 14,003 73,813 808,047 727,546
Net cost of operations (226,476) 370,304 352,942 496,770 640,243

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

Industry Canada Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited) At March 31
(in thousands of dollars)    
  2009 2008
ASSETS    
Financial assets    
Accounts receivables and advances (Note 4) 102,348 207,628
Loans (Note 5) 404,913 360,473
Investments (Note 6) 1,316,178 1,066,400
Total financial assets 1,823,439 1,634,501
Non-financial assets    
Prepaid expenses 277 171
Tangible capital assets (Note 7) 109,228 111,115
Total non-financial assets 109,505 111,286
TOTAL 1,932,944 1,745,787
LIABILITIES    
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities (Note 8) 649,713 855,754
Vacation and compensatory leave 23,910 22,816
Deferred revenue (Note 9) 4,957,325 958,159
Allowance for loan guarantees (Note 12) 346,714 301,751
Allowance for employee severance benefits (Note 11) 95,070 81,784
Other liabilities (Note 10) 29,827 27,743
  6,102,559 2,248,007
Equity of Canada (4,169,615) (502,220)
TOTAL 1,932,944 1,745,787

Contingent liabilities (Note 12)
Contractual obligations (Note 14)

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

Industry Canada Statement of Equity of Canada (Unaudited) For the period ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars)
  2009 2008
Equity of Canada, beginning of year (502,220) (625,169)
Net cost of operations (496,770) (640,243)
Current year appropriations used (Note 3) 1,228,571 1,363,914
Revenue not available for spending (600,936) (521,541)
Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue fund (Note 3) (3,885,341) (163,633)
Services provided without charge by other government departments (Note 14) 87,081 84,452
Equity of Canada, end of year (4,169,615) (502,220)

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

Industry Canada Statement of Cash Flow (Unaudited) For the period ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars)
  2009 2008
Operating activities    
Net cost of operations 496,770 640,243
Non-cash items:    
Amortization of tangible capital assets (15,103) (15,440)
Gain on disposal of tangible capital assets 179 347
Write-down of tangible capital assets (143) (198)
Loss on write-offs of tangible capital assets (23) -
Adjustment to tangible capital assets (1,362) 1,005
Services provided without charge (Note 14) (87,081) (84,452)
Variations in Statement of Financial Position:    
Decrease (increase) in liabilities (3,854,552) 47,000
Increase in financial assets 188,938 72,572
Increase (decrease) in prepaid expenses 106 (63)
Cash used by operating activities (3,272,271) 661,014
Capital investment activities    
Acquisitions of tangible capital assets 14,748 18,089
Proceeds from disposal of tangible capital assets (183) (363)
Cash used by capital investment activities 14,565 17,726
Net cash provided by (to) Government of Canada (3,257,706) 678,740

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements

Industry Canada
Notes to the Financial Statements (Unaudited)

1. Authority and Objectives

The authorities for the programs for which Industry Canada is responsible are derived from the Department of Industry Act. Many other acts are under the responsibility of the Minister of Industry, and Treasury Board also defines other specific Industry authorities.

Industry Canada aims to help Canadians contribute to the knowledge economy and improve productivity and innovation performance through its three strategic outcomes, which are mutually reinforcing. Sound marketplace frameworks help establish a business environment that supports innovation, investment and entrepreneurial activity. Fostering innovation in science and technology helps ensure that discoveries and breakthroughs happen here in Canada, and that the social and economic benefits of these innovations contribute to improving Canadians’ standard of living and quality of life. Encouraging investment in technology will help Canadian businesses to compete in the global marketplace and increase opportunities for trade. Successful businesses combined with a sound environment form the sustainable communities that attract investment. Taken together, Industry Canada’s strategic outcomes support growth in employment, income and productivity, and promote sustainable development in Canada.

Industry Canada’s activities are delivered at its headquarters in Ottawa as well as in the regions. There are six regional offices with service points located across Canada.

Industry Canada has a number of transfer payment programs through which it provides grants and contributions to recipients in targeted groups and sectors. Each transfer payment program has specific objectives and expected results that support the achievement of Industry Canada’s strategic objectives.

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies, which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector.

Significant accounting policies are as follows:

  1. Parliamentary appropriations - Industry Canada is financed through Parliamentary appropriations. Appropriations provided to Industry Canada do not parallel financial reporting according to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles since appropriations are primarily based on cash flow requirements. Consequently, items recognized in the statement of operations and the statement of financial position are not necessarily the same as those provided through appropriations from Parliament. Note 3 provides a high-level reconciliation between the bases of reporting.
  2. Consolidation - The financial statements include the accounts of Industry Canada, the Canadian Intellectual Property Office (revolving fund) and three special operating agencies: Measurement Canada, Superintendent of Bankruptcy, and Industrial Technologies Office. The accounts of these sub-entities have been consolidated with those of Industry Canada and all inter-organizational balances and transactions have been eliminated. Industry Canada’s investment in the Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC) is recorded at cost. The net results of the BDC are not consolidated in these financial statements as Industry Canada is not deemed to control the Crown corporation.
  3. Net cash provided by (to) Government - Industry Canada operates within the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF), which is administered by the Receiver General for Canada. All cash received by Industry Canada is deposited to the CRF and all cash disbursements made by Industry Canada are paid from the CRF. The net cash provided by Government is the difference between all cash receipts and all cash disbursements including transactions between departments of the federal government.
  4. Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue Fund - This is the difference between the net cash provided by Government and appropriations used in a year, excluding the amount of non-respendable revenue recorded by Industry Canada. It results from timing differences between when a transaction affects appropriations and when it is processed through the CRF.
  5. Revenues
    • Revenues from regulatory fees are recognized in the accounts based on the services provided in the year.
    • Funds received from external parties for specified purposes are recorded upon receipt as deferred revenues. These revenues are recognized in the period in which the related expenses are incurred.
    • Other revenues are accounted for in the period in which the underlying transaction or event occurred that gave rise to the revenues.
    • Revenues that have been received but not yet earned are recorded as deferred revenues.
  6. Expenses
    Expenses are recorded on an accrual basis.
    • Grants are recognized in the year in which the conditions for payment are met. In the case of grants which do not form part of an existing program, the expense is recognized when the Government announces a decision to make a non-recurring transfer, provided the enabling legislation or authorization for payment receives parliamentary approval prior to the completion of the financial statements.
    • Contributions are recognized in the year in which the recipient has met the eligibility criteria or fulfilled the terms of a contractual transfer agreement.
    • Vacation pay and compensatory leave are expensed as the benefits accrue to employees under their respective terms of employment.
    • Services provided without charge by other government departments for accommodation, the employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans, workers' compensation costs, and legal services are recorded as operating expenses at their estimated cost.
  7. Employee future benefits
    1. Pension benefits: Eligible employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, a multi-employer plan administered by the Government of Canada. Industry Canada's contributions to the Plan are charged to expenses in the year incurred and represent the total departmental obligation to the Plan. Current legislation does not require Industry Canada to make contributions for any actuarial deficiencies of the Plan.
    2. Severance benefits: Employees are entitled to severance benefits under labour contracts or conditions of employment. These benefits are accrued as employees render the services necessary to earn them. The obligation relating to the benefits earned by employees is calculated using information derived from the results of the actuarially determined liability for employee severance benefits for the Government as a whole.
  8. Receivables and advances - Receivables and advances are stated as amounts expected to be ultimately realized. A provision is made for receivables where recovery is considered uncertain.
  9. Loans - Loans are stated at the amounts realized. Loans are subject to payment in the event of the default of the debtor. An allowance is used to reduce the carrying value of the loans to amounts that approximate their net realizable value. Interest on loans receivable is applied in accordance with the policy that governs the loan. Interest revenue is recognized at the time it is applied to the account.
  10. Allowances for loan guarantees - An allowance for loan guarantees is recorded for potential losses on loan guarantees when it is likely that a payment will be made in the future to honour a guarantee and when the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated.

    The allowance for losses on outstanding loan guarantees is based on forecasting models developed by program areas.
  11. Repayable contributions - Repayable contributions are contributions the recipient is expected to repay. Depending on their nature, they are classified as either unconditionally repayable or conditionally repayable and are accounted for differently.
    1. Unconditionally repayable contributions are contributions that must be repaid without qualification. Normally, these contributions are provided with a low or no interest clause.They are recorded on the Statement of Financial Position as loans at their estimated present value, if they contain significant concessionary terms (defined to be when the grant portion is greater than 25% of the contribution). Otherwise, they are recorded at the face value of the loan. A portion of the unamortized discount is brought into income each year to reflect the change in the present value of the contributions outstanding. Appropriate allowances for uncollectible amounts are also established based on an individual appraisal of accounts.
    2. Conditionally repayable contributions are contributions that all or a part of become repayable, if conditions specified in the contribution agreement come into effect. Accordingly, they are not recorded on the Statement of Financial Position until such time as the conditions specified in the agreement are satisfied, at which time they are then recorded as a receivable and a corresponding reduction in transfer payment expense.
  12. Prepaid expenses - Includes prepaid expenses, deferred charges and payments where, pursuant to a contract or contribution agreement, a payment is made before the completion of the work, delivery of the goods or rendering of the service.
  13. Contingent liabilities - Contingent liabilities are potential liabilities, which may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded. If the likelihood is not determinable or an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the contingency is disclosed in the notes to the financial statements.
  14. Environmental liabilities - Environmental liabilities reflect the estimated costs related to the management and remediation of environmentally contaminated sites. Based upon management's best estimates, a liability is accrued and an expense recorded when the contamination occurs or when Industry Canada becomes aware of the contamination and is obligated, or is likely to be obligated, to incur such costs. If the likelihood of Industry Canada's obligation to incur these costs is not determinable, or if an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the costs are disclosed as contingent liabilities in the notes to the financial statements.
  15. Foreign currency transactions - Transactions involving foreign currencies are translated into Canadian dollar equivalents using rates of exchange in effect at the time of those transactions. Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in a foreign currency are translated into Canadian dollars using the rate of exchange in effect on March 31, 2009. Gains and losses resulting from foreign currency transactions are included in the Statement of Operations.
  16. Tangible capital assets - All tangible capital assets and leasehold improvements having an initial cost of $10,000 or more are recorded at their acquisition cost. Industry Canada does not capitalize intangibles, works of art and historical treasures that have cultural, aesthetic or historical value; assets located on Indian Reserves; and museum collections.

    Amortization of tangible capital assets is done on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset as follows:

    Asset Class Amortization period
    Buildings 15 to 30 years
    Works and infrastructure 30 years
    Machinery and equipment 3 to 10 years
    Vehicles 5 to 10 years
    Assets under construction Once in service, in accordance with asset type
    Leasehold improvements Lesser of the remaining term of the lease or useful life of the improvement
  17. Measurement uncertainty - The preparation of these financial statements in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies, which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector, requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses reported in the financial statements. At the time of preparation of these statements, management believes the estimates and assumptions to be reasonable. The most significant items where estimates are used are contingent liabilities, environmental liabilities, the liability for employee severance benefits and the useful life of tangible capital assets. Actual results could significantly differ from those estimated. Management's estimates are reviewed periodically and, as adjustments become necessary, they are recorded in the financial statements in the year they become known.

3. Parliamentary appropriations

Industry Canada receives most of its funding through annual Parliamentary appropriations. Items recognized in the statement of operations and the statement of financial position in one year, may be funded through Parliamentary appropriations in prior, current or future years. Accordingly, Industry Canada has different net results of operations for the year on a government-funding basis than on an accrual accounting basis. The differences are reconciled in the following tables:

(a) Reconciliation of net cost of operations to current year appropriations used

(in thousands of dollars)    
  2009 2008
Net cost of operations 496,770 640,243
Adjustments for items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting appropriations:
Add (Less):
   
Revenue not available for spending 600,936 521,541
Repayment of conditionally repayable contributions 138,375 180,015
Services provided without charge (87,081) (84,452)
Allowance for loan guarantees (44,178) 108,755
Bad debts/write-offs/write-down (6,852) (14,221)
Amortization of tangible capital assets (15,103) (15,440)
Employee severance benefits (13,286) 1,773
Adjustment of previous year's Accounts Payable 13,593 7,930
Refund of previous year's expenditures 11,913 3,861
Transfer payment adjustments 510 8,746
Allowance for environmental liabilities 10 (12)
Vacation pay and compensatory leave (1,469) 903
Loss on disposal and write-down of tangible capital assets (143) (198)
Year-end accrual of transfer payments 70,996 (107,757)
Other (1,582) 935
  1,163,409 1,252,622
Adjustments for items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting appropriations:
Add (Less):
   
Loans, investments, and advances 51,305 96,662
Deferred revenue (1,266) (3,889)
Acquisitions of tangible capital assets 14,748 18,089
Allowance for vacation pay 375 430
  65,162 111,292
Current Year Appropriation Used 1,228,571 1,363,914

(b) Appropriation provided and used

(in thousands of dollars)    
  2009 2008
Vote 1 - Operating expenditures 449,062 427,254
Vote 5 - Capital expenditures 21,936 18,232
Vote 10 - Grants and contributions 649,598 760,840
Statutory amounts 379,552 417,446
  1,500,148 1,623,772
Less:    
Appropriations available for future years (152,645) (138,808)
Lapsed appropriations: Operating (118,932) (121,050)
Current year appropriations used 1,228,571 1,363,914

(c) Reconciliation of net cash provided by Government to current year appropriations used

(in thousands of dollars)    
  2009 2008
Net cash provided by (to) Government of Canada (3,257,706) 678,740
Revenue not available for spending 600,936 521,541
  (2,656,770) 1,200,281
Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue Fund    
Variations in Statement of Financial Position:    
Variation in financial assets (188,938) (72,572)
Variation in liabilities 3,854,552 (47,000)
Variation in prepaid expenses (106) 63
Other:    
Year-end accrual of transfer payments 70,996 (107,757)
Repayment of conditionally repayable contributions 138,375 180,015
Allowance for loan guarantees (44,178) 108,755
Loans, investments, and advances 51,305 96,662
Miscellaneous 3,335 5,467
Total 3,885,341 163,633
Current year appropriation used 1,228,571 1,363,914

4. Accounts receivable and advances

(in thousands of dollars)    
  2009 2008
External    
Accounts receivable - other revenue 46,202 44,875
Allowance for doubtful accounts (37,655) (41,545)
Accrued receivables 18,251 21,699
Employee advances 88 114
Other receivables 2,002 2
Total external 28,888 25,145
Receivables from other Federal Government departments and agencies 73,460 182,483
Total accounts receivable and advances 102,348 207,628

5. Loans

(in thousands of dollars)    
  2009 2008
Atlantic Provinces Power Development Act 690 1,132
Enterprise development loans 110,000 110,000
Less: Unamortized discount loans (27,666) (31,124)
Net Enterprise development loans 82,334 78,876
Unconditionally repayable contributions 325,610 281,568
Less: Unamortized discount (785) (1,103)
Less: Allowance for doubtful loans and advances (2,936) -
Net unconditionally repayable contributions 321,889 280,465
Loans and advances on expired loan guarantees 230,265 216,354
Less: Allowance for doubtful loans (230,265) (216,354)
Net loans on expired loan guarantees - -
Total loans 404,913 360,473

Atlantic Provinces Power Development Act
Loans have been made to Atlantic Provinces, to assist in the generation of electrical energy by steam driven generators in the provinces, and in the control and transmission of electric energy. The loans bear interest at rates from 4.5% to 8.5% per annum, and are repayable in annual instalments over the next 5 years, with final instalments due March 31, 2014.

Enterprise development loans
These loans are made to industries engaged in manufacturing, processing or service industries in Canada in order to promote the establishment, improvement, growth, efficiency or international competitiveness of such industries, or to assist them in their financial restructuring. There is one interest-free loan outstanding which is repayable at maturity on April 1, 2017.

Unconditionally repayable contributions
The unamortized discount on unconditionally repayable contributions is calculated by applying the 25% rule on an individual loan basis.

Loans and advances on expired loan guarantees
Industry Canada guarantees loans to small business enterprises under the Small Business Loans Act, the Canada Small Business Financing Act, the Capital Leasing Pilot Project and other loan guarantee payments net of recoveries.

6. Investments

(in thousands of dollars)    
  2009 2008
Business Development Bank of Canada 1,316,178 1,066,400
Total investments 1,316,178 1,066,400

Business Development Bank of Canada
The Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC) is an agent of Her Majesty, reports through the Minister of Industry, and is listed in Part I of Schedule III of the Financial Administration Act. Included in the account are:

  • Common Shares - The Government’s investment in the common shares of the BDC represents a book value of $1,058.4 million. ($808.4 million in 2007-2008)
  • Preferred Shares - The outstanding book value of preferred shares purchased pursuant to Section 23 of the Business Development Bank of Canada Act as at March 3, 2009 is $230 million.
  • Contributed Capital - Contributed capital in the amount of $27.778 million was issued in 1999-2000 in counterpart of the transfer of the Cultural Industries Development Fund to the BDC.

For the period ending March 31, 2009, Industry Canada received $16,487,645 in dividend revenue from the BDC ($21,482,202 in 2007-2008).

7. Tangible capital assets

(in thousands of dollars) Cost Accumulated amortization    
Tangible Captial asset class Opening balance Acquisitions Disposals/write-offs/adjustments* Closing balance Opening balance Amortization Disposals/write-offs/adjustments* Closing balance 2008–2009
net book value
2007–2008
net book value
Land 1,450 - - 1,450 - - - - 1,450 1,450
Buildings 35,636 86 (10,443) 46,165 20,044 1,394 190 21,248 24,917 15,592
Works and infrastructure 6,178 - (35) 6,213 4,065 211 - 4,276 1,937 2,113
Machinery and equipment 138,827 5,115 (108,465) 252,407 103,615 10,206 (98,655) 212,476 39,931 35,212
Vehicles 12,360 1,379 868 12,871 8,500 1,068 856 8,712 4,159 3,860
Assets under Construction 41,637 8,041 23,542 26,136 - - - - 26,136 41,637
Leasehold improvements 22,075 127 (1,189) 23,391 10,824 2,224 355 12,693 10,698 11,251
Total 258,163 14,748 (95,722) 368,633 147,048 15,103 (97,254) 259,405 109,228 111,115

Amortization expense for the year ended March 31,2009 is $15,103,447 (2007-2008 - $15,440,097).

* Includes primarily disposals, write-offs, but also includes adjustments to capital assets.

8. Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

(in thousands of dollars)    
  2009 2008
External    
Accounts payable 338,062 476,384
Accrued salaries & wages 14,477 12,771
Accrued liabilities 335 345
Transfer payments 282,761 353,757
Other external payables 123 87
Total external 635,758 843,344
Other government departments 13,955 12,410
Total accounts payable and accrued liabilities 649,713 855,754

9. Deferred revenue

The majority of Industry Canada's deferred revenues result from the auction of radio license frequencies. These revenues are recognized over a ten-year period. There was another auction during the fiscal year which resulted in deferred revenue of $ 4.2 billion. Another main source of deferred revenues comes from examination requests of intellectual property. These fees are charged in advance and recognized as revenue once the exam is completed.

Prime Minister’s Awards were established to record amounts deposited by external parties to be used in support of the Prime Minister’s Awards for Teaching Excellence.

(in thousands of dollars)    
  2009 2008
Deferred Revenue, opening balance 958,159 1,125,237
License fees received 4,467,727 203,967
License fees earned (469,726) (375,409)
  3,998,001 (171,442)
Fees for trademarks, patents and copyrights received 31,834 32,999
Fees for trademarks, patents and copyrights earned (30,872) (29,110)
  962 3,889
Other services of a regulatory nature received 305 657
Other services of a regulatory nature earned (657) (763)
  (352) (106)
Prime Minister's Awards received 150 150
Prime Minister's Awards disbursed (125) -
  25 150
Customer deposits received 56,505 56,629
Customer deposits disbursed (55,975) (56,198)
  530 431
Deferred revenue, closing balance 4,957,325 958,159

10. Other liabilities

Other liabilities represent funds received from third parties to be disbursed for a specified purpose. Activity during the year in these accounts is as follows:

(in thousands of dollars)        
  Opening balance Receipts Payments Closing balance
Restitutions under the Competition Act - 30 24 6
Cost sharing project 1,304 862 936 1,230
Securities in Trust, Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act 83 - - 83
Contra - Securities in Trust, Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act (31) - - (31)
Unclaimed Dividends and Undistributed Assets 17,327 3,454 1,767 19,014
Petro Canada Enterprises unclaimed shares 690 - 1 689
Canada Business Corporations Act (CBCA) 7,545 43 36 7,552
Winding-up and Restructuring Act 727 555 - 1,282
Canada / Provinces Business Service Centre 98 400 496 2
Total other liabilities 27,743 5,344 3,260 29,827

Restitutions under the Competition Act - This account was established to facilitate judgements rendered under article 52 of the Competition Act, and account for monies received in trust for restitution and for subsequent payment.

Cost sharing projects - Industry Canada partners with other governments and external organizations to deliver programs and services that contribute to an innovative economy. The account was established to record amounts deposited by these partners.

Securities in trust and income from Securities in Trust, Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act - was established to record dividends paid on shares held by a bankrupt stockbroker on behalf of clients. As the shares were not registered in clients’ names, dividends are paid to the last registered owner, in this case, the stockbroker. These dividends are forwarded to the Superintendent of Bankruptcy until such time as rightful owners are identified.

Unclaimed Dividends and Undistributed assets, Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act - This account represents amounts credited to the Receiver General in accordance with the provisions of the Act, pending distribution to creditors.

Petro-Canada Enterprises Inc. - unclaimed shares - was established to record the liability to shareholders who have not presented their shares for payment in accordance with Section 227 of the Canada Business Corporations Act.

Unclaimed Dividends and Undistributed Assets, Canada Business Corporations Act - was established for the purpose of recording liabilities to creditors and shareholders who have not been located. The account is charged when funds are paid to them.

Winding-up and Restructuring Act - records deposits credited to the Receiver General as a result of the final winding-up of the operations of a company, in accordance with sections 138 and 139 of the Winding-up and Restructuring Act, pending distribution to the persons entitled thereto.

Canada/Provinces Business Service Centre - was established to record monies received from provinces under cost-sharing agreements for the Canada-Ontario Business Service Centre.

11. Employee benefits

a) Pension benefits
Industry Canada’s employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, which is sponsored and administered by the Government of Canada. Pension benefits accrue up to a maximum period of 35 years at a rate of 2 percent per year of pensionable service, times the average of the best five consecutive years of earnings. The benefits are integrated with Canada/Québec Pension Plans benefits and they are indexed to inflation.

Both the employees and Industry Canada contribute to the cost of the Plan. The 2008– 2009 expense amounts to $51,293,315 ($51,604,353 in 2007–2008), which represents approximately 2.0 times (2.1 in 2007–2008) the contributions by employees.

Industry Canada's responsibility with regard to the Plan is limited to its contributions. Actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the financial statements of the Government of Canada, as the Plan's sponsor.

b) Severance benefits
Industry Canada provides severance benefits to its employees based on eligibility, years of service and final salary. These severance benefits are not pre-funded. Benefits will be paid from future appropriations. Information about the severance benefits, measured as at March 31, is as follows:

(in thousands of dollars)    
  2009 2008
Accrued benefit obligation, beginning of year 81,784 83,557
Expense for the year 22,302 7,859
Benefits paid during the year (9,016) (9,632)
Accrued benefit obligation, end of year 95,070 81,784

12. Contingent liabilities

a) Contaminated sites
Liabilities are accrued to record the estimated costs related to the management and remediation of contaminated sites where Industry Canada is obligated or likely to be obligated to incur such costs. Industry Canada has identified 2 sites where such action is possible and for which a liability of $90,000 ( $99,657 in 2007–2008) has been recorded. Industry Canada’s ongoing efforts to assess contaminated sites may result in additional environmental liabilities related to newly identified sites, or changes in the assessments or intended use of existing sites. These liabilities will be accrued by Industry Canada in the year in which they become known.

b) Claims and litigation
Claims have been made against Industry Canada in the normal course of operations. Legal proceedings for claims totaling approximately $245,207 ( $245,207 in 2007–2008 ) were still pending at March 31, 2009. Some of these potential liabilities may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded in the financial statements.

c) Loan guarantees

Industry Canada has guaranteed the following debts:

(in thousands of dollars)    
  Authorized Limit Loan Guarantee
Outstanding
Balance
Enterprise Development Program 1,200,000 212
Small Business Loans Act (SBLA) 1,838,292 11,870
Canada Small Business Financing Act (CSBFA) 1,368,801 666,976
Capital Leasing Pilot Project 15,661 10,943
Regional Aircraft Credit Facility 1,500,000 206,322

An allowance of $346,714,173 has been recorded for estimated losses on outstanding loan guarantees ($301,751,409 in 2007-2008). The expenses related to loan guarantees are reported under other transfer payments in the Statement of Operations.

Enterprise Development Program - Loans are made to Canadian manufacturers and members of the service industry for the purpose of promoting the establishment, growth, efficiency and international competitiveness of Canadian industry. These loans also foster the expansion of Canadian industry and of Canadian trade to a person engaged or about to engage in manufacturing, processing or other commercial activity.

Small Business Loan Act (SBLA) Loan Guarantee Program and Canada Small Business Financing Act (CSBFA) Loan Guarantee Program - Loans are made directly by approved lenders to small business enterprises, providing for sharing of each individual loan loss, if any, on the basis of 85% government, 15% lender, to an aggregate, per lending institution not exceeding the Minister’s contingent liability, as stated in Section 5 of the SBLA and Section 6(2) of the CSBFA.

The authorized limit represents the Crown’s maximum liability incurred on the aggregate amount of loans made by the lender starting in April 1993 (SBLA) and April 1999 (CSBFA).

The outstanding guarantee for loans made starting in April 1993 (SBLA) and April 1999 (CSBFA) is the lesser of the Crown’s net liability (authorized limit less claims paid by the Crown) or 85% of the outstanding loan amounts of the lenders.

Capital Leasing Pilot Project (CLPP) - Capital leases were made directly by approved lessors to small business enterprises, providing for sharing of each individual lease loss, if any, on the basis of 85% government, 15% lessor to an aggregate, per leasing institution, not exceeding the Minister’s contingent liability based upon the aggregate amount of leases registered per leasing institution, as stated in section 7 of the CLPP.

The authorized limit represents the Crown’s maximum liability incurred on the aggregate amount of the capital leases having been entered or transferred since the period starting in April 2002.

The outstanding guarantee for capital leases entered into since April 2002, is the lesser of the Crown’s net liability or 85% of the outstanding capital lease amounts of the lessors.

Regional Aircraft Credit Facility - Industry Canada has extended loan guarantees on several Air Canada regional jets. Provisioning from the Canada Account Loss Provisioning Pool has been set aside by Finance Canada, manager of the funds. The loan guarantees began in the summer of 2005.

13. Contractual obligations

The nature of Industry Canada's activity results in some large multi-year contracts and obligations whereby Industry Canada will be committed to make future payments when the services/goods are rendered. Major commitments that can be reasonably estimated are as follows:

  2010 2011 2012 2013 Thereafter Total
  (in thousands of dollars)
Transfer Payments 410,377 319,319 272,839 132,164 31,839 1,166,538
Other goods and services 71,102 4,378 1,156 856 2,820 80,312
Other 10,925 - - - - 10,925
Total 492,404 323,697 273,995 133,020 34,659 1,257,775

14. Related party transactions

Industry Canada is related as a result of common ownership to all Government of Canada departments, agencies, and Crown corporations. Industry Canada enters into transactions with these entities in the normal course of business and on normal trade terms. Also, during the year, Industry Canada received services, which were obtained without charge from other Government departments.

Services provided without charge:
During the year Industry Canada received, without charge, services from other departments for accommodation, legal fees, contributions for employees' share of insurance premiums, and worker's compensation coverage.

(in thousands of dollars)    
  2009 2008
Accommodation provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) 56,548 55,454
Contributions covering employees' share of insurance premiums and expenditures paid by Treasury Board Secretariat 26,690 21,726
Worker's compensation coverage provided by Human Resources Skills Development Canada 491 454
Salary and associated expenditures of legal services provided by Justice Canada 3,352 6,818
Total services provided without charge 87,081 84,452

The Government has structured some of its administrative activities for efficiency and cost-effectiveness purposes so that one department performs these on behalf of all without charge. The costs of these services, which include payroll and cheque issuance services provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada and audit services provided by the Office of the Auditor General, are not included as an expense in the department's Statement of Operations.

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IM/IT Governance and Responsibilities at Industry Canada

In the 2008–09 Report on Plans and Priorities, Industry Canada identified information management (IM) and information technology (IT) governance and responsibilities as a departmental priority. As such, the Department committed to ensuring that all IM and IT investment decisions remained consistent with departmental priorities, maximized benefits and provided high levels of service to Canadians. Industry Canada’s progress in meeting this commitment is summarized below.

In the IM area, the Deputy Minister named the Assistant Deputy Minister of Small Business and Marketplace Services as the senior executive responsible for information management in January 2008.

In 2008–09, to support the ADM’s new role as senior executive, the Department consulted with senior managers to develop an enterprise IM governance and accountability framework. The Department also developed a four-phase, multi-year IM agenda with defined outcomes that was designed to fully integrate IM into departmental business processes. IM projects identified in the IM agenda are now subject to the IM/IT governance process for investment review and funding. In 2008–09, Industry Canada secured approval and funding ($3.2 million) to develop an enterprise-wide business-based classification structure as a critical piece of the IM program. The Department also secured approval and funding to implement an enterprise wiki.

Industry Canada developed IM products, including Departing Employee and Shared-Drive User Guidelines, completed 25 training and awareness sessions on access to information and privacy, and held multiple training sessions on the use of library resources.

In the IT area, Industry Canada achieved operational cost savings of $1.4 million, a budget reduction accomplished despite an increase in operational activities. The Chief Information Office was also able to meet the Service Level Agreement targets while continuing to provide reliable service.

Industry Canada has a project management stage-gate governance process to guide and govern the project development life cycle from inception to completion. The process is the conceptual and operational segment of the project delivery framework, which is integral to the success of IT-enabled projects.

In 2008–09, Industry Canada added a post-launch review to the stage-gate governance process. The review’s purpose is to summarize project accomplishments, provide an opportunity to evaluate the overall success of products/services, and determine the extent to which stated objectives were satisfied and anticipated outcomes were realized. A benefits-realization report is then prepared for senior management at Industry Canada. This report compares expected benefits that were achieved with those that were planned.

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Section 41, Official Languages Act

In 2008–09, Industry Canada and the regional development agencies (the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec and Western Economic Diversification Canada) received direction and funding through the Government of Canada’s Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2008–2013: Acting for the Future to implement an economic development initiative to foster the development of new business expertise in communities. For Canadians, this will mean economic development — tailored to their regional needs — through innovation, entrepreneurship, partnerships and diversifying economic activities.

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3.4 Additional Information for Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

Industry CanadaStrategic Outcome: A Fair, Efficient and Competitive Marketplace

Strategic Policy Sector — Marketplace

Expected Result: Development and coordination of economic policy frameworks that support a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace
Performance Indicator Results Trend
Number of policy initiatives, including legislative and regulatory amendments tabled and approved, aimed at supporting a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace in Canada (e.g., corporate, insolvency, intellectual  property, investment, international trade and competition policy)
  • 5 bills tabled:
    • C-61: An Act to amend the Copyright Act
    • C-62: An Act respecting not-for-profit corporations and certain other corporations (Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Act)
    • C-4 : An Act respecting not-for-profit corporations and certain other corporations
    • C-10: An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on January 27, 2009, and related fiscal measures (Budget Implementation Act, 2009)
    • C-4: Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Act
  • 1 set of regulatory amendments was published
  • Regulatory amendments were implemented to the Industrial Design Regulations
  • 2 internal trade protocols amending the Agreement on Internal Trade were adopted
Not applicable*

* Trends in performance indicators are not useful to measure due to the nature of the work of this program activity, where actual results vary from year to year depending on the current agenda and priorities of the government. Recognizing the inherent difficulties in measuring the performance of the program activity, Public Policy Services has been moved under Internal Services in the 2009–10 Program Activity Architecture.

Ressources financières ($Millions) 2007-2008
2008–09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
  2008–09 Human Resources
(Full-Time Equivalents)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending   Planned Actual Difference
12.6 18.2 18.1*   113 117 4

* The variance can be explained by the transfer of funds for new responsibilities.

Meeting our commitments:

In support of a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace, and in response to the Competition Policy Review Panel’s recommendations, Industry Canada amended the Competition Act and the Investment Canada Act contained in the Budget Implementation Act, 2009, Bill C-10, which received Royal Assent on March 12, 2009. As set out in its report, Compete to Win, these amendments respond to the Panel’s core recommendations for modernizing Canada’s competition and foreign investment laws and policies and better protecting consumers and promoting their interests by encouraging lower prices, better choices, and new products and services. Bill C-10 will also make Canada more competitive globally by creating jobs and opportunities for Canadians, attracting investment, improving productivity and innovation, and safeguarding Canada’s national security interests.

Industry Canada worked with other federal departments, provinces and territories in support of a federal/provincial/territorial Ministers' agreement on amendments to the Agreement on Internal Trade (AIT) that provided for labour mobility within Canada and strengthened the AIT’s dispute settlement process for government-to-government disputes. Further to the direction of First Ministers at their meeting on January 16, 2009, Industry Canada began work with the provinces and territories to develop a work plan for the harmonization of business standards and regulations in key areas.

The Department actively participated in Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) negotiations with the objective of strengthening international efforts to address trademark counterfeiting and copyright piracy.

Small Business and Marketplace Services and Regional Operations Sector — Marketplace

Expected Result: Marketplace fairness, integrity and efficiency are protected through regulation and promotion in the areas of insolvency, weights and measures, federal incorporation, and spectrum management
Performance Indicator Results Trend
Number of rules and requirements that are updated or reviewed to ensure relevance and responsiveness to marketplace needs New indicator
Client awareness of marketplace rules and regulations governing incorporation, bankruptcy, insolvency, and measurement 2,443,656 Internet visits were made to Industry Canada websites dealing with incorporation, bankruptcy, insolvency, and trade measurement, up from 1,672,862 in 2007–08 Improving
Percentage of authorized radio stations operating in compliance with their authorized parameters as determined by a statistically sound sample for a given category 71.4%; up from 70% in 2007–08* Improving

* Most frequent discrepancies identified are station location and unauthorized frequencies, which have the biggest impact on electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). To improve compliance, we plan to continue to raise awareness with equipment installers and hold non-responsive installers and users accountable for non-compliant installations with the use of selective enforcement. To better measure the impact of the follow-up compliance measures we put in place, the next national inspection program planned for 2011–12 will consider only new stations and stations amended since 2008.

2008–09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
  2008–09 Human Resources
(Full-Time Equivalents)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending   Planned Actual Difference
95.6 116.6 107.3   1,098 1,044 -54

Meeting our commitments:

In 2008–09, Industry Canada conducted in-depth consultations in the chemical products, food and beverage manufacturing, livestock and poultry, and fruit and vegetable sectors to obtain stakeholder views and recommendations on how measurement accuracy should be achieved and monitored in these marketplace sectors. Through the establishment of sector-specific marketplace approaches to achieving and monitoring measurement accuracy, stakeholder needs and expectations were addressed and a suitable level of government intervention was afforded, contributing to a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace. Other consultations were also held to improve incorporation service across the country through inter-jurisdictional partnership, witnessed through the active participation of partners, including provinces and territories, in developing and formulating the new NUANS® governance structure.

To ensure marketplace fairness and efficiency in spectrum management, the new Radiocommunication and Broadcasting Antenna Systems procedures were published in January 2008. They came into effect in July 2008, after a 6-month transition period, to allow the thousands of stakeholders across Canada, industry, government and the public time to adapt to the updated process. The key changes include one process for all antenna structure usages, clearer processes for public notification and consultation, and added community involvement. As well, the Department developed a draft Spectrum Management Operations Plan for the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. The document outlines the plans to permit Industry Canada to provide the optimum level of spectrum management services prior to and during the event.

Spectrum, Information Technologies and Telecommunications Sector — Marketplace

Expected Result: Canada’s radiocommunication and telecommunications infrastructure and online economy are governed by a modern and appropriate policy framework
Performance Indicator Results Trend
Percentage of policies, legislation and regulations developed, updated or reviewed as identified in annual branch business plans / strategic plans New indicator

 

2008–09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
  2008–09 Human Resources
(Full-Time Equivalents)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending   Planned Actual Difference
58.9 68.2 65.0*   357 337 -20

* The variance between Planned Spending and Actual Spending relates to the increased salary costs from collective agreements and retroactive pays, as well as internal funding reallocations towards program legislative and regulatory priorities relating to spectrum / telecom management.

Meeting our commitments:

Industry Canada has made significant progress in advancing Canada’s radiocommunications and telecommunications frameworks, which includes infrastructure, spectrum management and policy. In addition to licensing $226.6 million annually in spectrum and radio licences, the Department held the Advanced Wireless Services (AWS) auction in 2008, which concluded successfully and raised over $4 billion. This spectrum is to be used for advanced wireless services such as high-speed Internet and mobile devices.

The Department also completed the Digital TV Post-Transition Allotment Plan, which reserves a part of the current television spectrum for digital television use and allows other services to use the remainder. The Allotment Plan provides a channel for each television station. This plan has been coordinated with the U.S. plan. The transition to digital television is set to be completed by August 31, 2011.

Industry Canada ensured that spectrum and telecommunications are available for public safety and emergency purposes. This includes readiness exercises for the Vancouver 2010 Winter Games, maintaining partnerships with stakeholders in both the private and public sectors, and completing the initial phase of a study on the resilience of the Canadian wireless infrastructure. In addition, various operational drills were executed to ensure equipment and government-related procedures were understood and effective in responding to a crisis.

On the international front, Industry Canada concluded 2 new frequency-sharing Arrangements with the U.S. dealing with advanced public safety and commercial broadband mobile systems operating in the 700 MHz band. These treaty-binding Arrangements will secure equitable access to this very valuable radio spectrum for Canadians. Industry Canada also hosted a French delegation to discuss the establishment of a Canada-France working group for emergency telecommunications and held weekly video conferences with the National Communications Center (U.S.) to share intelligence on telecommunications security issues such as vulnerability assessments and cyber threats. The Department has 10 new Canada–U.S. Arrangements awaiting final ratification by Parliament and another 8 Arrangements under negotiation with the U.S. Federal Communications Commission. These Arrangements provide the technical basis for equitable access to radio spectrum in the border regions for new and existing wireless systems. Finally, Industry Canada made advances on its Mutual Recognition Agreements (MRAs) on Conformity Assessment of telecom apparatus. All such MRAs are now required to be treaty-based. This will delay the Israel and Japan MRA goals by at least 1 year. The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Telecommunications (APEC TEL) MRA, already in place, is steadily adding signatory economies with Singapore and Chile likely to join in the next 6 months. The text for a new MRA on mutual recognition of technical equivalence has been agreed at APEC TEL.

Industry Canada actively participated in World Telecommunication Standardization Assembly (WTSA) 2008, held under the auspices of the International Telecommunication Union. Overall, the outcome of the WTSA was highly successful, with the majority of Canadian objectives, positions and perspectives reflected in the results. Key decisions included global agreement on a more streamlined study group structure in line with industry interests and priorities, as well as the adoption of resolutions on accessibility for persons with disabilities and climate change.

Lessons Learned:

Industry Canada has commenced work in support of Public Safety's Critical Infrastructure Protection Program, and specifically developed a profile of the ICT sector. In addition, the Department continued the second phase of the wireless infrastructure resilience study to understand the state of resilience of the Canadian wireless infrastructure and its vulnerability to disasters, whether natural (e.g., pandemic, floods, ice storms) or human-induced (e.g., terrorism, computer viruses). While the study commenced in fiscal year 2008–09, delays were encountered and the work will instead be completed by July 2009. A probability/impact mapping exercise has been undertaken with security experts from the major telecommunications companies to understand the risks of electronic intrusion to the telecommunications networks.

Periodic exercising and engagement of the industry offer opportunities to identify gaps in telecommunication resiliency. To date, we have identified the need for the establishment of a permanent Emergency Telecommunications Operations Centre and a formal telecommunications exercise schedule to be undertaken by Industry Canada.

Office of Consumer Affairs

Expected Result: Consumer interests are protected and promoted throughout Canada
Performance Indicator Results Trend
Number of major challenges being addressed and/or documented that affect the consumer interest in Canada 4 consumer challenges (consumer debt, consumer literacy, use of alternative forms of credit, and the risk of identity theft) were continually addressed through research, advocacy and outreach New indicator

 

2008–09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
  2008–09 Human Resources
(Full-Time Equivalents)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending   Planned Actual Difference
5.1 6.4 6.3*   23 22 -1

* The variance can be explained by the fact that the Office of Consumer Affairs received further funding through supplementary estimates A and B.

Meeting our commitments:

Industry Canada, through the Office of Consumer Affairs (OCA), completed submissions concerning federal designation orders under the Criminal Code payday lending exemption for the province of Manitoba (order proposed in May 2008 and made official in June 2008) and for the province of Nova Scotia (order proposed in March 2009). In 2008–09, the OCA led the development of a joint federal/provincial/territorial discussion paper on services to help consumers recover from identity (ID) theft. In order to promote consumer confidence and address major consumer challenges, the Department also undertook research focusing on consumer vulnerability, the electronic marketplace and sustainable consumption. Evidence-based submissions were made to internal, interdepartmental and intergovernmental forums in support of modern frameworks for electronic payments, consumer credit reporting, financial literacy and telecommunications. Consumers were provided with a new information product on digital television and an information series of 5 topics including debt and identity theft was completed for Canadians with low literacy skills. The OCA also released the 2008–09 version of The Canadian Consumer Handbook.

Industry Canada also completed 2 studies on consumer detriment and low literacy and geographic isolation for use in preparing a strategy to mitigate challenges faced by the most vulnerable consumers. Additionally, the Department reached out to literacy groups, correctional centres, workforce re-entry centres and educational institutions to promote its online debt and financial management guides and ensure they can be understood by consumers with low literacy skills.

A usability assessment and content audit of the OCA website was conducted to ensure that all information remained relevant and timely, and a series of information products about the transition to digital broadcasting was developed and posted online.

Competition Bureau

Expected Result: The Canadian economy is efficient and adaptable due to the competitiveness of prices and choices available to consumers
Performance Indicator Results Trend
Percentage of economy subject to market forces Approximately 82% of the Canadian gross domestic product (GDP) is subject to market forces* New indicator
Dollar savings to consumers from Bureau actions that stop anti-competitive activity Estimated savings of $254 million (criminal enforcement only)** New indicator

* According to a study conducted by the Competition Bureau in 2005, the proportion of economic activity covered by the Competition Act has increased by 103% since its enactment in 1986.

** Estimated overcharge to consumers (or economic harm) for the duration of the infraction, prior to Bureau actions concluded in FY 2008–09. This is a conservative estimate based on similar methodologies used by anti-trust agencies in other countries.

2008–09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
  2008–09 Human Resources
(Full-Time Equivalents)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending   Planned Actual Difference
49.8 62.2 59.1   452 438 -14

Meeting our commitments:

Combatting domestic cartels and illegal bid-rigging agreements was a priority for the Competition Bureau in fiscal year 2008–09 and key to ensuring that the Canadian marketplace is fair and competitive. Industry Canada, through the Competition Bureau, uncovered a conspiracy to fix the price of gasoline at the pump in the province of Quebec. As a result of that investigation, 13 individuals and 11 companies were charged. As of March 2009, 6 companies and 8 individuals had pled guilty, fines totalled over $2.6 million and imprisonment terms totalled 44 months.

Charges were laid against 14 individuals and 7 companies accused of rigging bids in order to obtain Government of Canada IT services contracts worth approximately $67 million. In addition, the Bureau continued to support prevention and detection by educating buyers and sellers to identify and report potential bid-rigging schemes. It conducted 51 bid-rigging presentations for approximately 2,020 people, representing businesses across the country and all levels of governments. 15 organizations that had participated in the presentations informed the Bureau that they had implemented changes to their tendering process.

The Bureau continued to advocate for the introduction of greater competition in the regulated health sector. With the release of its 2008 study, Benefiting from Generic Drug Competition in Canada: The Way Forward, the Bureau offered tangible recommendations on where potential government and consumer savings of up to $800 million were being lost. One province, Manitoba, has amended its public drug plan policies on the basis of the Bureau’s recommendations and the Bureau continues to consult with other provinces and territories on potential reforms.

The Competition Bureau also targeted the increasing number of misleading and fraudulent performance claims affecting consumer health over the Internet. In collaboration with domestic and international partners, the Bureau successfully took action against almost 100 Canadian-operated sites, 99% of which complied with the Bureau’s demands to modify, remove or substantiate cancer-related claims made to promote products or treatments. In partnership with the Canadian Cancer Society, the Bureau distributed an education pamphlet to provide consumers with information on how to protect themselves from fraudulent health claims.

The Bureau continued to cooperate with foreign counterparts to combat anti-competitive practices that cross borders. In April 2008, the Bureau signed a cooperation arrangement with the U.S. Postal Inspection Service to facilitate enforcement cooperation, coordination and information sharing. In 2008, the Bureau participated in Operation Tele-PHONEY, a cross-border comprehensive attack on telemarketing fraud. Also, for the first time, a Bureau investigation into deceptive telemarketing resulted in the extradition to the U.S. of 3 Canadian operators.

As part of the Competition Bureau’s ongoing commitment to establish best practices in the manufacturing and retail sectors, the Bureau examined the use of rebate programs, including delayed payment rebates such as mail-in or online rebates. The Bureau developed and released, for public comment, the Draft Information Bulletin on Consumer Rebate Promotions, which outlines the Bureau’s approach to interpreting the false or misleading representations provisions of the Competition Act, the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act, and the Textile Labelling Act in the area of consumer rebate promotions.

The Bureau also reviewed mergers and acquisitions and challenged those few that resulted in a substantial lessening or prevention of competition. For example, the Bureau’s work led to a Consent Agreement with Superior Plus L.P. (Superior), resolving the Bureau’s competition concerns arising out of Superior’s proposed acquisition of certain assets of Irving Oil Limited and Irving Oil Marketing Limited. Further, following a closely integrated investigation by the Bureau and the U.S. Department of Justice, Google Inc. and Yahoo! Inc. abandoned a potentially serious anti-competitive advertising agreement. In addition, Dow Chemical agreed to certain divestitures and other commitments to address the Bureau’s competition concerns regarding its acquisition of Rohm and Haas. Over the course of its extensive review, the Bureau consulted with counterparts at the U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the European Commission's Competition Directorate.

Lessons Learned:

In order to enhance its capacity to conduct effective and timely investigations, the Competition Bureau established and intends to build on strong partnerships with the international competition community. For years, international cooperation has proven important in cartel investigations. More recently, the Bureau has had similar success in the mergers context. Specifically, where the Bureau is satisfied that a particular remedy will adequately address Canadian issues, it will suggest and/or implement the remedy agreed to in another jurisdiction.

Canadian Intellectual Property Office — Revolving Fund

Expected Result: The delivery of and quality of CIPO’s services respond to client needs and expectations
Performance Indicator Results Trend
Percentage overall satisfaction of clients with CIPO’s services 74% of clients were satisfied or very satisfied with CIPO’s services, down from 79% in 2005 Declining
Expected Result: Increase awareness and use of intellectual property by SMEs
Performance Indicator Results Trend
Percentage of SMEs that are aware of / familiar with IP Baseline of 36% established in 2006–07 (next survey: 2010–11) Not applicable (next survey: 2010–11)

 

2008–09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
  2008–09 Human Resources
(Full-Time Equivalents)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending   Planned Actual Difference
4.9 139.5 12.9*   1,030 944 -86

* Although CIPO and its clients have been operating in tenuous economic conditions, a positive variance in net operating income was incurred. This variance is primarily due to the prudent management of expenditures, lower investment in capital, and changes under various Balance Sheet accounts such as the deferred revenue and accounts payable. We anticipate utilizing the positive variance in future years to maintain current operating levels and to fulfill CIPO’s strategic objectives.

Meeting our commitments:

CIPO’s most recent National Client Survey showed a slight decline in client satisfaction from 2005 to 2008. CIPO is focused on becoming more efficient, accessible and responsive to clients, looking to help them strengthen their competitive advantage both domestically and globally. To better meet clients’ needs, CIPO enhanced its level of client service in several areas. Turnaround times for key client processes related to copyrights and industrial designs were improved. The Office improved client communication and provided electronic access to a wider range of CIPO services. Client-centric changes include improved access to information on patents, trademarks and copyrights, and online access to the entire Canadian Industrial Designs database.

Aligned with the government’s efforts to mobilize science and technology to Canada’s advantage, CIPO increased outreach efforts towards SMEs and Canadian students. CIPO continues to modernize its e-services platform through the Enterprise Business Renewal Initiative. This and other initiatives are aimed at improving client access to quality intellectual property (IP) rights in a timely fashion, enhancing the bilingual search capabilities of CIPO’s databases, and creating a more user-friendly website.

To improve awareness of IP, CIPO undertook projects in the education and SME sectors to increase the understanding of the effective use of IP by students, creators and innovators; piloted educational tools for university students in science and engineering faculties; prototyped IP data research tools for SMEs; and developed and delivered IP training for intermediaries to leverage their reach to multiple sectors. The Office also formed a new working group with Australia and the United Kingdom (called the Vancouver Group) to explore collaborative initiatives, share best practices and research findings, and to compare performance trends.

A new chapter of the Manual of Patent Office Practice (re: biotechnology) was issued to improve practices, and consultations were completed on 2 packages of regulatory amendments to the Patent Rules. Amendments were also made to the Industrial Design Regulations and a new Opposition Practice Notice was issued by the Trade-marks Opposition Board.

Lessons Learned:

CIPO conducted its first round of information sessions on e-services with clients in 5 Canadian cities with the objective of presenting its latest e-services and gathering input for future improvements. The sessions were successful in engaging clients in providing input and working with CIPO on ongoing e-service developments. Through the sessions, the Office learned that clients would like to participate in these types of sessions on a regular basis, and planning is now underway to organize another round of sessions.

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3.4 Additional Information for Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

Industry CanadaStrategic Outcome: An Innovative Economy

Science and Innovation Sector — Science and Technology (S&T) and Innovation

Expected Result: Development and coordination of policy frameworks in support of an innovative economy
Performance Indicator Results Trend
Policy proposals that are brought forward to reinforce the elements that advance an innovative economy and reflect a coordinated approach based on tools available across the sector Policy proposals were brought forward aimed at advancing an innovative economy and were championed for inclusion in the budget. Budget 2009, tabled on January 27, 2009, included initiatives that will result in cumulative S&T funding of over $5 billion, of which $3.8 billion will be spent by next fiscal year Improving
The Science and Innovation Sector (SIS) is coordinating the entire government S&T Strategy, released by the Prime Minister on May 17, 2007. It contained 37 policy commitments. SIS is tracking advances against these commitments Industry Canada is coordinating and tracking implementation of the federal S&T Strategy. Industry Canada worked with the Assistant Deputy Minister Committee on S&T (DMCST), the Director General Committee on Strategy Implementation (DGSI) and corporate communications to prepare a public report outlining progress made in implementing the S&T Strategy. The report described the strong progress that has been made implementing the Strategy. Through a whole-of- government effort, federal departments and agencies have designed and implemented innovative programs to encourage private sector engagement in S&T, build Canada’s knowledge base and brand Canada as a destination of choice for talented, highly qualified S&T workers and students. These include tax measures to attract investment and new programs to attract top researchers and PhD students New indicator
Innovation indicators prepared by Statistics Canada and others, such as the OECD Government Expenditures on R&D (GOVERD) have remained steady at 18% of Gross Expenditures on R&D (GERD)1 No change
Gross domestic expenditures on R&D amounted to 1.8% of GDP in 2008, slightly below the 1.9% witnessed in 20072 Declining
In 2008–09, the business sector funded over $800 million/year of higher education R&D, accounting for more than 8% of total R&D performed by universities3 No change

 

2008–09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
  2008–09 Human Resources
(Full-Time Equivalents)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending   Planned Actual Difference
101.1 100.0 99.7   74 70 -4

Meeting our commitments:

To foster innovation, Industry Canada supported granting councils in providing funding for research in priority areas and in enhancing their accountability and responsiveness. The Department bolstered the Canada Graduate Scholarships Program to offer an additional 1,000 scholarships, as announced in Budget 2007. These awards provided incremental federal support for top Canadian graduate students pursuing advanced training and research at Canadian universities. Opened to students from all disciplines, the Industrial R&D Internship program (IRDI), coordinated through the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, provided interns with the opportunity to apply their research skills to real-world challenges while connecting firms with intellectual capital and potential future employees. The program placed 468 graduate student and post-doctoral interns in firms across Canada last year.

In support of an innovative economy, Industry Canada, with its partners, the Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC), the National Research Council Canada (NRC), and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), took immediate action, aligned with the federal S&T Strategy to collaborate more closely and to share resources and expertise with the intent of accelerating the commercialization of publicly funded research that capitalizes on the individual strengths of these organizations. A steering committee was established to track the project’s progress, accelerate critical initiatives and identify fresh opportunities to work together effectively.

Industry Canada monitored progress in 5 priority areas and ensured that it was reported to ministers at the North American Leaders’ Summit in Montebello, Quebec, in August 2007. The 5 areas are Enhancing the Global Competitiveness of North America, Safe Food and Products, Sustainable Energy and Environment, Smart and Secure Borders, and Emergency Management and Preparedness.

To strengthen collaboration between federal departments and agencies, Industry Canada has worked through the Assistant Deputy Minister Committee on S&T to coordinate implementation of the S&T Strategy. The DMCST has created a platform to assist in coordination efforts between departments and agencies, and this approach has been successful, as described in the S&T Strategy progress report 2009 .

Lessons Learned:

There are challenges in coordinating the activities of 20 federal science-based departments and agencies to implement the S&T Strategy. Industry Canada found that holding regular meetings and creating work plans with clear deliverables, timelines and milestones were crucial to keeping the work on track.

Industry Sector — S&T and Innovation

Expected Result: Innovative Canadian Industries
Performance Indicator Results Trend
Increase year-over-year in industrial R&D4 expenditures 2007P:  $16.2B

2008P:  $16.3B5

Change:  0.97%

P: Preliminary estimate
No change
Increase year-over-year in output of high6 and medium7 technology industries relative to the total (for which the Industry Sector is responsible), subject to uncontrolled economic influence/impacts 2007: $B 62.6/524.7 = 11.9%

2008: $B 57.4/519.4 = 11.1%8

Change: -0.8%
Declining

 

2008–09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
  2008–09 Human Resources
(Full-Time Equivalents)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending   Planned Actual Difference
9.5 101.0 90.4*   83 79 -4

* The variance is a result of Treasury Board submissions that were approved in 2008–09.

Meeting our commitments:

To support innovation in targeted Canadian industries, Industry Canada announced 2 funding programs: the Automotive Innovation Fund (AIF) and the CSeries Program. Under the AIF, Industry Canada signed one contribution agreement for up to $80 million to support strategic, large-scale R&D projects for the development of innovative, greener and more fuel-efficient vehicles. In addition, through the CSeries program, the Department announced its intention to make a repayable investment of up to $350 million for the research and development of new aerospace technologies that will lead to more fuel-efficient and safer commercial aircraft.

Furthermore, Industry Canada facilitated the completion of 10 industry-led Technology Roadmaps (TRM) enabling industries — from hydrogen fuel cells to textiles to health management — to focus more effectively on R&D investments. Industry Canada also supported the creation of the Green Aviation Research and Development Network (GARDN), a business-led centre of excellence for the aerospace industry.

Finally, strategic partnerships were forged with R&D institutions and Industry Canada collaborated with stakeholders to enhance Canada’s innovation capacity. For example, the Department collaborated with its federal partners to finalize the letter of intent and application process for the development of a facility to manufacture small lots of potential HIV vaccines for use in clinical trials.

Spectrum, Information Technologies and Telecommunications Sector — S&T and Innovation

Expected Result: Improved science and research capacity and commercialization of information and communications technologies
Performance Indicator Results Trend
Percentage of “big science” projects that utilize CANARIE’s advanced network 95% of Canada’s big science initiatives use the CANARIE Network New indicator
Percentage of the top 50 Canadian R&D universities that utilize CANARIE’s advanced network 98% of the top 50 Canadian R&D universities are now connected to the CANARIE Network New indicator
Number of new technologies and applications developed in the areas of intelligent systems and advanced robotics through Precarn’s collaborative model Precarn developed 30 new technologies and applications New indicator

 

2008–09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
  2008–09 Human Resources
(Full-Time Equivalents)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending   Planned Actual Difference
18.4 30.2 29.5*   4 4 0

* The $28-million payment is the third instalment of the $120-million conditional grant for CANARIE’s Advanced Network. The amount paid is based on CANARIE’s cash flow requirements, reported annually to the Minister before an instalment is issued.

Meeting our commitments:

Network operations continue to be extended and optimized to deliver high-quality service to Canada’s research and education community. As a result, a total of more than 50 organizations now have access to, and use of, the CANARIE Network through the Infrastructure Extension Program. Additionally, and in support of an innovative economy, CANARIE encouraged the definition and implementation of collaborative projects that will accelerate the development of, and participation in, national and international cyber-infrastructure and e-research platforms.

Communications Research Centre Canada

Expected Result: Communications sector clients receive the required technical input to develop telecommunications policies, regulations, programs and standards
Performance Indicator Results Trend
Extent of client satisfaction (related to content, timeliness and usefulness) with Communications Research Centre technical inputs and assessments used to develop telecommunications policies, regulations, programs and standards No formal client satisfaction survey was undertaken during the year. However, client feedback indicated that CRC contributes positively to policy, regulations and standards initiatives Not applicable
Expected Result: Canadian companies use CRC-developed technology to enhance their product lines and competitiveness
Performance Indicator Results Trend
Sales revenue of Canadian communications companies with a technology link to Communications Research Centre A study of CRC’s economic impact is undertaken every 5 years, with the next study due in 2010. The last study (2005–06) by an external consultant pointed to $1.6 billion in annual sales revenues from CRC spinoff companies, and cumulative industry sales resulting from CRC IP licences to the year 2005 of $520 million Not applicable

 

2008–09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
  2008–09 Human Resources
(Full-Time Equivalents)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending   Planned Actual Difference
43.1 60.3 57.4*   400 374 -26

* The variance is a result of increased salary costs from collective agreements, recapitalization of scientific equipment, increased respendable revenues from collaborative research agreements and campus operation activities, and spectrum monitoring support for the Vancouver 2010 Winter Games.

Meeting our commitments:

Industry Canada, through the CRC, provided technical input and expertise to its various partners and clients on multiple occasions. The CRC is participating in a multi-partner CANARIE project called the Health Services Virtual Organization (HSVO) to create a sustainable platform for the experimental development of shared information and communications technology (ICT)-based health services. As its contribution, the CRC provided infrastructure support as well as specialized software. The CRC also provided support to the Department’s telecommunications policy making and spectrum regulation through a number of projects and studies, including interference studies from new technologies, such as white space and unlicensed devices on DTV reception; review of orbital licence allocation proposals; cognitive radio simulations and analysis to support technical inputs to the IEEE 802.16 standards; and development of new techniques for detecting and identifying malicious attacks on networks as part of a Canadian and global effort to improve security for business and other transactions.

The Department also contributed to the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) in the areas of HDTV and 3D-TV quality assessment, Audio Loudness measurement, and Software Defined Radio (SDR). The President of the CRC chaired the ITU-R Study Group responsible for spectrum and efficient use for all satellite services. These contributions will ensure Canada’s industry interests are taken into consideration in the development of international regulations and standards.

The CRC also completed a number of projects for the Department of National Defence, including:

  • demonstrating a proof-of-concept system for network traffic management for naval communications
  • developing a flexible wireless access scheme for tactical networked radios
  • advancing network and radio waveform techniques
  • investigating cognitive radio and dynamic spectrum access concepts
  • demonstrating the first phase of a sensor network concept
  • evaluating technology of commercial broadband wireless, aerostat-based range extension, interoperability with public safety and emergency response communications
  • enhancing technology for communications signal monitoring
  • influencing NATO standardization of radio interoperability

The CRC also collaborated with Canadian companies. For example, 4 new start-up companies were provided business incubation (space rented out, with access to CRC expertise and support) at CRC's Innovation Centre, and 21 Canadian SMEs were provided with technical assistance, either through licensing or research collaboration.

Industrial Technologies Office — Special Operating Agency

Expected Result: Leading-edge research and development in Canadian firms
Performance Indicator Results Trend
Dollar of private sector investment leveraged per dollar of Agency investment in ITO projects $2 New indicator

 

2008–09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
  2008–09 Human Resources
(Full-Time Equivalents)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending   Planned Actual Difference
311.8 333.5 294.6*   96 85 -11*

* The variance is due to a high staff turnover.

Meeting our commitments:

Industry Canada successfully wound down the h2 Early Adopters (h2EA) Program for the March 31, 2008, closing date. The 2008 h2EA final evaluation indicated that government and industry representatives saw the program as being in line with industry needs when established in 2003. The approved projects represented over 50 companies, including technology providers, funding partners and suppliers. Most companies experienced technical learning and general improvements in their capabilities in hydrogen technology.

The Department also invested in 9 new Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI) projects valued at $395.4 million, which leveraged upwards of $723 million in additional R&D investment commitments, thereby enhancing competitiveness in the aerospace and defence industry.

In addition, the Department disbursed $238 million towards the legacy Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) and Program for Strategic Industrial Projects (PSIP) programs.


1 Statscan -Science Statistics

2 Statscan -Science Statistics

3 Table 5: National Gross Domestic Expenditures on Research and Development, in the Total Sciences, Canada, Statistics Canada, 2009.

4 Intramural expenditures: expenditures for R&D work performed within the reporting company, including work financed by others.

5 Table 1-1: Total Intramural Research and Development Expenditures - By Industry , Statistics Canada, 2009

6 Industries targeted by the Industry Sector that are classified as “high tech” by the OECD are:  pharmaceuticals, aerospace and parts, and computers and electronic products (excluding SITT’s components).

7 Industries targeted by the Industry Sector that are classified as “medium-to-high tech” are: chemicals (excluding pharmaceuticals), motor vehicles and parts, other transportation equipment (excludes ship and boat building), and machinery.

8 National Economic Accounts – CANSIM Table, Statistics Canada, 2009

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3.4 Additional Information for Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

Industry CanadaStrategic Outcome: Competitive Industry and Sustainable Communities

Strategic Policy Sector — Economic Development

Strategic Policy Sector — Economic Development
Expected Result: Development and coordination of policy frameworks in support of competitive industry and sustainable communities
Performance Indicator Results Trend
Development and coordination of economic policy frameworks that support the competitiveness of Canadian industries and help ensure the sustainability of communities across the country
  • IC continued to implement the 26 action items in the Sustainable Development Strategy (2006–09)
  • IC participated in an interdepartmental working group with Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT), Environment Canada and Natural Resources Canada on the development of a national and North American region 10-year framework of programs to make progress towards sustainable consumption and production (SCP). Industry Canada also participated in a Canada–U.S. stakeholder consultation on the issue of programs
  • IC officials participated in international trade negotiations (within the World Trade Organization and with Korea, Panama, Jordan and Central America, for example) and in Foreign Investment Promotion and Protection Agreement negotiations (with Vietnam, Indonesia, China, Madagascar and Kuwait, among others)
Not applicable*

* Trends in performance indicators are not useful to measure due to the nature of the work of this program activity, where actual results vary from year to year depending on the current agenda and priorities of the government. Recognizing the inherent difficulties in measuring the performance of the program activity, Public Policy Services has been moved under Internal Services in the 2009–10 Program Activity Architecture.

2008–09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
  2008–09 Human Resources
(Full-Time Equivalents)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending   Planned Actual Difference
6.6 15.5 15.4*   38 37 -1

* The variance can be explained by the transfer of funds for new responsibilities.

Meeting our commitments:

The development of Industry Canada’s 5th Sustainable Development Strategy (SDS V) has been delayed until fiscal year 2010–11 due to the passage of a new Federal Sustainable Development Act (SDA) in June 2008. The Act requires that departments table their next SDS in June 2011, and that it be closely aligned, where appropriate, with the federal SDS, which will be tabled in June 2010.

In order to build the appropriate policy frameworks supporting competitive industries, Industry Canada officials provided trade policy advice to DFAIT and other departments throughout 2008–09 on issues related to telecommunications, investment, competition, intellectual property and industrial policies related to key sectors including autos, shipbuilding, aerospace, apparel and textiles. Departmental officials advised and participated in negotiations with the Andean communities. Free Trade Agreement (FTA) negotiations with Colombia and Peru were successfully completed and signed. FTA negotiations with the Caribbean community and the Dominican Republic were put on hold due to domestic issues within those countries. Investment negotiations with Jordan were successfully completed and an agreement is targeted for signature in 2009. For further information, see Negotiations and Agreements.

Industry Canada  officials participated in Doha Round trade negotiations at the WTO in 2008–09, in the negotiation of sectoral agreements in the non-agricultural market access as well as in the negotiation of rules for subsidies. These negotiations are ongoing. For more information, see Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada. They also developed policy positions on international trade rules in response to questions on Industry Canada legislation and policies (such as the Telecommunications Act and the Investment Canada Act, and industrial policies related to autos) in the WTO and in FTA negotiations with Korea and Singapore.

Lessons Learned:

Industry Canada collected departmental activities related to sustainable development which were not captured within the SDS IV, and discovered that much of this work is proceeding with direct linkages to SD. The Department plans to collect this information on a regular basis and include it in the semi-annual SDS progress reports.

Small Business and Marketplace Services and Regional Operations Sector — Economic Development

Expected Result: A business environment that supports entrepreneurship, sustainable communities, growth and competitiveness across Canada, and recognizes regional perspectives
Performance Indicator Results Trend
Number of new government policies or initiatives that address SME needs, encourage entrepreneurship, or reflect regional perspective
  • 12 new policies, proposals or initiatives addressed SME needs*
  • 13 new policy and legislative initiatives reflected a regional perspectives
New indicator
Number of new or improved departmental programs, services and information products that target SMEs 1 information database was improved: the Canadian Company Capabilities (CCC) database of 60,000 Canadian companies used by the private and public sectors to source Canadian products and services

3 new services were provided by the Canada-Ontario Business Service Centre, including provision of telephone services in Spanish; provision of online information in Polish, Russian and Urdu; and service partnerships with Service Canada and Service Ontario

New indicator

* These include consultations on topics such as Aboriginal Economic Development, and EU/Canada Free Trade Agreement (FTA); information items to Director General Policy Committee; regulatory amendments for the Canada Small Business Financing Program (CSBFP); the Paperwork Burden Reduction Initiative; the Canada Youth Business Foundation (CYBF) and the Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC).

2008–09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
  2008–09 Human Resources
(Full-Time Equivalents)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending   Planned Actual Difference
235.6 315.4 272.3   523 507 -16

Meeting our commitments:

In 2008–09, Industry Canada worked with its partners to increase the number of locations offering the BizPaL service by 146% (167 additional municipalities and 3 additional provinces and territories began to offer the BizPaL service). These achievements enabled more Canadians to have access to BizPaL, which provides Canadian businesses with one-stop access to permit and licence information for all levels of government. This translates into savings in the time required to research and find required permits and licences quickly and efficiently in order to comply with government regulations. It also provides entrepreneurs and Canadian businesses with more time to focus on starting or growing their business, which, in turn, helps support the Canadian economy.

The Department also completed a program renewal exercise to serve ongoing funding for the Canada Business Network (CBN), an information service for small business delivered in partnership with the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Western Economic Diversification Canada and the Economic Development Agency for the Regions of Quebec.

FedNor continued to provide support for regional development in Northern Ontario through the Northern Ontario Development Program, the Eastern Ontario Development Program and the Community Futures Program. Notably, FedNor continued to deliver its $14.7-million commitment to help establish the Molecular Medicine Research Centre in Thunder Bay. This will help support leading-edge research that has commercial potential and will foster strategic alliances among research and post-secondary educational institutions, the private sector, communities and the government.

Additionally, through the Ontario Potable Water Program (launched in February 2008), Industry Canada has announced 65 grants totalling $12,539,542 that enable recipient municipalities to respond to economic development opportunities and help rebuild community capacity.

Lessons Learned:

Industry Canada is finding new ways to promote economic development in communities in order to encourage the development of skills and knowledge. During 2008–09, Industry Canada undertook a review and redesign of the Student Connections Program, which had operated as part of the federal Youth Employment Strategy (YES), to help  SMEs expand their use of information technology. The program was redesigned to improve its cost-efficiency and relevance while reducing the administrative burden for the recipients. The program has been renamed the Small Business Internship Program (SBIP).

Industry Sector — Economic Development

Expected Result:  Competitive and sustainable Canadian industries
Performance Indicator Results Trend
Increase in year-over-year Industry Sector’s GDP 2007: $524.7B

2008:  $519.4B9

Change:  -1.0%
Declining
Increase in year-over-year Industry Sector’s exports 2007: $276.3B

2008: $259.0B10

Change: -6.2%
Declining
Increase in year-over-year Industry Sector’s productivity11 2007: 27.8
2008: 27.612
No change

 

2008–09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
  2008–09 Human Resources
(Full-Time Equivalents)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending   Planned Actual Difference
66.8 81.4 77.9*   235 226 -9

* The variance is a result of additional authorities approved in 2008–09.

Meeting our commitments:

In an effort to support the competitiveness and sustainability of Canadian industries, Industry Canada requested that 2 automotive firms improve their cost structures outlined in their respective restructuring plans. As the companies each made sacrifices to help ensure a sustainable, competitive company going forward, the government supported their efforts to restructure.

To further support other Canadian industries, the Department also approved 32 projects through the Canadian Apparel and Textile Industries Program (CATIP), with total funding of $2.4 million. Additionally, 6 contribution agreements, representing over $80 million of value in sales to Canadian shipyards, were signed through the Structured Financing Facility (SFF). Moreover, as of March 31, 2009, the Industrial and Regional Benefits (IRB) policy has resulted in over $15 billion in commitments to invest in Canada. With the government’s unveiling of the Canada First Defence Strategy, planned future procurements could exceed $40 billion in new IRB opportunities over the next 10 years. Industry Canada also undertook activities to better inform trade negotiations and policy development, including improving market access to Japan for Canadian wood building products.

Spectrum, Information Technologies and Telecommunications Sector — Economic Development

Expected Result: Aid Canadian ICT companies in positioning themselves for industrial opportunities and growth in the global marketplace
Performance Indicator Results Trend
Number of website hits for ICT information products created to increase the level of awareness of Canadian ICT companies of domestic and international trends (e.g., quarterly monitoring of ICT sector) 157,941 hits for ICT information and products New indicator
Number of requests by Canadian ICT companies for business development services (e.g., investment) There were 567 requests by ICT companies for business services to address major challenges along common themes such as SR&ED and funding options, as well as company support available for various global events and business opportunities* New indicator

*Including CommunicAsia, BroadcastAsia, Expo Comm China, Futurecom, and Mobile World Congress (MWC).

2008–09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
  2008–09 Human Resources
(Full-Time Equivalents)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending   Planned Actual Difference
26.1 43.7 43.6*   49 80 31*

* The variance arises from the fact that no resources were reported in the RPP for the Community Access Program and the Computers for Schools program, as the program authorities were still pending at the time.

Meeting our commitments:

Industry analysis and support resulted in common issues being identified and validated in order to provide suggestions to improve policy, programs and services to the ICT sector. Industry Canada engaged stakeholders in all regions and sub-sectors of the ICT industry across Canada to encourage sharing of information such as business factors that affect productivity, sustainability and growth of the sector. The intelligence gathered was shared with the Trade Commissioner Service to assist in matching Canadian capabilities to foreign needs in order to enable companies to be better-positioned to compete in global markets.

Industry Canada secured funding to deliver the Community Access Program (CAP) in 2008–09 and 2009–10 and to deliver Computers for School (CFS) from 2008–13. In 2008–09, Budget 2009 announced a 3-year, $225-million program to develop and to implement a strategy to extend broadband coverage to as many underserved/unserved households as possible. The program will be based on a competitive application process that will be announced in late summer, 2009.

Mackenzie Gas Project

Expected Result: Development of Mackenzie gas resources supports sustainable communities
Performance Indicator Results Trend
Plan an effective, efficient regulatory process for the Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP) An MOU respecting coordination amongst federal departments and the National Energy Board and an Implementation Plan that outlines how regulators will work together effectively and efficiently were endorsed New indicator
Provide up to $2 million to Northwest Territories Aboriginal communities living along the proposed pipeline route to facilitate development of regional investment plans Provided $1.8 million to 5 Aboriginal communities to assist them in continuing and/or finalizing the development of regional investment plans New indicator

 

2008–09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
  2008–09 Human Resources
(Full-Time Equivalents)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending   Planned Actual Difference
7.9 5.0*   N/A N/A N/A

* Data are not available due to the fact the Mackenzie Gas Project was transferred to Industry Canada from Indian and Northern Affairs Canada late in 2007–08, and then was transferred to Environment Canada late in 2008–09.

Meeting our commitments:

The Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP) is a proposed 1,220-kilometre natural gas pipeline system through the Mackenzie Valley in the Northwest Territories that will connect northern onshore gas fields with North American markets. It has the potential to make key contributions to promoting economic development in the Northwest Territories. The Mackenzie Gas Project Office will continue to coordinate federal government efforts to support the MGP.


9 National Economic Account – CANSIM Table, Statistics Canada, 2009

10 Trade Data Online, Industry Canada, 2009

11 Labour Productivity = Real Value Added (or GDP) per Hour Worked

12 Statistics Canada (special request)

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3.5 Expected Results Information for Program Sub-Activities and Sub-Sub-Activities by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: A Fair, Efficient and Competitive Marketplace

Program Activity 1.1 — Strategic Policy Sector — Marketplace

Program Sub-Activity 1.1.1 — Marketplace Framework Policy Branch
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Development of policy in support of legislative and regulatory initiatives aimed at supporting a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace (e.g., corporate insolvency, intellectual property, investment and internal trade policies, regulations and laws) Number of legislative and regulatory amendments, both proposed and passed 5 bills were tabled between April 1, 2008, and March 31, 2009* Not applicable*
Number of discussion and consultation papers 0** Not applicable*
Number of consultations held 0** Not applicable*
Number of reports published 0** Not applicable*

* The tabling and adoption of legislative initiatives are prerogatives of Parliament.
** The decision to publish reports, discussion and consultation papers, and hold consultations is the Minister’s prerogative.

Note: Please refer to Program Activity 1.1 — Strategic Policy Sector — Marketplace for details on the results.

Program Sub-Activity 1.1.2 — Strategic Policy Branch — Marketplace
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Departmental and governmental objectives are integrated into the development of Industry Canada marketplace policies Number of economic marketplace items initiated by the Department reviewed by the Director General Policy Committee 20 marketplace items reviewed by the DGPC in 2008–09 Not applicable*

*It is not useful to measure trends in performance indicators due to the nature of the work of the Strategic Policy Sector, where actual results vary from year to year depending on the current agenda and priorities of the government. Recognizing the inherent difficulties in measuring the performance of the Strategic Policy Sector, Public Policy Services has been moved under Internal Services in the 2009–10 Program Activity Architecture.

Program Sub-Activity 1.1.3 — Micro-economic Policy Analysis Branch — Marketplace
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
The production of high-quality microeconomic research and analysis of current and emerging policy issues as input to the development of policies relating to the Canadian marketplace Number of high-quality research papers published and incorporated into policy development as measured by the number of research papers and reports accepted for publication by Industry Canada’s Publications Committee 3 research papers in 2008–09, up from 0 in 2007–08* Improving

*In addition to the papers that were published, other research was conducted to inform policy development.

Program Sub-Activity 1.1.4 — International and Intergovernmental Affairs*
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Updated databases on Industry Canada’s international agreements and activities Frequency with which the databases are consulted in the preparation of advice The databases were consulted 10 times in the preparation of advice New indicator
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Increased understanding of the positions and views of ministerial-led foreign delegations on a range of issues for which the Minister and the Deputy Minister are accountable Reports on results of meetings with ministerial-led foreign delegations 5 reports New indicator
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Increased understanding of provincial/territorial views across a broad range of issues for which the Minister and Deputy Minister are accountable Reports on results of meetings with provincial/territorial ministers on multiple (not single) issues No meetings organized by International and Intergovernmental Affairs Directorate Not applicable**
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Increased understanding by foreign delegations of Industry Canada’s policies and positions Reports on results of briefings given to foreign delegations 1 report*** New indicator

* As of January 2009, the International and Intergovernmental Affairs Directorate no longer exists.
** The number of meetings held each year is the prerogative of the Minister.
*** Regular briefings are provided to foreign delegates, but only 1 report was produced.

Program Activity 1.2 — Small Business and Marketplace Sector and Regional Operations Sector — Marketplace

Program Sub-Activity 1.2.1 — Measurement Canada
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
The integrity and accuracy are upheld by protecting consumers and businesses against financial loss due to inaccurate measurement Percentage increase in number of companies authorized to do work on Industry Canada’s behalf An 11% increase in the number of authorized service providers that can perform inspections on Industry Canada’s behalf (from 146 organizations in 2007–08 to 162 organizations in 2008–09) Improving
Percentage increase in number of technicians certified to do this work A 16% increase in the number of technicians certified to do this work (from 270 technicians in 2007–08 to 313 technicians in 2008–09) Improving
Percentage increase in number of inspections A 29% increase in the number of inspections (from 54,600 devices in 2007–08 to 70,700 in 2008–09) Improving


Program Sub-Activity 1.2.2 — Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy Canada
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
The integrity of the bankruptcy and insolvency system is protected by ensuring that estates are administered in a timely fashion and that relevant information regarding insolvencies is available to stakeholders Percentage of summary estate files not older than 3 years 91%; down from 92% in 2007–08 No change*
Percentage of ordinary estate files not older than 3 years 59%; down from 65% in 2007–08 Declining
Percentage of consumer bankruptcies and proposals filed electronically 100% of consumer bankruptcies and proposals filed electronically No change
Percentage of trustees using the e-filing system 99.4% of trustees using the e-filing system No change

* This indicator is reported as stable as the difference falls within expected fluctuations within the period.

Program Sub-Activity 1.2.3 — Corporations Canada
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Federally incorporated companies are compliant with corporate laws and regulations Percentage of federally incorporated corporations that comply with statutory filing requirements 83% corporation compliance for annual return filings Improving
Businesses have timely and reliable access to incorporation services and information Number of Corporation Canada’s service standards that are met or exceeded Service standards met or exceeded 95.75% of the time New indicator*
Key services are available/delivered to businesses electronically Percentage of transactions completed online for key services 90% of new incorporations completed online Improving
80% of annual returns received online Improving

* In the 2007–08 Departmental Performance Report (DPR) for Industry Canada, this program sub-activity measured the level of Corporations Canada's service standards achieved.

Program Sub-Activity 1.2.4 — Small Business Policy Branch
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
The overall burden of regulatory compliance faced by small businesses will be reduced Reduction of count of business regulatory forms/requirements 20.5% reduction New indicator*

* This target was established as an overall target as part of Budget 2007 and as such, no reporting was made in 2007–08.

Program Sub-Activity 1.2.5 — Investment Review
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Timely processing of notifications and applications for review filed by foreign investors under the Investment Canada Act Time required to process notifications Median time of 6 days required to process notifications in 2008–09; down from 8 days in 2007–08 Improving
Time required to process applications Median time of 44 days required to process applications in 2008–09; down from 50 days in 2007–08 Improving


Program Sub-Activity 1.2.6 — Regional Operations — Spectrum
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Timely access for Canadian citizens, private industry and public sector organizations to radio frequency spectrum and information on regulations, policy, procedures and standards, to meet their wireless telecommunication needs Percentage of clients who indicate that they are satisfied with the services provided by Regional Offices Due to the call of the federal election and the following 3-month moratorium, we could not conduct the planned survey in 2008–09. It will be done in 2009–10

2004 Survey: 79% were satisfied
Not applicable
Average number of weeks to process a complete fixed parameter application 0.76 week with 99.2% of applications within service standards; an improvement from an average of 0.87 week and 97.9% within service standards for 2005–08 Improving
Average number of weeks to process a complete land mobile application 5.20 weeks with 96.5% within service standards (including international coordination); an improvement from an average of 5.21 weeks and 96.8% within service standards for 2005–2008 Improving
Average number of weeks to process a complete microwave application 4.49 weeks with 94.3% within service standards; an improvement from an average of 4.71 weeks and 93.3% within service standards for 2005–08 Improving
Average number of weeks to process a complete earth station application 2.73 weeks with 100% within service standards; an improvement from an average of 4.08 weeks and 97.8% within service standards for 2005–08 Improving

Program Activity 1.3 — Spectrum, Information Technologies and Telecommunications Sector — Marketplace

Program Sub-Activity 1.3.1 — Electronic Commerce Branch
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Personal information and security, and Internet-based trade and commerce are protected and enhanced through policy and legal frameworks in support of Canadian marketplace requirements Percentage of consumers and businesses aware of the need and requirements to secure personal data Unable to measure and compare to previous years as the Electronic Commerce and Technology Survey (StatsCan) is no longer being undertaken

Anecdotal evidence shows a substantial increase in awareness

New indicator
Canadian industry is aware of and makes use of increasingly sophisticated e-business tools Percentage rates of adoption of e-business in Canada by business and consumers Unable to measure and compare to previous years as the Electronic Commerce and Technology Survey (StatsCan) is no longer being undertaken

Anecdotal evidence shows an increase in awareness

New indicator


Program Sub-Activity 1.3.2 — Spectrum/Telecom Management
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
An up-to-date and appropriate policy and regulatory framework, domestic and international, for the governance of Canada’s radiocommunications and telecommunications infrastructure and to promote a competitive marketplace for telecoms and radiocoms services Percentage of telecommunications markets fully competitive Approximately 90% of the telecommunications markets are considered competitive as these markets are no longer subject to economic regulation Improving

In December 2006, the Governor-in-Council issued a Policy Direction to the CRTC to rely on market forces to the maximum extent feasible. In April 2007, the Governor-in-Council altered a CRTC decision to accelerate economic deregulation of the local telephone market. These two initiatives aided in a significant increase in percentage of telecommunications markets that are no longer subject to economic regulation, allowing market forces to determine the competitive landscape.

Program Sub-Sub-Activity 1.3.2.1 — International Telecommunication Union, Switzerland
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Canadian interests are reflected in United Nations / International Telecommunication Union (UN/ITU) decisions and systems Proportion of Canadian delegation objectives met 100% of Canadian delegation objectives for the 2008 World Telecommunication Standard Assembly were met New indicator


Program Sub-Sub-Activity 1.3.2.2 — Spectrum/Telecom Program
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Policies, regulations, standards and procedures are in place to enable the introduction of new radiocommunications/ telecommunications technologies and services Number of telecommunications and radiocommunications services introduced in the marketplace With the release of spectrum through the Advanced Wireless Services auction, the opportunity exists for a wide range of service applications such as cellular telephony, data, multimedia and Internet Protocol (IP)-based applications and broadband access to be made available

New indicator

Telecommunications infrastructure is available to Canadians during times of emergency Readiness of telecommunications services during emergencies (readiness is the availability and reliability of the infrastructure during real and simulated emergencies) Participated in Silver Exercise for Olympic readiness and tested the recovery of telecommunications service due to an earthquake and cyber attack scenario. Also purchased additional satellite phones for regions and backup generator to ensure appropriate backup communication tools are available Improving (due to activities for the upcoming Vancouver 2010 Olympic Games)
Canadian interests and requirements pertaining to radiocommunications and telecommunications are reflected in international agreements and standards Degree of client satisfaction with the way Canadian interests and requirements are reflected in international agreements and standards High level of client satisfaction, gauged through regular, ongoing interaction with clients*

No change

* Such as the Radio Advisory Board of Canada, the Canadian Preparatory Committee for the WRC-12, the Technical Advisory Committee on Broadcasting, the Canadian Electrical Association, ITU delegations, CITEL delegations and others. Most of our clients are represented on these committees, including the private sector and other government departments (OGDs).

Program Activity 1.4 — Office of Consumer Affairs

Program Sub-Activity 1.4.1 — Consumer Policy
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
A robust policy framework that promotes and protects consumer interests throughout Canada Number of policy challenges that affect consumer protection being addressed and/or documented 2 policy challenges: consumers and regulatory frameworks; consumers and international standards New indicator


Program Sub-Activity 1.4.2 — Consumer Services and Outreach
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Canadian consumers make confident and well-informed decisions in the marketplace Extent to which Canadian consumers report making confident and well-informed decisions in the marketplace Approximately 3,500 consumer enquiries were received throughout the year; 244 written responses were received from clients acknowledging Office of Consumer Affairs (OCA) marketplace information services New indicator
Canadian consumers are aware of major consumer challenges Level of Canadian consumers' awareness of major consumer challenges OCA web statistics demonstrate that the top 5 information products accessed online reflected the following current major consumer challenges: spending, debt, digital television and cellular phones New indicator

Program Activity 1.5 — Competition Bureau

Program Sub-Activity 1.5.1 — Compliance with the Laws under the Competition Bureau’s Jurisdiction
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Companies/individuals cease their anti-competitive conduct following compliance interventions conducted by the Competition Bureau Percentage of recidivism or relapse of individuals into anti-competitive behaviour following a Bureau intervention 0.06% or 5 individuals

(criminal enforcement only)

Not applicable
Percentage of companies that change behaviour as a result of a Bureau compliance intervention* 82 companies and individuals New indicator
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Canadians recognize that the anti-competitive activity is unlawful and harmful Level of consumer and business awareness that anti-competitive activity is unlawful and harmful Media coverage in the Quebec Gasoline Case reached millions of readers, viewers and listeners** Not applicable
Number of immunity applicants 11 New indicator

* This performance indicator has been changed to a number beginning in FY 2009–10. To be able to compare with future statistics, the result is being presented as a number instead of a percentage.
** According to a study commissioned by the Competition Bureau to Delta Media, the Bureau’s announcement that charges had been laid against 13 individuals and 11 companies accused of fixing the price of gasoline at the pump in Victoriaville, Magog and Sherbrooke, Quebec, generated 1,067 media reports between June 12 and August 1, reaching an estimated 51 million readers, viewers and listeners.

Program Sub-Activity 1.5.2 — Advocacy of Competition Principles
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Removal of unnecessary regulation and no implementation of new restrictions on competition Advocacy efforts that resulted in the removal or lessening of market restrictions 7 New indicator

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3.5 Expected Results Information for Program Sub-Activities and Sub-Sub-Activities by Strategic Outcome

Industrie Canada Strategic Outcome: An Innovative Economy

Program Activity 2.1 — Science and Innovation Sector — S&T and Innovation

Program Sub-Activity 2.1.1 — External Relations and Innovation Branch1
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Science and technology policies in the federal government that further collaborations with other key players that support Canada’s domestic and international S&T interests Number of policy documents, reports, consultation papers and promotion materials Promoted and protected Canada's interests at the G8 Ministerial Meeting on Science and Technology, held in Japan in June 2008, and at various OECD meetings related to science, technology and innovation policy

Engaged provincial governments to identify potential areas of program complementarity and cooperation

Held an external stakeholder outreach activity to engage key stakeholders. More than 10 meetings were held with provincial Deputy Ministers, G13 university presidents,2 presidents of colleges, presidents of major science initiatives3 and presidents of select private sector companies engaged in R&D activities. As a result, potential areas of collaboration with various stakeholders have been identified

Not applicable*

*It is not useful to measure trends in performance indicators due to the nature of work of the External Relations and Innovation Branch, where actual results vary from year to year depending on the current agenda and priorities of the government. Recognizing the inherent difficulties in measuring the performance of this indicator, Public Policy Services will be moved under Internal Services in the Program Activity Architecture in 2009–10.

Program Sub-Activity 2.1.2 — Federal Science and Technology Policy Branch
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Horizontal science and technology policies that are effectively coordinated with the federal S&T community Collaborative research and analysis projects undertaken and completed with the federal S&T community and others Working groups, which included various departments, such as EC, HRSDC, PS, NRC, TC, DFAIT, DFO, CFIA, HC, AAFC and Industry Canada, identified and shared best practices in intellectual property management, international partnerships and measuring impacts

Industry Canada and the federal S&T community collaborated with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) on public science research projects

New indicator

Program Sub-Activity 2.1.3 — Prosperity Secretariat
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Concrete and measurable improvements to North American prosperity Number of projects/initiatives implemented that remove impediments to North American competitiveness 12 projects/initiatives New indicator
Implementation of proposed initiatives on competitiveness that are consistent with the priorities identified by the leaders at their 2007 Summit in Montebello, Quebec Implementation of 12 initiatives that promote competitiveness New indicator

Program Sub-Activity 2.1.4 — Policy Branch
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Improvements to research and development capacity through effective, aligned and coordinated investment in R&D, R&D infrastructure, skills development, highly qualified people (HQP), innovation and R&D commercialization Evaluation of programs and activities 166 Vanier scholarships awarded to top doctoral students to pursue studies at Canadian universities

$163 million was awarded to 11 Centres of Excellence in Commercialization and Research (CECR)**

10 Business Led-Networks of Centres of Excellence (BL–NCE) were invited to submit full proposals for the BL–NCE program ***

$80 million was provided to the granting councils to improve research in priority areas

Not applicable*
Innovation indicators prepared by Statistics Canada and others, such as the OECD Since 2007–08, government expenditures on R&D (GOVERD) have remained steady at 18% of gross expenditures on R&D (GERD)4 No change
Gross domestic expenditures on R&D amounted to 1.8% of GDP in 2008, slightly below the 1.9% witnessed in 20075 Declining
In 2008, the business sector funded over $800 million/year of higher education R&D, accounting for more than 8% of total R&D performed by universities6 No change

* It is not useful to measure trends in performance indicators due to the nature of work of the Policy Branch, where actual results vary from year to year depending on the current agenda and priorities of the government. Recognizing the inherent difficulties in measuring the performance of this indicator, Public Policy Services will be moved under Internal Services in the Program Activity Architecture in 2009–10.
** CECR program provides funds to create internationally recognized centres to pursue major discoveries and bring them to the market place.
*** BL–NCE program provides funds to business-led networks of centres of excellence to improve private sector investment in R&D.

Program Sub-Sub-Activity 2.1.4.1 — Canada Foundation for Innovation
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Strong research capability at Canadian research institutions Percentage of Innovation Fund recipients that rate the quality of their new infrastructure as near world-class or better, as a result of CFI awards 56% reported that their infrastructure was comparable to the best in the world* Improving**
Percentage of New Opportunities Fund and Canada Research Chairs fund recipients whose recruitment to Canada was influenced by CFI awards 72% report that the availability of the infrastructure was an important factor in recruitment and retention at the institution(s)*** No change****

* The Innovation Fund was replaced by the LEF/NIF; this distinction was introduced in 2006–07. A joint competition is held at the same time for these two funds.
** The percentage of project leaders that have considered their infrastructure comparable to the best in the world has improved: 2008: 56%; 2007: 49%; 2006: 51%; 2005: 46%; 2004: 48%.
*** In 2005–06, the NOF, the Canada Research Chairs Infrastructure Fund (CRCIF) and the Career Awards merged into the LOF.
**** The percentage of project leaders who report that the availability of the infrastructure was an important factor has remained slightly greater than 70% for the past 4 reporting periods (i.e., 2005 to 2008): 2008: 72%; 2007: 71%; 2006: 72%; 2005: 71%.
Note: Policy Branch does not conduct evaluations of programs and activities.

Program Sub-Sub-Activity 2.1.4.2 — Canadian Institute for Advanced Research
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
To ensure that Canada remains a global leader in advanced research by supporting multidisciplinary teams of leading researchers Number of prestigious awards received by researchers involved with CIFAR During the year ending June 30, 2008, CIFAR researchers received 39 major awards and honours for which researchers from a broad range of disciplines are eligible, as well as 20 field-specific prizes Declining
Frequency with which the work of researchers supported by CIFAR is cited in research literature Based on Essential Science Indicators (ESI) data, in 2007–08 the following percentages of CIFAR researchers were in the top 1% in their field worldwide: senior program members, 40%; Canada-based senior program members, 29%; advisory committee members, 54% Declining*

* Both measures reflect peer recognition of the researchers engaged in CIFAR’s programs. Overall, the figures for 2007–08 declined slightly from the previous year following the conclusion of one research program.
Note: CIFAR’s fiscal year ends in June 2009; final data for 2008–09 are not yet available.

Program Sub-Sub-Activity 2.1.4.3 — Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Expanded knowledge based in the social sciences and humanities and in public policy Volume of research performed by Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation awards recipients No data available7 Not available*
Number of public interaction events hosted by the Foundation to promote the dissemination of research findings Between May 2008 and February 2009, the Foundation hosted 13 events; up from 12 between May 2007 and February 20088

Increasing

* The Foundation does not track the volume of research performed by its award recipients.

Expected Result Performance Indicator Results
Program Sub-Sub-Activity 2.1.4.4 — Council of Canadian Academies
Trend
More informed public debate and government decision making on key public policy issues Number of government policies informed by CCA reports The CCA released 2 reports*  intended to inform government policies New indicator
Number of reports released by the CCA every year 2 reports*  in 2008–09; up from 1 in 2007–08 Improving

* The reports released by the CCA in 2008–09:

Program Sub-Sub-Activity 2.1.4.5 — Genome Canada
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
To ensure that Canada becomes a world leader in genomics and proteomics research by providing primary funding and acting as an information resource for genomics and proteomics research in Canada Number of companies formed, patent applications filed and commercial licences issued through projects funded by Genome Canada Number of companies formed: 15

Patent applications filed: 202

Commercial licences issued: 19

Note: These figures represent cumulative data since 2000

New indicator
Number of trainees supported No data available yet. Data will be available in the fall of 2009 New indicator
Number of publications Between 2005 and 2007, Canada ranked 6th internationally for the number of papers, and at least 3,370 publications have been produced since Genome Canada was founded New indicator
Number of awards received No data available* New indicator

* Genome Canada does not track the number of awards received by its recipients.

Program Activity 2.2 — Industry Sector — S&T and Innovation

Program Sub-Activity 2.2.1 — Aerospace, Defence and Marine Industries
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Favourable climate, initiatives and decisions supporting innovation in the aerospace, defence and marine industries Number of major challenges in the aerospace, defence and marine industries where the Branch has taken actions to address them 5 New indicator

Program Sub-Activity 2.2.2 — Automotive and Transportation Industries
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Favourable climate, initiatives and decisions supporting innovation in the automotive and transportation industries Number of major challenges in the automotive and transportation industries where the Branch has taken actions to address them 1 New indicator

Program Sub-Activity 2.2.3 — Life Sciences Industries
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Favourable climate, initiatives and decisions supporting innovation in the life sciences industries Number of major challenges in the life sciences industries that the Branch has taken actions to address 3 New indicator

The economic downturn that began in late 2008 has had a negative impact on life science industries, especially small Canadian biotechnology firms in drug development which are particularly dependent on ongoing access to capital to finance their operations.

Program Sub-Activity 2.2.4 — Resource Processing Industries
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Favourable climate, initiatives and decisions supporting innovation in the resource processing industries Number of major challenges in the resource processing industries that the Branch has taken actions to address 3 New indicator

New emerging renewable energy technologies are expanding at a rapid rate.

Program Sub-Activity 2.2.5 — Service and Consumer Products Industries
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Favourable climate, initiatives and decisions supporting innovation in the service consumer products industries Number of major challenges in the service and consumer products industries that the Branch has taken actions to address 1 New indicator

Program Activity 2.3 — Spectrum, Information Technologies and Telecommunications Sector — S&T and Innovation

Program Sub-Activity 2.3.1 — CANARIE
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Canadian researchers have access to leading-edge infrastructure to support research in areas of importance to Canadians Number of research and education organizations (including real and virtual) with access to the network 400 real research and education organizations and 20 virtual ones, for a total of 420 organizations Improving

Program Sub-Activity 2.3.2 — Precarn
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Increased development and use of ICTs and intelligent systems technologies by Canadian companies through the provision of project funding Number of national and small business projects from Precarn 6 national and 9 small business projects, for a total of 15 projects New indicator
Number of regional alliance projects in collaboration with Precarn’s regional partners 16 regional alliance projects took place New indicator

Program Activity 2.4 — Communications Research Centre Canada

Program Sub-Activity 2.4.1 — Telecommunications Research Program — Regulations and Standards
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Policy-makers, regulatory committees, standards organizations and program development sectors are aware of new communications technical developments and challenges Quantity and usefulness of Communications Research Centre Canada (CRC) technical inputs provided to organizations developing programs related to the telecommunications sector No formal client satisfaction survey was undertaken during the year. However, CRC provided over 25 contributions to Industry Canada branches, regional operations and international standards organizations (IEEE and ITU) in the form of technical briefs, reports, work-group participation and enhancements to equipment used for spectrum monitoring Increasing

Program Sub-Activity 2.4.2 — Telecommunications Research Program — Government Operations
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Canadian government departments make well-informed decisions on new communications technologies Level of funding received from other government departments to conduct research and testing on communications technologies Defence Communications Program: $7.57 million
Canadian Space Agency: $699,300
Other government agencies: $85,500
Increasing
Number of Communications Research Centre-led other government department (OGD) technology development programs CRC led 14 OGD technology development programs Increasing
Level of Communications Research Centre participation in OGD and international technology development programs CRC participated in 16 international technology and standards development programs on behalf of OGDs New indicator

Program Sub-Activity 2.4.3 — Telecommunications Research Program — Innovation and Technology Transfer
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Small and medium-sized Canadian telecommunications companies realize industrial benefits Extent to which small and medium-sized Canadian telecommunications companies report having realized benefits through access to Communications Research Centre Canada's (CRC's) intellectual property portfolio A study of CRC economic impact is undertaken every 5 years with the next one due in 2010. The last study of 2005–06 done by an external consultant showed cumulative industrial sales resulting from CRC IP licences to the year 2005 as $520 million Not applicable
The Canadian telecommunications sector is aware of and has access to CRC's intellectual property portfolio Number of research partnerships between Communications Research Centre and the private sector, academic organizations, and national and international research organizations There are 68 active research partnerships which are as follows: 26 with the private sector, 10 with academic organizations, 18 with national research organizations and 14 with international research organizations. Of these, there were 16 new research partnerships as follows:
5 with the private sector, 4 with academic organizations, 5 with national research organizations and 2 with international research organizations. In FY 2008–09, there were 387 active licence agreements. There were 26 new licence agreements executed in this reporting period
Improving

Program Activity 2.5 — Industrial Technologies Office — Special Operating Agency


Program Sub-Activity 2.5.1 — Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Innovative and competitive aerospace, defence, space and security (A&D) firms Growth in recipient firm targeted aerospace, defence, space and security research and development expenditures Invested $395.4 million in 9 new innovative aerospace and defence projects during
2008–09
New indicator
Investment in strategic research and development activities in the aerospace, defence, space and security industries Dollars of private sector investment leveraged per dollar of Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative dollar invested $2 New indicator
Collaborative partnerships on research and development between aerospace, defence, space and security industries and research institutes, universities, colleges and/or non-profit organizations Number of new or enhanced collaborative partnerships among aerospace, defence, space and security researchers 6 New indicator

Program Sub-Activity 2.5.2 — h2 Early Adopters Program
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Hydrogen and hydrogen-compatible technologies adopted by the market Number of participants involved in new demonstration projects using existing hydrogen technology The Program expired March 31, 2008 Not applicable
Investment in demonstration activities in the hydrogen and hydrogen-compatible technologies industry Weighted average (by dollar value) sharing ratio The Program expired March 31, 2008 Not applicable
Dollars of private sector investment leveraged per dollar of h2EA investment The Program expired March 31, 2008 Not applicable

Program Sub-Activity 2.5.3 — Program for Strategic Industrial Projects
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Investment in technology adaptation and adoption activities in the automotive industry Weighted average (by dollar value) sharing ratio No new projects were contracted Not applicable
Investment in research and development activities in the automotive industry Dollars of private sector investment leveraged per dollar of Program for Strategic Industrial Projects investment No new projects were contracted Not applicable
Number and type of automotive projects funded 3 No change

Program Sub-Activity 2.5.4 — Technology Partnerships Canada — Research and Development Program
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Investment in research and development activities in the aerospace, defence, environmental and enabling technology industries Weighted average (by dollar value) sharing ratio The Program closed for new investments on December 31, 2006 Not applicable
Dollars of private sector investment leveraged per dollar of TPCR&D Program investment The Program closed for new investments on December 31, 2006 Not applicable
Number and type of aerospace, defence, environmental and enabling technology projects funded The Program closed for new investment on December 31, 2006 Not applicable

 


1 As of February 2008, the External Relations and Innovation Branch no longer exists, and became part of the Policy branch.

2 G13 Universities include University of Alberta, University of British Columbia, University of Calgary, Dalhousie University, Université Laval, McGill University, McMaster University, Université de Montréal, University of Ottawa, Queen's University, University of Toronto, University of Waterloo, University of Western Ontario.

3 Major Science Initiatives are SNOLab in Sudbury, Neptune in Victoria, Canadian Light Source in Saskatoon.

4 Statscan — Science Statistics

5 Statscan — Science Statistics

6 Table 5: National Gross Domestic Expenditures on Research and Development, in the total sciences, Canada, Statistics Canada, 2009.

7 However, in 2008–09, the Foundation disbursed the following awards: 15 Scholarships (awarded May 2008); 5 Fellowships (awarded May 2008); and 10 Mentorships (awarded January 2008).

8 For further information on events hosted, please see the Foundation’s 2007-08 Annual Report.

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3.5 Expected Results Information for Program Sub-Activities and Sub-Sub-Activities by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: Competitive Industry and Sustainable Communities

Program Activity 3.1 — Strategic Policy Sector — Economic Development

Program Sub-Activity 3.1.1 — Strategic Policy Branch — Economic Development
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Integration of departmental and governmental objectives into the development of economic policies and consideration of sustainable development and trade issues in the policy development process Number of economic development and sustainable development and trade items reviewed by the Director General Policy Committee (DGPC) 22 items reviewed by the DGPC in 2008–09* Not applicable**

* The DGPC required Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) on all policy items to ensure that environmental considerations were factored into policy development.

** It is not useful to measure trends in performance indicators due to the nature of the work of the Strategic Policy Sector, where actual results vary from year to year depending on the current agenda and priorities of the government. Recognizing the inherent difficulties in measuring the performance of the Strategic Policy Sector, Public Policy Services has been moved under Internal Services in the 2009–10 Program Activity Architecture.

Program Sub-Activity 3.1.2 — Microeconomic Policy Analysis Branch — Economic Development
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
High-quality microeconomic research and analysis on current and emerging policy issues are added to the policy development process Number of high-quality research papers that are incorporated into policy development as measured by the number of research papers and reports accepted for publication by Industry Canada’s Publications Committee 11 research papers in 2008–09; up from 4 in 2007–08 Improving

 

Program Activity 3.2 — Small Business and Marketplace Services and Regional Operations Sector — Economic Development

Program Sub-Activity 3.2.1 — FedNor
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Communities and businesses in Northern, Eastern and rural Ontario are sustainable and competitive Number of businesses and organizations created, expanded, maintained or strengthened 7,186 businesses and organizations created, expanded, maintained or strengthened Not applicable*

* Trending information is not applicable for this performance indicator due to a change in the scope of the indicator in the 2008–09 reporting period. In previous years, measurement was limited to the number of SMEs created, expanded or maintained, whereas in 2008–09, the scope of measurement increased to the number of business and other organizations created, expanded or maintained. This change in scope better reflects program reach.

Program Sub-Sub-Activity 3.2.1.1 — Community Futures Program
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Communities and businesses in rural Ontario are sustainable and competitive Leverage ratio of funds raised from other sources through federal CF Program investments 1:1.98, an increase from 1:1.7 in 2007–08, possibly due to increased partnerships with conventional lending institutions Improving
Number of businesses created, expanded, maintained or strengthened in rural Ontario by CFDCs 3,195 businesses created, expanded, maintained and strengthened in rural Ontario by CFDCs; a decline from 3,835 in 2007–08, possibly due to increased ability to find information online Declining
Program Sub-Sub-Activity 3.2.1.2 — Northern Ontario Development Program
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Communities and businesses in Northern Ontario are sustainable and competitive Leverage ratio of funds raised from other sources through Northern Ontario Development Program (NODP) contributions 1:2.79; an increase from 1:2.3 in 2007–08 due to significant partner contributions on large projects Improving
Number of Northern Ontario businesses and organizations created, expanded, maintained or strengthened 3,376 businesses and organizations created, expanded, maintained or strengthened Not applicable*

* Trending information is not applicable for this performance indicator due to a change in the scope of the indicator in the 2008–09 reporting period. In previous years, measurement was limited to the number of SMEs created, expanded or maintained, whereas in 2008–09, the scope of measurement increased to the number of business and other organizations created, expanded or maintained. This change in scope better reflects program reach.

Program Sub-Sub-Activity 3.2.1.3 — Eastern Ontario Development Program
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Communities and businesses in rural Eastern Ontario are sustainable and competitive Leverage ratio of funds raised from other sources through Eastern Ontario Development Program (EODP) contributions 1:2.9; down from 1:5.5 in 2007–08* Declining
Number of rural Eastern Ontario businesses and organizations created, expanded, maintained or strengthened 615 rural Eastern Ontario businesses and organizations created, expanded, maintained or strengthened Not applicable**

* 2007–08 numbers include one project with a significant amount of leveraged funds.
** Trending information is not applicable for this performance indicator due to a change in the scope of the indicator in the 2008–09 reporting period. In previous years, measurement was limited to the number of SMEs created, expanded or maintained, whereas in 2008–09, the scope of measurement increased to the number of business and other organizations created, expanded or maintained. This change in scope better reflects program reach.

Program Sub-Activity 3.2.2 — Regional Delivery
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Departmental and OGD clients and external stakeholders are aware of regional perspectives and advice Number of contributions to departmental policy documents and initiatives such as MCs, DGPC committee documents within established time frames Accurate and timely advice and commentary was provided to 41 formal requests for information from senior management, an increase from 37 in 2007–08 Increasing
Number of events, initiatives, activities engaging regional stakeholders 143 regional events and announcements were conducted, an insignificant decline from 145 in 2007–08 No change
SME use of government business-related information, programs and services and facilitated compliance for business Increase in number of clients using the Canada Business Network website in Yukon, NWT, Nunavut and Ontario The Canada-Ontario Business Service Centre had 1,626,692 visitors to its website in 2008–09, an increase from 1,049,314 in 2007–08 Increasing
The Canada-Yukon Business Service Centre had 116,133 visitors to its website in 2008–09, a decline from 118,727 in 2007–08 Decreasing
The Canada-NWT Business Service Centre had 77,255 visitors in 2008–09, an increase from 34,603 in 2007–08 Increasing
The Canada–Nunavut Business Service Centre had 32,561 visitors in 2008–09, an increase from 24,608 in 2007–08 Increasing


Program Sub-Activity 3.2.3 — Section 41 — Official Languages Act
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Official Language Minority Community and business representatives are aware of the Government of Canada’s economic development programs and services Number of community and business organizations that participate in consultations and awareness sessions 30 consultations were held with various community and business organizations in Official Language Minority Communities New indicator


Program Sub-Activity 3.2.4 — Canada Small Business Financing Program
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Significant incremental debt financing for SMEs Number of loans registered 7,846 loans registered, down from 8,930 in 2007–08 Declining
Value of loans registered $916.4 million, down from $987.7 million in 2007–08 Declining
Percentage of incrementality 75% of Canada Small Business Financing Program borrowers obtained some degree of financial incrementality; no change from 2007–08 No change


Program Sub-Activity 3.2.5 — Service to Business
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
SME use of government business-related information, programs and services, and facilitated compliance for business Increase in number of clients using the Canada Business Network website over the previous year 7.4 million Internet visits to Canada Business Network websites (not including British Columbia); up from 5.4 million in 2007–08 Improving
Integrated business permit and licence information from all levels of government provides value to clients across Canada Percentage of clients that indicate that they are satisfied with the services provided BizPaL’s proposal was not identified on the list of Ministerial-approved public opinion researches for 2008–09. Due to limitations on conducting public opinion research, no client survey was undertaken Not applicable


Program Sub-Activity 3.2.6 — Student Connections
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Knowledge and skills related to the Internet and e-commerce applications and technologies by SMEs and seniors Client perceptions of increased knowledge and skills 75% reported that they received practical instruction that improved their use of information technology No change
Practical, short-term work experience for students in post-secondary IT-related studies Youth perceptions that the opportunities to gain new skills will help them in looking for work in the future 93% of youth interviewed agreed that the program has given them opportunities to gain new skills that will help them in looking for work in the future New indicator


Program Sub-Activity 3.2.7 — Small Business Policy Branch — Economic Development
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Departmental and OGD clients and external stakeholders are aware of small business perspectives and advice Number of references of small business issues in research, policy and program documents (e.g., MCs, TB subs, research conference reports, consultation reports) 18 Declining
Number of significant policy proposals submitted to the Department’s Policy Committees, Deputy Ministers, Minister and/or Secretary of State for consideration 8 New indicator

Program Activity 3.3 — Industry Sector — Economic Development

Program Sub-Activity 3.3.1 — Competitiveness in Aerospace, Defence and Marine Industries
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Favourable climate, initiatives and decisions supporting competitiveness and sustainability in the aerospace, defence and marine industries Number of major challenges in the aerospace, defence and marine sectors that the Branch has taken actions to address 4 New indicator
Program Sub-Sub-Activity 3.3.1.1 — Structured Financing Facility — Shipbuilding and Industrial Marine Framework
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Qualifying shipbuilding firms obtain work to maintain their viability Number of qualifying firms that receive assistance 4 New indicator
The number of SFF applications 0 New indicator

4 projects were completed and contributions paid. 3 projects were approved for support in future years, 2 for Groupe Ocean for 3 vessels and 1 for Nordane for 4 vessels.

Program Sub-Sub-Activity 3.3.1.2 — Ongoing Activities
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Stakeholders who are aware and motivated in respect to major challenges and opportunities regarding competitiveness and sustainability in the aerospace, defence and marine industries Client and stakeholder feedback with respect to major challenges and opportunities regarding competitiveness and sustainability in the aerospace, defence and marine industries See note New indicator

Improving as a result of major consultative and industry initiatives, such as the IRB Policy review and the industry-led FMP Initiative. Client feedback on major challenges included input on alignment of current government mechanisms to support R&D, changes to the IRB Policy and industry feedback on procurement processes.

Program Sub-Activity 3.3.2 — Competitiveness in Automotive and Transportation Industries
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Favourable climate, initiatives and decisions supporting competitiveness and sustainability in the automotive and transportation industries Number of major challenges in the automotive and transportation industries where the Branch has taken actions to address them 2 New indicator


Program Sub-Activity 3.3.3 — Competitiveness in Life Sciences Industries
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Favourable climate, initiatives and decisions supporting competitiveness and sustainability in the life sciences industries Number of major challenges in the life sciences industries that the Branch has taken actions to address 3 New indicator

The economic downturn that began in late 2008 has had a negative impact on life science industries, especially small Canadian biotechnology firms in drug development which are particularly dependent on ongoing access to capital to finance their operations.

Program Sub-Activity 3.3.4 — Competitiveness in Resource Processing Industries
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Favourable climate, initiatives and decisions supporting competitiveness and sustainability in the resource processing industries Number of major challenges in the resource processing industries where the Branch has taken actions to address them 3 New indicator

The global recession and depressed demand and prices have had a negative impact on all resource processing industries.

Program Sub-Activity 3.3.5 — Competitiveness in Service and Consumer Products Industries
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Favourable climate, initiatives and decisions supporting competitiveness and sustainability in the service and consumer products industries Number of major challenges in the service and consumer products industries that the Branch has taken actions to address 3 New indicator


Program Sub-Sub-Activity 3.3.5.1 — Canadian Apparel and Textile Industries Program
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Firms in the service and consumer products industries are enabled (i.e., enabled to invest or offer attractive sales terms) Percentage of qualifying firms receiving assistance 90.5% New indicator

The percentage of qualifying firms receiving assistance rose to 90.5% in 2008–09 from 87.0% in 2007–08. Applications were received from 21 qualifying firms (those deemed eligible to apply); 2 of those firms did not receive assistance based on the due diligence on the proposed projects.

Program Sub-Sub-Activity 3.3.5.2 — Ongoing Activities
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Stakeholders who are aware and motivated with respect to major challenges and opportunities regarding competitiveness and sustainability in the service and consumer products industries Client and stakeholder feedback with respect to major challenges and opportunities regarding competitiveness and sustainability in the service and consumer products industries All stakeholders contacted provided positive feedback New indicator

Program Activity 3.4 — Spectrum, Information Technologies and Telecommunications Sector — Economic Development

Program Sub-Activity 3.4.1 — Information and Communications Technologies Branch — Economic Development
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Comprehensive understanding of Information and Communications Technologies Branch (ICT) industry developments, trends and issues in order to influence policy and decision-makers to position Canadian companies for growth and innovation in the global marketplace Number of ICT statistical analysis reports (including statistical reports, sub-sector profiles and vertical market profiles) 75 statistical analysis products were produced* Improving, not in number of items, but rather in depth of sector knowledge and type of analysis carried out by the branch**
Influence over government decisions on issues affecting the ICT industry through informed advocacy for ICT stakeholders Number of issues addressed in briefing notes, policy forums, and interdepartmental and departmental meetings with industry stakeholders and ICT Branch Management to inform and advocate on ICT policy issues 236*** issues were identified addressing 5 key challenges, Financing, HR, Tax and SR&ED, Procurement and Innovation, and Commercialization No change
Increased business opportunities for the Canadian ICT sector Number of client services, such as corporate calls, participation in global events, support for incoming and outgoing missions 151**** industry delegations were coordinated and supported at 4 global events No change

Increased business opportunities for ICT companies were the same as last year 

* Product examples: ICT statistical reports, ICT Stats overview and Quarterly Monitor, sub-sector analysis reports, company profiles, policy briefs, briefing notes, sector presentations, sub-sector presentations etc.
** Example: fewer company profiles vs. actual sub-sector stats, figures and technology trends.
*** Example of core issues included HQP, venture capital, procurement, ICT sector and S&T strategy, green IT and Nortel etc.
**** Examples include corporate calls addressing company retention, expansion, layoffs, SR&ED and funding; company support given for various global events and business opportunities including CommunicAsia and BroadcastAsia, Expo Comm China, Futurecom, and Mobile World Congress (MWC).

Program Sub-Activity 3.4.2 — Information Highway Applications Branch
Expected Result Performance Indicator Results Trend
Provision of funding to support the operations of approximately 3,800 Community Access Program (CAP) sites across Canada

Provision of funding for the refurbishment and distribution of 85,000 computers to schools and not-for-profit learning organizations
Number of CAP sites supported 3,760 CAP sites were supported in 2008–09, an insignificant decline from 3,800 sites in 2007–08 Declining
Number of refurbished computers delivered to schools and not-for-profit learning organizations 65,766 computers were refurbished and delivered in 2008–09, a decline from
78,102 in 2007–08
Declining
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