2011-12 Estimates—Report on Plans and Priorities

Table of contents


How to read this report

This Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP) presents Industry Canada's 2011–12 plans for making progress toward its strategic outcomes through its program activities. The report contains an introductory message from the Minister, which summarizes the Department's plans for serving Canadians and for contributing to government-wide objectives, followed by the four sections detailed below.

Section 1, Departmental Overview, contains the following:

  • information on Industry Canada's raison d'être and responsibilities;
  • a quick view of Industry Canada's framework of program activities and subactivities, which feed into and contribute to progress toward the Department's three strategic outcomes;
  • a summary of Industry Canada's total financial and human resources;
  • a summary of departmental plans at the program activity level, including planned spending, performance indicators and targets;
  • a discussion of the Department's operational and management priorities, including their links to the Department's strategic outcomes;
  • contextual information and a risk analysis explaining the effects of internal and external factors on the Department's plans and priorities;
  • a link to the 2011–12 Main Estimates on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) website where the Department's voted and statutory items may be found.
  • the Department's expenditure profile; and

Section 2, Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome, provides detailed information on Industry Canada's plans at the program activity level and by strategic outcome, including planned spending and human resources, expected results, performance indicators and targets.

Section 3, Supplementary Information, includes highlights of Industry Canada's financial position and provides a link to its future-oriented financial statements on the departmental website. This section also itemizes the Department's supplementary information tables, which are available on the TBS website.

Section 4, Other Items of Interest, provides links to Industry Canada's website, where information on the following may be found: information management and information technology at Industry Canada, titles and descriptions of Industry Canada's program activities, a summary of departmental plans at the program subactivity level and the Department's sustainable development activities.

In 2010–11, Industry Canada underwent a strategic review of its program expenditures as part of the government's commitment to delivering programs and services that are efficient and effective, aligned with the priorities of Canadians and financially sustainable over the long term. Results of the strategic review were unavailable at the time this report was produced; however, an overview of the results is included in Budget 2011. Industry Canada's 2011–12 Departmental Performance Report will elaborate on the results of the strategic review.

Due to rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

In our continuing effort to provide Canadians with online access to information and services, we are including web links to more information and highlights. These links are numbered and presented as endnotes.

We are committed to continuously improving our reporting and welcome your comments. Send comments by email to ic.info-info.ic@canada.ca, by fax to 613-957-6543, or by mail to

Planning, Performance and Reporting Group
Comptrollership and Administration Sector
Industry Canada
2nd Floor, East Tower
235 Queen Street
Ottawa ON K1A 0H5


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Minister's Message

As Canada's economy shows continued signs of growth following the global recession, the Harper government has a clear vision for Canada. We remain focused on creating jobs and economic growth in all regions of Canada. We remain committed to fighting protectionism, the number one impediment to global economic recovery. And we remain dedicated to supporting science, technology and innovation to improve the quality of life of Canadians.

In the coming year, Industry Canada and its Portfolio partners will seize the opportunities stemming from the evolving global economy. We will set the conditions for industrial success by improving policies we put in place, making strategic investments, and supporting business-focused programs and services. We are working to remove impediments to competition and to create the best climate for international investment. Industry Canada will lead efforts to develop major policy initiatives in support of Canada's digital economy and to shape a whole-of-government strategy for federal tourism activities. The Department will also improve the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of its own operations and will work with recovering industries and sectors to help ensure a solid and prosperous future.

And, as always, I will work with my colleagues, the private sector and other governments to create the fundamentals for a strong and competitive economy.

It is my pleasure to present this year's Report on Plans and Priorities for Industry Canada and its Portfolio partners.

Christian Paradis
Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)


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Section 1: Departmental Overview

1.1 Raison d'être and responsibilities

Mission

Industry Canada's mission is to foster a growing, competitive, knowledge-based Canadian economy.

The Department works with Canadians throughout the economy, and in all parts of the country, to improve conditions for investment, improve Canada's innovation performance, increase Canada's share of global trade and build an efficient and competitive marketplace.

Mandate

Industry Canada's mandate is to help make Canadian industry more productive and competitive in the global economy, thus improving the economic and social well-being of Canadians.

The many and varied activities Industry Canada carries out to deliver on its mandate are organized around three interdependent and mutually reinforcing strategic outcomes. Each outcome is linked to a separate key strategy, as outlined below. The key strategies are shown the figure below.

Industry Canada's mandate

Graphic of 3 Key Strategies (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure

This chart illustrates that Industry Canada's three strategic outcomes — the Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive; advancements in science and technology, knowledge,and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy; and Canadian businesses and communities are competitive — are driven by and contribute to the Government of Canada's desired outcomes: a fair and secure marketplace; an innovative and knowledge-based economy; strong economic growth; and a strong and mutually beneficial North America. Industry Canada's three strategic outcomes the result of the Department's three key strategies — advancing the marketplace; fostering the knowledge-based economy; and supporting business — which are delivered through various program activities and supported by strategic enablers such as people management, risk management, management accountability and other corporate functions.

3 color Logo The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive

Advancing the marketplace

Industry Canada fosters competitiveness by developing and administering economic framework policies that promote competition and innovation; support investment and entrepreneurial activity; and instill consumer, investor and business confidence.

3 color Logo Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy

Fostering the knowledge-based economy

Industry Canada invests in science and technology to generate knowledge and equip Canadians with the skills and training they need to compete and prosper in the global knowledge-based economy. These investments help ensure that discoveries and breakthroughs happen here in Canada and that Canadians can realize the social and economic benefits.

3 color Logo Canadian businesses and communities are competitive

Supporting business

Industry Canada encourages business innovation and productivity because businesses are the organizations that generate jobs and wealth creation. Promoting economic development in communities encourages the development of skills, ideas and opportunities across the country.

Under its founding legislation, the Department of Industry Act, Industry Canada is mandated not only to foster a growing, competitive, knowledge-based Canadian economy but also to promote sustainable development.

Industry Canada works on a broad range of matters related to industry and technology, trade and commerce, science, consumer affairs, corporations and corporate securities, competition, trade measurement, bankruptcy and insolvency, intellectual property, investment, small business, and tourism. Industry Canada is the Government of Canada's centre of microeconomic policy expertise. The Department is composed of many organizational entities that have distinct mandates and diverse program activities, which are highly dependent on partnerships.

1.2 Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

Industry Canada is a participant in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS). The FSDS, with its inclusion of environmental sustainability and strategic environmental assessment as an integral part of government decision-making processes, represents a major step forward for the Government of Canada. Industry Canada's contributions to the FSDS are presented in sections 2, 3 and 4 of this report.

Complete details on Industry Canada's sustainable development activities are available on the Environment and Sustainability subsite of the departmental website. Industry Canada's Greening Government Operations table, one of the supplementary information tables itemized in Section 3 of this report, is available on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat website. For complete details on the FSDS, please see the Environment Canada website.

The following icons, which correspond to the four environmental sustainability themes of the FSDS, will be used throughout this report to identify the departmental activities that support the FSDS.

Theme 1:  Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityTheme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and AvailabilityTheme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

Theme III: Protecting NatureTheme III: Protecting Nature

Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with GovernmentTheme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government

1.3 Program activity architecture

This Report on Plans and Priorities is aligned with Industry Canada's Management, Resources and Results Structure (MRRS). The MRRS provides a standard basis for reporting to parliamentarians and Canadians on the alignment of resources, program activities and results.

Industry Canada's Program Activity Architecture (PAA) is an inventory of all of its programs. The programs are depicted in a logical and hierarchical relationship to each other and to the strategic outcome to which they contribute. The PAA also provides a framework through which to clearly link financial and non-financial resources to each program activity.

2010–11 and 2011–12 PAA crosswalk
Over the past year, Industry Canada has made changes to its PAA to ensure that it remains a complete and accurate inventory of Industry Canada programs.

3 color Logo Strategic Outcomes

Industry Canada's strategic outcomes are long-term, enduring benefits to the lives of Canadians; reflect the Department's mandate and vision; and are linked to Government of Canada priorities and intended results. Two of Industry Canada's strategic outcomes have been updated in 2011–12: The strategic outcome "Science and technology, knowledge, and innovation are effective drivers of a strong Canadian economy" has been changed to "Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy" and the strategic outcome "Competitive businesses are drivers of sustainable wealth creation" has been changed to "Canadian businesses and communities are competitive." These changes were made to improve both measurability of the strategic outcomes and compliance with the MRRS instructions.

3 color Logo Removal of the Security and Prosperity Partnership program activity

The Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America — Canadian Secretariat program activity has been removed because its funding expires on March 31, 2011, and will not be renewed.

3 color Logo Transfer of programs to FedDev Ontario

A number of programs that were previously administered by Industry Canada have been transferred to FedDev Ontario. These include the Eastern Ontario Development Program, the Canada–Ontario Municipal Rural Infrastructure Program, the Ontario Municipal Rural Infrastructure Top-Up Program, the Ontario Potable Water Program, the Brantford Greenwich–Mohawk Remediation Project, the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Program and the Building Canada Program.

3 color Logo Streamlining of the structure

The structure of the PAA has been significantly streamlined in an effort to ensure its program activities and program subactivities appropriately reflect the programs and not the activities performed as part of a program. A result of this streamlining is that the 2011–12 PAA no longer contains any program sub-subactivities, thereby reducing the amount of overlap between the outcomes at different levels of the PAA. It also tells a more concise and clear performance story and reduces the repetition of performance data contained in the Performance Measurement Framework.

3 color Logo Changes to program titles and descriptions

A number of programs were renamed and a number of program descriptions modified to reflect program changes or improve compliance with the MRRS instructions.


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Industry Canada's 2011–12 Program Activity Architecture

Strategic Outcome: The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive

Program Activities: Marketplace Frameworks and Regulations

Subactivities
  • Measurement Canada
  • Superintendent of Bankruptcy
  • Corporations Canada
  • Investment Review
  • Intellectual Property
  • Internal Trade Secretariat

Program Activities: Spectrum, Telecommunications and the Online Economy

Subactivities
  • Spectrum Management and Telecommunications
  • Electronic Commerce

Program Activities: Consumer Affairs

Program Activities: Competition Law Enforcement

Strategic Outcome: Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy

Theme 1:  Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityProgram Activities: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Subactivities
  • Government Science and Technology Policy Agenda
  • Science and Technology Partnerships

Information and Communication Technologies Research and Innovation

Theme 1:  Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityProgram Activities: Research and Development Financing

Subactivities
  • Automotive Innovation
  • Aerospace Innovation
  • Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative
  • Technology Partnerships Canada

Strategic Outcome: Canadian businesses and communities are competitive

Program Activities: Small Business Research, Advocacy and Services

Subactivities
  • Canada Small Business Financing
  • Canada Business Network
  • Small Business Internship
  • Small Business Growth and Prosperity

Program Activities: Industrial Competitiveness and Capacity

Subactivities
  • Industry-Specific Policy and Analysis
  • Shipbuilding Capacity
  • Industrial and Regional Benefits

Program Activities: Community Economic Development

Subactivities
  • Community Futures
  • Northern Ontario Development
  • Computers for Schools
  • Community Access
  • Linguistic Duality and Official Languages

Internal ServicesTheme 1:  Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Legend:

Theme 1:  Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityTheme I: Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with GovernmentTheme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government

1.4 Planning summary

Industry Canada's financial and human resources

The following two tables present Industry Canada's financial resources and human resources, expressed as full-time equivalents (FTE), for the next three fiscal years.

Financial Resources ($ millions)Footnote *
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
1,407.5Footnote ** 1,425.7 1,147.1Footnote ***
Human Resources (FTEs)Footnote *
2011–12Footnote ** 2012–13 Footnote ** 2013–14
5,649 5,622 5,633

Summary by strategic outcome

Strategic Outcome 1: The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive
Performance Indicators Targets
  • Canada's ranking for Integrated Product Market Regulation (OECD indicator of a country's economy-wide regulatory and market environments)
  • 4th
  • Canada's ranking for "starting a business" (World Bank Group's Ease of Doing Business index)
  • 3rd
  • Canada's ranking for barriers to competition (OECD assessment of accessibility to the Canadian market)
  • 26th
Program Activity Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
($ millions)View the footnote 14_6 *
Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
Marketplace Frameworks and Regulations 68.0 58.3 56.3 62.0 Economic Affairs: A Fair and Secure Marketplace
Spectrum,Telecommunications and the Online Economy 90.8 87.7 86.3 86.2 Economic Affairs: A Fair and Secure Marketplace
Consumer Affairs 4.7 4.6 4.6 4.6 Economic Affairs: A Fair and Secure Marketplace
Competition Law Enforcement 46.9 47.7 48.8 48.8 Economic Affairs: A Fair and Secure Marketplace
Total Planned Spending 198.3 196.0 201.7  

* Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 14_6)

Strategic Outcome 2: Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Performance Indicators Targets
  • Canada's rank in G7 in public-performed research and development as a percentage of GDP (Statistics Canada and the OECD)
  • 1st
  • Canada's rank in G7 in business-performed research and development as a percentage of GDP (Statistics Canada and the OECD)
  • 6th
  • Canada's labour productivity measured as real GDP per hour worked (Statistics Canada and the Centre for the Study of Living Standards)
  • $44.29
Program Activity Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
($ millions)View the footnote 14_7 *
Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
Science, Technology and Innovation CapacityView the footnote 14_8 1 1,309.4 265.7 326.4 200.8 Economic Affairs: An Innovative and Knowledge-based Economy
Information and Communication Technologies Research and Innovation 43.6 38.2 37.5 37.5 Economic Affairs: An Innovative and Knowledge-based Economy
Research and Development FinancingView the footnote 14_9 2 358.6 431.9 462.6 323.3 Economic Affairs: An Innovative and Knowledge-based Economy
Total Planned Spending 735.8 826.4 561.6  

* Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 14_7)

1. Forecast spending for Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity includes funding for Canada's Economic Action Plan initiatives that will not be continuing in future years, such as the Knowledge Infrastructure Program.(return to the text reference 14_8)

2. Planned spending in 2011–12 for Research and Development Financing includes deferred funding from previous fiscal years to support investments in innovation made under the existing Technology Partnerships Canada program and the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative. Funding to support the automotive sector in developing and building greener, more fuel-efficient vehicles has also been increased.(return to the text reference 14_9)

Strategic Outcome 3: Canadian businesses and communities are competitive
Performance Indicators Targets
  • Canada's ranking for the "Small and medium-size enterprises are efficient by international standards" criterion (IMD International's World Competitiveness Yearbook)
  • 17th
  • Canada's ranking for the "Large corporations are efficient by international standards" criterion (IMD International's World Competitiveness Yearbook)
  • 32nd
  • Ratio of small and medium-sized enterprises in rural versus urban areas (defined by census subdivisions)
  • 1:5.6
Program Activity Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
($ millions)View the footnote 14_10 *
Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
Small Business Research, Advocacy and Services 140.0 128.6 127.4 124.4 Economic Affairs: Strong Economic Growth
Industrial Competitiveness and CapacityView the footnote 14_11 1 89.6 47.1 56.1 51.1 Economic Affairs: Strong Economic Growth
Community Economic DevelopmentView the footnote 14_12 2 212.8 154.0 92.7 83.7 Economic Affairs: Strong Economic Growth
Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America — Canadian SecretariatView the footnote 14_13 3 2.2  
Total Planned Spending 329.8 276.2 259.2  

* Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 14_10)

1. Forecast spending for Industrial Competitiveness and Capacity includes funding for Canada's Economic Action Plan initiatives that will not be continuing in future years, such as the Marquee Tourism Events Program. (return to the text reference 14_11)

2. Forecast spending for Community Economic Development includes deferred funding from previous fiscal years for the Broadband Canada program, which aims to extend broadband coverage to as many unserved and underserved households as possible. (return to the text reference 14_12)

3. Effective 2011–12, the Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America — Canadian Secretariat program activity will no longer exist because its funding expires. (return to the text reference 14_13)

Program activity supporting all strategic outcomes
Program Activity Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending ($ millions)View the footnote 14_14 *
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
Internal Services1 169.3 143.6 127.1 124.6

* Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 14_14)

1. Forecast spending for Internal Services includes deferred funding from previous fiscal years and amounts pertaining to the reimbursement of maternity, parental and severance costs. (return to the text reference 14_15)

1.5 Contribution of priorities to strategic outcomes

Operational priorities

Operational Priority:
Ensure marketplace policies help promote competition and instill consumer and investor confidence
Type:View the footnote 1
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome:
The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive

Why this is a priority

  • Ensures that Canadian businesses can respond to the ever-changing demands and needs of the modern marketplace while ensuring continued consumer and investor confidence.
  • Policies that are responsive to consumer interests enable consumers to be effective marketplace participants and help stimulate economic growth.

Plans for meeting the priority

  • Pending the coming into force of the Fairness at the Pumps Act in 2010–11, seek approval of regulations establishing mandatory inspection frequencies of measuring devices in eight sectors.
  • Combat abuse of market dominance, domestic cartels and fraud in the digital economy through targeted enforcement action.
  • Modernize consumer protection through the development of e-commerce standards and increase public awareness of the risks of the online environment as well as the protections available to consumers in this environment.
  • Maximize the economic and social benefits that Canadians derive from the radio frequency spectrum through market auctioning of 700 MHz and 2500 MHz bands.

1In accordance with Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat guidance, types are defined as follows: "New" means newly committed to in fiscal year 2011–12; "Previously committed to" means committed to one or two fiscal years earlier, i.e., 2009–10 or 2010–11; and "Ongoing" means committed to at least three fiscal years earlier, i.e., 2008-09 or earlier.(return to the text reference refnew)

Operational Priority:
Foster business innovation
Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome:
Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy

Why this is a priority

  • In order to create high-quality, knowledge-intensive jobs with high wages, organizations need to be at the forefront of scientific development and technological achievement.
  • These organizations make our economy more competitive and productive.

Plans for meeting the priority

  • Foster business innovation and promote science and entrepreneurial culture, including responding to the Research and Development Review Panel.
  • Continue to provide support and enable world-class research and development (R&D) on innovative information and communication technologies that support the government in developing policies, regulations, standards and programs.
  • Delivery of the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative to encourage R&D; enhance competitiveness; and foster collaboration among research institutes, universities, colleges and the private sector.
Operational Priority:
Invest in science and technology (S&T) to enhance the generation and commercialization of knowledge
Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome:
Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy

Why this is a priority

  • S&T capacity is expanding globally in a much more competitive environment.
  • To remain competitive and realize the economic and social benefits of S&T, Canada must be at the leading edge of S&T.

Plans for meeting the priority

  • Advance Canada's knowledge, people and entrepreneurial advantage by ensuring the effectiveness of federal programs to support knowledge generation and its transfer and application in Canada.
  • Through the provision of science policy advice and policy frameworks, work with counterparts to fulfill commitments made in the science and technology strategy, Mobilizing Science and Technology to Canada's Advantage – 2007.
Operational Priority:
Foster internationally competitive businesses and industries
Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome:
Canadian businesses and communities are competitive

Why this is a priority

  • Internationally competitive businesses contribute to the creation of jobs and wealth and to a strong Canadian economy.

Plans for meeting the priority

  • Continue to assess and analyze the unique economic, business and investment issues faced by industries and develop comprehensive policy advice to ensure that Canadian firms can grow and compete in the globalized marketplace.
  • Develop value proposition for investment in Canadian sectors while focusing on reducing barriers to foreign investment.
  • Ensure that Canadian companies have opportunities to participate in, or move up, the global value chains associated with large multinationals that receive procurement contracts from the Government of Canada.
  • Through the provision of tourism policy advice and whole-of-government approach, Industry Canada will work with partners to fulfill commitments made under the Federal Tourism Strategy (FTS), should the government proceed with an FTS.
Operational Priority:
Promote business growth, entrepreneurship and community development
Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome:
Canadian businesses and communities are competitive

Why this is a priority

  • By supporting the creation and growth of small businesses, Canada will benefit from a more dynamic economy and a higher standard of living.

Plans for meeting the priority

  • Contribute to the design and delivery of programs and services that help small businesses access financing, grow and succeed.
  • Obtain advice from the Advisory Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship on the most important issues facing small businesses in Canada, such as reducing the paperwork burden and improving business access to federal programs and information.
  • Continue to strengthen northern Ontario communities through the delivery of FedNor programs by fostering an environment that is conducive to economic growth, productivity and job creation.

Management priorities

Management Priority:
People management
Type:View the footnote *
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome:
All strategic outcomes

Why this is a priority

  • Similar to the rest of the federal public service, Industry Canada faces major human resources (HR) pressures, such as competition for skilled workers in a highly mobile labour market, retention of staff, impending retirements and development of new hires.
  • Industry Canada must be in a position to recruit, develop and retain the talent needed to create and maintain a productive, sustainable, adaptable, competent and diverse workforce to be able to deliver on the Department's strategic outcomes.
  • This management priority is considered a foundation piece and a core element of Industry Canada's framework for sound stewardship and management.

Plans for meeting the priority

  • Industry Canada's People Management Strategy for Renewal and Results, a three-year strategy with annual action plans, addresses priorities related to employee engagement and renewal, leadership development, HR service excellence and service improvement, and integrity and accountability.
  • The Year-3 Action Plan focuses on targeted recruitment, talent management strategies, succession planning, development of EX and EX feeder groups, improvement of efficiencies in HR processes, and implementation of action plans to address issues raised in the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey.

*In accordance with Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat guidance, types are defined as follows: "New" means newly committed to in fiscal year 2011–12; "Previously committed to" means committed to one or two fiscal years earlier, i.e., 2009–10 or 2010–11; and "Ongoing" means committed to at least three fiscal years earlier, i.e., 2008–09 or earlier.(return to the text reference refnew1)

Management Priority:
Financial management
Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome:
All strategic outcomes

Why this is a priority

  • Financial management provides assurance on, as well as supports departmental managers in ensuring, the sound stewardship of public resources and compliance with legislation, regulations and policies.
  • This management priority is considered a foundation piece and a core element of Industry Canada's framework for sound stewardship and management.

Plans for meeting the priority

  • Strengthen processes and quality of information to ensure investments in assets and acquired services are well targeted, appropriately resourced and managed strategically to support the business of the Department.
  • Ensure sound analysis and develop strategies for meeting governmental expenditure priorities.
Management Priority:
Internal audit
Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome:
All strategic outcomes

Why this is a priority

  • Industry Canada has an effective internal audit function that is founded on rigorous planning, robust reporting and strong governance, including a fully operational, independent Departmental Audit Committee.
  • This management priority is considered a foundation piece and a core element of Industry Canada's framework for sound stewardship and management.

Plans for meeting the priority

  • Support the internal audit function as it provides added assurance, independent from line management, on risk management, control and governance processes of current and newly introduced programs and initiatives.
Management Priority:
Management of business communication tools
Type:
New
Strategic Outcome:
All strategic outcomes

Why this is a priority

  • Updating Industry Canada's business communication tools will allow the Department to better communicate its programs, key messages and achievements to various stakeholders.

Plans for meeting the priority

  • Improve internal and external service delivery through a comprehensive update of Industry Canada's intranet and its web presence on the Internet.
Management Priority:
Asset and materiel management
Type:
New
Strategic Outcome:
All strategic outcomes

Why this is a priority

  • Addressing Industry Canada's asset and materiel management processes will produce long-term strategic and operational benefits throughout the Department.

Plans for meeting the priority

  • Implement a comprehensive framework to provide adequate oversight of Industry Canada's materiel resources.

1.6 Operating environment and risk analysis

Global context

Over the past year, Canada has recovered rapidly from the recession. Close to 400,000 jobs have been created since July 2009 — the strongest job growth in the G7 — and the economy has grown for five straight quarters. The unemployment rate has been declining, as economic growth and job creation are being buoyed by strong commodity prices, more sustained private sector demand, rising exports, increased business investment, and timely and strategic investments under Canada's Economic Action Plan. While Canada's medium-term growth prospects are healthy, there remains some uncertainty about the trajectory of the broader global economic recovery, which may lead to a moderation in Canada's growth outlook.

Rising commodity prices are supporting several resource-based industries, while the improved U.S. economic outlook is benefitting various export sectors. Private business investment is growing rapidly as firms take advantage of the strong dollar to import more productivity-enhancing machinery and equipment.

The Canadian economy faces several risks. The strong Canadian dollar and high household debt could constrain the growth of non-resource-related industries and private consumption, respectively. Global risks include weak domestic demand in most advanced economies, inflation in emerging economies, global trade imbalances and uncertainty in European sovereign debt markets. Risks related to global trade barriers and to government currency manipulation persist, despite progress by some countries in reducing investment restrictions and advancing trade negotiations.

Over the medium to long term, the Canadian economy will face pressures from an aging population and the changing global economic environment unless productivity improvements can make up for Canada's slowing labour force growth.

In addition, Canadian industries will be challenged to respond to intensifying global competition, the demand for new goods and services, and environmental and sustainability considerations. Industries will face pressure to expand their global reach, integrate into global supply chains and adopt cutting-edge new technologies.

Overall, Industry Canada is well positioned to continue supporting Canadian businesses and industries by helping them understand and exploit the changing global economic landscape; by promoting skills development and sector-specific knowledge growth; and by fostering business innovation, competitiveness and productivity.

Industry Canada risk context

Through the implementation of a tailored integrated risk management approach, Industry Canada has taken steps to proactively address some of the key risks that may impede the Department's overall ability to deliver on its mandate. This approach meets the Department's needs for sound risk management and allows it to monitor the mitigation strategies and action plans for its corporate risks. In 2011–12, Industry Canada will also continue to implement strong governance, oversight and risk management practices. The following table presents Industry Canada's corporate risks and associated challenges and their alignment to departmental priorities. Highlights of program-specific risks and mitigation actions are presented in Section 2 of this report.

Corporate Risks and ChallengesView the footnote 16_1 * Highlights of Alignment to Departmental PrioritiesView the footnote 16_2 **
Fully advancing a regulatory and policy framework that will ensure the continued evolution of telecommunications and wireless infrastructure This aligns with Industry Canada's operational priorities related to ensuring marketplace policies help promote competition and instill consumer and investor confidence; fostering business innovation; and investing in science and technology to enhance the generation and commercialization of knowledge.
Managing expectations and maintaining Industry Canada's reputation among stakeholder groups, the public and the media This aligns with Industry Canada's operational priorities related to ensuring marketplace policies help promote competition and instill consumer and investor confidence; fostering business innovation; investing in science and technology to enhance the generation and commercialization of knowledge; fostering internationally competitive businesses and industries; and promoting business growth, entrepreneurship and community development.
Meeting the shifting and emerging priorities and demands of the recovering economy may affect Industry Canada's ability to support program delivery and meet departmental and government priorities This aligns with Industry Canada's operational priorities related to ensuring marketplace policies help promote competition and instill consumer and investor confidence; fostering business innovation; investing in science and technology to enhance the generation and commercialization of knowledge; fostering internationally competitive businesses and industries; and promoting business growth, entrepreneurship and community development.
Responding to the current global economic environment and its shifting economic drivers may affect Industry Canada's ability to appropriately support key stakeholders in their investment and innovation capacity and their ability to leverage leading-edge research and S&T discoveries This aligns with Industry Canada's operational priorities related to fostering business innovation and investing in science and technology to enhance entrepreneurship, community development, and the generation and commercialization of knowledge.

* The corporate risks are broad, high-level statements, as identified in Industry Canada's Corporate Risk Profile, which link program risks to departmental priorities. (return to the text reference 16_1)

** Plans for meeting these priorities also involve the mitigation of risks associated with each challenge. Furthermore, all of Industry Canada's plans for meeting its management priorities contribute to ensuring that sound management practices are observed, thereby supporting the mitigation of this risk. (return to the text reference 16_2)

Industry Canada will continue to update its Corporate Risk Profile as well as identify, monitor and mitigate corporate risks that may affect the Department's ability to achieve its expected results and deliver its mandate.

Strategic review

Industry Canada underwent a strategic review in 2010–11. The strategic review process requires departments and agencies to review 100 percent of their programs with a view to better focusing programs and services, streamlining internal operations and transforming the way they do business, and achieving better results for Canadians. Through this process, organizations identify opportunities to redirect funding to other programs that meet the priorities of the government and Canadians. Results of the strategic review were unavailable at the time this report was produced; however, an overview of the results is included in Budget 2011. Industry Canada's 2010–11 Departmental Performance Report will elaborate on the results of the strategic review.

1.7 Canada's Economic Action Plan

In Budget 2009: Canada's Economic Action Plan, the Government of Canada announced a set of initiatives aimed at providing a quick recovery from the economic downturn and ensuring long-term economic growth and prosperity for Canadian businesses and individuals. These initiatives were to be implemented over a two-year time frame ending on March 31, 2011. This resulted in a temporary increase in Industry Canada's spending for 2009–10 and 2010–11.

On December 2, 2010, the Government of Canada announced that the deadline for completing infrastructure projects under Canada's Economic Action Plan would be extended from March 31, 2011, to October 31, 2011. The Knowledge Infrastructure Program is the only Industry Canada program affected by this announcement.

1.8 Expenditure profile

Industry Canada's total planned spending for 2011–12 is $1.41 billion. The majority of planned spending is directed at Industry Canada's three strategic outcomes, with a cost-effective 10 percent being allocated to Internal Services.

Industry Canada will continue to implement strategies to ensure efficient use of its operating budget to better deliver benefits to Canadians.

Breakdown of 2011–12 Planned Spending by Strategic Outcome ($ millions)

Graph of Breakdown of 2011-2012 Planned Spending by Strategic Outcome (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure
Breakdown of 2011 -12 Planned Spending by Strategic Outcome ($ millions)
Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy 735.8 (53%)
Canadian businesses and communities are competitive 329.8 (23%)
The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive 198.3 (14%)
Internal Services 143.6 (10%)

A focus on efficient, high-performing programs will allow Industry Canada to continue to effectively deliver its mandate, with a reduced operating budget, in the coming years and adapt to evolving government priorities. More than ever, the results of audits, evaluations and strategic reviews will be critical to planning, setting priorities and allocating resources.

Spending Trend ($ millions)

The figure below illustrates Industry Canada's spending trend from 2007–08 to 2013–14.

Spending Trend ($ millions)
Breakdown of 2011–12 Planned Spending by Strategic Outcome ($ millions)

Graph of Spending Trend ($millions) (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure
Spending Trend ($ millions)
Breakdown of 2011–12 Planned Spending by Strategic Outcome ($ millions)
  2007–08 2008–09 2009–10 2010–11 2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
Actual Spending 1,364 1,277 2,568 - - - -
Forecast Spending - - - 2,607 - - -
Planned Spending - - - - 1,408 1,426 1,147

The increase in spending in 2009–10 and 2010–11 was primarily related to Canada's Economic Action Plan. The decrease in spending in 2013–14 is mainly related to the Automotive Innovation Fund, which is scheduled to end in 2012–13, as well as decreases in funding to the Bombardier CSeries program, the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative and the Canada Foundation for Innovation.

1.9 Estimates by vote

For information on Industry Canada's votes and statuatory expenditures, please see the 2011–12 Main Estimates on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat website.


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Section 2: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

3 color Logo 2.1 The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive

The global economy continues to emerge from the economic downturn, and growth continues to be slow and uneven, resulting in significant uncertainty in the global marketplace. Therefore, the Canadian marketplace requires effective frameworks and regulations to provide businesses and consumers with some degree of certainty and predictability and to ensure that Canadian firms have every opportunity to innovate and succeed within current market conditions. Efficient marketplace frameworks and regulations are also necessary to facilitate competitiveness and to build and maintain consumer and investor confidence.

Breakdown of 2011–12 Planned Spending by Program Activity ($ millions)

Breakdown of 2011–12 Planned Spending by Program Activity graphic (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure
Breakdown of 2011–12 Planned Spending by Program Activity ($ millions)
Spectrum, Telecommunications and the Online Economy 87.7 (45%)
Marketplace Frameworks and Regulations 58.3 (29%)
Competition Law Enforcement 47.7 (24%)
Consumer Affairs 4.6 (2%)
Total 198.3

Industry Canada strives to achieve an efficient and competitive marketplace by developing, implementing and enforcing policies that are fundamental to the effective functioning of a market. These policies strengthen Canada's capacity for innovation, competition and productivity, which are key drivers of the economy.

Industry Canada strives to achieve an efficient and competitive marketplace by developing, implementing and enforcing policies that are fundamental to the effective functioning of a market. These policies strengthen Canada's capacity for innovation, competition and productivity, which are key drivers of the economy.
Financial Resources ($ millions)View the footnote 2_3_1 *   Human Resources (FTEs)
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14   2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
198.3 196.0 201.7   2,928 2,943 2,950

* Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 2_3_1)

Industry Canada contributes to an efficient and competitive Canadian marketplace by

  • delivering sound regulatory regimes and frameworks and ensuring compliance with these regulatory regimes and frameworks, which include regulations, policies, procedures and standards for bankruptcy and insolvency, foreign direct investment, competition, internal trade, federal incorporations, intellectual property, trade measurement, radio frequency spectrum and telecommunications;
  • securing Canada's interest in the international regulation of radio frequency spectrum and telecommunications to protect Canadian access to spectrum and satellite orbit resources;
  • providing support to existing federal not-for-profit corporations when the new provisions of the Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Act come into force; developing regulations to meet the needs of the not-for-profit sector; providing policies, guidelines and accessible tools to assist not-for-profit corporations in meeting statutory and regulatory obligations; and providing client-oriented services that are responsive and accessible;
  • ensuring that consumers and investors are protected and have access to an honest, sound, safe and competitive marketplace, enabling them to be effective marketplace participants; and
  • administering and enforcing, among others, the Competition Act, the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act, the Textile Labelling Act, the Weights and Measures Act, the Electricity and Gas Inspection Act, the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act, the Companies' Creditors Arrangement Act, the Canada Business Corporations Act, the Investment Canada Act, the Radiocommunication Act, the Telecommunications Act and the Precious Metals Marking Act.

The following key activities will support this strategic outcome:

  • monitoring domestic and international developments, including but not limited to technological and scientific developments, international financial trends, changes in other countries' marketplace policy directions and international agreements, with a view to modernizing Canadian marketplace frameworks to promote competition and innovation, which is conducive to productivity growth and prosperity;
  • ensuring clear and transparent rules govern foreign investment and maintain an internationally competitive marketplace environment that will attract investment and support economic growth in Canada;
  • continuing to work in collaboration with partners to reduce unnecessary barriers to private sector cross-border data flow;
  • administering the new provisions of the Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Act when they are brought into force (expected to come into force in June 2011);
  • advancing next-generation networks by implementing and monitoring Broadband Canada projects, updating coverage maps and developing policy options for next steps;
  • supporting cyber security and emergency telecom services and negotiating mutual recognition agreements (MRA) for conformity assessment of telecommunications equipment;
  • securing Canadian interests in treaty revisions to both the international Radio Regulations and Telecommunications Regulations;
  • improving accessibility and effective use of intellectual property information; and
  • preventing anti-competitive mergers and combatting abuse of market dominance, domestic cartels and fraud in the digital economy through targeted enforcement action.

By focusing on these key activities in the coming years, Industry Canada will help improve the Canadian business environment, providing consumers and investors with access to a competitive marketplace.

Program Activity 2.1.1
Marketplace Frameworks and Regulations
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)View the footnote 21_1 *
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
1,770 58.3 1,782 56.3 1,787 62.0

* Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 21_1)

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target
Legislation, regulations and policy are in place and are administered for Canadian markets. Percentage of cases for which regulatory time frames or service standards are met 80 percent

Planning highlights and benefits for Canadians

Industry Canada will implement and administer the new provisions of the Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Act, which are expected to come into force in 2011–12. The Act will establish a modern governance framework for not-for-profit corporations and allow them to incorporate faster and be more efficient and effective in the competitive marketplace.

In response to stakeholder requests that NUANS become the single comprehensive source of corporate names used in all Canadian federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions, Industry Canada will continue its efforts to have NUANS adopted Canada-wide by the 2014 target date.

Pending royal assent of the Fairness at the Pumps Act in 2010–11, which would amend the Weights and Measures Act and Electricity and Gas Inspection Act, Industry Canada will introduce mandatory frequencies for the inspection of measuring devices (e.g. scales, gas pumps), increased fines and administrative monetary penalties (AMP), which will align Canada with international practices for fair and accurate trade measurement and strengthen consumer and business protection against loss from inaccurate measurement.

The promotion of, and dissemination of information about, intellectual property (IP) in Canada will be ongoing, with a focus on the post-secondary education sector and intermediaries that support exporting small and medium-sized enterprises (SME). This will assure Canadians that their ideas and inventions are adequately protected, which in turn will support innovation in Canada.

Industry Canada will move forward with work aimed at modernizing IP legislation, aligning it with international IP administrative systems and treaties. This will better facilitate innovation and the commercialization of ideas, ensure effective rights enforcement, decrease uncertainty for businesses and inventors, and support inventors who operate on a global scale.

By improving conditions in the marketplace through the plans indicated above, Industry Canada will ensure that Canadians and Canadian businesses benefit from marketplace fairness, integrity, efficiency and competitiveness.

Highlights of challenges and risk areas

Pending royal assent of the Fairness at the Pumps Act in 2010–11, the introduction of AMPs will require Industry Canada to establish new processes and procedures to ensure the successful implementation of this new compliance strategy.

To effectively implement and administer the new provisions of the Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Act, Industry Canada must complete enhancements to its information technology system. The Department has developed a detailed project plan to ensure that the system is adequately prepared and that implementation is timely.

Program Activity 2.1.2
Spectrum, Telecommunications and the Online Economy
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)View the footnote 21_2 *
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
703 87.7 719 86.3 721 86.2

* Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 21_2)

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target
Canada's radiocommunication and telecommunications infrastructure and online economy are governed by an effective policy and regulatory framework. Number of policies, legislation and regulations developed, updated or reviewed to strengthen the policy and regulatory framework 5

Planning highlights and benefits for Canadians

Canada's radiocommunication and telecommunications infrastructure and the online economy require modern, efficient and effective policy and regulatory frameworks. Demand continues to grow for advanced wireless services. This demand is driven by an expanding mobility market and broadband Internet access, which also require privacy protection. Industry Canada will undertake the development of policies, regulations, standards and treaties to support effective spectrum management and the provision of new wireless services.

Consultation on technical rules for auctions in both the 2500 MHz and 700 MHz bands will be completed and the results published. The auctioning of these bands will help support new mobile technologies and services in the Canadian marketplace and ensure that Canadians have sufficient and timely access to essential spectrum.

Industry Canada will implement anti-spam legislation, develop related regulations and establish a Spam Reporting Centre. Bill C-29, An Act to amend the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (short title: the Safeguarding Canadians' Personal Information Act), has been introduced to Parliament. Its purpose is to increase the protection of personal information in the online marketplace. Bill C-29 also requires that organizations report data breaches to the Privacy Commissioner and affected individuals.

A second statutory review of the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) will assess the effectiveness of the Act in the face of technological advances to ensure that it continues to effectively protect personal information in a commercial context and promote confidence in the online marketplace. Consultations with the provinces and territories will be held to align regimes for private sector privacy legislation, making it easier to understand and ensuring that Canadians have equivalent levels of privacy protection in Canada.

A cyber security strategy was launched by Public Safety Canada to protect Canadian governments, industries and consumers from cyber threats. In support, Industry Canada will implement the cyber security work plan, which includes risk analysis and mitigation of cyber security threats affecting the telecommunications infrastructure.

Industry Canada will be negotiating treaty revisions to the international Radio Regulations. Preparations, in consultation with private industry and other government departments, are underway. One of the key objectives of these treaty revisions is to secure and protect Canada's interests in spectrum and satellite orbit resources. This includes facilitating communications across Canada and protecting Canadian sovereignty in remote areas through modern digital technologies.

Industry Canada plans to negotiate frequency-sharing arrangements with the U.S. to facilitate the deployment of new wireless systems. MRAs for conformity assessment of telecommunications equipment will be negotiated with trading partners so that Canadian standards pertaining to radiocommunications and telecommunications can be stipulated in international agreements and standards.

By delivering on these plans, Industry Canada will ensure that Canadians have access to advances in radiocommunications and telecommunications and to the online economy and that accompanying regulations are in place to sufficiently protect Canadians' privacy.

Highlights of challenges and risk areas

Growth in mobile services over the next 10 years is expected to have an impact on spectrum availability and the ability to meet mobile services demands in a timely fashion. To ensure Canada does not lag in the new mobile Internet economy, Industry Canada is developing and implementing a multi-year plan to make spectrum available, to introduce market-based fees as an incentive for efficient use, and to update legislation to facilitate trade and reallocation of spectrum.

Program Activity 2.1.3
Consumer Affairs
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)View the footnote 21_3 *
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
23 4.6 23 4.6 23 4.6

* Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 21_3)

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Citizens and policy-makers are aware of consumer issues in the Canadian marketplace. Number of instances per year where consumer research and/or analysis contributes to consumer policy discussions 3
Number of visitors accessing information products on websites managed by the Office of Consumer Affairs (OCA) 1.65 million
Number of instances per year where research and analysis performed by consumer organizations supported by the OCA's Contributions Program for Non-Profit Consumer and Voluntary Organizations contribute to policy discussions or media coverage 12

Planning highlights and benefits for Canadians

In the current economic climate, the challenges facing consumers are ever changing and increasingly complex. Proactively addressing these challenges offers consumers some degree of certainty and is essential to maintaining their confidence in the marketplace. Industry Canada, through the OCA, will offer consumers information on areas where they may be particularly vulnerable and equip them with tools from the Canadian Consumer Handbook to help them make informed decisions, thereby contributing to a marketplace that is more efficient and competitive.

Industry Canada will continue to implement the OCA's Partnership Strategy. This will expand the reach and impact of the analytical work that is performed to support federal, provincial and territorial deliberations.

In conjunction with the Consumer Measures Committee, Industry Canada will continue to explore measures to protect consumer interests through joint analysis of current consumer pressures in priority sectors and the sharing of best practices for regulatory compliance with federal, provincial and territorial consumer protection laws.

Industry Canada will implement a communications strategy for the anti-spam legislation, aimed at educating consumers and businesses about, and increasing their awareness of, spam and other online threats, which is critical for the safe use of the Internet. Creating the knowledge base, information and tools that lead to independent, safe and productive use of the Internet helps increase consumer confidence in the online marketplace.

Industry Canada will work with partners in other departments and international partners on a variety of consumer policy projects pertaining to sustainable consumption, consumer vulnerability and electronic commerce. International policy work will involve actively participating in the OECD's Committee for Consumer Policy and various technical committees of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) to modernize consumer protections in e-commerce, ensure environmental claims are meaningful and accurate, enhance consumer product safety, improve the readability of consumer utility bills and encourage social responsibility in organizations.

Through these actions, the interests of Canadian consumers will be better protected, and they will have access to tools and information to make informed decisions.

Highlights of challenges and risk areas

Consumers and businesses may not be aware of their roles and responsibilities regarding spam and other online threats under the new anti-spam legislation. In response, Industry Canada will implement a communications strategy, which will include an evaluation component, and provide information to educate stakeholders about the new legal provisions.

Program Activity 2.1.4
Competition Law Enforcement
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)View the footnote 21_4 *
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
432 47.7 419 48.8 419 48.8

* Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 21_4)

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Canadian markets are competitive. Estimated dollar savings per annum to consumers from Competition Bureau actions that stop anti-competitive activity $330 million
Approximate percentage of Canada's gross domestic product (GDP) subject to market forces No less than 82 percent
Businesses/individuals change their anti-competitive conduct following compliance interventions conducted by the Competition Bureau. Percentage of recidivists Less than 5 percent

Planning highlights and benefits for Canadians

Well-designed competition law and effective competition law enforcement, including resolving cases of demonstrable benefit to consumers, promote increased efficiency and economic growth.

To ensure the Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive, Industry Canada, through the Competition Bureau, will continue to vigorously and effectively enforce the laws under its jurisdiction. The Competition Bureau, as an independent law enforcement agency, ensures that Canadian businesses and consumers prosper in a competitive and innovative marketplace. The Competition Bureau will engage in enforcement actions targeting abuse of dominance and domestic cartels and will ensure timely and effective merger reviews, including resolution before the Competition Tribunal. In addition, the Competition Bureau will target fraud in the digital economy, particularly in the areas of health and the environment, and will continue to protect competitive markets by detecting, disrupting and deterring the most egregious forms of anti-competitive conduct.

Through the effective implementation of recent amendments to the Competition Act, the Competition Bureau will enhance its transparency and increase the predictability and effectiveness of its enforcement actions by using the full range of tools in the enforcement continuum, including litigation where necessary. Providing clarity and predictability to businesses and consumers is particularly important in the current uncertain economic climate.

Highlights of challenges and risk areas

What can be expected of the Competition Bureau and what it can accomplish with the new powers it will receive as a result of the anti-spam legislation may not be well understood by Canadians. The Competition Bureau will therefore ensure that the new enforcement provisions are effectively and efficiently implemented and will also develop a communications strategy to manage expectations.


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Section 2: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

3 color Logo 2.2 Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy

Science and technology (S&T) are essential to building the knowledge-based economy of tomorrow. Fostering innovation and investing in S&T are fundamental to improving Canada's productivity and global competitiveness. Canada holds a leading global position in some areas of the research and innovation system but faces challenges in other areas. Industry Canada supports a viable private sector innovation system and, in support of this objective, has launched a Research and Development Review Panel to determine how government support can best be used to advance and commercialize research. The Department works with its portfolio partners, the private sector, industry associations, academia and all levels of government to foster an environment that is conducive to innovation, scientific excellence and industrial competitiveness.

Breakdown of 2011–12 Planned Spending by Program Activity ($ millions)

Breakdown of 2011–12 Planned Spending by Program Activity graphic (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure
Breakdown of 2011–12 Planned Spending by Program Activity ($ millions)
Research and Development Financing 431.9 (59%)
Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity 265.7 (36%)
Information and Communication Technologies Research and Innovation 38.2 (5%)
Total 735.8

It is through these relationships that the Department is helping to promote innovation, technology transfer and spinoffs as well as contributing to a skilled workforce and ensuring that Canadians and Canadian businesses benefit from an innovative and knowledge-based economy.

It is through these relationships that the Department is helping to promote innovation, technology transfer and spinoffs as well as contributing to a skilled workforce and ensuring that Canadians and Canadian businesses benefit from an innovative and knowledge-based economy.
Financial Resources ($ millions)View the footnote 2_2_1 *   Human Resources (FTEs)
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14   2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
735.8 826.4 561.6   534 523 522

* Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 2_2_1)

Industry Canada also supports further advancements in S&T, knowledge and innovation by focusing on the following:

  • the attraction and retention of top research talent through effective S&T programs;
  • the commercialization of Canadian research and development (R&D) and technology transfer to increase innovation;
  • strategic, large-scale R&D projects in the automotive and aerospace sectors that support innovative, greener and more fuel-efficient vehicles and aircraft; and
  • research in advanced telecommunications and information technologies to support the development of new products and services for the information and communication technologies (ICT) sector and the adoption of innovative ICT applications.

The following key activities will support this strategic outcome:

  • advancing science policy advice and policy frameworks to fulfill commitments made in the multi-year science and technology strategy, Mobilizing Science and Technology to Canada's Advantage – 2007;
  • producing and launching the 2010 State of the Nation report on Canada's science, technology and innovation system;
  • working with portfolio agencies to ensure funding programs promote private sector innovation; and
  • consulting and collaborating with external stakeholders and counterparts in other science-based departments to improve Canada's science and innovation system.

By focusing on these key activities in the coming years, Industry Canada will encourage innovation and ensure that Canadian businesses become increasingly competitive in the global economy.

Program Activity 2.2.1
Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityScience, Technology and Innovation Capacity
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)View the footnote 22_2 *
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
FTEs Planned SpendingView the footnote 22_3 ** FTEs Planned SpendingView the footnote 22_4 *** FTEs Planned Spending
69 265.7 69 326.4 69 200.8

* Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 22_2)

** Planned spending in 2011–12 does not include funding for the extension of the Knowledge Infrastructure Program to October 31, 2011, under Canada's Economic Action Plan. (return to the text reference 22_3)

*** A new up-front multi-year funding agreement totalling $600 million over five years was announced in Budget 2009. This funding agreement, which is for future activities at the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), comes into effect in 2012–13. However, existing funding to Genome Canada and a previous grant agreement with the CFI will end in 2012–13. (return to the text reference 22_4)

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Canada's S&T capacity is developed. Canada's rank in federal investment in higher education research and development (HERD) as a percentage of GDP Leadership position in the G7
Canada invests in skilled workers to drive innovation. R&D workers in the workforce Year-over-year increase
Knowledge Infrastructure Program:
Provide economic stimulus in local economies across Canada through infrastructure investments at post-secondary institutions
Total value of approved projects at colleges and universities $2 billion by October 31, 2011

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityProgramming in this area supports Theme I: Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality (return to the text reference 22_1).

Planning highlights and benefits for Canadians

Innovation is a major driver of productivity growth. Scientific discoveries and new technologies provide solutions to many of the issues that are important to Canadians and contribute to a higher standard of living and better quality of life. The Government of Canada remains committed to strengthening the effectiveness of its investments in S&T, which were outlined in its S&T strategy, to ensure that Canadians benefit from scientific innovation.

In fulfilling commitments made in the S&T strategy, the Department will continue to provide science policy advice. It will do so in collaboration with its portfolio agencies, other science-based departments and agencies, the provinces and territories, and the regional development agencies.

The Department will also continue to support the Science, Technology and Innovation Council (STIC). The STIC, an advisory body established under the S&T strategy, provides the Government of Canada with policy advice on S&T issues. Industry Canada, in collaboration with the STIC, will produce and launch the 2010 State of the Nation report on Canada's science, technology and innovation system. The report will provide an assessment of Canada's research and innovation as well as its S&T performance against international standards of excellence to ensure that commitments made in the S&T strategy are fulfilled.

Industry Canada will focus on developing S&T and innovation policies to foster business innovation and to promote science and an entrepreneurial culture. This will be informed by economic research and analysis and consultations with Canadian and international partners.

Industry Canada will continue to monitor the effectiveness of research funding. Together with partners such as the federal granting councils, National Research Council Canada, the Canada Foundation for Innovation and Genome Canada, the Department will measure and maximize the impact of these investments to ensure that they advance S&T in Canada.

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityIndustry Canada will also continue to provide science policy advice and policy frameworks and work with portfolio agencies to fulfill commitments made in the S&T strategy in the following priority areas: health and related life sciences, environmental science and technologies, natural resources and energy, and information and communication technologies3.

Through these activities and its work with portfolio partners, other government departments and external stakeholders from the private and public sectors, Industry Canada will endeavour to promote scientific excellence and foster an environment that is conducive to innovation.

* Complete details on Industry Canada's sustainable development activities are available on the Environment and Sustainability subsite of the departmental website. Industry Canada's Greening Government Operations table, one of the supplementary information tables itemized in Section 3.2 of this report, is available on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat website (www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2011-2012/index-eng.asp). For complete details on the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, please see the Environment Canada website (www.ec.gc.ca/dd-sd/default.asp?lang=En&n=C2844D2D-1). (return to the text reference 3)

Highlights of challenges and risk areas

Private sector investment in R&D in Canada continues to lag behind other countries, despite the Government of Canada's considerable investment in business R&D. As announced in Budget 2010, an independent expert panel was created to review federal support of business R&D and make recommendations to maximize the impact of these initiatives. The panel will report back to the Minister of State for Science and Technology in October 2011.

Canada's Economic Action Plan

The Knowledge Infrastructure Program (KIP), which was introduced in Budget 2009, provides funding of up to $2 billion over two years for R&D infrastructure projects at post-secondary institutions. On December 2, 2010, the Government of Canada announced that the program would be extended until October 31, 2011.

Program Activity 2.2.2
Information and Communication Technologies Research and Innovation
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)View the footnote 22_5 *
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
377 38.2 366 37.5 365 37.5

* Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 22_5)

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Industry Canada policy-making and program development sectors are made aware of new and emerging communication technologies and are provided with the technical information they need to make well-informed decisions. Number of new and emerging communication technologies for which Communications Research Centre Canada (CRC) has provided advice or input to Industry Canada for the development of policy, standards and regulations and for contributions to international forums (e.g. the International Telecommunication Forum, or ITU) 10 new technologies for which advice is sought or for demonstration
Canadian government departments and agencies (National Defence, Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, Canadian Space Agency) are provided with the information they need to make well-informed decisions on new communication technologies. Level of funding received from other federal government departments to conduct research and testing on communication technologies $7 million
Canadian telecommunications companies realize industrial and economic benefits from CRC intellectual property (IP) and technology transfer. IP revenue and contracting-in money received by CRC $2 million

Planning highlights and benefits for Canadians

Industry Canada is committed to a competitive Canadian ICT sector. Support for the development of new products and services for the ICT sector is provided through the CRC. In addition, the CRC enables Industry Canada to provide technical information to support well-informed decisions on such issues as cyber security, the transition to digital television, the sharing of the television spectrum and the implementation of digital radio and mobile television. Industry Canada will continue to support R&D activities targeted at promoting the adoption of innovative ICT applications.

Industry Canada will support the development of technologies to improve spectrum efficiency for intelligent radio, prediction of ultra high frequency (UHF), environment and white space interference, propagation analysis and wireless network convergence, as well as to increase information broadcasting capacity and quality through audio-visual coding, modulation and interference mitigation.

In addition, Industry Canada will support R&D in the following areas:

  • technologies and infrastructure used in emergencies, with the purpose of improving technologies for rapidly deployable and interoperable radio and public alerting; and
  • technologies and infrastructure for network attacks, emergency alerting and response, search and rescue, and surveillance and sensing, with the purpose of improving network security and public safety.

The Department will coordinate, at the national level, ICT-related international S&T agreements and participate in various international research consortiums.

Results of ICT-related R&D will be submitted to international organizations' technical panels and working groups in support of Canadian interests in the areas of, for example, propagation (ITU-R WP3) and international search and rescue satellite systems.

Industry Canada will also investigate the use of broadcasting, satellite, wireless and optical communications systems to improve and expand broadband access.

The Department will develop and support new technology in the area of energy efficiency and greenhouse gas reduction as well as produce a report on the Smart Grid program.

These plans will be undertaken to support the development of ICT capacity and to close the innovation gap by facilitating the transfer of new technologies to Canadian industry.

Highlights of challenges and risk areas

As scientific equipment becomes obsolete and campus infrastructures age, Industry Canada's ability to meet its R&D commitments could be affected. Over the next three years, the Department will ensure that cost-saving measures are identified and implemented and that savings are used for the highest campus operations' priorities as well as for items identified in the long-term capital plan.

Program Activity 2.2.3
Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityResearch and Development Financing
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)View the footnote 22_6 *
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned SpendingView the footnote 22_7 **
88 431.9 88 462.6 88 323.3

* Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 22_6)

** The decrease in planned spending in 2013–14 is mainly due to the Automotive Innovation Fund, which is scheduled to end in 2012–13. As well, decreases are planned in 2013–14 for the Bombardier CSeries program and the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative. (return to the text reference 22_7)

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Investment in leading-edge R&D in targeted Canadian industries Dollar value of disbursements to firms for R&D activities $361.4 million
Dollars of investment leveraged per dollar of Industry Canada investments in R&D projects $2.00
Development and commercialization of new and improved products, processes and services Nature and extent of new and improved technologies developed Description of technologies developed and commercialized

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityProgramming in this area supports Theme I: Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality. (return to the text reference 22_8)

Planning highlights and benefits for Canadians

Through strategic support of R&D projects, Industry Canada contributes to the advancement of Canada's innovation capacity and expertise and to the creation and retention of jobs in Canada.

The Department will continue to effectively monitor the aerospace innovation program, manage its partnerships, and implement the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI), thereby enhancing Canada's capacity for R&D and the commercialization of new technologies in the Canadian aerospace industry.

The Industrial Technologies Office (ITO) will implement a performance management strategy to ensure that SADI's benefits and results are being clearly communicated and to demonstrate that its objectives are being met.

To improve client service and increase efficiency without compromising due diligence, ITO will implement new measures to reduce the processing time for amendments to SADI and Technology Partnerships Canada contribution agreements.

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityThe Automotive Innovation Fund will continue until 2013. This $250-million fund provides the automotive sector with support for strategic, large-scale R&D projects to develop innovative, greener and more fuel-efficient vehicles.

By delivering on these plans, Industry Canada will help increase the capacity of Canadian firms to participate in leading-edge R&D and S&T innovation.

Highlights of challenges and risk areas

Given how rapidly technology advances and changes, Industry Canada faces the uncertainty that certain funded projects could become redundant or non-competitive. To address this, the Department considers the effect of technological change when analyzing the expected performance of key industries and leading firms.


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Section 2: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

3 color Logo 2.3 Canadian businesses and communities are competitive

Canada's competiveness in the global economy may be attributable to the productivity of Canadian firms, as they are the generators of wealth, innovation, investment and employment within the economy. They will continue to face challenges as a result of increasing global competition. The Department therefore continues to strive to maximize Canadian productivity and competitiveness and enable Canadian industries to take advantage of opportunities and respond to risks, link into global value chains, and build and strengthen partnerships both domestically and internationally. The goal is for competitive and adaptable Canadian industries to have the knowledge and capacity to respond appropriately to external shocks within an uncertain economic climate and to compete internationally.

Breakdown of 2011–12 Planned Spending by Program Activity ($ millions)

Breakdown of 2011–12 Planned Spending by Program Activity graphic (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure
Breakdown of 2011–12 Planned Spending by Program Activity ($ millions)
Community Economic Development 154.0 (47%)
Small Business Research, Advocacy and Services 128.6 (39%)
Industrial Competitiveness and Capacity 47.1 (14%)
Total 329.7

Canada is facing challenges in its productivity growth, which affects its ability to attract foreign investment. There is increasing competition for investment from emerging economies that were not affected as significantly by the recession.

Canada is facing challenges in its productivity growth, which affects its ability to attract foreign investment. There is increasing competition for investment from emerging economies that were not affected as significantly by the recession.
Financial Resources ($ millions)View the footnote 23_1 *   Human Resources (FTEs)
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14   2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
329.8 276.2 259.2   592 561 562

* Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 23_1)

To ensure that Canadian businesses and communities are competitive, Industry Canada collaborates with businesses, governments and industry to enhance the recognition of Canadian industrial capabilities and to identify and address opportunities and risks affecting industry competitiveness within the globalized marketplace.

Additionally, Industry Canada supports small and medium-sized enterprises (SME), which play a role in and contribute to Canada's economic well-being, by facilitating their access to financing and through capacity building in both physical infrastructure and ICT. Industry Canada works collaboratively with federal departments, the provinces and territories, and industry to gather knowledge about such sectors as ICT, energy, life sciences, automotive, services, and aerospace and defence to ensure that government policies and programs effectively support the competitiveness of these sectors. This increases the capacity of firms and communities across Canada to participate in a knowledge-based economy. This is one way in which the Department promotes business growth, entrepreneurship and community development.

Industry Canada further contributes to ensuring that Canadian businesses and communities are competitive by

  • supporting the growth and competitiveness of small business and encouraging entrepreneurship;
  • helping Canadian industries develop the capacity to adapt to the ever-changing economic landscape, respond appropriately to external shocks, and innovate and compete internationally;
  • applying expertise to develop and contribute to policy, legislation and regulations and to engage various public and private stakeholders in strengthening Canada's industrial capacity;
  • encouraging growth and economic diversification to create sustainable communities; and
  • informing communities about access to the infrastructure that is essential for participating in today's economy by reporting on results of the Broadband Canada: Connecting Rural Canadians program.

The following key activities will support this strategic outcome:

  • providing support to the Advisory Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship as it looks at ways to improve small business access to federal programs and services, which is one element of the Paperwork Burden Reduction Initiative;
  • continuing to improve services for small businesses, saving them time and effort when seeking information on government programs and services;
  • implementing recommendations from audits and evaluations of programs;
  • encouraging and promoting the adoption and adaptation of new business processes, technologies and skills;
  • monitoring and analyzing firms and trends in industry, thereby enabling the Department to advise stakeholders on key strategic issues and to bring an industry perspective to government decision making, policy formulation and business development; and
  • implementing a digital economy strategy that is based on research, analysis and recommendations from stakeholder consultations.

By focusing on these activities in the coming years, Industry Canada will help support Canadian business competitiveness and productivity.

Program Activity 2.3.1
Small Business Research, Advocacy and Services
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)View the footnote 23_2 *
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
123 128.6 123 127.4 122 124.4

* Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 23_2)

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target
Small businesses use government programs, tools and information. Number of small businesses using government programs, tools and information to enhance their growth and competitiveness 2,342,050

Planning highlights and benefits for Canadians

Industry Canada raises awareness across government of the challenges facing small businesses and provides statistical information about SMEs as well as analysis and expertise on SME-related issues, such as entrepreneurship, financing, innovation and growth firms. The Department also recommends policy options, works with SMEs to deliver programs that help support them and entrepreneurial activity across Canada, and provides analysis in relation to the Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC).

Industry Canada will support the Minister of Industry in the conduct of the 10-year legislative review of the BDC, which is to be conducted in consultation with the Minister of Finance. The Department will also support implementation of the resulting recommendations. The aim of the review is to encourage small business growth, competitiveness and entrepreneurship.

Based on the findings of the 2010 Comprehensive Review and discussions with stakeholders, improvements to the Canada Small Business Financing Program (CSBFP) are being developed. The aim of these improvements is to streamline the administrative process, make CSBFP loans more appealing for lenders to offer and mitigate the risks to government. The CSBFP helps to increase SMEs' access to financing that would not otherwise be accessible without government support.

The Department will leverage partnerships to continue to deliver integrated business information service strategies for small business. It will also build and strengthen partnerships with other departments and agencies, other levels of government and national associations serving small business to increase awareness of the Canada Business Network, leverage access to content and identify future areas for collaborating on service-to-business delivery. This will ensure that SMEs have the necessary information to make informed business decisions and will also facilitate business compliance.

By continuing to assist SMEs in their adoption of e-business strategies through student internships, Industry Canada will enhance the growth and competitiveness of small business and encourage entrepreneurship.

As a result of the Department's efforts in this program area, Canada's entrepreneurs and SMEs will contribute to strengthening the Canadian economy as it continues to emerge from the recession.

Highlights of challenges and risk areas

Consultations in support of the 10-year legislative review of the BDC are ongoing. While the Senate report has been received, there could be delays in receiving other input. Given this, Industry Canada has developed a flexible action plan to monitor and track input and incorporate it during report development.

Program Activity 2.3.2
Industrial Competitiveness and Capacity
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)View the footnote 23_3 *
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned SpendingView the footnote 23_4 ** FTEs Planned Spending
305 47.1 298 56.1 299 51.1

* Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 23_3)

** Planned spending in 2012–13 includes deferred funding from previous fiscal years for the Structured Financing Facility, which maintains shipyard capability for federal marine procurement and maintenance requirements. Funding for this program ends in 2013–14. (return to the text reference 23_4)

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Canadian industries have the capacity to prepare for and respond to risks and opportunities in domestic and global markets. Canada's ranking for "Value chain breadth" (indicator 11.05 of the World Economic Forum's Global Competitiveness Report) 33rd or better (based on 2010–11 report)
Canada's ranking for "Firm-level technology absorption" (indicator 9.02 of the World Economic Forum's Global Competitiveness Report) 22nd or better
Industry perspective is considered in policy, legislation, regulations and agreements. Number of collaborative policy projects focused on industry competitiveness and adaptability 46

Planning highlights and benefits for Canadians

Departmental officials engage with associations, governments and leading firms to help Canadian industries become more innovative, enter into global value chains, strengthen partnerships both domestically and internationally, attract investment and promote Canadian expertise.

Should the government adopt and release a Federal Tourism Strategy, Industry Canada would lead its implementation. The strategy would further articulate the federal government's approach to supporting tourism, building on the four priorities announced by the Prime Minister in June 2009:

  • encouraging product development and investments in Canadian tourism assets and products;
  • facilitating ease of access and movement for travellers, while ensuring the safety and integrity of Canada's borders;
  • increasing awareness of Canada as a premier tourist destination, including federal tourism assets; and
  • fostering an adequate supply of skills and labour to enhance visitor experiences through quality service and hospitality.

Theme 1:  Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityThe Department will also work in collaboration with the private sector on the development of technology roadmaps, including the Soldier Systems Technology Roadmap that supports Canada's soldier modernization efforts. Working with partners such as other departments and agencies, councils, research institutions and the private sector, Industry Canada will guide the completion of the development phase and will help establish the framework for successful implementation of this modernization effort. Technology roadmaps encourage and promote the identification of key emerging or disruptive technologies so that Canadian companies in sectors such as ICT, advanced materials, biotechnology and clean energy technologies can seize opportunities in domestic and global markets.

Industry Canada will continue to engage with industry associations, key firms, other federal government departments and other levels of government to enhance its understanding of issues related to competitiveness so as to better align policies and leverage programs to create an environment that fosters business innovation and encourages investment in key industries.

Through the Industrial and Regional Benefits policy, which provides the framework for using federal defence procurement to leverage long-term industrial and regional development within Canada, Industry Canada is working with partners to ensure that Canadian companies participate in, or move up, the global value chains associated with major defence contracts.

Industry Canada's efforts in this program area will help Canadian industries develop the capacity to adapt to the ever-changing economic landscape, respond appropriately to external shocks, and innovate and compete internationally, thereby strengthening Canada's industrial capacity.

Highlights of challenges and risk areas

In many countries, recovery from the recession is slower than in Canada. This, coupled with the relatively high Canadian dollar, may limit opportunities for Canadian firms to sell their products and invest in key global markets. To address this, Industry Canada is analyzing business, financial and investment factors; advising government stakeholders on the impact of changing market conditions on industrial competitiveness; and also advising industry stakeholders on strategic risks and opportunities.

Program Activity 2.3.3
Community Economic Development
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)View the footnote 23_5 *
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
FTEs Planned SpendingView the footnote 23_6 ** FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
164 154.0 140 92.7 141 83.7

* Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 23_5)

** Planned spending in 2011–12 includes deferred funding from previous fiscal years for the Broadband Canada program, which aims to extend broadband coverage to as many unserved and underserved households as possible. Funding for this program is scheduled to end in 2011–12. (return to the text reference 23_6)

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Targeted businesses and organizations in northern Ontario create economic growth. Number of northern Ontario businesses and organizations created, expanded or maintained 3,398
The Broadband Canada: Connecting Rural Canadians program is expected to expand broadband coverage to as many unserved and underserved households in Canada as possible, beginning in 2009–10. Percentage of projects completed by March 31, 2012 100 percent

Planning highlights and benefits for Canadians

By means of program funding through FedNor, Industry Canada will support northern Ontario communities and businesses to ensure that they are competitive in the Canadian marketplace. To achieve this, Industry Canada will continue to provide financial support through the Northern Ontario Development Program (NODP), FedNor's core program designed to promote economic growth, diversification, job creation and sustainable communities in northern Ontario. An evaluation of the program and the renewal of its Terms and Conditions will create opportunities to improve how the program is delivered, to revise program priorities and to consider the implementation of new directions that are aligned with the changing needs of the federal government, local businesses, communities and the economy of the region.

The Department will also continue providing financial support to Community Futures organizations. In collaboration with other partners, these organizations provide economic stability and contribute to growth in northern Ontario through the creation of diversified economies and sustainable communities. This environment is essential for attracting investment, which further contributes to job creation. The Department's implementation of audit and evaluation recommendations will ensure the optimal administration of this program, including increased transparency in and accountability for its administrative processes.

Also in northern Ontario, Industry Canada will implement recommendations from the evaluation of the Economic Development Initiative, which is part of the Government of Canada's Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008–2013: Acting for the Future. This initiative encourages sustainable economic growth in Ontario's Francophone communities through activities that enhance the competitiveness of SMEs while responding to their needs. There will also be a focus on examining SMEs in these communities to identify economic development issues as well as opportunities.

Through these plans, Industry Canada will enable northern Ontario communities to be better positioned to attract and support business and community economic development.

Through the Computers for Schools program, refurbished computers are being distributed to schools, libraries and not-for-profit organizations across Canada. Another component of the program involves engaging youth interns to assist in computer refurbishment and ICT skills integration. Industry Canada will develop and implement a marketing, communications and outreach strategy to increase awareness of the program and highlight program improvements.

Highlights of challenges and risk areas

In response to northern Ontario's changing economic climate, the NODP's priorities will be realigned to achieve short- to medium-term, measurable results supporting the economic development and growth of northern Ontario communities and businesses. The NODP's updated criteria and guidelines will be accessible through the FedNor website and provide Canadians with comprehensive information about the program.

3 color Logo 2.4 Internal Services

Theme 1:  Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityShrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)View the footnote 24_1 *
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned SpendingView the footnote 24_2 ** FTEs Planned Spending
1,595 143.6 1,595 127.1 1,599 124.6

* Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 24_1)

** Royalties from Defence Industries Productivity programs that support Industry Canada's operating requirements are forecast to decrease by approximately $20 million in 2012–13. (return to the text reference 24_2)

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityProgramming in this area supports Theme I: Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality. (return to the text reference 24_3)

Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with GovernmentProgramming in this area supports Theme IV: Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint - Beginning with Government. (return to the text reference 24_4)

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other departmental obligations.

Internal Services include management and oversight services, public policy services, communications services, legal services, human resources (HR) management services, financial management services, information management services, information technology services, real property services, materiel services, acquisition services, and travel and other administrative services.

Internal Services involve only those activities and resources that apply across the Department, not those that are specific to a program.

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityIn support of environmental sustainability, Industry Canada will continue to promote industry's development and use of corporate social responsibility (CSR) management tools and the use of CSR standards in the Canadian marketplace3.

Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with GovernmentAs a participant in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS), Industry Canada contributes to Greening Government Operations targets through its Internal Services program activity. The Department contributes to Theme IV of the FSDS, specifically the following target areas:

  • establish green procurement targets (including targets related to training, performance evaluations, and management processes and controls);
  • recycle all surplus electronic and electrical equipment in an environmentally sound manner;
  • reduce internal paper consumption per employee by 20 percent from 2006–07 levels;
  • achieve an 8:1 ratio of employees to printing units;
  • adopt a guide for greening meetings and events; and
  • reduce greenhouse gas emissions from fleet vehicles by 17 percent from 2005–06 levels by 20203.

3 Complete details on Industry Canada's sustainable development activities are available on the Environment and Sustainability subsite of the departmental website. Industry Canada's Greening Government Operations table, one of the supplementary information tables itemized in Section 3.2 of this report, is available on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat website (www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2011-2012/index-eng.asp). For complete details on the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, please see the Environment Canada website (www.ec.gc.ca/dd-sd/default.asp?lang=En&n=C2844D2D-1). (return to the text reference 3)

Highlights of challenges and risk areas

Successful recruitment, development and retention of the talent needed to create and maintain a productive, sustainable, adaptable, competent and diverse workforce is fundamental to the Department's meeting its strategic outcomes. In response, Industry Canada has adopted a comprehensive approach to HR management and planning, including the development of a three-year People Management Strategy for Renewal and Results. This strategy includes a series of people management initiatives focused on the following four main priority areas: employee engagement and renewal, leadership development, HR service excellence and service improvement, and integrity and accountability.


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Section 3: Supplementary Information

3.1 Financial highlights

These future-oriented financial highlights are intended to serve as a general overview of Industry Canada's financial position and operations. They are prepared on an accrual basis to strengthen accountability and improve transparency and financial management.

Industry Canada's future-oriented financial statements can be found on the departmental website.

($ thousands)
Condensed Future-Oriented Statement of Financial Position (unaudited)
At March 31
% Change Estimated Results 2010–11 Forecast 2011–12
Assets      
Financial Assets -15 1,540,701 1,309,085
Non-Financial Assets -5 103,526 98,758
Total -14 1,644,227 1,407,843
Liabilities      
Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities -42 918,461 529,182
Deferred Revenue -14 3,792,475 3,265,951
Other Liabilities 1 532,863 538,917
Total Liabilities -17 5,243,799 4,334,050
       
Equity -19 (3,599,572) (2,926,207)
Total -14 1,644,227 1,407,843

($ thousands)
Condensed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations (unaudited)
For the period ended March 31
% Change Estimated Results 2010–11 Forecast 2011–12
Expenses      
Transfer Payments -64 1,771,718 642,987
Operating Expenses -3 838,023 812,131
Total Expenses -44 2,609,741 1,455,118
Revenues      
Sales of Services -4 1,081,510 1,034,353
Other -40 18,184 10,977
Total Revenues -5 1,099,694 1,045,330
Net Cost of Operations -73 1,510,047 409,788

Assets by Type

Total assets for 2011–12 are projected to be $1.41 billion. Expected increases for unconditionally repayable contributions recorded as loans are largely related to the Automotive Innovation Fund and the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative. Due from CRF (Consolidated Revenue Fund) amounts are largely dependent on projected payables and, as such, will vary with fluctuations in those accounts. Non-financial assets represent tangible capital assets for which no substantial increases or decreases are expected.

Assets by Type

Assets by Type graph (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure
Assets by Type ($ thousands)
Loans 665,647 (47%)
Due from CRF 481,363 (34%)
Accounts receivable 162,075 (12%)
Non-financial assets 98,758 (7%)
Total 1,407,843 

Liabilities by Type

Total liabilities for 2011–12 are projected to be $4.33 billion. The forecast deferred revenue is the largest liability in the Future-Oriented Statement of Financial Position (76 percent or $3.27 billion). This amount represents auction revenues that are deferred and recognized on a straight-line basis, with a significant portion resulting from the Advanced Wireless Services and Other Spectrum auction that was held in 2008–09. Accounts payable and accrued liabilities are projected based largely on expense levels. Other liabilities consist of an allowance for loan guarantees (conservatively held at September 30, 2010, levels), special purpose accounts, and allowances for vacation and severance pay, all of which are projected based on low-level upward trends and historic rates.

Liabilities by Type

Liabilities by Type graph (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure
Liabilities by Type ($ thousands)
Deferred revenue 3,265,951 (76%)
Other liabilities 538,917 (12%)
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities 529,182 (12%)
Total 4,334,050

Expenses by Type

Total expenses for 2011–12 are projected to be $1.46 billion. The majority of these expenses are in the form of transfer payments. Transfer payment programs under Canada's Economic Action Plan (EAP) were scheduled to end on March 31, 2011, except for the Broadband Canada program. This program had a predetermined end date of March 31, 2012, and will continue making payments with EAP funding during 2011–12. For this reason, projected expenses are approximately $1.25 billion less than the two previous fiscal years. Operating expenses are expected to remain at their historic levels, with a slight year-over-year decrease, including salaries and employee benefits.

Expenses by Type

Expenses by Type graph (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure
Expenses by Type ($ thousands)
Transfer payments 647,987 (45%)
Salaries and employee benefits 528,082 (37%)
Other operating expenditures 284 089 (19%)
Total 1,455,158

Revenues by Type

Total revenues for 2011–12 are projected to be $1.05 billion. Radio spectrum licences make up three quarters of the projected revenue, which includes yearly licence revenue as well as deferred revenue from sales of spectrum licences. Other sales of services include various sources of revenue, such as fees collected under the Canada Small Business Financing Program and by the Canadian Intellectual Property Office and the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy, all of which have been projected to be consistent with amounts collected in previous years. Other revenues consist largely of fines collected under the Competition Law Enforcement program, which are projected to be half of the 2010–11 levels.

Revenues by Type

Revenues by Type graph (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure
Revenue by Type ($ thousands)
Radio spectrum licences 757,124 (72%)
Other sales of services 277,229 (27%)
Other revenues 10,977 (1%)
Total 1,045,330

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Section 3: Supplementary Information

3.2 Supplementary information tables

The following tables are available on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat website:


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Section 4: Other Items of Interest

The following information is available online. (return to the text reference 32_1)

4.1 Information management and information technology governance and responsibilities at Industry Canada

4.2 Program activity titles and descriptions

The program activities are presented by the strategic outcome to which they contribute.

  • The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive
  • Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
  • Canadian businesses and communities are competitive

4.3 Expected results of program subactivities by strategic outcome

The program subactivities, including their expected results, performance indicators and targets, are presented by the strategic outcome to which they contribute.

  • The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive
  • Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
  • Canadian businesses and communities are competitive

4.4 Strategic environmental assessments and sustainable development activities

In accordance with the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS), Industry Canada commits to the following:

  • providing more specific information on departmental sustainable development activities, as is appropriate to the Department's mandate;
  • strengthening the application of strategic environmental assessments (SEA) by ensuring that the government's environmental goals are taken into account when pursuing social and economic goals; and
  • employing best practices when reporting summary information on the results of SEAs and linking results to FSDS goals and targets to ensure that environmental decision making is more transparent.

Complete details on Industry Canada's sustainable development activities are available on the Environment and Sustainability subsite of the departmental website. Industry Canada's Greening Government Operations table, one of the supplementary information tables itemized in Section 3 of this report, is available on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat website. For complete details on the FSDS, please see the Environment Canada website.


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4.1 Information management and information technology governance and responsibilities at Industry Canada

Information management (IM) and information technology (IT) continue to play an important role as strategic enablers of the Department's business. While the effective stewardship of information and technology involves meeting client needs and expectations for high-quality, authoritative information, it also requires fiscal responsibility. The value of information is enhanced when it can be accessed and applied to accelerate decision making, and IT tools play a crucial role in providing the means to do this. The growth in the volume and complexity of electronic information has emphasized the need for integrating IM requirements and technology planning to ensure that information is accessible for business needs and supports high levels of service to Canadians.

To address these needs, the Department's multi-year Information Management Agenda identifies three outcomes: Industry Canada has the requisite IM governance structure in place, employees are aware of their IM responsibilities and know how to execute them, and employees have the tools to help them do so. The Department is well advanced in delivering on many projects and initiatives undertaken to achieve these outcomes. A recent, significant achievement includes the approval and implementation of a governance structure to support IM decision making with committees at the departmental level, across programs, as well as at operational levels. Managing projects in an effective manner and ensuring alignment between departmental priorities and investments is a senior management responsibility, with Deputy Minister accountability.

In 2011–12, the Department will focus on enhancing capacity to manage digital information by clarifying and communicating employees' responsibilities for effective record keeping, by continuing to deliver IM awareness sessions and by developing IM services and tools required to better manage information at the desktop. The Department will advance the implementation of the enterprise Business-Based Classification Structure to help employees organize the information they use according to the business activities they perform. The Department will focus on enhancing capacity to monitor and track the benefits of IT investments. This work will be coordinated by the Departmental Project Management Office (DPMO), which is also responsible for reporting on the IT investment portfolio; supporting the IT governance committees in their oversight and decision-making roles; and providing advice, tools and professional development support to Industry Canada's project management community. The Department's integrated planning process will continue to improve the alignment of IM activities and technology directions.

Assessment of the health of Industry Canada's IT systems is another priority in 2011–12. As a follow-up to Chapter 1, "Aging Information Technology Systems", of the 2010 Spring Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) asked all departments to prepare a report on the state of aging IT systems, indicating where material risk to the government may be present. Industry Canada's report was submitted to TBS in January 2011. In 2011–12, where mitigation plans are not already in place, they will be developed for the applications and infrastructure that were identified in the report as presenting a risk to the delivery of Industry Canada's mandate. This work will be overseen by the Information Technology Strategic Management Committee (ITSMC).


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Department of Industry (033)

Statement of Management Responsibility

Responsibility for the compilation, content and presentation of the accompanying future-oriented financial information for the years ended March 31, 2011 and 2012, rests with Industry Canada management, including responsibility for the appropriateness of the assumptions on which these statements are prepared. The future-oriented financial information has been prepared in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies, which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector. These statements are based on the best information available and assumptions adopted as at January 25, 2011, and reflect the plans described in the Report on Plans and Priorities.

The future-oriented financial statements of Industry Canada have not been audited.

______________________
Richard Dicerni, Deputy Head
Ottawa, Canada
______________________
Kelly Gillis,
Chief Financial Officer

______________________

Date

______________________

Date


Industry Canada
Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
At March 31

(in thousands of dollars)
  Estimated
Results
2011
Forecast 2012
Assets
Financial assets
Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund 800,780 481,363
Accounts receivable and advances (note 6) 175,729 162,075
Loans (note 7) 564,192 665,647
Total financial assets 1,540,701 1,309,085
Non-financial assets
Prepaid expenses 424 405
Tangible capital assets (note 9) 103,102 98,353
Total non-financial assets 103,526 98,758
  1,644,227 1,407,843
Liabilities and equity of Canada
Liabilities
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities (note 8) 918,461 529,182
Vacation pay and compensatory leave 28,214 30,290
Deferred revenue (note 10) 3,792,475 3,265,951
Allowance for loan guarantees (note 13) 384,781 384,781
Allowance for employee severance benefits (note 12) 83,749 84,049
Other liabilities (note 11) 36,119 39,797
  5,243,799 4,334,050
Equity of Canada (3,599,572) (2,926,207)
  1,644,227 1,407,843

Contingent liabilities (note 13)
Contractual obligations (note 14)

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these future-oriented financial statements.

Industry Canada
Future-oriented Statement of Operations (Unaudited)
For the year ended March 31

(in thousands of dollars)
  Estimated
Results
2011
Forecast 2012
Expenses
The Canadian Marketplace 459,332 455,556
Science and Technology, Knowledge, and Innovation 1,508,616 524,474
Competitive Businesses 466,178 294,073
Internal Services 175,615 181,015
Total expenses 2,609,741 1,455,118
Revenues
The Canadian Marketplace 1,034,099 978,549
Science and Technology, Knowledge, and Innovation 10,169 10,169
Competitive Businesses 55,108 56,537
Internal services 318 75
Total revenues 1,099,694 1,045,330
Net cost of operations 1,510,047 409,788

Segmented information (note 16)

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

Industry Canada
Future-oriented Statement of Equity of Canada (Unaudited)
For the year ended March 31

(in thousands of dollars)
  Estimated
Results
2011
Forecast 2012
Equity of Canada, beginning of year (4,335,918) (3,599,572)
Net cost of operations (1,510,047) (409,788)
Net cash provided by Government 2,108,005 1,313,923
Change in due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund 49,902 (319,417)
Services provided without charge by other government departments (note 15) 88,486 88,647
     
Equity of Canada, end of year (3,599,572) (2,926,207)

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these future-oriented financial statements.

Industry Canada
Future-oriented Statement of Cash Flow (Unaudited)
For the year ended March 31

(in thousands of dollars)
  Estimated
Results
2011
Forecast 2012
Operating activities
Net cost of operations 1,510,047 409,788
Non-cash items:
Amortization of tangible capital assets (15,963) (12,697)
Loss on disposal of capital assets (1,428) (1,351)
Services provided without charge by other government departments (note 15) (88,486) (88,647)
Variations in Statement of Financial Position:
Increase (decrease) in accounts receivable (15,078) (13,654)
Increase (decrease) in loans 74,067 101,455
Increase (decrease) in prepaid expenses (601) (19)
Decrease (increase) in accounts payable and accrued liabilities 49,716 389,279
Decrease (increase) in vacation pay and compensatory leave (1,933) (2,076)
Decrease (increase) in deferred revenue 584,254 526,524
Decrease (increase) in allowance for loan guarantees (8,082)
Decrease (increase) in future employee benefits 4,733 (300)
Decrease (increase) in other liabilities (3,339) (3,678)
Cash used in operating activities 2,087,907 1,304,624
Capital investment activities
Acquisitions of tangible capital assets 20,098 9,299
Cash used by capital investment activities 20,098 9,299
Net cash provided by Government of Canada 2,108,005 1,313,923

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these future-oriented financial statements.

Industry Canada
Notes to Future-oriented Financial Statements (Unaudited)
At March 31

1. Authority and Objectives

The authorities for the programs for which Industry Canada is responsible are derived from the Department of Industry Act. Many other acts are under the responsibility of the Minister of Industry, and Treasury Board also defines other specific Industry authorities.

Industry Canada aims to help make Canadian industry more productive and competitive in the global economy, thus improving the economic and social well-being of Canadians through its three strategic outcomes, which are mutually reinforcing. Fostering competitiveness helps advance the marketplace by developing and administering economic framework policies that promote competition and innovation, support investment and entrepreneurial activity, and instill consumer, investor and business confidence. Investing in science and technology to generate knowledge and equip Canadians with the skills and training they need to compete and prosper in the global, knowledge-based economy helps ensure that discoveries and breakthroughs happen here in Canada, and that Canadians can realize the social and economic benefits. Promoting economic development in communities helps support business by encouraging the development of skills, ideas and opportunities across the country. Taken together, Industry Canada's strategic outcomes support growth in employment, income, productivity and sustainable development in Canada.

Internal Services are groups of activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of Industry Canada. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across Industry Canada, not those provided specifically to a program.

Industry Canada's activities are delivered at its headquarters in Ottawa as well as in the regions. There are six regional offices with service points located across Canada.

Industry Canada has a number of transfer payment programs through which it provides grants and contributions to recipients in targeted groups and sectors. Each transfer payment program has specific objectives and expected results that support the achievement of Industry Canada's strategic outcomes.

2. Significant Assumptions

These future-oriented statements have been prepared on the basis of the government priorities and the plans of the department as described in the Report on Plans and Priorities:

  • The funding for Canada's Economic Action Plan will not continue past the 2010–11 fiscal year.
  • Expenses and revenues, including the determination of amounts internal and external to the government, are based on historical experience. The general historical pattern of dispersion is expected to continue.
  • Allowances are based on historical experience and the most up-to-date information possible.
  • The resources provided will enable Industry Canada to deliver the expected results specified in the Report on Plans and Priorities.

These assumptions are adopted as at January 25, 2011.

3. Variations and Changes to the Forecast Financial Information

While every attempt has been made to accurately forecast final results for 2010-11 and for 2011-12, actual results achieved for both years are likely to vary from the forecast information presented, and this variation could be material.

In preparing these financial statements, Industry Canada has made estimates and assumptions concerning the future. These estimates and judgments may differ from the subsequent actual results. Estimates and judgments are continually evaluated and are based on historical experience and other factors, including expectations of future events that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances.

Factors that could lead to material differences between the future-oriented financial statements and the historical financial statements include the following:

  1. The timing and amounts of acquisitions and disposals of property, plant and equipment may affect gains/losses and amortization expense.
  2. Economic conditions may affect both the amount of revenue earned and the collectability of loan receivables.
  3. Interest rates in effect at the time of issue will affect the net present value of non-interest bearing loans.
  4. Further changes to the operating budget through additional new initiatives or technical adjustments later in the year.
  5. A new collective agreement between the members of Public Service Alliance Canada and the Government of Canada may significantly reduce future severance liabilities.

Once the Report on Plans and Priorities is presented, Industry Canada will not be updating the forecasts with any changes to appropriations or forecast financial information made in ensuing supplementary estimates. Variances will be explained in the Departmental Performance Report.

4. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

The future-oriented financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the Treasury Board accounting policies stated below, which are based on Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector. The presentation and results using the stated accounting policies do not result in any significant differences from Canadian generally accepted accounting principles.

Significant accounting policies are as follows:

  1. Parliamentary appropriations — Industry Canada is financed by the Government of Canada through Parliamentary appropriations. Appropriations provided to Industry Canada do not parallel financial reporting according to generally accepted accounting principles since appropriations are primarily based on cash flow requirements. Consequently, items recognized in the Future-oriented Statement of Operations and the Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position are not necessarily the same as those provided through appropriations from Parliament. Note 5 provides a high-level reconciliation between the bases of reporting.
  2. Consolidation — The future-oriented financial statements include the accounts of Industry Canada including the revolving fund Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) and special operating agencies Measurement Canada and the Industrial Technologies Office. The accounts of these sub-entities have been consolidated with those of Industry Canada and all inter-organizational balances and transactions have been eliminated.
  3. Net cash provided by Government—Industry Canada operates within the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF), which is administered by the Receiver General for Canada. All cash received by Industry Canada is deposited to the CRF and all cash disbursements made by Industry Canada are paid from the CRF. The net cash provided by Government is the difference between all cash receipts and all cash disbursements including transactions between departments of the Government.
  4. Amounts due from/to the CRF are the result of timing differences at year-end between when a transaction affects authorities and when it is processed through the CRF. Amounts due from the CRF represent the net amount of cash that Industry Canada is entitled to draw from the CRF without further appropriations to discharge its liabilities.
  5. Revenues
    • Revenues are presented on an accrual basis.
    • Revenues from regulatory fees are recognized in the accounts based on the services provided in the year.
    • Funds received from external parties for specified purposes are recorded upon receipt as deferred revenues. These revenues are recognized in the period in which the related expenses are incurred.
    • Funds that have been received are recorded as deferred revenue, provided that Industry Canada has an obligation to other parties for the provision of goods, services or the use of assets in the future.
    • Other revenues are accounted for in the period in which the underlying transaction or event occurred that gave rise to the revenues.
  6. Expenses
    • Expenses are recorded on an accrual basis.

    • Grants are recognized in the year in which the conditions for payment are met. In the case of grants that do not form part of an existing program, the expense is recognized when the Government announces a decision to make a non-recurring transfer, provided the enabling legislation or authorization for payment receives parliamentary approval prior to the completion of the future-oriented financial statements.

    • Contributions are recognized in the year in which the recipient has met the eligibility criteria or fulfilled the terms of a contractual transfer agreement.

    • Vacation pay and compensatory leave are expensed as the benefits accrue to employees under their respective terms of employment.

    • Services provided without charge by other government departments for accommodation, the employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans, workers' compensation costs, and legal services are recorded as operating expenses at their estimated cost.

  7. Employee future benefits
    1. Pension benefits: Eligible employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, a multi-employer plan administered by the Government. Industry Canada's contributions to the Plan are charged to expenses in the year incurred and represent the total departmental obligation to the Plan. Current legislation does not require Industry Canada to make contributions for any actuarial deficiencies of the Plan.
    2. Severance benefits: Employees are entitled to severance benefits under labour contracts or conditions of employment. These benefits are accrued as employees render the services necessary to earn them. The obligation relating to the benefits earned by employees is calculated using information derived from the results of the actuarially determined liability for employee severance benefits for the Government as a whole.
  8. Accounts and loans receivables — These are stated at the lower of cost and net recoverable value. A valuation allowance is recorded for receivables where recovery is considered uncertain.

  9. Loans — Loans are stated at the amounts that are realizable. Loans are subject to payment in the event of the default of the debtor. An allowance is used to reduce the carrying value of the loans to amounts that approximate their net realizable value. Interest on loans receivable is applied in accordance with the policy that governs the loan. Interest revenue is recognized at the time it is applied to the account.

  10. Allowances for loan guarantees — An allowance for loan guarantees is recorded for potential losses on loan guarantees when it is likely that a payment will be made in the future to honour a guarantee and when the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated.

    The allowance for losses on outstanding loan guarantees is based on forecasting models developed by program areas.

  11. Repayable contributions — Contributions where the recipient is expected to repay the amount advanced. Depending on their nature, they are classified as either unconditionally repayable or conditionally repayable and are accounted for accordingly.

    1. Unconditionally repayable contributions are contributions that must be repaid without qualification. Normally, these contributions are provided with a low- or no-interest clause. Due to their concessionary nature, they are recorded on the Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position as loans at their estimated present value. A portion of the unamortized discount is brought into income each year to reflect the change in the present value of the contributions outstanding. An estimated allowance for uncollectibility is established where appropriate.
    2. Conditionally repayable contributions are contributions that all or a part of which become repayable if conditions specified in the contribution agreement come into effect. Accordingly, they are not recorded on the Statement of Financial Position until such time as the conditions specified in the agreement come into effect, at which time they are recorded as a receivable and a reduction in transfer payment expenses. An estimated allowance for uncollectibility is established where appropriate.
  12. Contingent liabilities — Contingent liabilities are potential liabilities, which may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded. If the likelihood is not determinable or an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the contingency is disclosed in the notes to the future-oriented financial information.

  13. Tangible capital assets — All tangible capital assets and leasehold improvements having an initial cost of $10,000 or more are recorded at their acquisition cost. Industry Canada does not capitalize intangibles; works of art and historical treasures that have cultural, aesthetic or historical value; assets located on Indian Reserves; and museum collections.

    Amortization of tangible capital assets is done on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset as follows:

    Industry Canada Notes to Future-oriented Financial Statements (Unaudited) At March 31 (in millions of dollars)
    Asset Class Amortization Period
    Buildings 15 to 30 years
    Works and infrastructure 30 years
    Machinery and equipment 3 to 10 years
    Vehicles 5 to 10 years
    Computer hardware 5 to 10 years
    Computer software 3 to 10 years
    Assets under construction Once in service, in accordance with asset type
    Leasehold improvements Lesser of the remaining term of the lease or useful life of the improvement

    Assets under construction are recorded in the applicable capital asset class in the year that they become available for use and are not amortized until they become available for use.

5. Parliamentary Appropriations

Industry Canada receives most of its funding through expenditure authorities provided by Parliament. Items recognized in the Future-oriented Statement of Operations and the Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position in one year may be funded through Parliamentary authorities in prior, current or future years. Accordingly, Industry Canada has different net results of operations for the year on a government funding basis than on an accrual accounting basis. The differences are reconciled in the following tables:

  1. Reconciliation of net cost of operations to requested authorities

    Industry Canada Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited) At March 31 (in millions of dollars)
    (in thousands of dollars) Estimated
    Results
    2011
    Forecast
    2012
    Net cost of operations 1,510,047 409,788
    Adjustments for items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting appropriations:
    Repayment of conditionally repayable contributions 158,788 169,994
    Revenue not available for spending 895,976 832,560
    Services provided without charge by other government departments (88,486) (88,647)
    Increase in vacation pay and compensatory leave (1,933) (2,075)
    Increase in employee severance benefits (4,369) (9,540)
    Salary expense recorded at Treasury Board Secretariat (13,889) (13,889)
    Amortization of tangible capital assets (15,963) (12,697)
      2,440,171 1,285,494
    Adjustments for items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting appropriations:
    Acquisition of tangible capital assets 20,098 9,299
    Increase in loans and advances 74,889 111,869
    Other appropriations 800 800
      95,787 121,968
    Forecast authorities available 2,535,958 1,407,462
  2. Authorities requested

    Industry Canada Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited) At March 31 (in millions of dollars)
    (in thousands of dollars) Estimated
    Results
    2011
    Forecast
    2012
    Budgetary authorities
    Vote 1 – Operating expenditures 512,432 475,280
    Vote 5 – Capital expenditures 17,330 6,532
    Vote 10 – Grants and contributions 1,309,796 771,350
    Statutory amounts 695,600 153,500
      2,535,158 1,406,662
    Non-budgetary authorities 800 800
    Forecast authorities available 2,535,958 1,407,462

    Forecast authorities requested for the year ending March 31, 2012, are the planned spending amounts presented in the 2011-12 Report on Plans and Priorities. Estimated authorities requested for the year ending March 31, 2011, include amounts presented in the 2010-11Main Estimates and Supplementary Estimates (A) and (B), planned for presentation in Supplementary Estimates (C), and estimates of amounts to be allocated at year-end from Treasury Board central votes.

6. Accounts Receivable and Advances

Industry Canada Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited) At March 31 (in millions of dollars)
(in thousands of dollars) Estimated
Results
2011
Forecast 2012
Receivables from other government departments and agencies 141,466 130,475
Accounts receivable from external parties 55,403 51,099
Accrued receivables 21,394 19,732
Employee advances 103 95
Other receivables 1,017 938
  219,383 202,339
Allowance for doubtful accounts on receivables from external parties 43,654 40,264
  175,729 162,075

7. Loans

Industry Canada Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited) At March 31 (in millions of dollars)
(in thousands of dollars) Estimated
Results
2011
Forecast
2012
Enterprise development loans 110,000 110,000
Less: Unamortized discount loans 20,749 17,291
Net Enterprise development loans 89,251 92,709
Unconditionally repayable contributions 478,343 574,266
Less: Unamortized discount 149 75
Less: Allowance for doubtful loans and advances 3,253 1,253
Net unconditionally repayable contributions 474,941 572,938
Loans and advances on expired loan guarantees 107,725 110,050
Less: Allowance for doubtful loans 107,725 110,050
Net Loans on expired loan guarantees
  564,192 665,647

Enterprise development loans
These loans are made to manufacturing, processing or service industries in Canada in order to promote the establishment, improvement, growth, efficiency or international competitiveness of such industries, or to assist them in their financial restructuring. There is one interest-free loan outstanding, which is repayable at maturity on April 1, 2017.

Unconditionally repayable contributions
The unamortized discount on unconditionally repayable contributions is calculated by applying the 25% rule on an individual loan basis.

Loans and advances on expired loan guarantees
Industry Canada guarantees loans to small business enterprises under the Small Business Loans Act, the Canada Small Business Financing Act, the Capital Leasing Pilot Project and other loan guarantee payments net of recoveries.

8. Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities

Industry Canada Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited) At March 31 (in millions of dollars)
(in thousands of dollars) Estimated
Results
2011
Forecast 2012
Accounts payable to other government departments and agencies 31,727 31,727
Accounts payable to external parties 729,525 406,763
Accrual – pending Budget Implementation Act 150,010 84,100
Accrued salaries and wages 6,691 6,084
Other external payables 242 242
  918,195 528,916
Accrued liabilities 266 266
  918,461 529,182

9. Tangible Capital Assets

Industry Canada Notes to Future-oriented Financial Statements (Unaudited) At March 31 (in millions of dollars)
(in thousands of dollars) Cost   Accumulated amortization   Net book value
Tangible capital asset class Opening balance Acquisitions Disposals and writeoffsLink to the footnote 1 * Closing balance   Opening balance Acquisitions Disposals and writeoffs * Closing balance   Forecast
2012
Estimated
results 2011
Land 1 ,450 1 ,450     1,450 1,450
Buildings 45,894 34 45,928   24,559 1,662 26,221   19,707 21,334
Works and infrastructure 6,291 6,291   4,712 223 4,935   1,356 1,579
Machinery and equipment 69,131 2,129 3,457 67,803   48,128 3,985 2,406 49,707   18,096 21,003
Computer hardware 54,936 568 1,099 54,405   49,872 1,378 997 50,253   4,152 5,064
Computer software 42,623 142 (2,500) 45,265   31,915 2,848 34,763   10,502 10,708
Vehicles 13,765 682 688 13,759   9,758 1,119 489 10,388   3,371 4,008
Assets under construction 24,628 5,463 5,000 25,091     25,091 24,628
Leasehold improvements 41,822 281 (2,500) 44,603   28,493 1,482 29,975   14,628 13,328
Total 300,540 9,299 5,244 304,595   197,437 12,697 3,892 206,242   98,353 103,102

*Disposals of assets under construction represent assets that were put into production during the year and that have been transferred to the other capital asset classes as applicable.

10. Deferred Revenue

Deferred revenue represents the balance at year-end of unearned revenues stemming from amounts received from external parties that are restricted to fund the expenditures related to specific research projects and amounts received for fees prior to services being performed. Revenue is recognized in the period that these expenditures are incurred or the service is performed.

The majority of Industry Canada's forecasted deferred revenues result from the auction of radio licence frequencies.

Industry Canada Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited) At March 31 (in millions of dollars)
(in thousands of dollars) Estimated
Results
2011
Forecast
2012
Opening balance 4,376,729 3,792,475
Spectrum licence fees earned 584,254 526,524
  3,792,475 3,265,951

11. Other Liabilities

Other liabilities represent funds received from third parties to be disbursed for a specified purpose.

Restitutions under the Competition Act — This account was established to facilitate judgments rendered under article 52 of the Competition Act, and account for monies received in trust for restitution and for subsequent payment.

Cost-sharing Projects — Industry Canada partners with other governments and external organizations to deliver programs and services that contribute to an innovative economy. The account was established to record amounts deposited by these partners.

Securities in Trust and Income from Securities in Trust, Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act — This account was established to record dividends paid on shares held by a bankrupt stockbroker on behalf of clients. As the shares were not registered in clients' names, dividends are paid to the last registered owner, in this case, the stockbroker. These dividends are forwarded to the Superintendent of Bankruptcy until such time as rightful owners are identified.

Unclaimed Dividends and Undistributed assets, Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act— This account represents amounts credited to the Receiver General in accordance with the provisions of the Act, pending distribution to creditors.

Petro-Canada Enterprises Inc. — unclaimed shares— This account was established to record the liability to shareholders who have not presented their shares for payment in accordance with Section 227 of the Canada Business Corporations Act.

Unclaimed Dividends and Undistributed Assets, Canada Business Corporations Act— This account was established for the purpose of recording liabilities to creditors and shareholders who have not been located. The account is charged when funds are paid to them.

Winding-up and Restructuring Act — This account was established to record deposits credited to the Receiver General as a result of the final winding-up of the operations of a company, in accordance with sections 138 and 139 of the Winding-up and Restructuring Act, pending distribution to the persons entitled thereto.

Canada/Provinces Business Service Centre — This account was established to record monies received from provinces under cost-sharing agreements for the Canada-Ontario Business Service Centre.

12. Employee future benefits

  1. Pension benefits

    Industry Canada's employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, which is sponsored and administered by the Government of Canada. Pension benefits accrue up to a maximum period of 35 years at a rate of 2% per year of pensionable service, times the average of the best five consecutive years of earnings. The benefits are integrated with Canada/Quebec Pension Plan benefits and they are indexed to inflation.

    Both the employees and Industry Canada contribute to the cost of the Plan. The 2010-11 and 2011-12forecasted expense amounts are $62,385,331 and $65,415,160 respectively. These amounts represent approximately 1.9 times the contributions of employees.

    Industry Canada's responsibility with regard to the Plan is limited to its contributions. Actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the financial statements of the Government of Canada, as the Plan's sponsor.

  2. Severance benefits

    Industry Canada provides severance benefits to its employees based on eligibility, years of service and final salary. These severance benefits are not pre-funded.Benefits will be paid from future appropriations. Information about the severance benefits, estimated as at the date of these statements, is as follows:

    Industry Canada Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited) At March 31 (in millions of dollars)
    (in thousands of dollars) Estimated
    Results
    2011
    Forecast
    2012
    Accrued benefit obligation, beginning of year 88,482 83,749
    Expense for the year 4,369 9,540
    Benefits paid during the year (9,102) (9,240)
      83,749 84,049

13. Contingent Liabilities

Contingent liabilities arise in the normal course of operations and their ultimate disposition is unknown. They are grouped into two categories as follows:

  1. Claims and litigation

    Claims have been made against Industry Canada in the normal course of operations. Legal proceedings for claims totalling approximately $200,000 were still pending at September 30, 2010. Some of these potential liabilities may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded in the financial statements.

  2. Loan guarantees

    As of September 30, 2010, Industry Canada has guaranteed the following debts:

    Industry Canada Notes to Future-oriented Financial Statements (Unaudited) At March 31 (in millions of dollars)
    (in thousands of dollars) Authorized
    Limit
    Loan Guarantee
    Outstanding
    Balance
    Enterprise Development Program 1,200,000 212
    Small Business Loans Act (SBLA) 1,838,292 298
    Canadian Small Business Financing Act (CSBFA) 1,628,402 666,558
    Capital Leasing Pilot Project 15,661 5,396
    Regional Aircraft Credit Facility 1,500,000 151,996

    At September 30, 2010, an allowance of $384,780,778 has been recorded for estimated losses on outstanding loan guarantees. The expenses related to loan guarantees are reported under Non-Economic Action Plan transfer payments in note 16 for segmented Statement of Operations information.

    Enterprise Development Program — Loans are made to Canadian manufacturers and members of the service industry for the purpose of promoting the establishment, growth, efficiency and international competitiveness of Canadian industry. These loans to a person engaged or about to engage in manufacturing, processing or other commercial activity also foster the expansion of Canadian industry and of Canadian trade.

    Small Business Loan Act (SBLA) Loan Guarantee Program and Canada Small Business Financing Act (CSBFA) Loan Guarantee Program — Loans are made directly by approved lenders to small business enterprises, providing for sharing of each individual loan loss, if any, on the basis of 85% government, 15% lender, to an aggregate, per lending institution not exceeding the Minister's contingent liability, as stated in Section 5 of the SBLAand Section 6(2) of the CSBFA.

    The authorized limit represents the Crown's maximum liability incurred on the aggregate amount of loans made by the lender starting in April 1993 (SBLA) and April 1999 (CSBFA).

    The outstanding guarantee for loans made starting in April 1993 (SBLA) and April 1999 (CSBFA) is the lesser of the Crown's net liability (authorized limit less claims paid by the Crown) or 85% of the outstanding loan amounts of the lenders.

    Capital Leasing Pilot Project (CLPP)— Capital leases were made directly by approved lessors to small business enterprises, providing for sharing of each individual lease loss, if any, on the basis of 85% government, 15% lessor to an aggregate, per leasing institution, not exceeding the Minister's contingent liability based upon the aggregate amount of leases registered per leasing institution, as stated in Section 7 of the CLPP.

    The authorized limit represents the Crown's maximum liability incurred on the aggregate amount of the capital leases having been entered into or transferred since the period starting in April 2002.

    The outstanding guarantee for capital leases entered into since April 2002 is the lesser of the Crown's net liability or 85% of the outstanding capital lease amounts of the lessors.

    Regional Aircraft Credit Facility — Industry Canada has extended loan guarantees on several Air Canada regional jets. Provisioning from the Canada Account Loss Provisioning Pool has been set aside by Finance Canada, manager of the funds. The loan guarantees began in the summer of 2005.

14. Contractual Obligations

The nature of Industry Canada's activities results in some large multi-year contracts and obligations whereby Industry Canada will be committed to make future payments when the services/goods are rendered. Major commitments that can be reasonably estimated are as follows:

Industry Canada Notes to Future-oriented Financial Statements (Unaudited) At March 31 (in millions of dollars)
(in thousands of dollars) 2013 2014 2015 2016 Thereafter Total
Transfer payments 319,703 228,491 93,125 14,116 28,971 684,406
Other goods and services 11,472 6,786 4,849 2,251 25,358
  331,175 235,277 97,974 16,367 28,971 709,764

15. Related Party Transactions

Industry Canada is related as a result of common ownership to all Government of Canada departments, agencies, and Crown corporations. Industry Canada enters into transactions with these entities in the normal course of business and on normal trade terms. Also, during the year, Industry Canada is forecasted to receive services, which will be obtained without charge from other government departments.

  1. Common services provided without charge by other government departments:

    During the year, Industry Canada is forecasted to receive, without charge from other departments, accommodation, legal fees, the employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans, and worker's compensation coverage. These services without charge have been recognized in Industry Canada's Future-oriented Statement of Operations as follows:

    Industry Canada Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited) At March 31 (in millions of dollars)
    (in thousands of dollars) Estimated
    Results
    2011
    Forecast 2012
    Accommodation 56,066 56,135
    Employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans 27,244 27,244
    Worker's compensation coverage 443 464
    Legal services 4,733 4,804
      88,486 88,647

    The Government has structured some of its administrative activities for efficiency and cost-effectiveness purposes so that one department performs these on behalf of all without charge. The costs of these services, which include payroll and cheque issuance services provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada and audit services provided by the Office of the Auditor General, are not included as an expense in the Future-oriented Statement of Operations.

  2. Administration of programs on behalf of other government departments

    Under a memorandum of understanding signed with National Defence on September 1, 2004, Industry Canada administers a program called Development, Test, and Evaluation and Technical Services Activities. During the year 2010-11, Industry Canada expects to incur expenses of $2.5 million ($2.5 in 2011-12) on behalf of National Defence. These expenses will be reflected in the financial statements of National Defence and are not recorded in these financial statements.

  3. Other transactions with related parties

    (in thousands of dollars)
    (in thousands of dollars) Estimated
    Results
    2011
    Forecast 2012
    Expenses Other Government departments and agencies 120,136 123,316
    Revenues Other Government departments and agencies 13,717 13,778

16. Segmented information

Industry Canada Notes to Future-oriented Financial Statements (Unaudited) At March 31 (in millions of dollars)
  2012
(in thousands of dollars) 2011 Total The Canadian marketplace Science and technology,
knowledge and
innovation
Competitive businesses Internal services Total
Expenses
Transfer payments
Economic Action Plan 1,214,295 65,400 65,400
Non-Economic Action Plan 557,423 9,133 436,172 132,282 577,587
Total transfer payments 1,771,718 9,133 436,172 197,682 642,987
Operating expenses
Salaries and employee benefits 579,876 303,600 59,685 68,683 96,114 528,082
Professional and special services 104,286 63,075 9,891 11,345 35,964 120,275
Accommodation 56,066 22,121 3,849 3,709 26,456 56,135
Travel 16,750 13,090 1,587 1,815 2,919 19,411
Amortization 15,963 5,841 1,524 2,666 2,666 12,697
Communication 11,704 7,852 1,004 1,553 3,171 13,580
Furniture and equipment 13,643 6,928 3,484 638 4,765 15,815
Equipment repair and maintenance 10,281 6,500 1,682 681 3,051 11,914
Rental 11,387 11,941 242 346 624 13,153
Utilities, materials and supplies 8,751 3,087 3,366 593 3,111 10,157
Postage 1,995 1,476 84 110 641 2,311
Bad debt expense 5,641 11 1,587 5,073 5 6,676
Other operating expenses 1,680 901 317 (821) 1,528 1,925
Total operating expenses 838,023 446,423 88,302 96,391 181,015 812,131
Total expenses 2,609,741 455,556 524,474 294,073 181,015 1,455,118
Revenues
Radio spectrum licences 814,854 757,124 757,124
Sales of services 266,656 214,082 10,153 52,994 277,229
Revenue from fines 13,969 7,000 7,000
Amortization of discounts 3,776 3,458 75 3,533
Other revenue 439 343 16 85 444
Total revenues 1,099,694 978,549 10,169 56,537 75 1,045,330
Net cost of operations 1,510,047 (522,993) 514,305 237,536 180,940 409,788

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Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)

A summary of Industry Canada's Three-Year Plan for Transfer Payment Programs is available on the departmental website.

Strategic Outcome:
The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive


Program Activity: Spectrum, Telecommunications and the Online Economy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Telecommunication Union, Switzerland

Start Date: April 1, 2011

End Date: March 31, 2015

Description: Canada is a signatory to the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) treaty agreement, which is negotiated every four years at a plenipotentiary conference in accordance with the treaty obligations of the ITU Constitution and Convention. Canada's membership, contribution and standing in the ITU, and its involvement in related events, allow Industry Canada to achieve results internationally across a broad range of issues affecting radiocommunication, standardization and telecommunications development. Canada's contribution to the ITU is commensurate with its international standing and commitment to the United Nations and UN specialized agencies.

Expected Results:

  • Secure Canada's interests in the international regulation of the radio frequency spectrum and of telecommunications to protect Canadian access to spectrum and satellite orbit resources; to facilitate communications across Canada; to monitor and protect Canadian sovereignty in the Arctic and other remote areas through modern digital technologies; and to deal with scientific, environmental, weather-related, transportation, public safety, national and defence matters.
  • Provide leadership and focus in promoting the competitiveness of the Canadian telecommunications industry by working closely with Canadian stakeholders to obtain, among other things, spectrum allocations at global ITU conferences and to develop global standards that advance their product lines, technologies, services, and research and development activities.
  • Work with other countries to harmonize policy and regulatory frameworks, to promote interconnection and interoperability of global telecommunications networks and services, and to facilitate access to key markets for Canadian manufacturers and service providers.
  • Develop effective consultation and information dissemination processes in conjunction with Canada's key trading partners.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Grants 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.8
Total Transfer Payments 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.8

Strategic Outcome:
Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy


Program Activity: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Name of Transfer Payment Program: CANARIE

Start Date: April 1, 2007

End Date: March 31, 2012

Description: CANARIE (Canada's Advanced Research and Innovation Network), now in the fifth year of its five-year mandate, operates and develops the backbone of Canada's advanced, high-speed research network; and facilitates and supports publicly funded research and innovation. In partnership with provincial advanced research networks, the CANARIE network connects Canadian research facilities, universities, educational institutions, hospitals and other science facilities as well as links them to their international peers. It is an essential tool for researchers, innovators and educators.

Expected Results:

  • Continue to evolve applications and platforms supporting a 21st-century cyber infrastructure for Canada, which involves connecting data, computers and people to support advanced, internationally competitive and groundbreaking research.
  • Continue to operate and upgrade the network as well as expand its menu of network services, including IPv6, peering and shared access to research data across Canada.
  • Implement, in support of the federal government's Digital Economy Strategy, an innovation test-bed pilot addressing a segment of Canada's information and communication technologies (ICT) industry.
  • If the pilot is successful, propose to extend the network across Canada's ICT system as part of the renewal of CANARIE's mandate in 2012.
  • Continue to upgrade the network through the Infrastructure Extension Program (IEP) and to promote the innovative research platforms developed through the Network-Enabled Platform (NEP) Program, both of which support the development of middleware tools and related platform technologies that will enable virtual organizations and other research communities to easily access and benefit from the CANARIE network.

Results are reported back to Industry Canada on an annual basis.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Statutory Payments 25.0
Total Transfer Payments 25.0

Program Activity: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Institute for Quantum Computing

Start Date: April 2, 2009

End Date: March 31, 2014

Description: The Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) is a research institute based at the University of Waterloo and located at the main campus in Waterloo, Ontario. IQC's mission is to be the world leader in the development of quantum technologies, and its objective is to create an environment for physicists, mathematicians, engineers and computer scientists to advance the fields of quantum information and quantum computation.

Expected Results:

  • Increase knowledge in quantum computing.
  • Create new opportunities for students to learn and to apply new knowledge.
  • Brand Canada as a place to conduct research in quantum technologies.
  • Position Canada to take advantage of the economic and social benefits of research.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12footnote1 1 *
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Grants 17.0 5.0 5.5 6.0
Total Transfer Payments 17.0 5.0 5.5 6.0

* The decrease in federal funding in 2011–12 is due to the completion of construction of the new IQC building in 2010–11. (return to the text reference 1)


Program Activity: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Start Date: April 1, 2002

End Date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) is a not-for-profit corporation that supports networks of Canadian and international researchers who conduct long-term research on scientific, social and economic issues. Working in association with Canadian and international institutions, CIFAR provides opportunities for eminent scholars to add to Canada's research base. At present, CIFAR supports 12 research programs and 350 researchers in a range of areas, including cosmology and gravity, experience-based brain and biological development, and nanoelectronics.

Expected Results:

  • Attract and retain highly qualified researchers.
  • Encourage greater private sector and provincial government investment in basic research and development activities in Canada.
  • Build interdisciplinary research strengths in areas benefiting Canada's long-term scientific, economic and social development.
  • Encourage closer links between the research activities of Canadian researchers and international researchers.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Grants 5.0 5.0
Total Transfer Payments 5.0 5.0

Program Activity: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics

Start Date: March 30, 2007

End Date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Perimeter Institute (PI) for Theoretical Physics is an independent, non-profit, resident-based research institute devoted to foundational issues in theoretical physics at the highest levels of international excellence. PI pursues scientific research and engages in educational outreach activities, bringing together international scientists to push the limits of understanding of physical laws and develop new ideas about the very essence of space, time, matter and information. PI provides a multi-disciplinary environment to foster research in cosmology, particle physics, quantum foundations, quantum gravity, quantum information, superstring theory and related areas.

Expected Results:

  • Broaden PI's research to combine insights from the full spectrum of physics.
  • Become the primary research home of a critical mass of the world's leading theoretical physicists and secondary research home for many of the world's outstanding theorists.
  • Generate through-flow of the most promising talent.
  • Increase PI's position as Canada's focal point for foundational physics research.
  • Host timely, focused conferences, workshops and seminars.
  • Engage in high-impact outreach.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
(Statutory Payments)
10.0 1.0
Total Transfer Payments 10.0 1.0

Program Activity:Research and Development Financing

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Automotive Innovation Fund

Start Date: May 9, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2013

Description: The Automotive Innovation Fund supports strategic, large-scale research and development (R&D) projects to develop innovative, greener and more fuel-efficient vehicles.

Expected Result:

  • Enhanced capacity for automotive R&D, positioning Canada's automotive industry to meet the demands for cars of the future.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Contributions 15.3 92.5 110.3
Total Transfer Payments 15.3 92.5 110.3

Program Activity: Research and Development Financing

Name of Transfer Payment Program: CSeries Program

Start Date: September 2008

End Date: October 2015

Description: In July 2008, the Government of Canada announced its intention to contribute $350 million to Bombardier Aerospace for research and development (R&D) of aircraft technologies related to its CSeries, a new family of 110- to 130-seat commercial aircraft. The R&D projects will support the Canadian aerospace industry's goal of developing new technologies for the next generation of more fuel-efficient and safer commercial aircraft. The contribution is being provided by Industry Canada and is conditionally repayable.

Expected Result:

  • Enhanced capacity for R&D and the commercialization of new technologies in the Canadian aerospace industry.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Contributions 89.4 70.4 66.6 47.1
Total Transfer Payments 89.4 70.4 66.6 47.1

Program Activity: Research and Development Financing

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Industrial Technologies Office — Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative

Start Date: April 2, 2007

End Date: March 31, 2012footnote4 4 *

Description: The Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI) encourages the development of innovative products and services; enhances the competitiveness of Canadian aerospace and defence (A&D) firms; and fosters collaboration among research institutes, universities, colleges and the private sector. SADI is a component of the government's science and technology strategy, which aims to leverage greater private sector research and development (R&D) investment in Canada. SADI acts as a catalyst for new A&D investments by providing repayable contributions to Canadian A&Dcompanies for strategic industrial research and pre-competitive development. SADI accepts applications on an ongoing basis, and projects are selected following a rigorous review of financial, technical and market criteria. The initiative is financed through funds previously allocated to Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) and repayments received from TPC and SADI projects.

Expected Results:

  • Increased R&D investment in innovative and competitive aerospace, defence, space and security firms.
  • New and ongoing collaborative R&D partnerships among aerospace, defence, space and security industries and research institutes, universities, colleges, and the private sector.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Contributions 177.0 220.0 243.8 240.7
Total Transfer Payments 177.0 220.0 243.8 240.7

*SADI is an ongoing program; its terms and conditions must be renewed on or before March 31, 2012. (return to the text reference 4)

Program Activity: Research and Development Financing

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Industrial Technologies Office — Technology Partnerships Canada

Start Date: March 11, 1996

End Date: December 31, 2006

Description: The Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) program provided repayable contributions to Canadian businesses to support industrial research and pre-competitive development in the aerospace and defence, environmental and life sciences, information and communication technologies, and advanced manufacturing sectors. The program helped leverage private sector investment in research and development (R&D) and produced a wide range of economic, social and environmental benefits for Canadians. TPC ended on December 31, 2006. Although it no longer takes applications, TPC continues to manage a $3.5-billion portfolio of existing contracted projects. Repayments on these projects are expected until 2035.

Expected Results:

  • Government investment in R&D activities in the aerospace, defence, environmental and enabling technology industries generates other incremental investment from Canadian businesses.
  • New and innovative products, services and processes are commercialized by Canadian businesses.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Contributions 49.9 30.8 23.7 18.5
Total Transfer Payments 49.9 30.8 23.7 18.5

Strategic Outcome:
Canadian businesses and communities are competitive


Program Activity: Small Business Research, Advocacy and Services

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Small Business Financing Program

Start Date: 1961

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The Canada Small Business Financing Program (CSBFP) helps Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) access financing that would not otherwise be available or would be available only under less favourable terms. It is a loan loss-sharing program involving partnerships with financial institutions. To be eligible, SMEs must be for-profit businesses with revenues under $5 million per year. Under the program, financial institutions can make term loans on real property, leasehold improvements and equipment. In the event that a registered loan defaults, the government pays 85 percent of net eligible losses. CSBFP is a national program that operates in all provinces and territories.

Expected Results:

  • Facilitate access to approximately $1 billion in debt financing.
  • Increase awareness of CSBFP among lenders, SMEs and intermediaries.
  • Continue communicating with financial institutions to improve program delivery.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Other Payments (Statutory Payments)

CSBFP
108.6

CSBFP
110.0

CSBFP
110.1

CSBFP
107.5

SBLA
0.1

SBLA
0.1

SBLA

SBLA

Total Transfer Payments 108.7 110.1 110.1 107.5

Program Activity: Small Business Research, Advocacy and Services

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canadian Youth Business Foundation

Start Date: April 1, 2002

End Date: March 31, 2011

Description: The Canadian Youth Business Foundation is designed to support and develop youth entrepreneurship. The youth business program provides assistance to entrepreneurs between the ages of 18 and 34 through loans, mentorship support and its interactive website.

Expected Result:

  • Increase in the number of young entrepreneurs assisted.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Contributions 10.0
Total Transfer Payments 10.0

Program Activity: Industrial Competitiveness and Capacity

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Structured Financing Facility

Start Date: September 13, 2001

End Date: March 31, 2013

Description: This program provides financing support to qualifying domestic and foreign shipowners to build or refit vessels in Canada, stimulating economic activities in the Canadian shipbuilding and industrial marine industry and helping position the industry to meet government procurement requirements.

Expected Result:

  • Investments in support of the Canadian shipbuilding industry help develop necessary critical infrastructure to position the industry for future procurement opportunities.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Contributions 9.3 3.0 12.0 7.0
Total Transfer Payments 9.3 3.0 12.0 7.0

Program Activity: Community Economic Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Northern Ontario Development Program

Start Date: April 1, 1996

End Date: June 30, 2011

Description: The Northern Ontario Development Program (NODP) is administered by FedNor. Its mission is to promote growth, economic diversification, job creation, and sustainable, self-reliant communities in northern Ontario through a range of initiatives aimed at improving business access to capital, information and markets. This is achieved by providing financial support, through transfer payments, to small and medium-sized enterprises and not-for-profit organizations, including municipalities, municipal organizations, community development organizations and research institutions, in six priority areas: community economic development, information and communication technology, innovation, trade and tourism, human capital, and business financing support.

Expected Result:

  • Northern Ontario businesses and organizations create jobs and attract investors.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Contributionsfootnote6 6 * 36.8 36.5 36.3footnote6_1 6_1 ** 36.3
Total Transfer Payments 36.8 36.5 36.3 36.3

*Budgets beyond 2011–12 are conditional upon program renewal. NODP is an ongoing program; its terms and conditions must be renewed on or before June 30, 2011. (return to the text reference 6)

**Planned spending in 2012–13 is reduced because support for the Molecular Medicine Research Centre project, for which FedNor received additional funding, will be ending. (return to the text reference 6_1)

Program Activity: Community Economic Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Community Futures Program

Start Date: 1986

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The Community Futures (CF) Program is a national program administered by FedNor in rural northern Ontario and delivered through the regional development agencies in the rest of Canada. The program provides financial support to small and medium-sized enterprises through 24 Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDC) located throughout rural northern Ontario. The ultimate objectives of the program are to foster economic stability, growth and job creation; help create diversified and competitive local rural economies; and help build sustainable communities. CFDCs are incorporated, not-for-profit, community-based development organizations, each governed by a local volunteer board of directors. They offer a variety of products and services to support small business growth and community economic development, including access to capital, strategic community planning and socio-economic development; support for community-based projects and special initiatives; and business information, planning and support services. FedNor provides financial contributions to support the ongoing operations of individual CFDCs through either one- or three-year agreements.

Expected Result:

  • Targeted rural northern Ontario businesses create jobs and attract investors.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Contributions 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4
Total Transfer Payments 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4

Program Activity: Community Economic Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Community Adjustment Fund for Northern Ontario

Start Date: June 19, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2013

Description: The Community Adjustment Fund (CAF) is an economic stimulus initiative to create employment opportunities and support adjustment measures in communities affected by the economic downturn. Budget 2009 identified $1 billion nationally over two years for this fund, of which $348.9 million will support adjustment measures in Ontario communities. In 2009–10, $11.7 million in funding was delivered in northern Ontario.

Expected Result:

  • Support adjustment measures in communities.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Contributions 15.5
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments (Statutory Payments) 5.0
Total Transfer Payments 20.5

Program Activity: Community Economic Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Computers for Schools

Start Date: 1993

End Date: March 31, 2013

Description: Through the Computers for Schools (CFS) program, surplus computers donated by federal, provincial and territorial government departments, private companies, and private donors are refurbished through contribution agreements with licensed delivery agents. Once refurbished, they are distributed to schools and not-for-profit learning organizations across Canada. Through a national partnership-based network, the program continues to meet the ongoing demand for computers in Canadian schools and libraries, ensuring that more young Canadians have access to and can benefit from the knowledge-based economy. This program also supports work experience internships for youth who have demonstrated skills at the post-secondary level, providing them with opportunities to work on innovative information and communication technology (ICT) projects in the context of computer refurbishment workshop activities. These projects enable participants to develop practical work experience in such areas as computer repair, refurbishment and software testing; to cultivate skills such as teamwork, time management and administration; and to perform other activities related to managing a computer refurbishment workshop.

Expected Results:

  • Computers are distributed to schools, libraries, not-for-profit learning organizations and Aboriginal communities.
  • Youth interns gain work experience by assisting in computer refurbishment operations.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Contributionsfootnote7 7 * 3.4 3.4 3.4
Total Contributions Under the Youth Employment Strategy** 4.1 3.2 3.2
Total Transfer Payments 7.5 6.6 6.6

*The program has approved funding in the amount of $3.4 million annually until the end of 2012–13; however, an additional $0.6 million may be available to the program through the Department's reference levels. A request for these additional funds must be made on a yearly basis. (return to the text reference 7)

**CFS Youth is part of a horizontal initiative led by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. (return to the text reference 7_1)

Program Activity: Community Economic Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Community Access Program

Start Date: October 1994

End Date: March 31, 2011

Description: The Community Access Program (CAP) provides the public with access to the Internet, to related information and communication technologies (ICT) and applications, and to skills training. CAP delivers public and private sector services and information to Canadians in need of this critical support. CAP sites across Canada contribute to the economic and social development of Canadian communities and enable their residents to gain experience in the use of ICT. CAP sites are public locations providing affordable public access to the Internet and related ICT. While CAP meets the access needs of all Canadians, a sizable portion of users live and work in rural and remote communities.

CAP also provides work experience for up to 1,300 youth annually through placements at CAP sites throughout the country. Youth with demonstrated skills are offered opportunities to work on innovative ICT projects and to provide CAP site users with basic training in using the Internet, accessing online government services, developing websites and using other web-related services. This enables youth interns to develop practical work experience in skills training and promotion and to gain useful experience in teamwork, time management and administration. CAP is subject to program review and funding approval on an annual basis.

Expected Results:

  • The Canadian public has access to the Internet.
  • Youth interns gain work experience by assisting CAP site users in gaining ICT skills.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Contributionsfootnote8 8 * 9.1
Total Contributions Under the Youth Employment Strategyfootnote8_1 8_1 ** 18.6 13.7 13.7 13.7
Total Transfer Payments 27.7 13.7 13.7 13.7

*CAP is scheduled to end on March 31, 2011. The government is presently reviewing the program and a decision about its future is forthcoming. (return to the text reference 8)

**CAP Youth is part of a horizontal initiative led by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. (return to the text reference 8_1)

Program Activity: Community Economic Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Broadband Canada: Connecting Rural Canadians

Start Date: April 1, 2009

End Date: March 31, 2012

Description: As part of Canada's Economic Action Plan, $225 million was provided to Industry Canada over three years to develop and implement a strategy to extend broadband coverage to as many unserved and underserved households as possible, beginning in 2009–10.

Broadband Internet access is viewed as essential infrastructure for shaping tomorrow's economy, as it enables citizens, businesses and institutions to access information, services and opportunities that could otherwise be out of reach.

Expected Results:

  • Expand broadband coverage to as many unserved and underserved households in Canada as possible, beginning in 2009–10.
  • Increase the number of Canadian households with access to affordable broadband services (a minimum of 1.5 MBps) and provide essential infrastructure to Canadians in remote and rural areas, allowing them to participate in the Internet economy by accessing information, services and opportunities that could otherwise be out of reach.
  • Strengthen the knowledge-based economy and foster an environment that is conducive to innovation, which will benefit Canadian business and the economy as a whole.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Contributions 91.4 65.4 8.9 8.9
Total Transfer Payments 91.4 65.4 8.9 8.9

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Up-Front Multi-Year Funding

*These programs are one-time funding agreements with payments allocated according to the negotiated terms and conditions.

Strategic Outcome:
Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy

Program Activity: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Name of Recipient: Council of Canadian Academies

Start Date: July 2005

End Date: March 2015

Description: The Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) is an arm's-length, not-for-profit organization that was established to assess the state of scientific knowledge underpinning key public policy issues. Its founding members are the Royal Society of Canada, the Canadian Academy of Engineering and the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences. The Government of Canada provided CCA with a $30-million one-time conditional grant in July 2005 from Budget 2005, which entitles the government to up to five assessments per year. All CCA assessments are undertaken by independent panels of qualified experts from Canada and abroad. Each assessment takes 18 months to two years to complete.

($ millions)
Total Funding Prior Years' Funding Planned Funding
2011–12
Planned Funding
2012–13
Planned Funding
2013–14
30.0 30.0

Summary of Annual Plans of Recipient: CCA published two assessment reports in 2010–11: Understanding Research Integrity in the Canadian Context (October 2010) and The State and Trends of Biodiversity Science in Canada (November 2010). CCA is aiming to complete two assessments in 2011–12: Approaches to Animal Health Risk Assessment and The Integrated Testing of Pesticides. Work on 2 additional assessments, The Status of Women University Researchers in Canada and Science Performance and Research Funding, is ongoing.

These assessments will report on the relevant science, identifying both what is strongly supported by the existing evidence and where there are gaps in our knowledge. Such findings will be relevant for policy decisions because these are matters where scientific factors play a significant role.

Recipient's website: www.scienceadvice.ca

Program Activity: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Name of Recipient: Brain Research Centre

Start Date: February 28, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Brain Research Centre is a research facility that operates as a hub-and-spoke facility, with teams of neuroscientists (over 190 investigators) located at the University of British Columbia campus and other locations in Vancouver and beyond. The Centre's structure and multidisciplinary approach is designed to bridge the gap between basic science and its clinical applications, while contributing to significant discoveries and the development of effective new therapies.

The Centre's expected results are as follows:

  • providing infrastructure to enable and advance innovation research and commercialization in neurodegenerative diseases, multiple sclerosis, mental health and addictions, stroke, neurotrauma and vision;
  • developing and expanding laboratories;
  • developing an environment that fosters collaboration, knowledge translation and commercialization opportunities;
  • facilitating the development of neurotechnology enterprises and industrial partnerships; and
  • enabling translational training in clinical neuroscience.
($ millions)
Total Funding Prior Years' Funding Planned Funding
2011–12
Planned Funding
2012–13
Planned Funding
2013–14
15.0 15.0

Summary of Annual Plans of Recipient: The Centre's activities in 2011–12 relate to the construction of its facility, which is scheduled to be completed in early 2012. The facility will encourage collaboration among basic and applied researchers and health practitioners to improve knowledge of brain diseases and, in turn, accelerate the introduction of new therapies and biotech ventures.

Recipient's website: www.brain.ubc.ca

Program Activity: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Name of Recipient: Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI)

Start Date: April 25, 1998

End Date: December 31, 2017

Description: The Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) is an independent corporation created by the Government of Canada to fund research infrastructure. The CFI's mandate is to strengthen the capacity of Canadian universities, colleges, research hospitals and non-profit research institutions to carry out world-class research and technology development that benefits Canadians. The CFI's key objectives are as follows:

  • promote world-class excellence
  • focus on priorities
  • foster partnerships
  • enhance accountability
($ millions)
Total Funding Prior Years' Funding Planned Funding
2011–12
Planned Funding
2012–13
Planned Funding
2013–14
4,990.0* 4,086.0 177.0 249.0 167.0

*Cumulative total since 1998

Summary of Annual Plans of Recipient:

The overall objective of CFI programming is:

  • to increase Canada's capability to carry out world-class scientific research and technology development;
  • to expand research and job opportunities for young Canadians;
  • to promote productive networks between and collaboration among Canadian post-secondary educational institutions, research hospitals and the private sector; and
  • to support economic growth and job creation and encourage innovation that benefits the environment and the health of Canadians.

The federal government has supported the CFI since its inception through a number of funding agreements starting in 1998. In 2010–11, a new funding agreement was put in place that provided an additional $600 million in federal investments to the CFI. The CFI funds research infrastructure projects that strengthen the capacity of researchers in Canada to carry out world-class research and technology development, thereby competing with the best from around the world and positioning Canada in the global, knowledge-based economy. Specifically, the $600 million will be disbursed over five years and will support research infrastructure projects in colleges and polytechnics, enabling them to further support private sector innovation, and other research infrastructure in higher educational institutions to help them attract and retain top talent. It will also fund operational costs of some major science facilities that provide researchers with access to the latest equipment, technology and facilities in support of their cutting-edge research.

Recipient's website: www.innovation.ca

 

Program Activity: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Name of Recipient: Canada School of Energy and Environment

Start Date: March 7, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2014

Description: The Canada School of Energy and Environment (CSEE) is a virtual centre that builds on capacity within the University of Calgary, the University of Alberta and the University of Lethbridge. The goal of the CSEE is to draw on the best academics to become the global leader in integrated research and policy on energy and environmental issues.

The CSEE's five objectives are as follows:

  • create opportunities for national and international collaborations on policy issues;
  • provide advice to industry, academia and government;
  • coordinate research and academic programming;
  • facilitate technology transfer and commercialization; and
  • facilitate the exchange of research findings and information and promote collaboration among the international community.
($ millions)
Total Funding Prior Years' Funding Planned Funding
2011–12
Planned Funding
2012–13
Planned Funding
2013–14
15.0 15.0

Summary of Annual Plans of Recipient of Recipient: The CSEE's activities in 2011–12 will continue to support its five key objectives. Plans for the year include hosting a number of conferences and round tables on climate change, carbon management and northern issues related to energy extraction; continuing its support of government-led policy processes such as the Clean Energy Dialogue; facilitating technology transfer through its Proof of Principle competitions, which are offered twice a year; coordinating research and academic programming at the University of Alberta, University of Calgary and University of Lethbridge; and continuing development of an interactive website to facilitate the exchange of research findings and promote collaboration.

Recipient's website: www.canadaschoolofenergy.com

Program Activity: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Name of Recipient: Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery

Start Date: March 7, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery (HSFCSR), affiliated with the University of Toronto and the University of Ottawa, is developing a program of integrated, translational research involving molecular biology, laboratory models and clinical studies that help pave the way for designing and testing post-stroke interventions and therapies more quickly. The Centre's primary objective is to establish a globally competitive program of excellence in brain recovery research that will have a realistic likelihood of leading to effective functional improvements after a stroke.

($ millions)
Total Funding Prior Years' Funding Planned Funding
2011–12
Planned Funding
2012–13
Planned Funding
2013–14
15.0 15.0

Summary of Annual Plans of Recipient: HSFCSR will continue to implement its program of excellence in brain recovery research. This will involve the following:

  • generating research capacity through the recruitment of world-class personnel and providing them with the necessary tools to advance their research endeavours;
  • fostering collaboration among researchers by providing the scientific leadership and creativity to focus on potential synergies and funding projects that stimulate collaboration; and
  • providing the necessary infrastructure to advance research, such as a patient database that is able to gather and pool patient information, including information on different types of patients, from multiple sources.

Recipient's website: http://www.canadianstroke.ca/

Program Activity: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Name of Recipient: Trudeau Foundation

Start Date: March 31, 2002

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The Trudeau Foundation supports research and disseminates research findings in the following humanities and human sciences: Canadian studies, history, international relations, journalism, law, peace and conflict studies, philosophy, political economy, political science, sociology, and urban and community studies.

Using a peer review process, the Trudeau Foundation offers three types of awards: scholarships awarded to doctoral candidates, fellowships awarded to established researchers at Canadian universities and mentorships awarded to seasoned professionals who are able to counsel the scholars. The Foundation also administers the Public Interaction Program, which communicates the work of the Foundation through conferences, lectures and symposia.

($ millions)
Total Funding Prior Years' Funding Planned Funding
2011–12
Planned Funding
2012–13
Planned Funding
2013–14
125.0 125.0footnote9 9 * — * — * — *

*The Trudeau Foundation was given a $125-million endowment from the federal government in 2002. The Foundation uses the interest on the endowment to support its activities. (return to the text reference 9)

Summary of Annual Plans of Recipient: In 2011–12, the Trudeau Foundation intends to award 15 scholarships, 4 fellowships and up to 12 mentorships. In addition, under its Public Interaction Program, the Foundation will host up to eight events designed to facilitate knowledge dissemination, such as the Annual Trudeau Conference on Public Policy, the Trudeau Lectures, the Mentors-Scholars Retreat and the Summer Institute.

Recipient's website: www.trudeaufoundation.ca/en

Program Activity: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Name of Recipient: Genome Canada

Start Date: March 27, 2000

End Date: March 31, 2015

Description: Genome Canada is an independent corporation that supports six regional genome centres across Canada. Genome Canada, the primary funding and information resource for genomics and proteomics in Canada, has enabled important research to be undertaken in key areas such as agriculture, the environment, fisheries, forestry, health and new technology development as well as in ethical, environmental, economic, legal and social issues related to genomics (GE3LS).

($ millions)
Total Funding Prior Years' Funding Planned Funding
2011–12
Planned Funding
2012–13
Planned Funding
2013–14
915.0* 766.0 64.9 64.1 20.0

*Cumulative total since 2000

Summary of Annual Plans: In 201112, Genome Canada will continue to work towards its overall objectives:

  • Develop and establish a coordinated strategy for genomics research, enabling Canada to become a world leader in areas such as health, agriculture, the environment, forestry and fisheries.
  • Provide leading-edge technology to researchers in all genomics-related fields through the six regional genome centres across Canada.
  • Support large-scale projects of strategic importance to Canada by bringing together industry, government, universities, research hospitals and the public.
  • Assume leadership in ethical, environmental, economic, legal, social and other issues related to genomics research (GE3LS).
  • Communicate the relative risks, rewards and successes of genomics to the Canadian public.
  • Encourage investment in the field of genomics research.

The $75 million in new federal investment provided to Genome Canada in Budget 2010 will support a new large-scale genomics research competition (including a portion of funding targeted to research in forestry and the environment), as well as a competition for operations support for the S&T Innovation Centres.

Recipient's website: www.genomecanada.ca/


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Greening Government Operations

Green Building Targets

8.1 As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, new construction and build-to-lease and major renovation projects will achieve an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance.1
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Number of completed new construction, build-to-lease and major renovation projects in the given fiscal year, as per departmental strategic framework N/A
Number of completed new construction, build-to-lease and major renovation projects that have achieved an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance in the given fiscal year, as per departmental strategic framework N/A
Existence of strategic framework Expected completion March 2012

Strategies/Comments

  1. In 2011–12, Industry Canada will work to develop and adopt a strategic framework for this target. The strategic framework will address the minimum level of environmental performance, appropriate thresholds (dollar value or floor area) and applicable building types.
  2. Industry Canada is custodian of only one building with a floor area greater than 1,000 m2.


8.2 As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, existing Crown buildings over 1000 m2 will be assessed for environmental performance using an industry-recognized assessment tool.2
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Number of buildings over 1000 m2, as per departmental strategic framework N/A
Percentage of buildings over 1000 m2 that have been assessed using an industry-recognized assessment tool, as per departmental strategic framework N/A
Existence of strategic framework Expected completion March 2012

Strategies/Comments

  1. In 2011–12, Industry Canada will work to develop and adopt a strategic framework for this target. The strategic framework will address the minimum level of environmental performance, appropriate thresholds (dollar value or floor area) and applicable building types.
  2. Industry Canada is custodian of only one building with a floor area greater than 1,000 m2.


8.3 As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, new lease or lease renewal projects over 1000 m2, where the Crown is the major lessee, will be assessed for environmental performance using an industry-recognized assessment tool.3
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Number of completed lease and lease renewal projects over 1000 m2 in the given fiscal year, as per departmental strategic framework N/A
Number of completed lease and lease renewal projects over 1000 m2 that were assessed using an industry-recognized assessment tool in the given fiscal year, as per departmental strategic framework N/A
Existence of strategic framework Expected completion March 2012

Strategies/Comments

  1. In 2011–12, Industry Canada will work to develop and adopt a strategic framework for this target. The strategic framework will address the minimum level of environmental performance, appropriate thresholds (dollar value or floor area) and applicable building types.


8.4 As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, fit-up and refit projects will achieve an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance.4
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Number of completed fit-up and refit projects in the given fiscal year, as per departmental strategic framework N/A
Number of completed fit-up and refit projects that have achieved an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance in the given fiscal year, as per departmental strategic framework N/A
Existence of strategic framework Expected completion March 2012

Strategies/Comments

  1. In 2011–12, Industry Canada will work to develop and adopt a strategic framework for this target. The strategic framework will address the minimum level of environmental performance, appropriate thresholds (dollar value or floor area) and applicable building types.
  2. Industry Canada is custodian of only one building with a floor area greater than 1,000 m2.

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Target


8.5 The federal government will take action now to reduce levels of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from its operations to match the national target of 17% below 2005 by 2020.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Departmental GHG reduction target: Percentage of absolute reduction in GHG emissions by 2020–21, relative to 2005–06 17%
Departmental GHG emissions in 2005–06, in kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent 1.911
Departmental GHG emissions in the given fiscal year, in kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent 2011–12 1.781
2012–13 1.759
2013–14 1.737
2014–15 1.716
2015–16 1.694
2016–17 1.672
2017–18 1.651
2018–19 1.629
2019–20 1.607
2020–21 1.586
Percent change in departmental GHG emissions from 2005–06 to the end of the given fiscal year 2011–12 - 6.80%
2012–13 - 7.93%
2013–14 - 9.07%
2014–15 - 10.20%
2015–16 - 11.33%
2016–17 - 12.47%
2017–18 - 13.60%
2018–19 - 14.73%
2019–20 - 15.87%
2020–21 - 17.00%

Strategies/Comments

  1. Source of targeted GHG emissions: Fleet only (on-road vehicles)
  2. To match the government-wide GHG reduction target of 17% by 2020, the Department's GHG fleet emissions targets were calculated using a linear model.
  3. The implementation plan for Industry Canada's GHG emissions reduction strategy takes technology advancements into account and will capitalize on the use of Public Works and Government Services Canada's green standing offers for vehicle purchases and internal communiqués for imparting information about the various tools to improve fleet efficiency and reduce emissions (e.g. anti-idling campaign).

Surplus Electronic and Electrical Equipment Target

8.6 By March 31, 2014, each department will reuse or recycle all surplus electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) in an environmentally sound and secure manner.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Existence of implementation plan for the disposal of all departmentally generated EEE Completion April 2011
Total number of departmental locations with fully implemented EEE disposal plan, expressed as a percentage of all locations, by the end of the given fiscal year 2011–12 33%
2012–13 66%
2013–14 100%

Strategies/Comments

  1. Definition of location: Six regions in total
  2. Industry Canada's implementation plan will cater to all regions. In the National Capital Region, the reuse/recycle strategy for surplus EEE is already in the process of being fully implemented.
  3. The implementation plan for the regions is based on the approach proposed by the Office of Greening Government Operations, Public Works and Government Services Canada, for target 8.6 in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Guideline and meets the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy's mandatory implementation strategy requirements for this target.

Printing Unit Reduction Target

8.7 By March 31, 2013, each department will achieve an average 8:1 ratio of office employees to printing units, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units in 2010–11, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow 2:1
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units at the end of the given fiscal year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow 2011–12 5:1
2012–13 8:1
2013–14 8:1

Strategies/Comments

  1. Definition of printing unit: Scanner, photocopier, fax, desktop printer, networked printer, multifunctional device
  2. Scope: While some buildings may have a smaller ratio due to building occupancy or security considerations, on the whole, the Department will meet the target ratio.
  3. Method for determining the number of printing units: In the National Capital Region, project consultants collected data by way of a floor-by-floor count of devices. Data from the regions were provided by the respective regional offices.
  4. Method for determining the number of office employees: Number of employees obtained from Chief Information Office (CIO) Monthly Employee Report
  5. Implementation strategies:
    1. Approach is two-pronged: soft target of 5:1 in 2011–12 and 8:1 in 2012–13. Most sectors have agreed to go to 8:1 in the first year.
    2. All devices will be networked.
    3. Use a single supplier / price-per-page model.
    4. CIO is target lead.

Paper Consumption Target

8.8 By March 31, 2014, each department will reduce internal paper consumption per office employee by 20%. Each department will establish a baseline between 2005–06 and 2011–12 as well as an applicable scope.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Number of sheets of internal office paper purchased or consumed per office employee in the baseline year selected, as per departmental scope N/A
Cumulative reduction (or increase) in paper consumption, expressed as a percentage, relative to baseline year selected 2011–12 N/A
2012–13 N/A
2013–14 N/A

Strategies/Comments

  1. This target is optional for 201112. Industry Canada will develop this target for 201213.

Green Meetings Target

8.9 By March 31, 2012, each department will adopt a guide for greening meetings.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Green meeting guide adopted Expected adoption March 2012

Strategies/Comments

  1. This target is optional for 201112. Industry Canada will develop this target for 201213.

Green Procurement Targets

8.10 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish at least 3 SMART green procurement targets to reduce environmental impacts.

Commodity: Printers and multifunctional devices

Target: By March 2014, 95% of printers and multifunctional devices purchased by the Department will be environmentally preferred products.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Number of environmentally preferred printers and multifunctional devices purchased, relative to the total number of printers and multifunctional devices purchased by the Department N/A
Progress against 2011–12 measurement 80%

Strategies/Comments

  1. All equipment will be Energy Star compliant over nine technical categories.
  2. Collaboration of multiple stakeholders is ongoing.
  3. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Achievement level of 95%.
    • Measurable: Information available from the departmental Integrated Financial Management System (IFMS).
    • Achievable: Project endorsed by senior management.
    • Relevant: Estimated dollar value of environmentally preferred equipment purchased is $14.5 million over five years.
    • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation and completion.


Commodity: Furniture

Target: By March 2014, 90% of furniture purchases made by the Department will be environmentally preferred products.

Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Dollar value of environmentally preferred furniture purchases, relative to the total value of all furniture purchases (baseline year: 2009–10) 75%
Progress against 2011–12 measurement 80%

Strategies/Comments

  1. Data analysis will permit monitoring and reporting of furniture purchases.
  2. This target will require collaboration among functional specialists, namely, the Facilities Branch at headquarters and the departmental regions.
  3. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Achievement level of 90%.
    • Measurable: Information available from the departmental Integrated Financial Management System (IFMS).
    • Achievable: With collaboration of functional specialists.
    • Relevant: Furniture purchases are a significant expenditure and represent an area for increased environmental benefit.
    • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation and completion.


Commodity: Vehicles

Target: By March 31, 2014, 30% of Industry Canada's executive and light-duty class vehicles will be environmental leadership vehicles.

Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Number of environmental leadership vehicles owned by Industry Canada, relative to its total number of vehicles owned (executive and light-duty class only) N/A
Progress against 2011–12 measurement 22%

Strategies/Comments

  1. Environmental leadership vehicles include hybrid vehicles and alternative fuel vehicles.
  2. Industry Canada does not have the necessary data to currently set a baseline for this target. The Department will be working toward clearing its existing data and will start recording and reporting on the environmental leadership vehicles it owns by the end of 2011–12.
  3. Industry Canada's Vehicle Acquisition Plan will be reviewed centrally every year. Internal communiqués will be sent to the regions to reinforce the importance of identifying opportunities to replace the existing fleet with environmental leadership vehicles.
  4. Data on vehicle purchases will be collected and reviewed on a continuous basis to monitor the Department's progress against the set target. The departmental Integrated Financial Management System (IFMS) and the Fleet Management Information System provided by the federal fleet management support services, ARI Financial Services Inc., will be the tools used to collect the information.
  5. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Achievement level of 30%.
    • Measurable: Information available from the departmental Integrated Financial Management System (IFMS) and the ARI system.
    • Achievable: With collaboration of functional specialists.
    • Relevant: Vehicle purchases are a significant expenditure and represent an area for increased environmental benefit.
    • Time-bound: Date established for target.


8.11 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish SMART targets for training, employee performance evaluations, and management processes and controls, as they pertain to procurement decision making.

Training

Target: By March 31, 2014, 90% of designated Materiel managers and Procurement personnel will have taken green procurement training.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Number of Materiel managers and Procurement personnel who have completed green procurement training, relative to the total number of Materiel managers and Procurement personnel (baseline year: 2010–11) 60%
Progress against 2011–12 measurement 85%

Strategies/Comments

  1. Employees include Procurement and Materiel Management functional specialists (PG-01 to 04) from the Contracting and Materiel Management section of the Comptrollership and Administration Sector (CAS).
  2. CAS's 2010–11 Human Resources Plan describes the Sector's human resources (HR) priorities for 2011–12, including the HR objectives, staffing strategies, training and development plans, goals and future requirements that will allow the Sector to effectively meet and exceed its mandate over the long term. Green procurement training in 2011–12 will be included in the training plans for target positions.
  3. Training progress will be monitored by the Contracting and Materiel Management section's Senior Training and Communications Advisor.
  4. Proof that training was completed is mandatory and will be validated by the Senior Training and Communications Advisor.
  5. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Achievement level for 2011–12 has been set at 85%. This target is specific to Materiel managers and Procurement personnel.
    • Measurable: Information available from the departmental training coordinators.
    • Achievable: Green procurement training is free and available online.
    • Relevant: Industry Canada's Materiel managers and Procurement personnel routinely procure goods and services for which environmental alternatives are available.
    • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation and completion.


Performance Evaluations

Target: By March 31, 2012, 75% of team leaders (PG-05) in the Contracting and Materiel Management section as well as the manager (PG-06) of this section will have environmental consideration clauses incorporated into their performance evaluations.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Number of performance evaluations of identified positions that have environmental consideration clauses, relative to the total number of positions identified N/A
Progress against 2011–12 measurement 75%

Strategies/Comments

  1. The Comptrollership and Administration Sector's 2010–11 Human Resources Plan describes its human resources (HR) priorities for 2011–12, including the HR objectives, staffing strategies, training and development plans, goals and future requirements that will allow the Sector to effectively meet and exceed its mandate over the long term. Environmental consideration clauses for 2011–12 will be included in the performance evaluations of targeted positions.
  2. Progress will be monitored through performance agreements and by means of mid-year review.
  3. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Achievement level of 75%.
    • Measurable: Information available from performance agreements.
    • Achievable: Green procurement training is free and available online and will be included in the performance agreement.
    • Relevant: Industry Canada's Contracting and Materiel Management Managers and Team Leaders routinely review and provide advice on procurement processes of goods and services, where environmental alternatives are available.
    • Time-bound: Date established for target completion.


Processes and Controls

Target: By March 31, 2016, environmental performance considerations will be integrated into 90% of procurement processes and controls.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Number of designated processes and controls that have been modified to ensure that environmental performance considerations are integrated into procurement processes, relative to the total number of processes and controls 30%
Progress against 2011–12 measurement 60%

Strategies/Comments

  1. Revisions to integrate environmental factors into procurement processes and controls will take strategic planning into account and will incorporate best practices to improve these processes and controls and to support green decision making.
  2. Taking a phased approach, Industry Canada will start with updating policy documents.
  3. Secondly, the Department will focus on the processes and controls that have the greatest environmental impact and will develop best practices documents in support of green decision making.
  4. The Department will also establish a monitoring control framework that includes environmental indicators.
  5. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Achievement level of 90%.
    • Measurable: Policies, processes, procedures and controls reside with the Comptrollership and Administration Sector (CAS).
    • Achievable: CAS is the functional authority for Contracting and Materiel Management. The policy development group resides within CAS.
    • Relevant: The number of policies, processes and controls are significant, so their revision will achieve environmental benefits.
    • Time-bound: Date has been established for target completion, and the target strategies/comments include milestones.


Notes:

1 This would be demonstrated by achieving LEEDNC Silver, Green Globes Design 3 Globes, or equivalent.

2 Assessment tools include BOMA BESt, Green Globes or equivalent.

3 Assessment tools include BOMA BESt, an appropriately tailored BOMA International Green Lease Standard, or equivalent.

4 This would be demonstrated by achieving LEEDCI Silver, Green Globes Fit-Up 3 Globes, or equivalent.


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Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations in the Next Three Fiscal Years

Internal Audits

Proposedfootnote10 10 * Internal Audit Projects in 2011–12

Name of Internal Audit Internal Audit Type
Horizontal Departure Process Audit
Regions (Ontario and British Columbia) Audit
Canadian Intellectual Property Office – Financial Management Control Framework Audit
Canadian Intellectual Property Office – Enterprise Business Renewal

Audit / IT Audit

Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy – National Framework

Audit

*These projects will be confirmed as part of the annual audit planning process scheduled to take place in Q4 of 2010–11. (return to the text reference 10)

Proposedfootnote11 11 * Internal Audit Projects in 2012–13

Name of Internal Audit Internal Audit Type
Long-Term Capital Planning Audit
Management of Real Property Audit
Program Policy and Management – Collection of Repayments Audit
Pay and Benefits Audit
Human Resources Management System – PeopleSoft Audit
Information Management Audit
Electronic Filing – Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy Audit / IT Audit
Bombardier CSeries Audit
Corporations Canada Audit
Computer for Schools Audit
IT Project Management – Spectrum Application Modernization Audit / IT Audit
Canada Small Business Financing Program Preliminary Survey

*These projects will be confirmed as part of the annual audit planning process scheduled to take place in Q4 of 2011–12.(return to the text reference 11)

Proposedfootnote12 12 * Internal Audit Projects in 2013–14

Name of Internal Audit Internal Audit Type
Management of Expenditures Audit
Contribution Management Information System Audit / IT Audit
Risk Management Audit
Business Continuity Management Audit
Resource Management Audit
Delegation of Authorities Audit
Measurement Canada Preliminary Survey
Spectrum Management Audit
Communications Research Centre Audit
Canada Business Network Audit

*These projects will be confirmed as part of the annual audit planning process scheduled to take place in Q4 of 2012–13. (return to the text reference 12)

Evaluations

Proposedfootnote13 13 * Projects in 2011–12

Name of Evaluation Program Type
Marquee Tourism Events Program Contribution program
Economic Development Initiative (Official Language Minority Communities) Contribution program
Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative Contribution program
Computers for Schools Contribution program
Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy – Outreach Element Program
Knowledge Infrastructure Program Contribution program
Canadian Intellectual Property Office Program

*These evaluations will be confirmed as part of the annual evaluation planning process scheduled to take place in Q4 of 2010–11.(return to the text reference 13)

Proposedfootnote14 14 * Projects in 2012–13

Name of Evaluation Program Type
Automotive Innovation Fund Contribution program
Corporations Canada Program
Canada Business Network Program
Measurement Canada Program
Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Program
Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy Program

(return to the text reference 14)*These evaluations will be confirmed as part of the annual evaluation planning process scheduled to take place in Q4 of 2011–12.

Proposedfootnote15 15 * Projects in 2013–14

Name of Evaluation Program Type
Industry-Specific Policy and Analysis Program
Industrial and Regional Benefits Contribution program
Small Business Internship Program Contribution program
Small Business Growth and Prosperity Program
Ivy Centre for Health Innovation Contribution program
Competition Law Enforcement Program
Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Program
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Grant Program Grant program

*These evaluations will be confirmed as part of the annual evaluation planning process scheduled to take place in Q4 of 2012–13.(return to the text reference 15)

Note: The Evaluation Directorate also completes a number of other activities, including development of the Results-Based Management Accountability Framework (RMAF) and the Performance Measurement Plan, as well as oversight and follow-up reviews of RMAF implementation, Treasury Board submissions and funding agreements.


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Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue

Respendable Revenue
($ millions)
Program Activity Forecast
Revenue
2010–11
Planned
Revenue
2011–12
Planned
Revenue
2012–13
Planned
Revenue
2013–14
The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive        
Marketplace Frameworks and Regulations        
Bankruptcy and Insolvency Administration 36.2 39.8 40.8 40.8
Corporations Regulation 8.8 8.8 8.8 8.8
Canadian Intellectual Property Office Revolving Fund 146.5 145.0 146.3 148.5
Competition Law Enforcement
Competition Law and Policy 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5
Subtotal 202.1 204.1 206.5 208.7
Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy        
Information and Communication Technologies Research and Innovation
Communications Research 8.7 8.7 8.7 8.7
Subtotal 8.7 8.7 8.7 8.7
Total Respendable Revenue 210.8 212.8 215.1 217.3


Non-Respendable Revenue
($ millions)footnote16 16 *
Program Activity Forecast
Revenue
2010–11
Planned
Revenue
2011–12
Planned
Revenue
2012–13
Planned
Revenue
2013–14
The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive        
Marketplace Frameworks and Regulations        
Bankruptcy and Insolvency Supervision 6.1 6.1 7.9 8.8
Corporations Regulation (including NUANS) 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4
Trade Measurement Regulation 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9
Competition Law Enforcement
Fines 14.0 7.0 7.0 7.0
Consumer Labelling and Advertising Regulation 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
Spectrum, Telecommunications and the Online Economy
Radio/Spectrum licences – New and Amended 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.0
Radio licences – Renewals 87.4 87.4 87.4 87.4
Spectrum licences – Renewals 135.6 135.6 135.6 135.6
Radio and terminal equipment approval 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6
Subtotal 254.8 247.9 249.8 250.8
Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian Economy        
Information and Communication Technologies Research and Innovation        
Communications Research 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5
Research and Development Financing        
Receipts from Repayable Contributions 112.4 119.7 149.5 152.2
Subtotal 113.9 121.2 151.0 153.7
Canadian businesses and communities are competitive        
Small Business Research, Advocacy and Services        
Small Business Loans Act / Canada Small Business Financing Act Fees 49.3 50.9 52.5 53.5
Return on Investment 9.0 17.0 32.0 41.0
Industrial Competitiveness and Capacity
Receipts from Repayable Contributions 46.4 50.3 33.8 31.4
Loan Guarantees 2.4 2.2 2.0 1.8
Subtotal 107.0 120.4 120.3 127.7
Total Non-Respendable Revenue 475.7 489.5 521.1 532.1
Total Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenuefootnote16_1 16_1 ** 686.5 702.3 736.3 749.5

*Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 16)

**Excludes ''Deferred Spectrum Auction Revenues" received in previous years. (return to the text reference 16_1)


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Summary of Capital Spending by Program Activity

($ millions)footnote17 17 *
Program Activity Forecast
Spending
2010–11
Planned
Spending
2011–12
Planned
Spending
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2013–14
The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive        
Marketplace Frameworks and Regulations 2.3 1.8 1.0 0.8
Spectrum, Telecommunications and the Online Economy 2.5 0.6 0.6 0.6
Consumer Affairs
Competition Law Enforcement 2.6 0.8 0.8 0.8
Subtotal 7.4 3.3 2.4 2.2
Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian Economy        
Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity
Information and Communication Technologies Research and Innovation 3.4 0.5 0.5 0.5
Research and Development Financing
Subtotal 3.4 0.5 0.5 0.5
Canadian businesses and communities are competitive        
Small Business Research, Advocacy and Services 0.7
Industrial Competitiveness and Capacity
Community Economic Development 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
Internal Services 5.6 2.6 2.6 1.6
Subtotal 6.5 2.8 2.8 1.8
Total 17.3 6.5 5.7 4.5

*Minor differences are due to rounding. (return to the text reference 17)


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User Fees for 2011–12

User Fee: Written Opinions
Fee Type Other Goods and Services
Fee-Setting Authority Competition Bureau's Fee and Service Standards Policy, through the Department of Industry Act
Reason for Planned Introduction of or Amendment to Fee Fees and service standards related to written opinions were last revised in 2002. Several changes since that time warrant a review of both the fees and the service standards.
Effective Date of Planned Change It is anticipated that the newly revised fee regime will take effect in 2012–13.
Consultation and Review Process Planned The Competition Bureau will meet with stakeholders to consult on proposed revisions to its Fee and Service Standards Policy for written opinions.


User Fee: CA Number
Fee Type Other Goods and Services
Fee-Setting Authority Textile Labelling Act and Department of Industry Act
Reason for Planned Introduction of or Amendment to Fee The Competition Bureau expects to make changes to pricing to reflect increased costs associated with administering this program.
Effective Date of Planned Change It is anticipated that the revised fee regime will take effect in 2012–13.
Consultation and Review Process Planned The Competition Bureau will meet with stakeholders to consult on proposed changes to the process, service standards and CA Number fees.


User Fee: User Fees Under the New Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Actfootnote18 18 *
Fee Type Regulatory
Fee-Setting Authority Canada Not-for-Profit Corporations Act (not yet in force)
Reason for Planned Introduction of or Amendment to Fee Establishing user fees is a preliminary step before an order-in-council can bring into force the new Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Act.
Effective Date of Planned Change The fee is expected to be in place when an order-in-council brings the Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Act into force.
Consultation and Review Process Planned None

*Parliamentary review of the Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Act occurred in 2010–11. (return to the text reference 18)

User Fee: Spectrum Licence Renewal Fees for 24, 28 and 38 GHz Wireless Broadband Communications – New
Fee Type Regulatory
Fee-Setting Authority Department of Industry Act, section 19; Financial Administration Act, section 19.1
Reason for Planned Introduction of or Amendment to Fee The terms of the 24 and 38 GHz spectrum licences obtained through the 1999 auction were coming to an end in 2010. A decision released in March 2006 extended the initial terms of these licences and also announced a licensing process available for 24, 28 and 38 GHz spectrum. Issuing these licences will require that an annual fee be in place. A consultation was undertaken, and the results are being reviewed before proceeding with the required stages under the User Fees Act.
Effective Date of Planned Change The fee is expected to be in place in 2011–12.
Consultation and Review Process Planned The initial public consultation took place in April 2008. It is anticipated that the proposed fee under the User Fees Act may be reviewed by Parliament in 2011–12.


User Fee: Spectrum Licence Fees for Wireless Broadband Services in the Band 3650–3700 MHz – New
Fee Type Regulatory
Fee-Setting Authority Department of Industry Act, section 19; Financial Administration Act, section 19.1
Reason for Planned Introduction of or Amendment to Fee

To make this spectrum available for use, the Department held and subsequently published the public consultation on the licensing rules and applicable fees: Proposed Spectrum Utilization Policy, Technical and Licensing Requirements for Wireless Broadband Services (WBS) in the Band 3650–3700 MHz (DGTP-006-06).

The consultation regarding the use of the band and the fee proposal was launched in 2006 and completed in June 2009; however, the formal User Fees Act process has not yet begun. It is anticipated to be completed in 2011–12.

Effective Date of Planned Change The fee is expected to be in place in 2011–12.
Consultation and Review Process Planned The initial public consultation was launched in 2006. The User Fees Act process is anticipated to be completed in 2011–12.


User Fee: Fixed and Broadcast Satellite Licences
Fee Type Regulatory
Fee-Setting Authority Radiocommunication Act, section 6(1); Department of Industry Act, sections 18, 19 and 20; Financial Administration Act, section 19.1
Reason for Planned Introduction of or Amendment to Fee The Department intends to move away from a radio apparatus licence regime to a spectrum licence regime with applicable fees. Amended fees will aim to recover fair value for the use of the orbital and spectrum resources.
Effective Date of Planned Change In light of the User Fees Act, the original implementation date has been delayed. It is anticipated that the amended fee regime will take effect in 2012–13.
Consultation and Review Process Planned The consultation process has been delayed, as more market analysis was needed. A public consultation should be launched during the first quarter of 2011–12.
Industry Canada Program Titles and Descriptions
Type Order 2011–12 Title 2011–12 Description
SO 1 The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive Not applicable
PA 1.1 Marketplace Frameworks and Regulations Industry Canada is responsible for the oversight and regulation of a number of aspects of the Canadian marketplace, including bankruptcy, foreign direct investment, federal incorporation, intellectual property and trade measurement. To fulfill its mandate, Industry Canada, through this program, delivers sound regulatory regimes and frameworks, which include regulations, policies, procedures and standards, and ensures compliance with these regulatory regimes and frameworks. Overall, the program benefits Canadians by ensuring the integrity of the marketplace.
SA 1.1.1 Measurement Canada Measurement Canada, a special operating agency, ensures the integrity and accuracy of goods and services bought and sold on the basis of measurement in Canada. It protects Canadians against financial loss due to inaccurate measurement and maintains consumer and business confidence in measurement-based financial transactions (trade measurement) by ensuring that devices (e.g., scales, gas pumps, and electricity and natural gas meters) used in Canada meet legislative standards for accuracy and performance. Measurement Canada investigates measurement practices in the Canadian marketplace and compels institutions to take corrective actions when unfair practices are found.
SA 1.1.2 Superintendent of Bankruptcy In the public interest and for the benefit of investors, lenders and consumers, the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy supervises the administration of estates and matters under the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act and the Companies' Creditors Arrangement Act. As an integral source of information on Canadian insolvency matters, the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy provides leadership in protecting the integrity of the bankruptcy and insolvency system by maintaining an efficient and effective insolvency regulatory framework, promoting awareness of the rights and responsibilities of the stakeholders, and ensuring trustee and debtor compliance with the legislative and regulatory framework through the supervision of debtors and of trustees administering estates.
SA 1.1.3 Corporations Canada This program allows Canadians and businesses to incorporate at the federal level in accordance with Canadian laws, such as the Canada Business Corporations Act, the Canada Corporations Act, the Boards of Trade Act and the Canada Cooperative Associations Act, regulations and several corporate laws governing federal companies (with the exception of financial intermediaries). It also issues and registers official documents under the Great Seal of Canada. The program's main lines of business include incorporation and related services (such as amalgamation or corporate charter amendments), the dissolution of corporations, rulings on the use of corporate names, the collection and dissemination of information on federal companies, and compliance and enforcement activities related to the statutes it administers. This program's activities mostly affect Canadian businesses, not-for-profit organizations and other corporate entities.
SA 1.1.4 Investment Review The Investment Canada Act provides for the review of significant investments in Canada by non-Canadians to determine whether they encourage investment, economic growth and employment opportunities in Canada and whether they could be injurious to national security. This program implements the provisions of the Act by ensuring that the Minister of Industry has the information needed to determine whether an investment is likely to be of net benefit to Canada or whether there are reasonable grounds to believe that an investment could be injurious to national security. This is accomplished by processing notifications filed by investors and reviewing transactions to ensure their compliance with the Act.
SA 1.1.5 Intellectual Property This program administers Canada's system of intellectual property (IP) rights, namely patents, trademarks, copyrights, industrial designs and integrated circuit topographies. The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) grants and registers IP rights, legally recognizing certain endeavours of originality and creativity. It also disseminates information related to these rights to businesses, educational institutions and Canadians. CIPO's role is to ensure that IP contributes to an acceleration of Canadian economic development and that the benefits of the IP system accrue to Canadians. This program is entirely financed through a revolving fund and is fully cost recovered from client fees. Its clients include foreign and Canadian applicants for IP protection, users of IP information and the Canadian business community.
SA 1.1.6 Internal Trade Secretariat The Agreement on Internal Trade (AIT) is an intergovernmental trade agreement signed by Canadian first ministers; it came into force in 1995. The purpose of the AIT is to reduce and eliminate, to the extent possible, barriers to the free movement of persons, goods, services and investment within Canada and to establish an open, efficient and stable domestic market. The Internal Trade Secretariat provides administrative and operational support to the Committee on Internal Trade, to its Chair and to other committees or working groups established under the AIT or by the committee. It works closely with government officials to ensure the effective implementation of the AIT. The Secretariat supports the Committee on Internal Trade in preparing the reports, compiling and disseminating information from parties and ensuring appropriate support for the dispute resolution process. As a neutral third party, the Secretariat has facilitated ongoing negotiations to broaden and deepen the scope of the AIT. The work requires close and continuous contact with federal, provincial and territorial governments to facilitate the smooth and effective operation of the committees and working groups. The Secretariat plays an important role in assisting parties to fully implement the AIT, to pursue negotiations mandated by the AIT and to meet their outstanding obligations under the AIT. All parties share the Secretariat's operating costs. The federal government's share of the Secretariat's budget is 50 percent, which is paid by Industry Canada through a grant.
PA 1.2 Spectrum, Telecommunications and the Online Economy This program maximizes the public benefits of radio spectrum by allocating it efficiently and contributes to the orderly evolution of information and communication technologies, telecommunications networks and the online economy. This ensures that Canadians can develop, use and benefit from them domestically and internationally. It achieves this by developing and administering domestic regulations, economic framework policies, procedures and standards that govern Canada's radiocommunication and telecommunications industries and online economy. This program also promotes global telecommunications through the development of international treaties and agreements and helps facilitate international online trade and commerce through participation in international bilateral and multilateral forums.
SA 1.2.1 Spectrum Management and Telecommunications The goal of this program is to ensure the orderly and secure evolution of Canada's radio spectrum and telecommunications infrastructure through the development of a coherent regulatory framework, promotion of competition, establishment of sufficient regulation, enforcement of domestic and international requirements, and negotiation and promotion of international standards and treaties. This provides Canadian industries with the favourable conditions they need to develop, introduce and market leading technologies and services. The radio spectrum is a finite resource and can accommodate only a limited number of simultaneous users. Management of the radio spectrum requires careful planning to maximize its value for public and private services. This is achieved through the development and implementation of operational policies, procedures, processes, technical standards and international treaties. The program also provides for an assessed annual contribution to the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), in which Canada participates as a Member State. Canada participates in ITU meetings to influence the Union's direction and decision making in support of Canadian interests. Another goal of this program, which has the lead role for emergency telecommunications in Canada, is to make telecommunications services accessible to Canadians and to ensure that the public derives maximum benefit from their use.
SA 1.2.2 Electronic Commerce This program strengthens Canadians' confidence in the marketplace by protecting individual privacy and curbing Internet threats. The successful integration of e-business into the Canadian economy is dependent on the level of trust and confidence businesses and consumers have in the digital environment. This program clarifies marketplace rules through the development of legal and policy frameworks in the areas of privacy protection, online security and appropriate Internet content and removes barriers to the use of e-commerce in conjunction with the private sector. To improve market efficiency, the program promotes the conduct of e-business across all sectors of the economy and helps facilitate online trade and commerce internationally through the sharing of best practices and international benchmarking.
PA 1.3 Consumer Affairs This program gives consumers a voice in the development of government policies and enables them to be effective marketplace participants. It is part of the Department's consumer affairs role under the Department of Industry Act, which directs the Minister to promote the interests and protection of consumers. Through research on and analysis of on marketplace issues, the program supports both policy development and the intergovernmental harmonization of consumer protection rules and measures. It contributes to effective consumer protection through collaboration with provincial and territorial consumer protection agencies under Chapter 8 of the Agreement on Internal Trade and with other governments through the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's Consumer Policy Committee. Industry Canada, through this program, identifies important consumer issues and develops and disseminates consumer information and awareness tools. These consumer protection information products and tools are developed either by the program itself or in collaboration with other consumer protection agencies. Finally, the program provides financial support to not-for-profit consumer and voluntary organizations through the Contributions Program for Non-profit Consumer and Voluntary Organizations. The purpose of this support is to encourage the organizations to reach financial self-sufficiency and to assist them in providing meaningful, evidence-based input to public policy in the consumer interest.
PA 1.4 Competition Law Enforcement The objectives of this program include maintaining and encouraging competition, promoting the efficiency and adaptability of the Canadian economy and protecting competitive markets. This program also ensures that all businesses have equitable opportunities to participate in the Canadian economy, which provides consumers with competitive prices and product choices. The Competition Bureau, an independent law enforcement agency, is responsible for the administration and enforcement of the Competition Act, the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act, the Textile Labelling Act and the Precious Metals Marking Act. It seeks to ensure that businesses and individuals comply with the legislation under its jurisdiction through negotiated settlements, consent agreements and, where appropriate, the prosecution of anti-competitive conduct through litigated proceedings. It protects competitive markets by detecting, disrupting and deterring anti-competitive conduct. The Competition Bureau also encourages reliance on market forces. It conducts market studies, provides advice to government legislators and policy-makers, and intervenes and/or makes representations before federal and provincial boards, commissions and tribunals to encourage competition as a means of achieving policy or regulatory objectives.
Industry Canada Program Titles and Descriptions
Type Order 2011–12 Title 2011–12 Description
SO 2 Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy Not applicable
PA 2.1 Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity This program supports the Minister of Industry and the Minister of State (Science and Technology) in their science, technology and innovation responsibilities. It sets the strategic direction for the policies and programs that support and stimulate research, development and innovation in Canada. In collaboration with portfolio partners, other government departments and external stakeholders from the private and public sectors, the program fosters an environment that is conducive to innovation and promotes scientific excellence.
SA 2.1.1 Government Science and Technology Policy Agenda This program supports science and technology (S&T) and innovation and aims to improve Canada's research and development capacity and excellence by developing and formulating policy frameworks to position S&T and innovation in the context of broader government policy. It also develops specific policies and programs to support highly qualified people, the direct and indirect costs of higher education research, and research infrastructure. This is accomplished through partnerships with various stakeholders, including other government departments (particularly science-based departments and agencies); through consultation with private sector stakeholders, universities and colleges, and provincial governments; and through international forums and collaborative relationships. This program also supports the activities of the Science, Technology and Innovation Council (STIC). STIC is an independent advisory body that provides the Government of Canada and the Minister with external policy advice on S&T and innovation issues. STIC regularly produces national reports measuring Canada's S&T performance against international standards of excellence. STIC's advice helps inform government policy development and decision making.
SA 2.1.2 Science and Technology Partnerships This program supports the effective and efficient implementation of science and technology programs delivered by the Department and its portfolio partners. This involves working closely with the federal granting agencies within the Industry Portfolio and managing the federal contributions to the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, CANARIE Inc., the Council of Canadian Academies, Genome Canada, the Trudeau Foundation, the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Precarn Inc. and three centres of excellence, which are the Brain Research Centre, the Canada School of Energy and Environment, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery.
PA 2.2 Information and Communication Technologies Research and Innovation Through the Communications Research Centre, this program conducts research on advanced telecommunications and information technologies to ensure an independent source of advice for public policy and to support the development of new products and services for the information and communication technologies (ICT) sector. Research projects involve a combination of in-house activities, tasks performed for other government departments on a cost-recovery basis, and partnerships with industrial and academic organizations. The research performed provides insight into future technologies, which assists Industry Canada in developing telecommunications policies, regulations and program delivery; improves other government departments' ICT-related decision making; and closes the innovation gap by transferring new technologies to Canadian industry.
PA 2.3 Research and Development Financing This program helps Canadian businesses increase research and development (R&D) by supplementing private sector investment in R&D and innovation projects with additional funds in the form of repayable contributions. Agreements normally specify which funding will come from the federal government and which will come from other sources. Projects are chosen based on their impact on the Canadian economy and their potential for maximizing innovation capacity and expertise and for creating and retaining jobs in Canada.
SA 2.3.1 Automotive Innovation The Automotive Innovation Fund was put in place to support the production of innovative, greener and more fuel-efficient vehicles by contributing to strategic, large-scale research and development (R&D) projects in the automotive sector. It provides support in the form of repayable contributions to automotive-related companies to fund transformative, innovative activities related to automotive engineering, R&D and manufacturing modernization to position the Canadian industry to lead in producing the cars of the future. This program also supports Canada's environmental agenda in advancing R&D and innovation to increase automobile fuel efficiency and reduce greenhouse gases, thereby contributing to meeting the objectives of Canada's Clean Air Agenda and new fuel consumption regulations. Through this program, Industry Canada considers funding proposals that provide for private sector investment in Canada of more than $75 million over five years.
SA 2.3.2 Aerospace Innovation This program advances and supports research and development (R&D) in the aerospace industry, encourages and leverages private sector investment, and maintains and enhances the technology base and technological capabilities of Canadian aerospace firms. This program will provide conditionally repayable contributions that support the development of new technologies for the next generation of more fuel-efficient and safe aircraft.
SA 2.3.3 Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative The Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI) helps to encourage the development of innovative products and services; enhance the competitiveness of Canadian aerospace and defence (A&D) firms; and foster collaboration among research institutes, universities, colleges and the private sector. SADI is a component of the government's science and technology strategy, which aims to leverage greater private sector research and development investment in Canada. The program acts as a catalyst for new A&D investments by providing repayable contributions to Canadian A&D companies for strategic industrial research and pre-competitive development. SADI accepts applications on an ongoing basis, and projects are selected following a rigorous review of financial, technical and market criteria. The program is financed with funds that were previously allocated to Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) and repayments received from TPC and SADI projects
SA 2.3.4 Technology Partnerships Canada The Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) program provided repayable contributions to Canadian businesses to support industrial research and pre-competitive development in the aerospace and defence, environmental and life sciences, information and communication technologies, and advanced manufacturing sectors. The program helped leverage research and development investment and produced a wide range of economic, social and environmental benefits for all Canadians. TPC ended on December 31, 2006. Although it no longer takes applications, TPC continues to manage a $3.5-billion portfolio of existing contracted projects. Repayments on these projects are expected until 2035.
Industry Canada Program Titles and Descriptions
Type Order 2011–12 Title 2011–12 Description
SO 3 Canadian businesses and communities are competitive Not applicable
PA 3.1 Small Business Research, Advocacy and Services The Department's work in this program area is aimed at enhancing the growth and competitiveness of small business and encouraging entrepreneurship. Through this program activity, Industry Canada raises awareness across government of the challenges facing small businesses; provides knowledge and expertise on small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) in a number of areas, including statistics, entrepreneurship, financing, innovation and growth firms; recommends policy options; delivers programs that help support SMEs and entrepreneurial activity across Canada; and provides advice and support related to the Business Development Bank of Canada.
SA 3.1.1 Canada Small Business Financing The Canada Small Business Financing Program (CSBFP) helps Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) access financing that would not otherwise be available or would only be available under less favourable terms. It is a loan loss-sharing program in partnership with financial institutions. To be eligible for this program, SMEs must be for-profit businesses with revenues of less than $5 million per year. Under the program, financial institutions can make term loans on real property, leasehold improvements and equipment. In the event that a registered loan defaults, the government pays 85 percent of the net eligible losses. The CSBFP is a national program operating in all provinces and territories.
SA 3.1.2 Canada Business Network The Canada Business Network provides existing and potential business entrepreneurs and Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) with information on relevant federal, provincial and territorial government services, programs and regulations. This information is available on the Internet, by telephone (toll-free), by email and through a network of service centres providing access to business-related publications, directories and electronic databases. This provides SMEs with convenient, one-stop access to government information, programs and services, saving them time and helping them to make well-informed business decisions. Canada Business is managed by four lead departments — Industry Canada, Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions and Western Economic Diversification — in collaboration with the provinces and territories. Each lead department has its own program activity architecture and associated performance measures.
SA 3.1.3 Small Business Internship The Small Business Internship Program (SBIP) provides small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) with financial support to employ a post-secondary student intern to assist them in their adoption of information and communication technologies (ICT). The program, delivered in collaboration with Canadian small businesses, post-secondary institutions and non-government organizations, offers post-secondary students hands-on experience working on e-commerce projects under the mentorship and coaching of entrepreneurs. The SME gets the ICT help it needs to grow, and the student gets valuable on-the-job experience.
SA 3.1.4 Small Business Growth and Prosperity Through advocacy, evidence-based research and analysis, stakeholder consultations and surveys, this program ensures that the government is better informed on small business issues, including the importance of entrepreneurship and small businesses to Canada's economy, the challenges they face in terms of growth and prosperity, and the strategies for reducing their paperwork burden when complying with government requirements and obligations. This program also supports the Canadian Youth Business Foundation (CYBF), a not-for-profit organization that provides loans and mentorship to young Canadian entrepreneurs who would not typically receive financial assistance from traditional lending institutions.
PA 3.2 Industrial Competitiveness and Capacity This program was put in place to help Canadian industries develop the capacity to adapt to the ever-changing economic landscape, respond appropriately to external shocks, and innovate and compete internationally. Through research and analysis, it develops expertise on Canadian industries and Canada's position in the global economy. The overall goal is to strengthen Canada's industrial capacity by applying this expertise in the development of policy, legislation and regulations and to engage various public and private stakeholders. Departmental officials engage with associations, governments and leading firms to help Canadian industries become more innovative and enter into global value chains, strengthen partnerships both domestically and internationally, attract investment and promote Canadian expertise. Through this program, the Department also invests in private sector initiatives that are aimed at maximizing productivity and facilitating access to capital.
SA 3.2.1 Industry-Specific Policy and Analysis This program provides both government and industry with intelligence, analysis and advice on industry's capacity to adapt to the continually evolving economic environment. Departmental officials monitor trends and business issues affecting innovation and competitiveness in targeted industries and track international economic and policy developments to determine their effects on Canadian industries. This expertise is used to advise stakeholders on key issues and policies that are relevant to the competitiveness of targeted industries and their positions within globalized markets and value chains. Through this program, the Department brings an industry perspective to government decision making and, in turn, a government perspective back to industry. In collaboration with partners such as industry associations and other government departments, Industry Canada develops value chain studies, research papers, statistical reports and other such products, which are disseminated to enable informed decision making. This program also promotes the adoption and adaptation of new and emerging technologies and skills for business processes and supports strategic research and development, marketing and investment activities.
SA 3.2.2 Shipbuilding Capacity This program helps ensure that shipbuilding capacity exists for federal marine procurement and maintenance requirements in keeping with the Buy Canada procurement policy. Eligible products are new vessels and offshore marine structures or existing vessels and offshore marine structures undergoing major refurbishment, conversion or other major modification in Canadian shipyards. Financing is provided to applicants, lenders or lessors, who will receive a non-repayable contribution to reduce the applicant's interest or leasing costs. Subject to limitations, this support can be up to 15 percent of the purchase price paid to the Canadian shipyard for the construction or modification of an eligible vessel or offshore marine structure.
SA 3.2.3 Industrial and Regional Benefits The Industrial and Regional Benefits (IRB) Policy provides the framework for leveraging federal defence and security procurements to generate long-term industrial and regional development within Canada. The IRB Policy ensures that Canadian companies can derive benefits from federal procurements and their potential to create new business opportunities or investments in research and development, technology commercialization or business development activities. Under the IRB Policy, prime contractors that are awarded major federal defence and security contracts are required to generate new business activity in the Canadian economy in an amount equal to the value of the contract. The investments must be in advanced technology sectors across Canada and can be either directly or indirectly related to the procured item. The IRB Policy is the Canadian version of the industrial participation policies practised in over 100 countries.
PA 3.3 Community Economic Development This program advances the economic development of northern Ontario communities in the same manner that regional development agencies support similar activities in other regions of Canada. Its main goal is to strengthen the northern Ontario economy by providing financial support, through contribution agreements, for economic and community development projects led by the private, not-for-profit and public sectors. This program also helps to increase public access to the Internet, provide schools with greater access to computers, and improve IT skills and learning in community groups and communities across Canada.
SA 3.3.1 Community Futures The Community Futures (CF) Program is a national program administered by FedNor in rural northern Ontario and delivered through the regional development agencies in the rest of Canada. The CF Program provides financial support to small and medium-sized enterprises through 24 Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDC) located throughout rural northern Ontario. The program's objectives are to foster economic stability, growth and job creation; help create diversified and competitive local rural economies; and help build sustainable communities. CFDCs are incorporated, not-for-profit, community-based development organizations, each governed by a local, volunteer board of directors. They offer a variety of products and services to support small business growth and community economic development, such as access to capital; strategic community planning and socio-economic development; support for community-based projects and special initiatives; and business information, planning and support services. FedNor provides financial contributions to support the ongoing operations of individual CFDCs through either one- or three-year agreements.
SA 3.3.2 Northern Ontario Development The Northern Ontario Development Program (NODP) is administered by FedNor. Its mission is to promote growth, economic diversification, job creation, and sustainable, self-reliant communities in northern Ontario through a range of initiatives aimed at improving business access to capital, information and markets. This is achieved by providing financial support, through transfer payments, to small and medium-sized enterprises and not-for-profit organizations, including municipalities, municipal organizations, community development organizations and research institutions, in six priority areas: community economic development, information and communication technologies, innovation, trade and tourism, human capital, and business financing.
SA 3.3.3 Computers for Schools Through this program, surplus computers from federal, provincial and territorial government departments and from private companies and private donors are refurbished through contribution agreements with licensed delivery agents. Once refurbished, they are distributed to schools and not-for-profit learning organizations across Canada. Through a national partnership-based network, the program continues to meet an ongoing demand for computers in Canadian schools and libraries, ensuring that more young Canadians have access to the benefits of a knowledge-based economy and society. This program also supports work experience internships for youth at the post-secondary level. Youth interns with the requisite skills are given the opportunity to work on innovative information and communication technologies projects in the context of computer refurbishment workshop activities. These projects enable participants to develop practical work experience in such areas as computer repair, refurbishment and software testing; to cultivate skills such as teamwork, time management and administration; and to perform other activities related to managing a computer refurbishment workshop.
SA 3.3.4 Community Access The Community Access Program (CAP) provides public access to the Internet, to related information and communication technologies (ICT) and applications, and to skills training, and it delivers public and private sector services and information to Canadians in need of this critical support. CAP sites across Canada contribute to the economic and social development of Canadian communities and their residents who face barriers to the use of ICT. A CAP site is a public location providing affordable public access to the Internet and to related ICT. While CAP meets the access needs of all Canadians, a sizable portion of users live and work in rural and remote communities. CAP also provides work experience for up to 1,300 youth annually through placements at CAP sites throughout the country. Youth who have the requisite skills are offered opportunities to work on innovative ICT projects, providing CAP site users with basic training in using the Internet, accessing online government services, developing websites and using other web-related services. This enables the youth interns to develop practical work experience in training and promotion and to cultivate other useful work-related skills such as teamwork, time management and administration. CAP is subject to program review and funding approval on an annual basis.
SA 3.3.5 Linguistic Duality and Official Languages The Linguistic Duality and Official Languages program is focused on implementing section 41 of the Official Languages Act, which involves the following: 1) ensuring all Industry Canada programs and initiatives take into account the needs of Official Language Minority Communities (OLMC) and serve to enhance their vitality, assist their development, and foster the full recognition and use of both English and French in Canadian society; and 2) managing the horizontal coordination of the $30.5-million Economic Development Initiative (EDI) under the Government of Canada's Roadmap to Linguistic Duality 2008–2013: Acting for the Future. This initiative promotes the development of new business expertise through innovation, economic diversification activities, partnerships and increased support to small businesses. The EDI also promotes the economic benefits of Canada's linguistic duality and the linguistic skills of its human capital. Funding, which not-for-profit organizations receive through transfer payments, supports two priority areas: community strategic planning and business economic development. FedNor is responsible for delivery of the EDI in northern Ontario. The existing Northern Ontario Development Program is the vehicle through which the EDI will be implemented in OLMCs throughout northern Ontario.
Program Subactivity
Measurement Canada
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Fair and accurate trade measurement in Canada Percentage of marketplace monitoring inspections where devices are found to be measuring accurately 85 percent
Percentage of Measurement Canada product and surveillance audits confirming authorized service providers' competencies to conduct inspections on the agency's behalf 90 percent

Description:
Measurement Canada, a special operating agency, ensures the integrity and accuracy of goods and services bought and sold on the basis of measurement in Canada. It protects Canadians against financial loss due to inaccurate measurement and maintains consumer and business confidence in measurement-based financial transactions (trade measurement) by ensuring that devices (e.g., scales, gas pumps, and electricity and natural gas meters) used in Canada meet legislative standards for accuracy and performance. Measurement Canada investigates measurement practices in the Canadian marketplace and compels institutions to take corrective actions when unfair practices are found.

Program Subactivity
Superintendent of Bankruptcy
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
The integrity of the insolvency system is protected, and estates are supervised and administered in accordance with insolvency legislation. Percentage of trustees with a satisfactory compliance record 85 percent
Percentage of debtors with surplus income who completed payments to the estate as required 75 percent

Description:
In the public interest and for the benefit of investors, lenders and consumers, the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy supervises the administration of estates and matters under the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act and the Companies' Creditors Arrangement Act. As an integral source of information on Canadian insolvency matters, the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy provides leadership in protecting the integrity of the bankruptcy and insolvency system by maintaining an efficient and effective insolvency regulatory framework, promoting awareness of the rights and responsibilities of the stakeholders, and ensuring trustee and debtor compliance with the legislative and regulatory framework through the supervision of debtors and of trustees administering estates.

Program Subactivity
Corporations Canada
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Federally incorporated companies comply with corporate laws and regulations. Percentage of federally incorporated corporations that comply with statutory filing requirements 80 percent
Businesses have timely and reliable access to incorporation information and services. Percentage of published Corporations Canada service standards that are met or exceeded 90 percent
Corporations Canada's key services are available online and delivered to businesses electronically. Percentage of transactions for key services completed online 80 percent

Description:
This program allows Canadians and businesses to incorporate at the federal level in accordance with Canadian laws, such as the Canada Business Corporations Act, the Canada Corporations Act, the Boards of Trade Act and the Canada Cooperative Associations Act, regulations and several corporate laws governing federal companies (with the exception of financial intermediaries). It also issues and registers official documents under the Great Seal of Canada. The program's main lines of business include incorporation and related services (such as amalgamation or corporate charter amendments), the dissolution of corporations, rulings on the use of corporate names, the collection and dissemination of information on federal companies, and compliance and enforcement activities related to the statutes it administers. This program's activities mostly affect Canadian businesses, not-for-profit organizations and other corporate entities.

Program Subactivity
Investment Review
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Timely processing of foreign investment notifications and applications filed for review by foreign investors under the Investment Canada Act Median time required to certify notifications 6 days
Median time required to process applications 55 days

Description:
The Investment Canada Act provides for the review of significant investments in Canada by non-Canadians to determine whether they encourage investment, economic growth and employment opportunities in Canada and whether they could be injurious to national security. This program implements the provisions of the Act by ensuring that the Minister of Industry has the information needed to determine whether an investment is likely to be of net benefit to Canada or whether there are reasonable grounds to believe that an investment could be injurious to national security. This is accomplished by processing notifications filed by investors and reviewing transactions to ensure their compliance with the Act.

Program Subactivity
Intellectual Property
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
The delivery and quality of intellectual property (IP) services respond to client needs and expectations. Percentage of clients satisfied with the Canadian Intellectual Property Office's services 80 percent
Awareness and use of IP by Canadians The number of domestic and international IP filings in Canada

Total: 54,024

Domestic: 25,131

International: 28,893

Description:
This program administers Canada's system of intellectual property (IP) rights, namely patents, trademarks, copyrights, industrial designs and integrated circuit topographies. The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) grants and registers IP rights, legally recognizing certain endeavours of originality and creativity. It also disseminates information related to these rights to businesses, educational institutions and Canadians. CIPO's role is to ensure that IP contributes to an acceleration of Canadian economic development and that the benefits of the IP system accrue to Canadians. This program is entirely financed through a revolving fund and is fully cost recovered from client fees. Its clients include foreign and Canadian applicants for IP protection, users of IP information and the Canadian business community.

Program Subactivity
Internal Trade Secretariat
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
The Internal Trade Secretariat (ITS) provides high-quality administrative support to the Committee on Internal Trade in its efforts to strengthen internal trade. Industry Canada helps the ITS achieve these goals through funding and participation in ITS Board of Directors' activities. Stakeholder satisfaction with the ITS's services   8 out of 10 performance rating

Description:
The Agreement on Internal Trade (AIT) is an intergovernmental trade agreement signed by Canadian first ministers; it came into force in 1995. The purpose of the AIT is to reduce and eliminate, to the extent possible, barriers to the free movement of persons, goods, services and investment within Canada and to establish an open, efficient and stable domestic market. The Internal Trade Secretariat provides administrative and operational support to the Committee on Internal Trade, to its Chair and to other committees or working groups established under the AIT or by the committee. It works closely with government officials to ensure the effective implementation of the AIT. The Secretariat supports the Committee on Internal Trade in preparing the reports, compiling and disseminating information from parties and ensuring appropriate support for the dispute resolution process. As a neutral third party, the Secretariat has facilitated ongoing negotiations to broaden and deepen the scope of the AIT. The work requires close and continuous contact with federal, provincial and territorial governments to facilitate the smooth and effective operation of the committees and working groups. The Secretariat plays an important role in assisting parties to fully implement the AIT, to pursue negotiations mandated by the AIT and to meet their outstanding obligations under the AIT. All parties share the Secretariat's operating costs. The federal government's share of the Secretariat's budget is 50 percent, which is paid by Industry Canada through a grant.

Program Subactivity
Spectrum Management and Telecommunications
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Canadians have sufficient access to essential spectrum. Percentage of spectrum requests that are accommodated through licensing 98 percent
Canadian interests and requirements pertaining to radiocommunications and telecommunications are reflected in international agreements and standards. Percentage of Canadian objectives/proposals represented in international agreements 100 percent
Telecommunications services are available to first responders in times of emergency. Percentage of telecommunications carriers with emergency management plans 90 percent

Description:
The goal of this program is to ensure the orderly and secure evolution of Canada's radio spectrum and telecommunications infrastructure through the development of a coherent regulatory framework, promotion of competition, establishment of sufficient regulation, enforcement of domestic and international requirements, and negotiation and promotion of international standards and treaties. This provides Canadian industries with the favourable conditions they need to develop, introduce and market leading technologies and services. The radio spectrum is a finite resource and can accommodate only a limited number of simultaneous users. Management of the radio spectrum requires careful planning to maximize its value for public and private services. This is achieved through the development and implementation of operational policies, procedures, processes, technical standards and international treaties. The program also provides for an assessed annual contribution to the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), in which Canada participates as a Member State. Canada participates in ITU meetings to influence the Union's direction and decision making in support of Canadian interests. Another goal of this program, which has the lead role for emergency telecommunications in Canada, is to make telecommunications services accessible to Canadians and to ensure that the public derives maximum benefit from their use.

Program Subactivity
Electronic Commerce
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
The privacy and security of personal information and Internet-based trade and commerce are protected. Percentage of Canadian businesses that are aware of their responsibilities and compliance obligations under Canada's privacy laws 65 percent
Percentage of Canadians buying and selling online 15 percent
Percentage of Canadians using the Internet 86 percent

Description:
This program strengthens Canadians' confidence in the marketplace by protecting individual privacy and curbing Internet threats. The successful integration of e-business into the Canadian economy is dependent on the level of trust and confidence businesses and consumers have in the digital environment. This program clarifies marketplace rules through the development of legal and policy frameworks in the areas of privacy protection, online security and appropriate Internet content and removes barriers to the use of e-commerce in conjunction with the private sector. To improve market efficiency, the program promotes the conduct of e-business across all sectors of the economy and helps facilitate online trade and commerce internationally through the sharing of best practices and international benchmarking.

Program Subactivity
Government Science and Technology Policy Agenda
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Consultation and collaboration with the federal science and technology (S&T) community and other key S&T players Number of federal science-based departments and agencies involved in the implementation of the government's science and technology strategy 20
Number of external organizations consulted to advance Canada's S&T agenda 20
Number of S&T Advisory Committee meetings and range of topics discussed 3
Broader understanding of science underpinning S&T policy Number of Council of Canadian Academies reports under way that provide a basis for S&T policy 7

Description:
This program supports science and technology (S&T) and innovation and aims to improve Canada's research and development capacity and excellence by developing and formulating policy frameworks to position S&T and innovation in the context of broader government policy. It also develops specific policies and programs to support highly qualified people, the direct and indirect costs of higher education research, and research infrastructure. This is accomplished through partnerships with various stakeholders, including other government departments (particularly science-based departments and agencies); through consultation with private sector stakeholders, universities and colleges, and provincial governments; and through international forums and collaborative relationships. This program also supports the activities of the Science, Technology and Innovation Council (STIC). STIC is an independent advisory body that provides the Government of Canada and the Minister with external policy advice on S&T and innovation issues. STIC regularly produces national reports measuring Canada's S&T performance against international standards of excellence. STIC's advice helps inform government policy development and decision making.

Program Subactivity
Science and Technology Partnerships
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Science and technology (S&T) partnerships between industry and academia are created and sustained. Value in dollars of cash and in-kind industrial and other contributions leveraged through granting councils' S&T industry partnership programs for which Industry Canada sits on governance bodies

2:1

For every $2.00 provided by granting council programs, industry and other funders will need to put in $1.00 (cash and/or in-kind contribution).

Number of companies involved in granting councils' S&T industry partnership programs for which Industry Canada sits on governance bodies 120
Federal programs are in place to attract and retain highly qualified students and researchers. Number of students and researchers supported through granting councils' S&T "people advantage" programs for which Industry Canada sits on governance bodies 3,460

Description:
This program supports the effective and efficient implementation of science and technology programs delivered by the Department and its portfolio partners. This involves working closely with the federal granting agencies within the Industry Portfolio and managing the federal contributions to the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, CANARIE Inc., the Council of Canadian Academies, Genome Canada, the Trudeau Foundation, the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Precarn Inc. and three centres of excellence, which are the Brain Research Centre, the Canada School of Energy and Environment, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery.

Program Subactivity
Automotive Innovation
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Enhanced capacity for the development of innovative, more fuel-efficient technologies in the Canadian automotive industry Number of projects focusing on innovative fuel-efficient technologies and processes 4
Leveraged leading-edge research and development in the Canadian automotive industry Dollars of private sector investment leveraged per dollar of Automotive Innovation Fund investment $5.00

Description:
The Automotive Innovation Fund was put in place to support the production of innovative, greener and more fuel-efficient vehicles by contributing to strategic, large-scale research and development (R&D) projects in the automotive sector. It provides support in the form of repayable contributions to automotive-related companies to fund transformative, innovative activities related to automotive engineering, R&D and manufacturing modernization to position the Canadian industry to lead in producing the cars of the future. This program also supports Canada's environmental agenda in advancing R&D and innovation to increase automobile fuel efficiency and reduce greenhouse gases, thereby contributing to meeting the objectives of Canada's Clean Air Agenda and new fuel consumption regulations. Through this program, Industry Canada considers funding proposals that provide for private sector investment in Canada of more than $75 million over five years.

Program Subactivity
Aerospace Innovation
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Investment in research and development (R&D) and commercialization of new technologies in the Canadian aerospace industry Number of R&D positions maintained and created as a result of this program 1,300

Description:
This program advances and supports research and development (R&D) in the aerospace industry, encourages and leverages private sector investment, and maintains and enhances the technology base and technological capabilities of Canadian aerospace firms. This program will provide conditionally repayable contributions that support the development of new technologies for the next generation of more fuel-efficient and safe aircraft.

Program Subactivity
Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Research and development (R&D) investment in innovative and competitive aerospace, defence, space and security firms Dollars of investment leveraged per dollar of Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI) investment $2.00
Collaborative R&D partnerships among aerospace, defence, space and security industries and research institutes, universities, colleges and/or the private sector Percentage of approved assistance tied to projects that have a collaborative element 90 percent

Description:
The Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI) helps to encourage the development of innovative products and services; enhance the competitiveness of Canadian aerospace and defence (A&D) firms; and foster collaboration among research institutes, universities, colleges and the private sector. SADI is a component of the government's science and technology strategy, which aims to leverage greater private sector research and development investment in Canada. The program acts as a catalyst for new A&D investments by providing repayable contributions to Canadian A&D companies for strategic industrial research and pre-competitive development. SADI accepts applications on an ongoing basis, and projects are selected following a rigorous review of financial, technical and market criteria. The program is financed with funds that were previously allocated to Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) and repayments received from TPC and SADI projects.

Program Subactivity
Technology Partnerships Canada
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Government investment in research and development (R&D) activities in the aerospace, defence, environmental and enabling technology industries generates other incremental investment from Canadian businesses. Dollars of R&D investment leveraged per dollar of Technology Partnerships Canada investment $2.00

Description:
The Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) program provided repayable contributions to Canadian businesses to support industrial research and pre-competitive development in the aerospace and defence, environmental and life sciences, information and communication technologies, and advanced manufacturing sectors. The program helped leverage research and development investment and produced a wide range of economic, social and environmental benefits for all Canadians. TPC ended on December 31, 2006. Although it no longer takes applications, TPC continues to manage a $3.5-billion portfolio of existing contracted projects. Repayments on these projects are expected until 2035.

Program Subactivity
Canada Small Business Financing
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
With government support, small and medium-sized enterprises have access to financing that would not otherwise be accessible. Number of loans registered with the program 8,000
Value of loans registered with the program $1 billion
Percentage of loan recipients under the program who would not have obtained a loan otherwise or would have obtained a loan under less favourable conditions 75 percent

Description:
The Canada Small Business Financing Program (CSBFP) helps Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) access financing that would not otherwise be available or would only be available under less favourable terms. It is a loan loss-sharing program in partnership with financial institutions. To be eligible for this program, SMEs must be for-profit businesses with revenues of less than $5 million per year. Under the program, financial institutions can make term loans on real property, leasehold improvements and equipment. In the event that a registered loan defaults, the government pays 85 percent of the net eligible losses. The CSBFP is a national program operating in all provinces and territories.

Program Subactivity
Canada Business Network
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Small businesses use government business-related information, programs and services. Number of client visits to the Canada Business website 1.5 million
Percentage of clients who can find the information they are looking for on the Canada Business website 50 percent
Volume of client interactions facilitated by Canada Business Network's regional presence in Ontario 5 percent increase over 2010–11 volume

Description:
The Canada Business Network provides existing and potential business entrepreneurs and Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) with information on relevant federal, provincial and territorial government services, programs and regulations. This information is available on the Internet, by telephone (toll-free), by email and through a network of service centres providing access to business-related publications, directories and electronic databases. This provides SMEs with convenient, one-stop access to government information, programs and services, saving them time and helping them to make well-informed business decisions. Canada Business is managed by four lead departments — Industry Canada, Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions and Western Economic Diversification — in collaboration with the provinces and territories. Each lead department has its own program activity architecture and associated performance measures.

Program Subactivity
Small Business Internship
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Post-secondary students are employed as interns to assist on e-business projects. Number of students who improve ICT skills 400
Small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) undertake e-business projects to improve their use of information and communication technologies (ICT). Number of e-business projects undertaken by SMEs 400

Description:
The Small Business Internship Program (SBIP) provides small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) with financial support to employ a post-secondary student intern to assist them in their adoption of information and communication technologies (ICT). The program, delivered in collaboration with Canadian small businesses, post-secondary institutions and non-government organizations, offers post-secondary students hands-on experience working on e-commerce projects under the mentorship and coaching of entrepreneurs. The SME gets the ICT help it needs to grow, and the student gets valuable on-the-job experience.

Program Subactivity
Small Business Growth and Prosperity
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Departmental clients, clients of other government departments and external stakeholders are aware of small business perspective. Number of meetings and outreach events 15
The government will obtain information and advice from stakeholders on small business issues, including the regulatory and paperwork burden and access to government programs and information. Number of briefings sent to the responsible minister containing information and advice provided by stakeholders on small business issues 6Link to the footnote 1 *

*This may include recommendations from stakeholders on how to reduce the regulatory and paperwork burden and how to improve business access to government programs and information. (return to the text reference 1)

Description:
Through advocacy, evidence-based research and analysis, stakeholder consultations and surveys, this program ensures that the government is better informed on small business issues, including the importance of entrepreneurship and small businesses to Canada's economy, the challenges they face in terms of growth and prosperity, and the strategies for reducing their paperwork burden when complying with government requirements and obligations. This program also supports the Canadian Youth Business Foundation (CYBF), a not-for-profit organization that provides loans and mentorship to young Canadian entrepreneurs who would not typically receive financial assistance from traditional lending institutions.

Program Subactivity
Industry-Specific Policy and Analysis
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Government and industry decision makers have access to information on trends and issues affecting the competitiveness of Canadian industries. Percentage of responses to requests from stakeholders for information, advice or expertise on industrial competitiveness 100 percent
Number and type of knowledge products developed to analyze trends, risks and opportunities affecting the competitiveness of targeted Canadian industries that were disseminated to stakeholders

350

This includes company and sector profiles, research reports and studies, economic and business analyses, and technology roadmaps.

Description:
This program provides both government and industry with intelligence, analysis and advice on industry's capacity to adapt to the continually evolving economic environment. Departmental officials monitor trends and business issues affecting innovation and competitiveness in targeted industries and track international economic and policy developments to determine their effects on Canadian industries. This expertise is used to advise stakeholders on key issues and policies that are relevant to the competitiveness of targeted industries and their positions within globalized markets and value chains. Through this program, the Department brings an industry perspective to government decision making and, in turn, a government perspective back to industry. In collaboration with partners such as industry associations and other government departments, Industry Canada develops value chain studies, research papers, statistical reports and other such products, which are disseminated to enable informed decision making. This program also promotes the adoption and adaptation of new and emerging technologies and skills for business processes and supports strategic research and development, marketing and investment activities.

Program Subactivity
Shipbuilding Capacity
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Shipbuilders are aware of the program and inform shipowners. Number of shipyards to which letters are sent 6
Number of expressions of interest and number of applications received 8
Demand for new builds, conversions, refits and modifications in Canadian shipyards Number of contribution agreements approved 4

Description:
This program helps ensure that shipbuilding capacity exists for federal marine procurement and maintenance requirements in keeping with the Buy Canada procurement policy. Eligible products are new vessels and offshore marine structures or existing vessels and offshore marine structures undergoing major refurbishment, conversion or other major modification in Canadian shipyards. Financing is provided to applicants, lenders or lessors, who will receive a non-repayable contribution to reduce the applicant's interest or leasing costs. Subject to limitations, this support can be up to 15 percent of the purchase price paid to the Canadian shipyard for the construction or modification of an eligible vessel or offshore marine structure.

Program Subactivity
Industrial and Regional Benefits
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Prime contractors benefiting from federal procurement contracts reinvest in the Canadian economy. Dollar value of prime contractor investment in the Canadian economy $900 million
Business relationships are created between Canadian suppliers and prime contractors. Number of transactions that generate relationships between prime contractors and Canadian companies 75
Industrial and Regional Benefits transactions are reviewed, approved and reported on in a timely manner. From total applications received, percentage of new business transactions that are examined and assessed annually 90 percent

Description:
The Industrial and Regional Benefits (IRB) Policy provides the framework for leveraging federal defence and security procurements to generate long-term industrial and regional development within Canada. The IRB Policy ensures that Canadian companies can derive benefits from federal procurements and their potential to create new business opportunities or investments in research and development, technology commercialization or business development activities. Under the IRB Policy, prime contractors that are awarded major federal defence and security contracts are required to generate new business activity in the Canadian economy in an amount equal to the value of the contract. The investments must be in advanced technology sectors across Canada and can be either directly or indirectly related to the procured item. The IRB Policy is the Canadian version of the industrial participation policies practised in over 100 countries.

Program Subactivity
Community Futures
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Targeted rural northern Ontario businesses create jobs and attract investors. Ratio of funds raised from other sources to federal Community Futures (CF) Program investments 1:1.6
Number of jobs created in northern Ontario through CF investments 2,121

Description:
The Community Futures (CF) Program is a national program administered by FedNor in rural northern Ontario and delivered through the regional development agencies in the rest of Canada. The CF Program provides financial support to small and medium-sized enterprises through 24 Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDC) located throughout rural northern Ontario. The program's objectives are to foster economic stability, growth and job creation; help create diversified and competitive local rural economies; and help build sustainable communities. CFDCs are incorporated, not-for-profit, community-based development organizations, each governed by a local, volunteer board of directors. They offer a variety of products and services to support small business growth and community economic development, such as access to capital; strategic community planning and socio-economic development; support for community-based projects and special initiatives; and business information, planning and support services. FedNor provides financial contributions to support the ongoing operations of individual CFDCs through either one- or three-year agreements.

Program Subactivity
Northern Ontario Development
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Northern Ontario businesses and organizations create jobs and attract investors. Ratio of funds raised from other sources to Northern Ontario Development Program (NODP) contributions 1:1.30
Number of jobs created in northern Ontario through NODP investments 1,188

Description:
The Northern Ontario Development Program (NODP) is administered by FedNor. Its mission is to promote growth, economic diversification, job creation, and sustainable, self-reliant communities in northern Ontario through a range of initiatives aimed at improving business access to capital, information and markets. This is achieved by providing financial support, through transfer payments, to small and medium-sized enterprises and not-for-profit organizations, including municipalities, municipal organizations, community development organizations and research institutions, in six priority areas: community economic development, information and communication technologies, innovation, trade and tourism, human capital, and business financing.

Program Subactivity
Computers for Schools
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Schools, libraries and not-for-profit learning organizations and Aboriginal communities receive refurbished computers. Number of refurbished computer units delivered annually 65,000
Youth interns gain work experience in the information and communication technologies field. Number of youth interns hired and number of hours worked by youth interns in 2011–12 300 and 390,000

Description:
Through this program, surplus computers from federal, provincial and territorial government departments and from private companies and private donors are refurbished through contribution agreements with licensed delivery agents. Once refurbished, they are distributed to schools and not-for-profit learning organizations across Canada. Through a national partnership-based network, the program continues to meet an ongoing demand for computers in Canadian schools and libraries, ensuring that more young Canadians have access to the benefits of a knowledge-based economy and society. This program also supports work experience internships for youth at the post-secondary level. Youth interns with the requisite skills are given the opportunity to work on innovative information and communication technologies projects in the context of computer refurbishment workshop activities. These projects enable participants to develop practical work experience in such areas as computer repair, refurbishment and software testing; to cultivate skills such as teamwork, time management and administration; and to perform other activities related to managing a computer refurbishment workshop.

Program Subactivity
Community AccessLink to the footnote 2 *
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Canadians have public access to the Internet. Number of communities served 1,850
Youth interns gain work experience in the information and communication technologies field by assisting Community Access Program (CAP) site users. Number of youth interns hired and number of hours worked by youth interns in 2011–12 1,300 and 662,000

*This program is scheduled to end on March 31, 2011. The government is currently reviewing the future of CAP; a decision about its future is forthcoming. (return to the text reference 2)

Description:
The Community Access Program (CAP) provides public access to the Internet, to related information and communication technologies (ICT) and applications, and to skills training, and it delivers public and private sector services and information to Canadians in need of this critical support. CAP sites across Canada contribute to the economic and social development of Canadian communities and their residents who face barriers to the use of ICT. A CAP site is a public location providing affordable public access to the Internet and to related ICT. While CAP meets the access needs of all Canadians, a sizable portion of users live and work in rural and remote communities. CAP also provides work experience for up to 1,300 youth annually through placements at CAP sites throughout the country. Youth who have the requisite skills are offered opportunities to work on innovative ICT projects, providing CAP site users with basic training in using the Internet, accessing online government services, developing websites and using other web-related services. This enables the youth interns to develop practical work experience in training and promotion and to cultivate other useful work-related skills such as teamwork, time management and administration. CAP is subject to program review and funding approval on an annual basis.

Program Subactivity
Linguistic Duality and Official Languages
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Industry Canada programs, initiatives and services take into account the presence and needs of Canada's official language minority communities (OLMC) and support Canada's linguistic duality. Percentage of new Industry Canada programs and services that take into account the needs of OLMCs and support Canada's linguistic duality 100 percent
OLMC businesses in northern Ontario create jobs and attract investors. Ratio of funds raised from other sources to Economic Development Initiative (EDI) contributions 1:1.3
Number of jobs created and maintained in northern Ontario through EDI investments 100

Description:
The Linguistic Duality and Official Languages program is focused on implementing section 41 of the Official Languages Act, which involves the following: 1) ensuring all Industry Canada programs and initiatives take into account the needs of Official Language Minority Communities (OLMC) and serve to enhance their vitality, assist their development, and foster the full recognition and use of both English and French in Canadian society; and 2) managing the horizontal coordination of the $30.5-million Economic Development Initiative (EDI) under the Government of Canada's Roadmap to Linguistic Duality 2008–2013: Acting for the Future. This initiative promotes the development of new business expertise through innovation, economic diversification activities, partnerships and increased support to small businesses. The EDI also promotes the economic benefits of Canada's linguistic duality and the linguistic skills of its human capital. Funding, which not-for-profit organizations receive through transfer payments, supports two priority areas: community strategic planning and business economic development. FedNor is responsible for delivery of the EDI in northern Ontario. The existing Northern Ontario Development Program is the vehicle through which the EDI will be implemented in OLMCs throughout northern Ontario.

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