2010-11 Estimates—Report on Plans and Priorities

2010–11 Estimates — Report on Plans and Priorities

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Future-oriented Financial Statements & Notes
Years Ended March 31, 2010 and 2011

Department of Industry (033)

Statement of Management Responsibility

Responsibility for the compilation, content and presentation of the accompanying future-oriented financial information for the years ended March 31, 2010 and 2011, rests with Industry Canada management. The future-oriented financial information has been prepared by management in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies, which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector. The future-oriented financial information is submitted for Part III of Estimates (Report on Plans and Priorities) and will be used in Industry Canada’s Departmental Performance Report to compare with actual results.

Management is responsible for the integrity and objectivity of the information contained in future-oriented financial information and for the process of developing assumptions. Assumptions and estimates are based on information available and known to management at the time of development, reflect current business and economic conditions, and assume a continuation of current governmental priorities and consistency in Industry Canada’s mandate and strategic outcomes. Much of the future-oriented financial information is based on these assumptions, best estimates and judgment and gives due consideration to materiality. At the time of preparation of these future-oriented statements, management believes the estimates and assumptions to be reasonable. However, as with all such assumptions, there is a measure of uncertainty surrounding them. This uncertainty increases as the forecast horizon extends.

The actual results achieved for the fiscal years covered in the accompanying future-oriented financial statements will vary from the information presented and the variations may be material.

The future-oriented financial statements of Industry Canada have not been audited.

Deputy Head
Ottawa, Canada
Chief Financial Officer
Date Date

Industry Canada Future-oriented Statement of Operations (Unaudited)
For the year ended March 31
(in millions of dollars)
  Forecast
2010–11
Estimated Results
2009–10
  Marketplace Science and Technology, Knowledge, and Innovation Competitive Businesses Internal Services Total Total
Expenses            
Transfer payments            
Industry - 94 23 - 117 267
Other 9 1,296 332 - 1,637 1,911
Total transfer payments 9 1,390 355 - 1,754 2,178
Operating expenses            
Salaries and employee benefits 307 62 58 87 514 518
Professional and special services 50 16 12 7 85 144
Accommodation 23 10 11 11 55 85
Travel 11 2 2 1 16 26
Amortization 8 3 1 3 15 17
Communication 8 1 2 - 11 22
Furniture and equipment 7 3 1 1 12 22
Equipment repair and maintenance 6 2 1 1 10 18
Rentals 9 - - - 9 11
Utilities, materials and supplies 4 3 1 1 9 18
Postage 1 - - - 1 3
Other operating expenses 5 (1) 2 1 7 10
Total operating expenses 439 101 91 113 744 894
Total expenses 448 1,491 446 113 2,498 3,072
Revenues            
Sales of services 1,020 10 49 - 1,079 1,092
Dividends - - 9 - 9 15
Revenue from fines 7 - - - 7 8
Amortization of discounts - - 3 - 3 4
Other revenue - - 2 - 2 2
Total revenues 1,027 10 63 - 1,100 1,121
Net cost of operations (579) 1,481 383 113 1,398 1,951
             

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these future-oriented financial statements.

 

Industry Canada Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
At March 31
(in millions of dollars)
  Forecast
2010–11
Estimated
Results
2009–10
Assets    
Financial assets    
Accounts receivable and advances 102 102
Loans (Note 6) 560 492
Investments (Note 7) 2,897 2,772
Total financial assets 3,559 3,366
Non-financial assets    
Tangible capital assets (Note 8) 122 118
Total non-financial assets 122 118
Total 3,681 3,484
Liabilities    
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities 650 650
Vacation and compensatory leave 23 23
Deferred revenue (Note 9) 3,795 4,374
Allowance for loan guarantees (Note 12) 347 347
Allowance for employee severance benefits (Note 11) 95 95
Other liabilities (Note 10) 37 33
  4,947 5,522
Equity of Canada (1,266) (2,038)
TOTAL 3,681 3,484
     

Contingent liabilities (Note 12)
Contractual obligations (Note 13)

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these future-oriented financial statements.

 

Industry Canada
Future-oriented Statement of Equity of Canada (Unaudited)
At March 31

(in millions of dollars)
  Forecast
2010–11
Estimated Results
2009–10
Equity of Canada, beginning of year (2,038) (4,170)
Net cost of operations (1,398) (1,951)
Appropriations available for use (Note 5) 2,421 2,990
Revenue not available for spending (897) (908)
Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue Fund 559 1,885
Services provided without charge by other government departments (Note 14) 87 116
Equity of Canada, end of year (1,266) (2,038)
     

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these future-oriented financial statements.

 

Industry Canada Future-oriented Statement of Cash Flow (Unaudited)
For the year ended March 31
(in millions of dollars)
  Forecast
2010–11
Estimated
Results
2009–10
Operating activities    
Net cost of operations 1,398 1,951
Non-cash items:    
Amortization of tangible capital assets (15) (17)
Services provided without charge (Note 14) (87) (116)
Variations in Statement of Financial Position:    
Decrease in liabilities 575 580
Increase in financial assets 193 1,542
Cash used by operating activities 2,064 3,940
Capital investment activities    
Acquisitions of tangible capital assets 19 27
Cash used by capital investment activities 19 27
Net cash provided by Government of Canada 2,083 3,967
     

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these future-oriented financial statements.

 

Industry Canada
Notes to Future-oriented Financial Statements (Unaudited)
At March 31

1. Authority and Objectives

The authorities for the programs for which Industry Canada is responsible are derived from the Department of Industry Act. Many other acts are under the responsibility of the Minister of Industry, and Treasury Board also defines other specific Industry Canada authorities.

Industry Canada aims to help make Canadian industry more productive and competitive in the global economy, thus improving the economic and social well-being of Canadians through its three strategic outcomes, which are mutually reinforcing. Fostering competitiveness helps advance the marketplace by developing and administering economic framework policies that promote competition and innovation, support investment and entrepreneurial activity, and instill consumer, investor and business confidence. Investing in science and technology to generate knowledge and equip Canadians with the skills and training they need to compete and prosper in the global, knowledge-based economy helps ensure that discoveries and breakthroughs happen here in Canada, and that Canadians can realize the social and economic benefits. Promoting economic development in communities helps support business by encouraging the development of skills, ideas and opportunities across the country. Taken together, Industry Canada’s strategic outcomes support growth in employment, income, productivity and sustainable development in Canada.

Internal Services are groups of activities and resources that are administered to support the needs or programs and other corporate obligations of Industry Canada. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across Industry Canada, not those provided specifically to a program.

Industry Canada’s activities are delivered at its headquarters in Ottawa as well as in the regions. There are six regional offices with service points located across Canada.

Industry Canada has a number of transfer payment programs through which it provides grants and contributions to recipients in targeted groups and sectors. Each transfer payment program has specific objectives and expected results that support the achievement of Industry Canada’s strategic outcomes.

2. Underlying Assumptions

These future-oriented statements have been prepared:

  • as at December 18, 2009
  • on the basis of government policies, government priorities and external environment at the time the future-oriented financial information was finalized
  • in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies, which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector, and in accordance with the Treasury Board Guide for the Preparation of Future-oriented Financial Statements
  • on the basis that the resources provided will enable Industry Canada to deliver the expected results specified in the Report on Plans and Priorities
  • on the basis of historical costs and trends
  • on the basis that the organization of program activities within Industry Canada will remain fairly consistent.

3. Variations and Changes to the Forecast Financial Information

While every attempt has been made to accurately forecast final results for 2010/11, actual results achieved are likely to vary from the forecast information presented, and this variation could be material.

Once the Report on Plans and Priorities is presented, Industry Canada will not be updating the forecasts for any changes to appropriations or forecast financial information made in ensuing supplementary estimates.

4. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

These future-oriented financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies, which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector.

Significant accounting policies are as follows:

  1. Parliamentary appropriations — Industry Canada is financed through Parliamentary appropriations. Appropriations provided to Industry Canada do not parallel financial reporting according to generally accepted accounting principles since appropriations are primarily based on cash flow requirements. Consequently, items recognized in the Future-oriented Statement of Operations and the Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position are not necessarily the same as those provided through appropriations from Parliament. Note 5 provides a high-level reconciliation between the bases of reporting.
  2. Consolidation — The future-oriented financial statements include the accounts of Industry Canada including the Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) Revolving Fund and special operating agencies Measurement Canada, Superintendent of Bankruptcy and Industrial Technologies Office. The accounts of these sub-entities have been consolidated with those of Industry Canada and all inter-organizational balances and transactions have been eliminated. Industry Canada’s investment in the Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC) is recorded at cost. The net results of the BDC are not consolidated in these future-oriented financial statements as Industry Canada is not deemed to control the Crown Corporation
  3. Net cash provided by Government - Industry Canada operates within the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF), which is administered by the Receiver General for Canada. All cash received by Industry Canada is deposited to the CRF and all cash disbursements made by Industry Canada are paid from the CRF. The net cash provided by Government is the difference between all cash receipts and all cash disbursements including transactions between departments of the federal government.
  4. Forecasted revenues
    Revenues from regulatory fees are recognized in the accounts based on the services provided in the year.

    Funds received from external parties for specified purposes are recorded upon receipt as deferred revenues. These revenues are recognized in the period in which the related expenses are incurred.

    Other revenues are accounted for in the period in which the underlying transaction or event occurred that gave rise to the revenues.

    Revenues that have been received but not yet earned are recorded as deferred revenues.

  5. Forecasted expenses
    Expenses are recorded on an accrual basis:
    Grants are recognized in the year in which the conditions for payment are met. In the case of grants that do not form part of an existing program, the expense is recognized when the Government announces a decision to make a non-recurring transfer, provided the enabling legislation or authorization for payment receives parliamentary approval prior to the completion of the future-oriented financial statements.

    Contributions are recognized in the year in which the recipient has met the eligibility criteria or fulfilled the terms of a contractual transfer agreement.

    Vacation pay and compensatory leave are expensed as the benefits accrue to employees under their respective terms of employment.

    Services provided without charge by other government departments for accommodation, the employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans, workers’ compensation costs, and legal services are recorded as operating expenses at their estimated cost.

  6. Employee future benefits
    1. Pension benefits: Eligible employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, a multi-employer plan administered by the Government of Canada. Industry Canada’s contributions to the Plan are charged to expenses in the year incurred and represent the total departmental obligation to the Plan. Current legislation does not require Industry Canada to make contributions for any actuarial deficiencies of the Plan.
    2. Severance benefits: Employees are entitled to severance benefits under labour contracts or conditions of employment. These benefits are accrued as employees render the services necessary to earn them. The obligation relating to the benefits earned by employees is calculated using information derived from the results of the actuarially determined liability for employee severance benefits for the Government as a whole.
  7. Receivables and advances — Receivables are stated as amounts expected to be ultimately realized. A provision is made for receivables where recovery is considered uncertain.
  8. Loans — Loans are stated at the amounts realized. Loans are subject to payment in the event of the default of the debtor. An allowance is used to reduce the carrying value of the loans to amounts that approximate their net realizable value. Interest on loans receivable is applied in accordance with the policy that governs the loan. Inte rest revenue is recognized at the time it is applied to the account.
  9. Allowances for loan guarantees — An allowance for loan guarantees is recorded for potential losses on loan guarantees when it is likely that a payment will be made in the future to honour a guarantee and when the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated.

    The allowance for losses on outstanding loan guarantees is based on forecasting models developed by program areas.

  10. Repayable contributions — Repayable contributions are contributions the recipient is expected to repay. Depending on their nature, they are classified as either unconditionally repayable or conditionally repayable and are accounted for differently.

    1. Unconditionally repayable contributions are contributions that must be repaid without qualification. Normally, these contributions are provided with a low- or no-interest clause. They are recorded on the Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position as loans at their estimated present value if they contain significant concessionary terms (defined to be when the grant portion is greater than 25% of the contribution). Otherwise, they are recorded at the face value of the loan. A portion of the unamortized discount is brought into income each year to reflect the change in the present value of the contributions outstanding. Appropriate allowances for uncollectible amounts are also established based on an individual appraisal of accounts.
    2. Conditionally repayable contributions are contributions that all or a part of become repayable if conditions specified in the contribution agreement come into effect. Accordingly, they are not recorded on the Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position until such time as the conditions specified in the agreement are satisfied, at which time they are then recorded as a receivable and a corresponding reduction in transfer payment expense.
  11. Contingent liabilities — Contingent liabilities are potential liabilities that may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded. If the likelihood is not determinable or an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the contingency is disclosed in the notes to the future-oriented financial statements.
  12. Environmental liabilities — Environmental liabilities reflect the estimated costs related to the management and remediation of environmentally contaminated sites. Based on management's best estimates, a liability is accrued and an expense recorded when the contamination occurs or when Industry Canada becomes aware of the contamination and is obligated, or is likely to be obligated, to incur such costs. If the likelihood of Industry Canada's obligation to incur those costs is not determinable or if an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the costs are disclosed as contingent liabilities in the notes to the future-oriented financial statements.
  13. Tangible capital assets — All tangible capital assets and leasehold improvements having an initial cost of $10,000 or more are recorded at their acquisition cost. Industry Canada does not capitalize intangibles; works of art and historical treasures that have cultural, aesthetic or historical value; assets located on Indian Reserves; and museum collections.

    Amortization of tangible capital assets is done on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset as follows:

    Asset Class Amortization Period
    Buildings 15 to 30 years
    Works and infrastructure 30 years
    Machinery and equipment 3 to 10 years
    Vehicles 5 to 10 years
    Assets under construction Once in service, in accordance with asset type
    Leasehold improvements Lesser of the remaining term of the lease or useful life of the improvement

  14. Measurement uncertainty — The preparation of the future-oriented financial information requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of all the assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses reported in the future-oriented financial statements. Assumptions are based on information available and known to management at the time of development, reflect current business and economic conditions, and assume a continuation of current governmental priorities and consistency in Industry Canada’s mandate and strategic outcomes. At the time of preparation of these future-oriented statements, management believes the estimates and assumptions to be reasonable. Nonetheless, as with all such estimates and assumptions, there is a measure of uncertainty surrounding them. This uncertainty increases as the forecast horizon extends.

5. Parliamentary Appropriations

Industry Canada receives most of its funding through annual Parliamentary appropriations. Items recognized in the Future-oriented Statement of Operations and the Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position in one year may be funded through Parliamentary appropriations in prior, current or future years. Accordingly, Industry Canada will have different net results of operations for the year on a government funding basis than on an accrual accounting basis. The differences are reconciled in the following table:

Reconciliation of net cost of operations to appropriations available for use:

(in millions of dollars) Forecast
2010–11
Estimated Results
2009–10
Net cost of operations 1,398 1,951
Adjustments for items affecting net cost of
operations but not affecting appropriations:
   
Add (Less):    
Revenue not available for spending 897 908
Repayment of conditionally repayable contributions 154 158
Services provided without charge (87) (116)
Amortization of tangible capital assets (15) (17)
Employee severance benefits (10) (10)
Salary expense recorded at Treasury Board Secretariat (13) (13)
Assets under construction 9 13
Adjustment for transfer payments likely to become loans 69 89
  2,402 2,963
Adjustments for items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting appropriations:    
Add (Less):    
Acquisitions of tangible capital assets 19 27
  19 27
Appropriations available for use 2,421 2,990
     

6. Loans

(in millions of dollars) Forecast
2010–11
Estimated
Results
2009–10
Enterprise development loans 110 110
Less: Unamortized discount loans (21) (24)
Net Enterprise development loans 89 86
Unconditionally repayable contributions 474 409
Less: Unamortized discount - -
Less: Allowance for doubtful loans and advances (3) (3)
Net unconditionally repayable contributions 471 406
Loans on expired loan guarantees 90 108
Less: Allowance for doubtful loans (90) (108)
Net loans on expired loan guarantees - -
Total loans 560 492
     

Enterprise development loans
These loans are made to manufacturing, processing or service industries in Canada in order to promote the establishment, improvement, growth, efficiency or international competitiveness of such industries, or to assist them in their financial restructuring. There is one interest-free loan outstanding, which is repayable at maturity on April 1, 2017.

Unconditionally repayable contributions
The unamortized discount on unconditionally repayable contributions is calculated by applying the 25% rule on an individual loan basis.

Loans on expired loan guarantees
Industry Canada guarantees loans to small business enterprises under the Small Business Loans Act, the Canada Small Business Financing Act, the Capital Leasing Pilot Project and other loan guarantee payments net of recoveries.

7. Investments

(in millions of dollars) Forecast
2010–11
Estimated
Results
2009–10
Business Development Bank of Canada 2,897 2,772
Total investments 2,897 2,772
     

Business Development Bank of Canada
The Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC) is an agent of Her Majesty, reports through the Minister of Industry and is listed in Part I of Schedule III of the Financial Administration Act. Included in the account are:

  • Common Shares — The Government’s forecasted investment in the common shares of the BDC represents a book value of $2,639.4 million ($2,514.4 million in 2009–2010).
  • Preferred Shares — The outstanding book value of preferred shares purchased pursuant to Section 23 of the Business Development Bank of Canada Act as at March 31, 2011, is forecasted to remain unchanged at $230 million.
  • Contributed Capital — Contributed capital in the amount of $27.778 million was issued in 1999–2000 in counterpart of the transfer of the Cultural Industries Development Fund to the BDC.

For the period ending March 31, 2011, it is forecasted that Industry Canada will receive $9 million in dividend revenue from the BDC ($15 million forecasted in 2009–2010).

8. Tangible Capital Assets

(in millions of dollars) Cost   Accumulated Amortization   Net Book Value
Tangible capital asset class Opening Balance Acquisitions Closing Balance   Opening Balance Amortization Closing Balance   Forecast
2010–2011
Estimated
Results
2009–2010
Land 1 - 1   - - -   1 1
Buildings 46 1 47   23 2 25   22 23
Works and infrastructure 6 - 6   5 - 5   1 1
Machinery and equipment 262 7 269   224 10 234   35 38
Vehicles 15 1 16   10 1 11   5 5
Assets under construction 40 9 49   - - -   49 40
Leasehold improvements 25 1 26   15 2 17   9 10
Total 395 19 414   277 15 292   122 118

Amortization expense for the year ended March 31, 2011, is forecasted to be $15,203,271 (2009–2010 - $17,492,698).

9. Deferred revenue

The majority of Industry Canada's forecasted deferred revenues result from the auction of radio licence frequencies. These revenues are recognized over a 10-year period.

(in millions of dollars) Forecast
2010–11
Estimated
Results
2009–10
Deferred revenue, opening balance 4,374 4,957
Spectrum licence fees earned (579) (583)
Deferred revenue, closing balance 3,795 4,374
     

10. Other liabilities

Other liabilities represent funds received from third parties to be disbursed for a specified purpose.

Restitutions under the Competition Act — This account was established to facilitate judgments rendered under article 52 of the Competition Act, and account for monies received in trust for restitution and for subsequent payment.

Cost-sharing Projects — Industry Canada partners with other governments and external organizations to deliver programs and services that contribute to an innovative economy. The account was established to record amounts deposited by these partners.

Securities in Trust and Income from Securities in Trust, Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act — This account was established to record dividends paid on shares held by a bankrupt stockbroker on behalf of clients. As the shares were not registered in clients' names, dividends are paid to the last registered owner, in this case, the stockbroker. These dividends are forwarded to the Superintendent of Bankruptcy until such time as rightful owners are identified.

Unclaimed Dividends and Undistributed assets, Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act — This account represents amounts credited to the Receiver General in accordance with the provisions of the Act, pending distribution to creditors.

Petro-Canada Enterprises Inc. — unclaimed shares — This account was established to record the liability to shareholders who have not presented their shares for payment in accordance with Section 227 of the Canada Business Corporations Act.

Unclaimed Dividends and Undistributed Assets, Canada Business Corporations Act — This account was established for the purpose of recording liabilities to creditors and shareholders who have not been located. The account is charged when funds are paid to them.

Winding-up and Restructuring Act — This account was established to record deposits credited to the Receiver General as a result of the final winding-up of the operations of a company, in accordance with sections 138 and 139 of the Winding-up and Restructuring Act, pending distribution to the persons entitled thereto.

Canada/Provinces Business Service Centre — This account was established to record monies received from provinces under cost-sharing agreements for the Canada-Ontario Business Service Centre.

11. Employee benefits

  1. Pension benefits
    Industry Canada's employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, which is sponsored and administered by the Government of Canada. Pension benefits accrue up to a maximum period of 35 years at a rate of 2% per year of pensionable service, times the average of the best five consecutive years of earnings. The benefits are integrated with Canada/Quebec Pension Plan benefits and they are indexed to inflation.

    Both the employees and Industry Canada contribute to the cost of the Plan. The 2010–2011 forecasted expense amounts to $50,984,151 ($50,984,151 forecasted in 2009–2010).

    Industry Canada's responsibility with regard to the Plan is limited to its contributions. Actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the financial statements of the Government of Canada, as the Plan's sponsor.

  2. Severance benefits
    Industry Canada provides severance benefits to its employees based on eligibility, years of service and final salary. These severance benefits are not pre-funded. Benefits will be paid from future appropriations. Information about the severance benefits, forecasted as at March 31, is as follows:

    (in millions of dollars) Forecast
    2010–11
    Estimated
    Results
    2009–10
    Accrued benefit obligation, beginning of year 95 95
    Expense for the year 10 10
    Benefits paid during the year (10) (10)
    Accrued benefit obligation, end of year 95 95
         

12. Contingent Liabilities

  1. Contaminated sites
    Liabilities are accrued to record the estimated costs related to the management and remediation of contaminated sites where Industry Canada is obligated or likely to be obligated to incur such costs. As at March 31, 2009, Industry Canada has identified two sites where such action is possible and for which a liability of $90,000 has been recorded. Industry Canada’s ongoing efforts to assess contaminated sites may result in additional environmental liabilities related to newly identified sites, or changes in the assessments or intended use of existing sites. These liabilities will be accrued by Industry Canada in the year in which they become known.
  2. Claims and litigation
    Claims have been made against Industry Canada in the normal course of operations.
    Legal proceedings for claims totalling approximately $245,207 were still pending at March 31, 2009. Some of these potential liabilities may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded in the financial statements.
  3. Loan guarantees
    As of March 31, 2009, Industry Canada has guaranteed the following debts:

    (in millions of dollars) Authorized
    Limit
    Loan Guarantee
    Outstanding Balance
    Enterprise Development Program 1,200 0.212
    Small Business Loan Act (SBLA) 1,838 12
    Canadian Small Business Financing Act (CSBFA) 1,369 667
    Capital Leasing Pilot Project 16 11
    Regional Aircraft Credit Facility 1,500 206

    At March 31, 2009, an allowance of $346,714,173 has been recorded for estimated losses on outstanding loan guarantees. The expenses related to loan guarantees are reported under other transfer payments in the Future-oriented Statement of Operations.

    Enterprise Development Program — Loans are made to Canadian manufacturers and members of the service industry for the purpose of promoting the establishment, growth, efficiency and international competitiveness of Canadian industry. These loans also foster the expansion of Canadian industry and of Canadian trade to a person engaged or about to engage in manufacturing, processing or other commercial activity.

    Small Business Loan Act (SBLA) Loan Guarantee Program and Canada Small Business Financing Act (CSBFA) Loan Guarantee Program — Loans are made directly by approved lenders to small business enterprises, providing for sharing of each individual loan loss, if any, on the basis of 85% government, 15% lender, to an aggregate, per lending institution not exceeding the Minister’s contingent liability, as stated in Section 5 of the SBLA and Section 6(2) of the CSBFA.

    The authorized limit represents the Crown's maximum liability incurred on the aggregate amount of loans made by the lender starting in April 1993 (SBLA) and April 1999 (CSBFA). The outstanding guarantee for loans made starting in April 1993 (SBLA) and April 1999 (CSBFA) is the lesser of the Crown's net liability (authorized limit less claims paid by the Crown) or 85% of the outstanding loan amounts of the lenders.

    Capital Leasing Pilot Project (CLPP) — Capital leases were made directly by approved lessors to small business enterprises, providing for sharing of each individual lease loss, if any, on the basis of 85% government, 15% lessor to an aggregate, per leasing institution, not exceeding the Minister’s contingent liability based upon the aggregate amount of leases registered per leasing institution, as stated in Section 7 of the CLPP.

    The authorized limit represents the Crown's maximum liability incurred on the aggregate amount of the capital leases having been entered into or transferred since the period starting in April 2002.

    The outstanding guarantee for capital leases entered into since April 2002 is the lesser of the Crown's net liability or 85% of the outstanding capital lease amounts of the lessors.

    Regional Aircraft Credit Facility — Industry Canada has extended loan guarantees on several Air Canada regional jets. Provisioning from the Canada Account Loss Provisioning Pool has been set aside by Finance Canada, manager of the funds. The loan guarantees began in the summer of 2005.

13. Contractual Obligations

The nature of Industry Canada's activities results in some large multi-year contracts and obligations whereby Industry Canada will be committed to make future payments when the services/goods are rendered. Major commitments that can be reasonably estimated are as follows:

(in millions of dollars) 2011 2012 2013 2014 Thereafter Total
Transfer payments 1,439 409 308 136 32 2,324
Other goods and services 13 3 4 1 - 21
Other - - - - - -
Total 1,452 412 312 137 32 2,345
             

 

14. Related Party Transactions

Industry Canada is related as a result of common ownership to all Government of Canada departments, agencies and Crown corporations. Industry Canada enters into transactions with these entities in the normal course of business and on normal trade terms. Also, during the year, Industry Canada is forecasted to receive services that will be obtained without charge from other government departments.

Services provided without charge:
During the year, Industry Canada is forecasted to receive without charge from other departments, accommodation, legal fees, the employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans, and workers’ compensation coverage. These services without charge have been recognized in Industry Canada's Future-oriented Statement of Operations as follows:

(in millions of dollars) Forecast
2010–11
Estimated Results
2009–10
Accommodation provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) 55 85
Contributions covering employers' share of insurance premiums and expenditures paid by Treasury Board Secretariat and workers' compensation coverage provided by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada 27 25
Salary and associated expenditures of legal services provided by Justice Canada 5 6
Total services provided without charge 87 116
     

The Government has structured some of its administrative activities for efficiency and cost-effectiveness purposes so that one department performs these on behalf of all without charge. The costs of these services, which include payroll and cheque issuance services provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada and audit services provided by the Office of the Auditor General, are not included as an expense in Industry Canada's Future-oriented Statement of Operations.

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Program Titles and Descriptions

Type

Order

2010–11 Title

2010–11 Description

SO

1

The Canadian Marketplace is Efficient and Competitive

NOT APPLICABLE

PA

1.1

Marketplace Frameworks and Regulations

This program delivers effective regulatory regimes through regulations, policies, procedures and standards for bankruptcy, foreign direct investment, federal incorporation, intellectual property, and weights and measures to the Canadian marketplace (consumers, businesses and investors), while minimizing regulatory compliance burden on small businesses.

SA

1.1.1

Measurement Canada

This special operating agency ensures the integrity and accuracy of goods and services bought and sold on the basis of measurement in Canada. It protects Canadians against financial loss due to inaccurate measurement and maintains the confidence of consumers and businesses in measurement-based financial transactions (trade measurement) by ensuring that devices (e.g., scales, gas pumps, and electricity and natural gas meters) sold for use in Canada meet the legislative standards for accuracy and performance, and by ensuring the detection and the repair or correction of defective measuring devices and unfair measurement practices in the Canadian marketplace.

SA

1.1.2

Superintendent of Bankruptcy

This provisional special operating agency provides leadership in protecting the integrity of the bankruptcy and insolvency system by supervising the administration of all estates and matters that fall under insolvency legislation, for the benefit of investors, lenders, consumers and the general public.

SA

1.1.3

Corporations Canada

This program is in charge of administering the Canada Business Corporations Act (CBCA), the Canada Corporations Act (CCA), the Boards of Trade Act (BOTA), the Canada Cooperative Associations Act (CCAA) and several other corporate laws governing federal companies (with the exception of financial intermediaries). It also issues and registers official documents under the Great Seal of Canada. The program's main lines of business include incorporation and related services (such as amalgamation or corporate charter amendments), dissolution of corporations, ruling on the use of corporate names, collection and dissemination of information on federal companies, and compliance and enforcement activities related to the statutes that it administers.

SA

1.1.4

Paperwork Burden Reduction

This program raises awareness about the burden that complying with government regulations imposes on small and medium-sized businesses, uses evidence-based research and analysis to draw conclusions about the impact of said compliance on competitiveness, and proposes ways to reduce it. This program supports the horizontal initiative on Paperwork Burden Reduction.

SA

1.1.5

Investment Review

The purpose of the Investment Canada Act is to encourage Canadians and non-Canadians to invest in Canada and contribute to economic growth and employment opportunities. It also provides for the review of significant investment in Canada by non-Canadians. Because of this, the program aims to ensure that foreign investors seeking to acquire control of Canadian businesses demonstrate that their investments are likely to be of net benefit to Canada. The program accomplishes the administration of the Act by processing notifications filed by investors, completing reviews of transactions in accordance with the Act and providing a recommendation to the Minister to assist him/her in the net benefit determination.

SA

1.1.6

Canadian Intellectual Property Office

This program administers Canada's system of intellectual property (IP) rights, namely patents, trademarks, copyright, industrial designs and integrated circuit topographies. It grants and registers IP rights, as well as disseminates information related to these rights to businesses, educational institutions and Canadians. This program is entirely financed through a revolving fund; it is fully cost recovered from client fees. The program aims to accelerate Canadian economic development by encouraging invention, innovation and creativity in Canada through delivery of IP services and establishment of a competitive administrative IP framework in Canada. Its clients include applicants for IP protection, both foreign and Canadian; users of the IP information; and the Canadian business community.

SA

1.1.7

Internal Trade Secretariat

The Agreement on Internal Trade (AIT) is an intergovernmental trade agreement signed by Canadian First Ministers that came into force in 1995. Its purpose is to reduce and eliminate, to the extent possible, barriers to the free movement of persons, goods, services and investment within Canada and to establish an open, efficient and stable domestic market. The Internal Trade Secretariat provides administrative and operational support to the Committee on Internal Trade, to its Chair and to other committees or working groups under the Agreement or by the committee, and it works closely with government officials to ensure the effective implementation of the Agreement. The Secretariat supports the Committee on Internal Trade in preparing the reports, compiling and disseminating information from parties, and ensuring appropriate support for the dispute resolution process. As a neutral third party, the Secretariat has facilitated ongoing negotiations to broaden and deepen the scope of the Agreement. The work requires close and continuous contact with federal-provincial-territorial governments to facilitate the smooth and effective operation of the committees and sub-committees. The Secretariat plays an important role in assisting parties to fully implement the Agreement, pursuing the negotiations mandated by the Agreement and completing the outstanding obligations in the Agreement. All parties share the operating costs of the Secretariat. The federal government's share is 50% of the budget of the Secretariat. The mechanism for funding is a grant paid by Industry Canada.

PA

1.2

Marketplace Frameworks and Regulations for Spectrum, Telecommunications and the Online Economy

This program encourages business innovation, competition and growth by ensuring that Canada develops, uses and benefits both domestically and internationally from spectrum, information and communications technologies, and the online economy. It achieves this by developing domestic regulations, policies, procedures and standards that govern Canada's spectrum and telecommunications industries and the online economy. It also develops standards, promotes global telecommunications, and helps facilitate international online trade and commerce through participation in international bilateral and multilateral forums.

SA

1.2.1

Spectrum/Telecommunications Program (Operations and Engineering)

This program encourages efficiency in the Canadian marketplace by managing the radio frequency spectrum and contributing to the orderly evolution of telecommunications networks so that Canadians develop, use and benefit domestically from spectrum and information and communications technologies. This is achieved through the development and implementation of operational policies, procedures, processes, technical standards and international treaties to ensure that Canadians derive maximum social and economic benefits.

SSA

1.2.1.1

International Telecommunication Union Participation Program

This program provides an annual membership grant to the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), enabling Canada's participation. The ITU, created in 1865, in which Canada has been a member in its own right since 1932, is the United Nations Specialized Agency responsible for coordinating the global development of telecommunications and is the multilateral forum for the negotiation of binding international agreements on the use of the radio frequency spectrum, for the development of global standards, and for the promotion of all facets of the development of the global communications network. Canada participates in ITU meetings to influence the direction and decision making of the Union. One of Canada's key objectives is to secure Canada's interests in the international regulation of the radio frequency spectrum and international telecommunication regulation to protect Canadian interests in access to spectrum and satellite orbit resources. This includes facilitating communications across Canada and protecting Canadian sovereignty in remote areas through modern digital technologies.

SSA

1.2.1.2

Spectrum/Telecommunications Management and Regulations

This program facilitates the development and use of world-class information and telecommunications technologies and services through the development of international treaties, agreements, technical standards and regulations, and through the certification of communications equipment. It also maximizes the economic and social benefits from the radio frequency spectrum, a limited public resource, by actively promoting its efficient use through the certification of broadcasting facilities and licensing of the radio spectrum.

SSA

1.2.1.3

Regional Operations — Spectrum

This program is the main focal point for the front-line delivery of spectrum services directly to clients across Canada. Through a network of field offices across Canada, the 5 regions manage the use of a finite public resource to ensure that Canadians have access to modern telecommunications services and to sufficient interference-free spectrum in order to meet their operational requirements. They also manage a number of small departmental programs (less than $1 million) for technology development and communications applications.

SA

1.2.2

Electronic Commerce

This program develops effective legal and policy frameworks to improve confidence in the marketplace by protecting individual privacy and curbing harmful Internet content. To improve market efficiency, it also promotes the conduct of e-business across all sectors of the economy and participates in the facilitation of online trade and commerce internationally.

PA

1.3

Consumer Affairs Program

This program aims to ensure that consumers have a voice in the development of government policies and are effective marketplace participants. It is an element of the Department's consumer affairs role under the Department of Industry Act, which directs the Minister to promote the interests and protection of consumers. There are two aspects of the program that are strongly interlinked. Priority consumer issues are identified for the development and dissemination of consumer information and awareness tools. These priorities also guide research and analysis undertaken for policy development. This program is delivered in collaboration with provincial and territorial governments, as well as not-for-profit consumer organizations.

SA

1.3.1

Consumer Information

This program uses information and research to provide objective advice that will enhance consumers' ability to make informed choices about products and services in the marketplace. It develops and publishes consumer information products and tools, both in print and online, itself and in collaboration with federal, provincial and territorial consumer protection agencies. It employs networks and partnerships to identify priority consumer issues for product development, to confirm content and to disseminate outputs.

SA

1.3.2

Consumer Policy and Non-Profit Consumer and Voluntary Organizations Contributions Program

This program contributes to effective consumer protection across Canada through research and analysis on emerging issues, and through collaboration with provincial and territorial governments under Chapter 8 of the Agreement on Internal Trade on the development and harmonization of consumer protection rules. The program provides research, analysis and policy development in support of federal, provincial and territorial consumer-related measures. It promotes harmonization of consumer measures and collaboration among governments, both domestically and internationally. It provides contribution funding to not-for-profit consumer and voluntary organizations to encourage them to reach financial self-sufficiency and assist them in providing meaningful, evidence-based input to public policy in the consumer interest.

PA

1.4

Competition Law Enforcement and Advocacy

This program is an independent law enforcement agency that contributes to the prosperity of Canadians by protecting and promoting competitive markets and enabling informed consumer choice. The Competition Bureau is responsible for the administration and enforcement of the Competition Act, the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act, the Textile Labelling Act and the Precious Metals Marking Act. Headed by the Commissioner of Competition, the organization investigates anti-competitive practices, promotes compliance with the laws under its jurisdiction and advocates in favour of market forces.

SA

1.4.1

Competition Law Enforcement

This program employs a variety of educational, compliance and enforcement instruments (collectively known as the conformity continuum) to provide a balanced approach to protecting competitive markets. The conformity continuum operates from the assumption that most businesses and their managers prefer to comply with the law rather than become involved in enforcement proceedings. Program funds cover the cost of promoting and obtaining compliance with the legislation under the Competition Bureau's jurisdiction. This includes the cost of bulletins and other information explaining the law, warning letters, compliance visits, adversarial proceedings and the investigative costs underlying these. It contributes to the prosperity of Canadians by protecting competitive markets and enabling informed consumer choice.

SA

1.4.2

Advocacy in Favour of Market Forces

This program contributes to the prosperity of Canadians by promoting competitive markets. These activities include conducting market studies; providing advice to government legislators and policy-makers; and intervening before federal and provincial boards, commissions and tribunals to encourage reliance on market forces to obtain policy or regulatory objectives.

Program Titles and Descriptions

Type

Order

2010–11 Title

2010–11 Description

SO

2

Science and Technology, Knowledge, and Innovation are Effective Drivers of a Strong Canadian Economy

NOT APPLICABLE

PA

2.1

Canada's Research and Innovation Capacity

This program activity supports the Minister of Industry in his/her responsibilities related to science and technology. It sets strategic direction of policies and programs in support of science, technology and innovation in Canada. It works with other government departments and external stakeholders (from the private and public sectors) to foster an environment that is conducive to innovation, and to promote scientific excellence and industrial competitiveness.

SA

2.1.1

Government Science and Technology Policy Agenda

This program supports science, technology and innovation to improve Canada's research and development capacity. This includes positioning science and technology (S&T) and innovation in the context of government policy announcements; and developing policies and supporting programs with regard to highly qualified people, direct and indirect costs of research, and research infrastructure (including networks and centres of excellence). This is done in partnership with other government departments (particularly science-based departments and agencies) and in consultation with private sector stakeholders, universities and colleges, and provincial governments. This program also manages funding agreements with the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR), CANARIE, the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA), Genome Canada, the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation (PET), Perimeter Institute, Precarn, and 7 centres of excellence. These are the Brain Research Centre, the Canada School of Energy and Environment, the Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery, the Life Sciences Research Institute, the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, the Montreal Neurological Institute, and the National Optics Institute.

SA

2.1.2

Science, Technology and Innovation Council Secretariat

This program supports the activities of the Science, Technology and Innovation Council (STIC). STIC is an independent advisory body that provides the Government of Canada with external policy advice to the Minister on science and technology (S&T) and innovation issues, and produces regular national reports that measure Canada's S&T performance against international standards of excellence. This external advice helps inform government policy development and decision making.

PA

2.2

Communications Research Centre Canada

This program conducts research on advanced telecommunications and information technologies to ensure an independent source of advice for public policy and to support the development of new products and services for the information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. Research projects are done through a combination of in-house activities, tasks performed for other government departments on a cost-recovery basis, and partnerships with industrial and academic organizations. The work is done to provide an insight into future technologies to assist Industry Canada in developing telecommunications policies, regulations and program delivery; to improve decision making related to ICT by other government departments; and to close the innovation gap by transferring new technologies to Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

SA

2.2.1

Information and Communications Technologies Expertise for Regulations, Standards and Programs

This program conducts research and development on innovative concepts, systems and enabling technologies to investigate the convergence of telecommunications systems and to improve the security, interoperability and reliability of communications networks in Canada. The program ensures an independent source of advice and knowledge to Industry Canada for public policy purposes, such as the development of standards and regulations, security of communications networks, and the deployment and use of broadband communications infrastructure. The work assists Industry Canada in its role as telecommunications regulator and also contributes to maintaining Canada's position in international telecom standards organizations.

SA

 2.2.2

Information and Communications Technologies Expertise for Other Federal Partners

This program provides scientific knowledge and expertise to major government clients in selected areas of information and communications technologies (ICT) application such as national defence, public safety and space-based communications. This information is used by clients who are not as familiar with communications technologies to improve their decision making and operational capability related to ICT procurement and deployment. Much of the work done by this program is on a cost-recovery basis.

SA

 2.2.3

Innovation and Technology Transfer

This program identifies and closes innovation gaps in Canada's information and communications technologies (ICT) sector by developing new intellectual property, engaging in industry and academic partnerships, building technical intelligence, supporting high technology small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and working with research organizations across Canada and internationally. The work is done to explore new areas of communications technology that may be useful for future Canadian requirements and to assist SMEs in acquiring knowledge that would be otherwise difficult to obtain. Most of the work is done in-house or in partnership with industrial or academic organizations.

PA

2.3

Commercialization and Research and Development Capacity in Targeted Canadian Industries

This program advances leading-edge research and development (R&D) in targeted Canadian industries and provides value-added knowledge and expertise to enhance conditions for commercialization and innovation. Relationships required to enhance Canadian innovation are fostered among the private sector, associations, academia and all levels of government. These collaborative relationships help to advance technology transfer, spinoffs and innovation, and contribute to a skilled workforce. The Department also conducts research and analysis, often with its industry and government partners, to develop strategic information products. This research and analysis is disseminated to key decision makers and is essential when the Department advises on issues, regulations and policies affecting commercialization and R&D in targeted industries. Government investments, such as repayable contributions, to foster Canadian private sector R&D are also targeted by this program activity that, in general, ensures that Canadians and Canadian businesses benefit from an innovative and knowledge-based economy.

SA

2.3.1

Industry-Specific Policy and Analysis for Innovation and Research and Development Investment

Through this program, the Department identifies and analyzes opportunities and risks involved in investing in research and development (R&D), innovation and commercialization in specific industries. The Department engages research institutes, associations, the private sector, other federal government departments and other governments to develop knowledge and expertise regarding the trends and impacts on R&D, innovation and commercialization in targeted Canadian industries. This information is packaged into tangible products, such as roadmaps and frameworks, which are disseminated to stakeholders to enhance informed decision making in the private, public and academic sectors. This analysis is used to advise on regulations and policies relating to Canada's R&D, commercialization and innovation capacity.

SA

2.3.2

Innovation Capacity in the Automotive Industry

This program advances and supports government priorities by contributing to strategic, large-scale research and development (R&D) projects in the automotive sector that support innovative, greener and more fuel-efficient vehicles. This program provides a strategic opportunity to support projects delivering on the government's wider competitiveness and science and technology agendas by supporting transformative, innovative activities related to automotive engineering, R&D and manufacturing modernization to position the Canadian industry as a leader in producing the "cars of the future." This program also supports Canada's environmental agenda in advancing R&D and innovation to increase fuel efficiency and reduce greenhouse gases, thereby contributing to meeting the objectives of Canada's Clean Air Agenda and new fuel consumption regulations.

SA

2.3.3

Research and Development Capacity in the Aerospace Industry

This program advances and supports government priorities by contributing strategically to research and development in the aerospace industry, encouraging and leveraging private sector investment, and maintaining and enhancing the technology base and technological capabilities of Canadian aerospace firms. This program will provide conditionally repayable contributions that support the development of new technologies for the next generation of more fuel-efficient and safe aircraft.

SA

2.3.4

Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative

The Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI) helps to encourage the development of innovative products and services; enhance the competitiveness of Canadian aerospace and defence (A&D) firms; and foster collaboration among research institutes, universities, colleges and the private sector. SADI is an element of the government's science and technology strategy, which aims to leverage greater private sector research and development (R&D) investment in Canada. The program acts as a catalyst for new A&D investments by providing repayable contributions to Canadian A&D companies for strategic industrial research and pre-competitive development. SADI takes continuous applications, and projects are selected following a rigorous review of financial, technical and market criteria. The program is financed from funds previously allocated to Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) and repayments received from TPC and SADI projects.

SA

2.3.5

Program for Strategic Industrial Projects

The Program for Strategic Industrial Projects (PSIP) was created in early October 2005 to strengthen the Canadian auto industry through support for the implementation of flexible manufacturing capacity at Canadian assembly plants. The program provides repayable contributions to fund large strategic projects within the automotive sector (in whole or in part) from the fiscal framework. PSIP advances and supports government initiatives through strategic investments in industrial research, pre-competitive development, and technology adaptation and adoption. To date, $355 million has been committed to 3 large, complex projects by major automotive manufacturers resulting in 2 older assembly plants being modernized to a very high degree and a new world-class assembly plant being built. These investments help increase economic growth within Canada and promote the long-term stability of the auto assembly sector and, by extension, the Canadian auto parts sector.

SA

2.3.6

Technology Partnerships Canada — Research and Development Program

The Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) program provided repayable contributions to support industrial research and pre-competitive development in the aerospace and defence, environmental, life sciences, information and communications technologies, and advanced manufacturing sectors. The program helped leverage private sector research and development (R&D) and produced a wide range of economic, social and environmental benefits for all Canadians. TPC ended on December 31, 2006; and, while it no longer takes applications, the program continues to manage a $3.5-billion portfolio of existing contracted projects. Repayments on these projects are expected until 2035.

Program Titles and Descriptions

Type Order 2010–11 Title 2010–11 Description

SO

3

Competitive Businesses are Drivers of Sustainable Wealth Creation

NOT APPLICABLE

PA

3.1

Entrepreneurial Economy

This program raises government-wide awareness of the challenges facing small businesses by providing value-added knowledge and expertise, recommending policy options, and delivering programs that enhance small business growth and competitiveness and encourage entrepreneurship.

SA

3.1.1

Canada Small Business Financing

The Canada Small Business Financing (CSBF) Program is designed to help Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) get access to financing that would not otherwise have been available, or would only have been available under less favourable terms. It is a loan loss-sharing program in partnership with financial institutions. Under the program, financial institutions can make term loans on real property, leasehold improvements and equipment. In the event a registered loan defaults, the government pays 85% of the eligible losses. The CSBF Program is a national program and operates in all provinces and territories. To be eligible for this program, SMEs must be for-profit businesses, the revenues of which do not exceed $5 million per year.

SA

3.1.2

Service to Business

This program includes Canada Business Network activities and various other products and tools delivered online that assist small businesses by providing them with convenient, one-stop access to government information, programs and services, saving time for business and assisting them to make well-informed business decisions. This program supports the horizontal initiative on Canada Business Network.

SA

3.1.3

BizPaL

This program provides online access to information on the business permits, licences and regulatory requirements of all levels of government, saving time for existing businesses, as well as for entrepreneurs who want to start a business. It enhances the competitiveness of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) by saving them time, which they can later use to develop strategies and focus on competitiveness. This program supports the horizontal initiative on BizPaL.

SA

3.1.4

Small Business Internship (formerly Student Connections)

The Small Business Internship Program (SBIP) provides small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) financial support to employ a youth intern to assist them in increasing their adoption of information and communications technologies (ICT) to augment their productivity and competitiveness.

SA

3.1.5

Small Business Growth and Prosperity

Through advocacy, policy research, analysis and reporting, this program raises government-wide awareness of the importance of entrepreneurship and small businesses to Canada's economy and of the challenges facing their growth and prosperity. In particular, it supports the Canadian Youth Business Foundation (CYBF), which is a not-for-profit organization that provides loans and mentorship to young Canadian entrepreneurs who would not typically receive financial assistance from traditional lending institutions.

PA

3.2

Global Reach and Agility in Targeted Canadian Industries

Through value-added policy expertise, industry development and analysis, and strategic funding, this program aims to enhance the ability of targeted Canadian industries to take advantage of opportunities and respond to risks, ensure Canadian industry's link into global value chains, and assist businesses in strengthening partnerships both domestically and internationally. The desired result is agile Canadian industries that are able to adapt to the ever-changing economic landscape, respond appropriately to external shocks and compete internationally. This program works to mitigate strategic risk factors affecting Canadian industries' performance in global markets by analyzing the specific issues they face and using this knowledge to contribute to the development of policies, marketplace frameworks and strategies, including contributing to research and analysis aimed at achieving regulatory objectives in a manner that is sensitive to economic impacts. Departmental officials interact with associations, governments and leading firms in this program activity so as to assist with matchmaking among companies, improve conditions for market access and promote Canadian expertise. In addition, through this program, the Department invests in private sector initiatives that are aimed at maximizing productivity and facilitating access to capital. By helping Canadian industries mitigate risks and take advantage of opportunities in globalized markets, this program is committed to creating competitive businesses and sustainable wealth creation capability for Canadians.

SA

3.2.1

Industry-Specific Policy, Advice and Expertise

This program provides intelligence, analysis and advice to government and industry partners that is oriented towards industry capacity to adapt to the continually evolving economic environment. As the centre of industrial sector expertise, the Department facilitates industry networks, participates on committees, and advises stakeholders on key issues and policies relevant to the sustainability of targeted Canadian industries and their positions within globalized markets and value chains. The Department brings the industry perspective to regulations, agreements and policies developed by the government.

SA

3.2.2

Industry Development and Analysis

This program provides intelligence, analysis, knowledge products, services and advice to targeted sector firms and industries so that they become increasingly agile and competitive within the context of globalized markets. The program monitors trends and business issues impacting targeted industries, and tracks international economic and policy developments to see what effects these will have on Canadian industries. In collaboration with partners, such as industry associations and other government departments, the Department develops products such as value-chain studies, research papers and statistical reports. These products are disseminated to stakeholders to enable informed decision making.

SA

3.2.3

Shipbuilding Capacity Development

This program is designed to help ensure that shipyard capability exists for federal marine procurement and maintenance requirements in keeping with the Buy Canada procurement policy. This program provides financing support in the form of a buy-down of financing costs to purchasers, either Canadian or foreign, of Canadian-built vessels. Subject to limitations, this support can be up to 15% of the purchase price paid to the Canadian shipyard for the construction or modification of an eligible vessel or offshore marine structure. The support is in the form of a non-repayable contribution.

SA

3.2.4

Industrial and Regional Benefits Policy and Program Management

The Industrial and Regional Benefits (IRB) Policy provides the framework for leveraging federal defence and security procurements to generate long-term industrial and regional development within Canada. Created in 1986, the IRB Policy ensures that Canadian companies can derive benefits from federal procurements through the creation of new business opportunities or investments in research and development, technology commercialization or business development activities. Under the IRB Policy, prime contractors who are awarded major federal defence and security contracts are required to generate new business activity in the Canadian economy in an amount equal to the contract value. The investments must be in advanced technology sectors across Canada and can be either directly or indirectly related to the procured item. IRBs are the Canadian version of industrial participation policies practised around the world by over 100 countries. Industry Canada is responsible for the administration and implementation of the IRB Policy. Regional development agencies support the implementation of the IRB Policy through analysis of regional capabilities and industry stakeholder engagement.

PA

3.3

Community, Economic and Regional Development

This program advances the economic development of Ontario communities in the same manner that regional development agencies support similar activities in other regions of Canada. The program supports and enhances the role and contribution of small and medium-sized businesses to Canada’s economic well-being by building capacity, such as infrastructure, in non-metropolitan communities. This program also promotes access to the Internet and information and communications technologies (ICT), and the skills to use them, in order to increase the capacity of individuals and communities across Canada to participate in the knowledge-based economy.

SA

3.3.1

Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario (FedNor)

FedNor is a regional development organization that promotes economic development and diversification, job creation, and the existence of competitive businesses and sustainable communities in northern and rural Ontario. FedNor achieves this through the delivery of 3 core transfer payment programs: the Northern Ontario Development Program, the Community Futures Program (Ontario) and the Eastern Ontario Development Program, through which funding is made available to a variety of regional and community businesses and partners to improve community capacity, access to capital and markets, the development of modern infrastructure and technology, innovation, and the development of human capital.

SSA

3.3.1.1

Community Futures Program

This program supports community economic development and builds the capacity of non-metropolitan communities in Ontario to realize their full sustainable potential. Funding is made available through transfer payments that provide contributions to designated Community Futures organizations in Ontario in support of strategic community planning and socio-economic development, business services, repayable business financing through local investment funds, and community-based projects and special initiatives.

SSA

3.3.1.2

Northern Ontario Development Program

This program promotes economic development and diversification in Northern Ontario and builds on the assets and strengths of communities to maximize their full potential. Funding through transfer payments provides contributions to not-for-profit organizations and small and medium-sized enterprises in 6 priority areas: community economic development, information and communications technology, innovation, trade and tourism, human capital, and business financing support.

SSA

3.3.1.3

Eastern Ontario Development Program

This program promotes socio-economic development in Eastern Ontario that leads to business and job opportunities, sustainable self-reliant communities, and a competitive and diversified regional economy. Delivered through Community Futures Development Corporations in Eastern Ontario, the program makes funding available though transfer payments to provide contributions in 5 priority areas: business and community development, access to capital, skills development, retention and attraction of youth, and technological enhancement.

SA

3.3.2

Linguistic Duality and Official Languages

The Linguistic Duality and Official Languages program has 3 components: (1) implementation of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act (OLA); (2) horizontal coordination of the Economic Development Initiative (EDI) under the Government of Canada’s Roadmap to Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future; and (3) implementation of the EDI in Ontario. The first component involves departmental coordination to ensure that all Industry Canada programs and initiatives meet the requirements of Section 41 of the OLA — enhancing the vitality of the English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada, supporting and assisting their development, and fostering the full recognition and use of both English and French in Canadian society. Industry Canada, the 3 regional development agencies (RDAs) and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) are responsible for delivery of the 5-year EDI. This initiative supports economic development of Canada’s official languages minority communities (OLMCs) and promotes the economic benefits of Canada’s linguistic duality. Industry Canada works with the RDAs and INAC to design, coordinate and implement a successful engagement strategy that respects, clarifies and institutionalizes accountability for the EDI, and establishes and delivers on stakeholder expectations for engagement on a national scale. FedNor is responsible for delivery of the EDI within Ontario. The existing Northern Ontario Development Program will be used to implement the EDI in OLMCs throughout Ontario.

SA

3.3.3

Canada-Ontario Municipal Rural Infrastructure Program

The Canada-Ontario Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (COMRIF) invests $298 million in federal funds for infrastructure projects throughout Ontario. This funding supports projects that benefit municipalities with populations of less than 250,000 for capital projects that help to build safe, clean, liveable communities across Ontario. Industry Canada, the federal delivery partner for Ontario, administers the program on behalf of Infrastructure Canada. Through its agreement with the Province of Ontario, the COMRIF program delivers and manages contribution agreements for infrastructure projects that have Ontario municipalities as recipients.

SA

3.3.4

Ontario Municipal Rural Infrastructure Top-Up Program

The Ontario Municipal Rural Infrastructure Top-Up Program provides additional funding to the Canada-Ontario Municipal Rural Infrastructure Program to support unfunded projects under COMRIF Intake Three. Unlike COMRIF, the MRIF Top-Up Program is unilaterally administered and delivered in Ontario by Industry Canada on behalf of Infrastructure Canada. The program delivers and administers contribution agreements for infrastructure projects that have Ontario municipalities as recipients.

SA

3.3.5

Computers for Schools

This program refurbishes surplus computers from federal government departments and private sector donors through contribution agreements with licensed delivery agents, and distributes them, ready-to-use, to schools and not-for-profit learning organizations throughout Canada. Through a national partnership-based network, the program continues to meet an ongoing demand for sufficient numbers of computers in Canadian schools and libraries, ensuring that more young Canadians have access to the benefits of a knowledge-based economy and society. This program also provides work experience for youth through the Technical Work Experience Program (TWEP). Youth who have demonstrated skills achieved at the post-secondary level are provided with opportunities to work on innovative information and communications technology (ICT) projects in the context of computer refurbishment workshop activities. TWEP supports ICT projects, which enable participants to develop practical work experience in such areas as computer repair, refurbishment and software testing; to cultivate skills such as teamwork, time management and administration; and to perform other activities related to managing a computer refurbishment workshop.

SA

3.3.6

Community Access Program

The Community Access Program (CAP) provides affordable public access to the Internet and related information and communications technologies (ICTs) and applications, skills training, and delivery of public and private sector services and information to Canadians in need of this critical support. CAP sites across Canada contribute to the economic and social development of Canadian communities and their residents who face barriers to the use of ICTs. While CAP meets the access needs of all Canadians, a sizable portion of users live and work in rural and remote communities. CAP also provides work experience for up to 1,500 youth annually through placements at CAP sites throughout the country. Youth with demonstrated skills are afforded opportunities to work on innovative ICT projects by providing CAP site users with basic training in using the Internet, accessing online government services, developing websites and using other web-related services. This enables them to develop practical work experience in training and promotion, as well as other useful work-related skills such as teamwork, time management and administration. CAP is subject to program review and funding approval on an annual basis.

SA

3.3.7

Ontario Potable Water Program

The Ontario Potable Water Program (OPWP) provides financial assistance in the form of grants to specific small and rural Ontario municipalities that incurred increased costs in order to meet Ontario drinking water regulations. These costs were incurred as a result of drinking water projects that were developed under the Canada-Ontario Infrastructure Program (COIP), which is administered and delivered by Industry Canada.

SA

3.3.8

Brantford Greenwich-Mohawk Remediation Project

The project provides a federal contribution to the remediation of 50 acres of land spread over 3 sites in Brantford, Ontario. Once remediated, the land will be redeveloped according to a community design plan that has been developed in consultation with the residents of Brantford. The plan includes residential development and some light commercial development with a heritage/cultural component. The project plan has several milestones spread over the 2008-2011 period.

SA

3.3.9

Canada Strategic Infrastructure Program

The Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF) helps support large-scale projects of major federal and regional significance in areas that are vital to sustaining economic growth and enhancing the quality of life of Canadians. CSIF projects support infrastructure in the following 5 investment categories: highways and railways, local transportation, tourism or urban development, water or sewage, and broadband (telecommunications connectivity). CSIF places emphasis on partnerships with any combination of municipal, provincial and territorial governments, as well as with the private sector. Industry Canada administers select projects under the CSIF program in Ontario on behalf of Infrastructure Canada.

SA

3.3.10

Building Canada Program

The Building Canada Fund (BCF) is a new infrastructure program that advances the national priorities important to all Canadians — a stronger economy, a cleaner environment and better communities — while addressing local and regional infrastructure needs. The program operates on 2 components: the Major Infrastructure Component (MIC), which targets larger, strategic projects of national and regional significance; and the Communities Component (CC), which focuses on projects in communities with populations of less than 100,000 and helps these smaller communities face their unique challenges. Industry Canada administers select projects under the BCF program in Ontario on behalf of Infrastructure Canada.

PA

3.4

Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America — Canadian Secretariat

This program supports the Minister of Industry in his/her responsibility for leading Canada's engagement in the Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP). This program leads, in cooperation with other federal departments and agencies, the identification of strategic Canadian bilateral and trilateral priorities with respect to prosperity and security within North America; negotiations with the United States and Mexico; and communications and reporting. This program also supports the Minister in his/her role as lead on the Prosperity Agenda focused on improving competitiveness and enhancing quality of life.

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Expected Results Information for Program Sub-Activities and Sub-Sub-Activities by Strategic Outcome

Section 1: The Canadian Marketplace is Efficient and Competitive

Program Sub-Activity
Measurement Canada
Expected Results Indicators Target
Fair and accurate trade measurement in Canada Number of marketplace sectors where compliance improvement strategies and complaint investigation services result in improved consumer protection against financial losses resulting from inaccurately measuring devices or unfair measurement practices 10
Number of marketplace sectors where rules and requirements, measuring device approval services and increased Measurement Canada authorized service provider inspections result in increased measurement accuracy 10

Description:
This special operating agency ensures the integrity and accuracy of goods and services bought and sold on the basis of measurement in Canada. It protects Canadians against financial loss due to inaccurate measurement and maintains the confidence of consumers and businesses in measurement-based financial transactions (trade measurement) by ensuring that devices (e.g., scales, gas pumps, and electricity and natural gas meters) sold for use in Canada meet the legislative standards for accuracy and performance, and by ensuring the detection and the repair or correction of defective measuring devices and unfair measurement practices in the Canadian marketplace.

Program Sub-Activity
Superintendent of Bankruptcy
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Estates are supervised and administered in a timely fashion Percentage of consumer bankruptcy files not older than 3 years 90%
Percentage of commercial bankruptcy files not older than 3 years 60%
Percentage of banking reports received from trustees analyzed by Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy (OSB) within 3 months of receipt 90%

Description:
This provisional special operating agency provides leadership in protecting the integrity of the bankruptcy and insolvency system by supervising the administration of all estates and matters that fall under insolvency legislation, for the benefit of investors, lenders, consumers and the general public.

Program Sub-Activity
Corporations Canada
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Federally incorporated companies are compliant with corporate laws and regulations Percentage of federally incorporated corporations that comply with statutory filing requirements 80%
Businesses have timely and reliable access to incorporation services and information Percentage of published Corporations Canada’s service standards that are met or exceeded 90%
Corporations Canada key incorporations services are available/delivered to businesses electronically Percentage of transactions completed online for key services 85%

Description:
This program is in charge of administering the Canada Business Corporations Act (CBCA), the Canada Corporations Act (CCA), the Boards of Trade Act (BOTA), the Canada Cooperative Associations Act (CCAA) and several other corporate laws governing federal companies (with the exception of financial intermediaries). It also issues and registers official documents under the Great Seal of Canada. The program’s main lines of business include incorporation and related services (such as amalgamation or corporate charter amendments), dissolution of corporations, ruling on the use of corporate names, collection and dissemination of information on federal companies, and compliance and enforcement activities related to the statutes that it administers.

Program Sub-Activity
Paperwork Burden Reduction
Expected Results Indicators Targets
The government will obtain advice from stakeholders on paperwork burden reduction Number of briefings sent to the Minister containing advice provided by the stakeholders on how to reduce paperwork burden 2

Description:
This program raises awareness about the paperwork burden that complying with government regulations imposes on small and medium-sized businesses, uses evidence-based research and analysis to draw conclusions about the impact of said compliance on competitiveness, and proposes ways to reduce it. This program supports the horizontal initiative on Paperwork Burden Reduction.

Program Sub-Activity
Investment Review
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Timely processing of foreign investment notifications and applications for review filed by foreign investors under the Investment Canada Act Median time required to certify notifications and process applications Notifications – 5 days
Application - 55 days

Description:
The purpose of the Investment Canada Act is to encourage Canadians and non-Canadians to invest in Canada and contribute to economic growth and employment opportunities. It also provides for the review of significant investment in Canada by non-Canadians. Because of this, the program aims to ensure that foreign investors seeking to acquire control of Canadian businesses demonstrate that their investments are likely to be of net benefit to Canada. The program accomplishes the administration of the Act by processing notifications filed by investors, completing reviews of transactions in accordance with the Act and providing a recommendation to the Minister to assist him/her in the net benefit determination.

Program Sub-Activity
Canadian Intellectual Property Office
Expected Results Indicators Targets
The delivery and quality of CIPO's services respond to client needs and expectations Percentage of overall satisfaction of clients with CIPO's services 80%
Increase awareness and use of intellectual property (IP) by SMEs Percentage awareness and use of IP by SMEs 40%

Description:
This program administers Canada’s system of intellectual property (IP) rights, namely patents, trademarks, copyright, industrial designs and integrated circuit topographies. It grants and registers IP rights, as well as disseminates information related to these rights to businesses, educational institutions and Canadians. This program is entirely financed through a revolving fund; it is fully cost-recovered from client fees. The program aims to accelerate Canadian economic development by encouraging invention, innovation and creativity in Canada through delivery of IP services and establishment of a competitive administrative IP framework in Canada. Its clients include: applicants for IP protection, both foreign and Canadian; users of the IP information; and the Canadian business community.

Program Sub-Activity
Internal Trade Secretariat
Expected Results Indicators Targets
The Committee on Internal Trade receives quality service from the Internal Trade Secretariat Percentage of stakeholders satisfied with services provided by the Internal Trade Secretariat 90%

Description:
The Agreement on Internal Trade (AIT) is an intergovernmental trade agreement signed by Canadian First Ministers that came into force in 1995. Its purpose is to reduce and eliminate, to the extent possible, barriers to the free movement of persons, goods, services and investment within Canada and to establish an open, efficient and stable domestic market. The Internal Trade Secretariat provides administrative and operational support to the Committee on Internal Trade, to its Chair and to other committees or working groups under the Agreement or by the committee, and it works closely with government officials to ensure the effective implementation of the Agreement. The Secretariat supports the Committee on Internal Trade in preparing the reports, compiling and disseminating information from parties, and ensuring appropriate support for the dispute resolution process. As a neutral third party, the Secretariat has facilitated ongoing negotiations to broaden and deepen the scope of the Agreement. The work requires close and continuous contact with federal-provincial-territorial governments to facilitate the smooth and effective operation of the committees and sub-committees. The Secretariat plays an important role in assisting parties to fully implement the Agreement, pursuing the negotiations mandated by the Agreement and completing the outstanding obligations in the Agreement. All parties share the operating costs of the Secretariat. The federal government’s share is 50% of the budget of the Secretariat. The mechanism for funding is a grant paid by Industry Canada.

Program Sub-Activity
Spectrum /Telecommunications Program (Operations and Engineering)
Expected Results Indicators Targets
An up-to-date and appropriate domestic and international, regulatory framework and operational policies, for the governance of Canada's radiocommunications and telecommunications infrastructure to promote a competitive marketplace for telecoms and radiocom services and equipment Percentage of planned initiatives providing access to new wireless services, equipment  and technology and improving access for existing services that are started or completed 80%

Description:
This program encourages efficiency in the Canadian marketplace by managing the radio frequency spectrum and contributing to the orderly evolution of telecommunications networks so that Canadians develop, use and benefit domestically from spectrum and information and communications technologies. This is achieved through the development and implementation of operational policies, procedures, processes, technical standards and international treaties to ensure that Canadians derive maximum social and economic benefits.

Program Sub-Sub-Activity
International Telecommunication Union (ITU)
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Canadian interests are reflected in United Nations/International Telecommunication Union operational procedures Percentage of International Telecommunication Union operational instruments and procedures that are responsive to Canadian interests and objectives 100%

Description:
This program provides an annual membership grant to the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), enabling Canada's participation. The ITU, created in 1865, in which Canada has been a member in its own right since 1932, is the United Nations Specialized Agency responsible for coordinating the global development of telecommunications and is the multilateral forum for the negotiation of binding international agreements on the use of the radio frequency spectrum, for the development of global standards, and for the promotion of all facets of the development of the global communications network. Canada participates in ITU meetings to influence the direction and decision making of the Union. One of Canada's key objectives is to secure Canada's interests in the international regulation of the radio frequency spectrum and international telecommunication regulation to protect Canadian interests in access to spectrum and satellite orbit resources. This includes facilitating communications across Canada and protecting Canadian sovereignty in remote areas through modern digital technologies.

Program Sub-Sub-Activity
Spectrum/Telecommunications Management and Regulations
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Policies, regulations, standards and procedures are in place to enable the introduction of new radiocommunications / telecommunications technologies, equipment and services Percentage of planned telecommunications and radiocommunication equipment and services or applications introduced in the marketplace (e.g., number of licensing initiatives, number of frequency bands, number of technical regulations/standards, and number of public consultations), that are started or completed 80%
During times of emergency, telecommunications services are available on a priority basis to first responders followed by Canadians generally Percentage of planned services/programs to alleviate network congestion during emergency (spectrum for public safety agencies, priority services, participation in the planning of drills/exercises, meetings/forums with telecom industry, government and associations), that are started or completed 80%
Canadian interests and requirements pertaining to radiocommunications and telecommunications are reflected in international agreements and standards Percentage of planned new/modified Mutual Recognition Agreements (MRAs), International Telecommunication Union (ITU) standards/recommendations, and Canada/U.S. agreements that are started or completed 80%

Description:
This program facilitates the development and use of world-class information and telecommunications technologies and services through the development of international treaties, agreements, technical standards and regulations, and through the certification of communications equipment. It also maximizes the economic and social benefits from the radio frequency spectrum, a limited public resource, by actively promoting its efficient use through the certification of broadcasting facilities and licensing of the radio spectrum.

Program Sub-Sub-Activity
Regional Operations — Spectrum
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Fair and timely access for Canadian citizens, private industry and public sector organizations to radio frequency spectrum (licensed and licence exempt) and information on regulations, policy, procedures and standards, to meet their wireless telecommunication needs Percentage of licence applications processed within service standards 90%
Percentage of clients who indicate that they are satisfied with the services provided by Regional Offices 80%
Compliance with rules and conditions for the use of spectrum Percentage of radiocommunications investigations completed within service standards (12 weeks) 90%

Description:
This program is the main focal point for the front-line delivery of spectrum services directly to clients across Canada. Through a network of field offices across Canada, the five regions manage the use of a finite public resource to ensure that Canadians have access to modern telecommunications services and to sufficient interference-free spectrum in order to meet their operational requirements. They also manage a number of small departmental programs (less than $1 million) for technology development and communications applications.

Program Sub-Activity
Electronic Commerce
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Personal information and security, and Internet-based trade and commerce, are protected and enhanced Number of planned initiatives that provide increased privacy protection and a more secure environment for online trade 2
Canadians are aware and make use of e-commerce tools and applications Percentage of improvement by March 31, 2011, of rates of adoption of e-commerce tools and applications (compared to 2006-07 level) 20%

Description:
This program develops effective legal and policy frameworks to improve confidence in the marketplace by protecting individual privacy and curbing harmful Internet content. To improve market efficiency, it also promotes the conduct of e-business across all sectors of the economy and participates in the facilitation of online trade and commerce internationally.

Program Sub-Activity
Consumer Information
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Office of Consumer Affairs (OCA) provides consumers with relevant consumer information and tools to make well-informed decisions in the marketplace Number of new consumer information products published per year 3
Percentage of increase in the number of media stories referencing OCA communications products per year 2%
Number of communications activities deployed in partnership with horizontal partners per year 1

Description:
This program uses information and research to provide objective advice that will enhance consumers’ ability to make informed choices about products and services in the marketplace. It develops and publishes consumer information products and tools, both in print and online, itself and in collaboration with federal, provincial, and territorial consumer protection agencies. It employs networks and partnerships to identify priority consumer issues for product development, confirm content, and disseminate outputs.

Program Sub-Activity
Consumer Policy and Non-Profit Consumer and Voluntary Organizations Contributions Program
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Collaborative consumer research and analysis contributes to federal, provincial and territorial government policy decision-making Number of instances per year where collaborative consumer research and/or analysis under Chapter 8 of the Agreement on Internal Trade contributes to inter-government policy discussions 2
Number of consumer research projects per year funded through the OCA Contributions Program 25
Number of projects per year funded through the OCA Contributions Program to encourage consumer and voluntary organizations to reach financial self-sufficiency or work collaboratively on joint plans and initiatives to address major consumer issues 3

Description:
This program contributes to effective consumer protection across Canada through research and analysis on emerging issues, and through collaboration with provincial and territorial governments under Chapter 8 of the Agreement on Internal Trade on the development and harmonization of consumer protection rules. The program provides research, analysis, and policy development in support of federal, provincial, and territorial consumer-related measures. It promotes harmonization of consumer measures and collaboration between governments both domestically and internationally. It provides contribution funding to not-for-profit consumer and voluntary organizations to encourage them to reach financial self-sufficiency and assist them in providing meaningful, evidence-based input to public policy in the consumer interest.

Program Sub-Activity
Competition Law Enforcement
Expected Results Indicators Targets

Companies/individuals cease their anti-competitive conduct following compliance interventions conducted by the Competition Bureau

Percentage of recidivists or relapse of individuals into anti-competitive behaviour (for example: bid-rigging, price fixing, and mass marketing fraud) following a Bureau intervention

5%

Number of companies and individuals that change behaviour as a result of a Bureau compliance intervention

40

Canadians recognize that anti-competitive activity is unlawful and harmful

Number of immunity applicants

10

Description:
This program employs a variety of educational, compliance and enforcement instruments (collectively known as the conformity continuum) to provide a balanced approach to protecting competitive markets. The conformity continuum operates from the assumption that most businesses and their managers prefer to comply with the law rather than become involved in enforcement proceedings. Program funds cover the cost of promoting and obtaining compliance with the legislation under the Competition Bureau’s jurisdiction. This includes the cost of bulletins and other information explaining the law, warning letters, compliance visits, adversarial proceedings and the investigative costs underlying these. It contributes to the prosperity of Canadians by protecting competitive markets and enabling informed consumer choice.

Program Sub-Activity
Advocacy in Favour of Market Forces
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Removal of unnecessary regulation and no implementation of new restrictions on competition Number of market restrictions removed 3

Description:

This program contributes to the prosperity of Canadians by promoting competitive markets. These activities include conducting market studies, providing advice to government legislators and policy-makers and intervening before federal and provincial boards, commissions and tribunals to encourage reliance on market forces to obtain policy or regulatory objectives.

Expected Results Information for Program Sub-Activities and Sub-Sub-Activities by Strategic Outcome

Section 2: Science and Technology, Knowledge, and Innovation are Effective Drivers of a Strong Canadian Economy

Program Sub-Activity
Government Science and Technology (S&T) Policy Agenda
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Effective, aligned and coordinated investment in R&D activities and infrastructure, highly qualified personnel development, innovation support and R&D commercialization Number of reports and/or consultation papers per year related to R&D and investments produced and disseminated internally and externally to the government 10
Percentage of foundations that comply with their funding agreement 100%
Science and technology policies in the federal government that promote world-class excellence, further collaborations and enhance partnerships with federal S&T community and other key players that support Canada's domestic and international S&T interests Number of collaborative research and analysis projects undertaken per year with the federal S&T community and other key stakeholders who support Canada's domestic and international S&T interests 3

Description:
This program supports science, technology and innovation to improve Canada’s research and development capacity. This includes positioning science and technology (S&T) and innovation in the context of government policy announcements, developing policies and supporting programs with regards to highly qualified people, direct and indirect costs of research, and research infrastructure (including networks and centres of excellence). This is done in partnership with other government departments (particularly science-based departments and agencies) and in consultation with private sector stakeholders, universities and colleges, and provincial governments. This program also manages funding agreements with the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR), CANARIE, the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA), Genome Canada, the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation (PET), Perimeter Institute, Precarn and seven centres of excellence. These are the Brain Research Centre, the Canada School of Energy and the Environment, the Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery, the Life Sciences Research Institute, the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, the Montreal Neurological Institute, and the National Optics Institute.

Program Sub-Activity
Science, Technology and Innovation Council Secretariat
Expected Results Indicators Targets
High-quality research, analytic, communications and administrative services of the Science, Technology and Innovation Council (STIC) Secretariat advance the Council’s work leading to informed advice on science, technology & innovation (ST&I) to the government Number of advice letters and background documents the Secretariat prepares for the Council and its working groups to advance their deliberations on ST&I issues 4

Description:
This program supports the activities of the Science, Technology and Innovation Council (STIC). STIC is an independent advisory body that provides the Government of Canada with external policy advice to the Minister on science and technology (S&T) and innovation issues, and produces regular national reports that measure Canada's S&T performance against international standards of excellence. This external advice helps inform government policy development and decision making.

Program Sub-Activity
Information and Communications Technologies Expertise for Regulations, Standards and Programs
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Industry Canada policy-making and program development sectors are made aware of new and emerging communications technologies and are provided with the technical information they need to make well-informed decisions Number of major Communications Research Centre Canada (CRC) technical inputs provided to Industry Canada groups developing policies and programs related to the information and communications technologies sector 10

Description:
This program conducts research and development on innovative concepts, systems and enabling technologies to investigate the convergence of telecommunications systems and to improve the security, interoperability and reliability of communications networks in Canada. The program ensures an independent source of advice and knowledge to Industry Canada for public policy purposes, such as the development of standards and regulations, security of communications networks, and the deployment and use of broadband communications infrastructure. The work assists Industry Canada in its role as telecommunications regulator and also contributes to maintaining Canada’s position in international telecom standards organizations.

Program Sub-Activity
Information and Communications Technologies Expertise for Other Federal Partners
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Canadian government departments and agencies (Department of National Defence, Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, Canadian Space Agency) are provided with the technical information they need to make well-informed decisions Number of major Communications Research Centre Canada (CRC) technical inputs provided to federal agencies developing policies and programs related to the information and communications technologies sector 5

Description:
This program provides scientific knowledge and expertise to major government clients in selected areas of information and communications technologies (ICT) application such as national defence, public safety and space-based communications. This information is used by clients who are not as familiar with communications technologies to improve their decision making and operational capability related to ICT procurement and deployment. Much of the work done by this program is on a cost-recovery basis.

Program Sub-Activity
Innovation and Technology Transfer
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Small and medium-sized Canadian telecommunications companies realize industrial benefits from CRC intellectual property and technology transfer Number of new and ongoing IP licences issued or in place with the industrial sector 200

Description:
This program identifies and closes innovation gaps in Canada’s information and communications technologies (ICT) sector by developing new intellectual property, engaging in industry and academic partnerships, building technical intelligence, supporting high-technology small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and working with research organizations across Canada and internationally. The work is done to explore new areas of communications technology which may be useful for future Canadian requirements and to assist SMEs in acquiring knowledge that would be otherwise difficult to obtain. Most of the work is done in-house or in partnership with industrial or academic organizations.

Program Sub-Activity
Industry-Specific Policy and Analysis for Innovation and Research and Development Investment
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Internal and external stakeholders are engaged, informed and provided with advice on developments, trends and issues that influence innovation in targeted Canadian industries Number of knowledge products1 developed to analyze trends, challenges and opportunities affecting innovation in targeted Canadian industries 24
Number of collaborative policy projects focused on R&D and innovation2 16

1 Knowledge products include sector profiles, research reports, decks, and technology roadmaps
2 Collaborative policy projects include facilitation of industry networks, participation on committees and joint initiatives with stakeholders

Description:
Through this program, the Department identifies and analyzes opportunities and risks involved in investing in research and development (R&D), innovation and commercialization in specific industries. The Department engages research institutes, associations, the private sector, other federal government departments and other governments to develop knowledge and expertise regarding the trends and impacts on R&D, innovation and commercialization in targeted Canadian industries. This information is packaged into tangible products, such as roadmaps and frameworks, which are disseminated to stakeholders to enhance informed decision making in the private, public and academic sectors. This analysis is used to advise on regulations and policies relating to Canada’s R&D, commercialization and innovation capacity.

Program Sub-Activit
Innovation Capacity in the Automotive Industry
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Enhanced capacity for automotive research and development in order to position Canada's automotive industry to be able to meet the demands for cars of the future Number of projects involving private sector investments under the Automotive Innovation Fund (AIF) that contribute to Canada's capacity to develop innovative, greener and more fuel-efficient vehicles 3

Description:
This program advances and supports government priorities by contributing to strategic, large-scale research and development (R&D) projects in the automotive sector that support innovative, greener and more fuel-efficient vehicles. This program provides a strategic opportunity to support projects delivering on the government’s wider competitiveness and science and technology agendas by supporting transformative, innovative activities related to automotive engineering, R&D and manufacturing modernization to position the Canadian industry as a leader in producing the “cars of the future.” This program also supports Canada’s environmental agenda in advancing R&D and innovation to increase fuel efficiency and reduce greenhouse gases, thereby contributing to meeting the objectives of Canada’s Clean Air Agenda and new fuel consumption regulations.

Program Sub-Activity
Research and Development Capacity in the Aerospace Industry
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Enhanced capacity for research and development and commercialization of new technologies in the Canadian Aerospace Industry Number of R&D positions maintained and created through this program activity 1,300

Description:
This program advances and supports government priorities by contributing strategically to research and development in the aerospace industry, encouraging and leveraging private sector investment, and maintaining and enhancing the technology base and technological capabilities of Canadian aerospace firms. This program will provide conditionally repayable contributions that support the development of new technologies for the next generation of more fuel-efficient and safe aircraft.

Program Sub-Activity
Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Increased investment in innovative and competitive aerospace, defence, space and security (A&D) firms Dollars of investment leveraged per dollar of Strategic Aerospace Defence Initiative (SADI) investment $2.00
Collaborative partnerships in research and development between aerospace, defence, space and security industries and research institutes, universities, colleges and/or non-profit organizations Number of SADI projects involving collaborative partnerships between industry, universities and research centres 10

Description:
The Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI) helps to encourage the development of innovative products and services; enhance the competitiveness of Canadian aerospace and defence (A&D) firms; and foster collaboration among research institutes, universities, colleges and the private sector. SADI is an element of the government’s science and technology strategy, which aims to leverage greater private sector research and development (R&D) investment in Canada. The program acts as a catalyst for new A&D investments by providing repayable contributions to Canadian A&D companies for strategic industrial research and pre-competitive development. SADI takes continuous applications, and projects are selected following a rigorous review of financial, technical and market criteria. The program is financed from funds previously allocated to Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) and repayments received from TPC and SADI projects.

Program Sub-Activity
Program for Strategic Industrial Projects
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Increased investment in research and development activities in the automotive industry Dollars of investment leveraged per dollar of Program for Strategic Industrial Projects (PSIP) new project $2.00

Description:
The program for Strategic Industrial Projects (PSIP) was created in early October 2005 to strengthen the Canadian auto industry through support for the implementation of flexible manufacturing capacity at Canadian assembly plants. The program provides repayable contributions to fund large strategic projects within the automotive sector (in whole or in part) from the fiscal framework. PSIP advances and supports government initiatives through strategic investments in industrial research, pre-competitive development and technology adaptation and adoption. To date, $355 million has been committed to three large, complex projects by major automotive manufacturers resulting in two older assembly plants being modernized to a very high degree and a new world-class assembly plant being built. These investments help increase economic growth within Canada and promote the long-term stability of the auto assembly sector and, by extension, the Canadian auto parts sector.

Program Sub-Activity
Technology Partnerships Canada – Research and Development Program
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Increased investment in research and development activities in the aerospace, defence, environmental and enabling technology industries Dollars of investment leveraged per dollar of Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) – R&D Program investment $2.00

Description:
The Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) Program provided repayable contributions to support industrial research and pre-competitive development in the aerospace and defence, environmental, life sciences, information and communications technologies, and advanced manufacturing sectors. The program helped leverage private sector research and development (R&D) and produced a wide range of economic, social and environmental benefits for all Canadians. TPC ended on December 31, 2006; and, while it no longer takes applications, the program continues to manage a $3.5 billion portfolio of existing contracted projects. Repayments on these projects are expected until 2035.

Expected Results Information for Program Sub-Activities and Sub-Sub-Activities by Strategic Outcome

Section 3: Competitive Businesses are Drivers of Sustainable Wealth Creation

Program Sub-Activity
Canada Small Business Financing Program
Expected Results Indicators Targets
SMEs have access to financing with government support, to which they would not otherwise have access Number of loans registered with the program 10,000
Value of loans registered with the program $1 billion
Percentage of CSBF loan recipients who would not have otherwise obtained a loan, or would have obtained a loan under less favourable conditions 75%

Description:
The Canada Small Business Financing (CSBF) Program is designed to help Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) get access to financing that would not otherwise have been available, or would only have been available under less favourable terms. It is a loan loss-sharing program in partnership with financial institutions. Under the program, financial institutions can make term loans on real property, leasehold improvements and equipment. In the event a registered loan defaults, the government pays 85% of the eligible losses. The CSBF Program is a national program and operates in all provinces and territories. To be eligible for this program, SMEs must be for-profit businesses, the revenues of which do not exceed $5 million per year.

Program Sub-Activity
Service to Business
Expected Results Indicators Targets
SME use of government business related information, programs and services, and facilitated compliance for business Increase in number of clients using the Canada Business Network website over the previous year 10%
Increase in number of assisted client interactions through regional presence of the Canada Business Network in Ontario, Nunavut, NWT and Yukon 5%

Description:
This program includes Canada Business Network activities and various other products and tools delivered online that assist small businesses by providing them with convenient, one-stop access to government information, programs and services, saving time for business and assisting them to make well-informed business decisions. This program supports the horizontal initiative on Canada Business Network.
 

Program Sub-Activity
BizPaL
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Integrated business permit and licence information from all levels of government provides value to clients across Canada Percentage of the Canadian population with access to the BizPaL service 60%

Description:
This program provides online access to information on the business permits, licences, and regulatory requirements of all levels of government, saving time for existing businesses, as well as for entrepreneurs who want to start a business. It enhances the competitiveness of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) by saving them time, which they can later use to develop strategies and focus on competitiveness. This program supports the horizontal initiative on BizPaL.

Program Sub-Activity
Small Business Internship
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Successful collaboration between small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and youth Number of students employed as interns 400
Improved competitiveness of businesses using e-business Number of e-business projects undertaken by SMEs 400

Description:
The Small Business Internship Program (SBIP) provides small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) financial support to employ a youth intern to assist them in increasing their adoption of information and communications technologies (ICT) to augment their productivity and competitiveness.

Program Sub-Activity
Small Business Growth and Prosperity
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Departmental and other government department (OGD) clients and external stakeholders are aware of small business perspectives Number of meetings and outreach events 15
Increase in the number of young entrepreneurs assisted Number of loans to entrepreneurs between the ages of 18-34 in Canada 480

Description:
Through advocacy, policy research, analysis and reporting, this program raises government-wide awareness of the importance of entrepreneurship and small businesses to Canada’s economy and of the challenges facing their growth and prosperity. In particular, it supports the Canadian Youth Business Foundation (CYBF), which is a not-for-profit organization that provides loans and mentorship to young Canadian entrepreneurs who would not typically receive financial assistance from traditional lending institutions.

Program Sub-Activity
Industry-Specific Policy, Advice and Expertise
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Internal and external clients are engaged and have access to information on trends and issues affecting the competitiveness of Canadian industries and receive value-added knowledge and advice Number of collaborative policy projects1 focused on industry competitiveness and agility 50

1 Collaborative policy projects include facilitation of industry networks, participation on committees and joint initiatives with stakeholders

Description:
This program provides intelligence, analysis and advice to government and industry partners that is oriented towards industry capacity to adapt to the continually evolving economic environment. As the centre of industrial sector expertise, the Department facilitates industry networks, participates on committees and advises stakeholders on key issues and policies relevant to the sustainability of targeted Canadian industries and their positions within globalized markets and value chains. The Department brings the industry perspective to regulations, agreements and policies developed by the government.

Program Sub-Activity
Industry Development and Analysis
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Focused research and analysis on factors affecting global reach and agility in targeted industries Number of knowledge products2 developed to analyze trends, risks and opportunities affecting the competitiveness of targeted Canadian industries 290

2 Knowledge products include sector and company profiles, research reports, and decks

Description:
This program provides intelligence, analysis, knowledge products, services and advice to targeted sector firms and industries so that they become increasingly agile and competitive within the context of globalized markets. The program monitors trends and business issues impacting targeted industries, and tracks international economic and policy development to see what effects these will have on Canadian industries. In collaboration with partners, such as industry associations and other government departments, the Department develops products such as value chain studies, research papers and statistical reports. These products are disseminated to stakeholders to enable informed decision making.

Program Sub-Activity
Shipbuilding Capacity Development
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Investments in support of Canadian shipbuilding industry to help develop necessary critical infrastructure to position the industry for future procurement efforts Percentage of available funding committed to Structured Financing Facility (SFF) projects 80%
Number of SFF projects approved 4

Description:
This program is designed to help ensure that shipyard capability exists for federal marine procurement and maintenance requirements in keeping with the Buy Canada procurement policy. This program provides financing support in the form of a buy down of financing costs to purchasers, either Canadian or foreign, of Canadian-built vessels. Subject to limitations, this support can be up to 15% of the purchase price paid to the Canadian shipyard for the construction or modification of an eligible vessel or offshore marine structure. The support is in the form of a non-repayable contribution.

Program Sub-Activity
Industrial and Regional Benefits Policy and Program Management
Expected Results Indicators Targets
High-quality, strategic business-led transactions generating broad, socio-economic benefits to Canada (e.g., business development, R&D, etc. ) Percentage of total offset obligations approved as new IRB transactions during the fiscal year 5%
New business transactions that are examined and assessed annually as a percentage of total applications received 90%
Ongoing transactions that are reviewed and reported on annually as a percentage of total approved transactions 50%

Description:
The Industrial and Regional Benefits (IRB) Policy provides the framework for leveraging federal defence and security procurements to generate long-term industrial and regional development within Canada. Created in 1986, the IRB Policy ensures that Canadian companies can derive benefits from federal procurements through the creation of new business opportunities or investments in research and development, technology commercialization or business development activities. Under the IRB Policy, prime contractors who are awarded major federal defence and security contracts are required to generate new business activity in the Canadian economy in an amount equal to the contract value. The investments must be in advanced technology sectors across Canada and can be either directly or indirectly related to the procured item. IRBs are the Canadian version of industrial participation policies, practised around the world by over 100 countries. Industry Canada is responsible for the administration and implementation of the IRB Policy. Regional development agencies support the implementation of the IRB Policy through analysis of regional capabilities and industry stakeholder engagement.

Program Sub-Activity
Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario (FedNor)
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Communities in Northern Ontario are viable and businesses in those regions are competitive Number of businesses and organizations created, expanded, or maintained 3,729

Description:
FedNor is a regional development organization that promotes economic development and diversification, job creation, and the existence of competitive businesses and sustainable communities in northern and rural Ontario. FedNor achieves this through the delivery of three core transfer payment programs: the Northern Ontario Development Program, the Community Futures Program (Ontario) and the Eastern Ontario Development Program, through which funding is made available to a variety of regional and community businesses and partners to improve community capacity, access to capital and markets, the development of modern infrastructure and technology, innovation, and the development of human capital.

Program Sub-Sub-Activity
Community Futures Program
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Communities in rural Northern Ontario are viable and businesses in this region are competitive Ratio of funds raised from other sources to federal Community Futures (CF) Program investments 1.48:1
Number of businesses created, expanded, maintained or strengthened in rural Northern Ontario by Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) 353

Description:
This program supports community economic development and builds the capacity of non-metropolitan communities to realize their full sustainable potential. Funding is made available through transfer payments that provide contributions to designated Community Futures organizations in support of strategic community planning and socio-economic development, business services, repayable business financing through local investment funds, and community-based projects and special initiatives.

Program Sub-Sub-Activity
Northern Ontario Development Program
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Communities in Northern Ontario are viable and businesses in this region are competitive Number of Northern Ontario businesses and organizations created, expanded or maintained 3,376
Ratio of funds raised from other sources to Northern Ontario Development Program (NODP) contributions 2.79:1

Description:
This program promotes economic development and diversification in Northern Ontario and builds upon the assets and strengths of communities to maximize their full potential. Funding through transfer payments provides contributions to not-for-profit organizations and small and medium-sized enterprises in six priority areas: community economic development, information and communications technology, innovation, trade and tourism, human capital, and business financing support.

Program Sub-Activity
Linguistic Duality and Official Languages
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Industry Canada programs, initiatives and services take account of the presence and needs of Canada’s official language minority communities (OLMCs) and support Canada’s linguistic duality Percentage of new Industry Canada programs and services that take account of the needs of OLMCs and support Canada’s linguistic duality  100%
Successful implementation of a coordinated process of reporting, evaluation and research for the EDI Percentage of EDI program delivery evaluations that address effectiveness of EDI 100%
SMEs in official language minority communities (OLMCs) have improved access to economic development projects Number of projects or activities in Northern Ontario (innovation, diversification, partnerships, or to support SMEs) 43

Description:
The Linguistic Duality and Official Languages program has three components: (1) implementation of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act (OLA); (2) horizontal coordination of the Economic Development Initiative (EDI) under the Government of Canada’s Roadmap to Linguistic Duality 2008–2013: Acting for the Future; and (3) implementation of the EDI in Ontario. The first component involves departmental coordination to ensure that all Industry Canada programs and initiatives meet the requirements of Section 41 of the OLA — enhancing the vitality of the English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada, supporting and assisting their development, and fostering the full recognition and use of both English and French in Canadian society. Industry Canada, the three regional development agencies (RDAs) and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) are responsible for delivery of the five-year EDI. This initiative supports economic development of Canada’s official languages minority communities (OLMCs) and promotes the economic benefits of Canada’s linguistic duality. Industry Canada works with the RDAs and INAC to design, coordinate and implement a successful engagement strategy that respects, clarifies and institutionalizes accountability for the EDI, and establishes and delivers on stakeholder expectations for engagement on a national scale. FedNor is responsible for delivery of the EDI within Ontario. The existing Northern Ontario Development Program will be used to implement the EDI in OLMCs throughout Ontario.

Program Sub-Activity
Computers for Schools
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Distribution of computers to schools, libraries, and not-for-profit organizations at low or no cost Number of refurbished computer units delivered annually by province and territory 85,000
Engagement of youth interns to assist in computer refurbishment and information and communications technology (ICT) skills integration Number of youth interns engaged 250
Increased computer awareness, knowledge and skills for youth Proportion of youth interns completing their training 90%

Description:
This program refurbishes surplus computers from federal government departments and private sector donors through contribution agreements with licensed delivery agents, and distributes them, ready-to-use, to schools and not-for-profit learning organizations throughout Canada. Through a national partnership-based network, the program continues to meet an ongoing demand for sufficient numbers of computers in Canadian schools and libraries, ensuring that more young Canadians have access to the benefits of a knowledge-based economy and society. This program also provides work experience for youth through the Technical Work Experience Program (TWEP). Youth who have demonstrated skills achieved at the post-secondary level are provided with opportunities to work on innovative information and communications technology (ICT) projects in the context of computer refurbishment workshop activities. TWEP supports ICT projects, which enable participants to develop practical work experience in such areas as computer repair, refurbishment and software testing; to cultivate skills such as teamwork, time management and administration; and to perform other activities related to managing a computer refurbishment workshop.

Program Sub-Activity
Community Access Program (CAP)*
Expected Results Indicators Targets
Public access to the Internet for Canadians and communities to receive public and private sector services and information Average number of users per CAP site per week 10
Youth interns are engaged to assist CAP site users in gaining information and communications technology skills Number of youth interns engaged 1,500
Improved entry-level working skills for youth Proportion of youth interns completing their training 90%

* CAP is scheduled to end on March 31, 2010. The government is presently reviewing the future of CAP and a decision about the future of the program is forthcoming.

Description:
The Community Access Program (CAP) provides affordable public access to the Internet and related information and communications technologies (ICTs) and applications, skills training, and delivery of public and private sector services and information to Canadians in need of this critical support. CAP sites across Canada contribute to the economic and social development of Canadian communities and their residents who face barriers to the use of ICTs. While CAP meets the access needs of all Canadians, a sizeable portion of users live and work in rural and remote communities. CAP also provides work experience for up to 1,500 youth annually through placements at CAP sites throughout the country. Youth with demonstrated skills are afforded opportunities to work on innovative ICT projects by providing CAP site users with basic training in using the Internet, accessing online government services, developing websites and using other web-related services. This enables them to develop practical work experience in training and promotion, as well as other useful work-related skills such as teamwork, time management and administration. CAP is subject to program review and funding approval on an annual basis.

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3.3 Other Items of Interest

IM/IT Governance and Responsibilities at Industry Canada

Information Management (IM) and Information Technology (IT) continue to play an important role as strategic enablers of the Department’s business. Effective stewardship of information and technology encompasses fiscal responsibility in meeting client needs and expectations for high-quality, authoritative information. The growth in volume and complexity of information has emphasized the need for continued vigilance to ensure IM/IT investment decisions are consistent with departmental priorities and provide high levels of service to Canadians.

Industry Canada is well positioned, with its multi-year Information Management (IM) Agenda, to ensure that departmental information is managed efficiently and effectively to support program and service delivery; foster informed decision making; facilitate accountability, transparency and collaboration; and preserve access to information and records for the benefit of present and future generations.

The desired outcomes of the IM Agenda are threefold: that Industry Canada has the requisite IM governance structure in place; that employees are aware of their IM responsibilities and know how to execute them; and that they are given the tools to help them do so. To meet these objectives, a series of IM projects have been identified and will be implemented in a phased approach.

Work on the multi-year IM Agenda will continue in 2010–11 with a focus on building capacity, delivering the corporate tools required to better manage information at the desktop and implementing an IM Governance and Accountability Framework. This will include supporting sectors in implementing the business-specific layer of the Enterprise Business-based Classification Structure and building IM Specialist capacity. In addition, a project will be initiated to develop a departmental information architecture to support solutions that cut across business and technological boundaries, as part of the departmental enterprise architecture; and, pending project approval, an enterprise Electronic Document and Records Management Solution (EDRMS) will be introduced.

The value of information is enhanced when it can be accessed and applied to accelerate decision making, and IT tools play a crucial role in providing the means to do this. The Department’s new integrated planning process will improve the alignment of IM activities and technology directions.

Industry Canada’s departmental IT governance structure provides the framework required for strategic decision making. Managing projects in an effective manner and ensuring alignment between departmental priorities and investments are senior management responsibilities with accountability to the Deputy Minister.

Under the guidance of departmental IT governance committees, Industry Canada ensures that departmental IM/IT investments are managed corporately and that they support departmental business objectives and priorities. Together, the committees are responsible for IM/IT procedures, policies, planning, investment decisions, project oversight and standards.

In 2010–11, the Department will focus on enhancing capacity to monitor and track the benefits of IT investments. This work will be done by the Departmental Project Management Office (DPMO), which is also responsible for reporting on the IT investment portfolio; supporting the IT governance committees in their oversight and decision-making roles; and providing advice, tools and professional development support to the project management community at Industry Canada.

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