Departmental Results Report 2018–19

From: Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada

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© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the Minister of Industry, 2020.

Cat. No. Iu1-23E-PDF
ISSN 2561-164X

Aussi offert en français sous le titre Rapport sur les résultats ministériels 2018-2019.

PDF Version

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Table of Contents


Ministers' message

We are pleased to present the 2018–19 Departmental Results Report for Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED). This report sets out the results achieved by ISED in support of making Canada a global innovation leader.

Over the past year, the various organizations in the Innovation, Science and Economic Development Portfolio have together worked hard to make Canada a global innovation leader and to build an economy that works for everyone.

Our primary objectives were, and continue to be, to empower businesses to reach their innovation potential to compete in a global, knowledge-based economy; to enhance Canada's economic strengths by supporting science and research; and to promote Canadian tourism. These objectives were supported by new and existing policies and programs designed to help Canadian entrepreneurs from across the country and from diverse backgrounds grow and reach new markets. We also continued to implement multi-year investments in science, including historic investments in fundamental research, while our robust tourism industry was bolstered by support for national initiatives.

ISED prioritized helping Canadian innovators compete in an increasingly competitive marketplace. In April 2018, we launched Canada's Intellectual Property Strategy to ensure that Canada's creators, entrepreneurs and innovators have access to the best resources to capitalize on their ideas. In June 2018, we conducted national consultations to understand how Canada can capitalize on digital and data technology to prepare Canadians for the future of work while building trust and confidence in how data is used; this culminated in the launch of Canada's Digital Charter. In March 2019, we hosted the 600 MHz spectrum auction, ensuring that all Canadian consumers, businesses and public institutions benefit from next-generation wireless services. Furthermore, we laid the groundwork to develop Canada's Connectivity Strategy—to address rural Canadians' unique broadband connectivity challenges so that they can start new businesses, develop new skills, and stay connected to each other and markets around the world.

These initiatives complemented the important work already underway through programs such as the Strategic Innovation Fund, the Innovation Superclusters Initiative and Innovative Solutions Canada to accelerate commercialization, to develop new technologies, to scale up businesses and to create good jobs for Canadians.

ISED also implemented Canada's Tourism Vision, a whole-of-government approach to supporting growth in Canada's tourism sector. In December 2018, the Regional Economic Growth Through Innovation program was launched, aligning Canada's regional development agencies with the Government's national objectives, and ensuring that their funding programs are tailored to fit and benefit regional needs. Finally, to complement federal efforts to advance gender equality, the WES Ecosystem Fund and Women Entrepreneurship Fund were launched, which aim to increase access to financing, networks and advice for women-owned businesses.

These are just a few examples of ISED's work on behalf of Canadians through collaboration, dialogue and partnerships across the country. We invite you to read this report to learn more about how we are working with and for Canadians to build our innovation nation.

Photo of The Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry

The Honourable
Navdeep Bains

Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry

Photo of The Honourable Mélanie Joly
Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages

The Honourable
Mélanie Joly

Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages

Photo of The Honourable Maryam Monsef, Minister for Women and Gender Equality and Rural Economic Development

The Honourable
Maryam Monsef

Minister for Women and Gender Equality and Rural Economic Development

Photo of The Honourable
Mary Ng, Minister of Small Business, Export Promotion and International Trade

The Honourable
Mary Ng

Minister of Small Business, Export Promotion and International Trade

Results at a glance

What funds were used?
(2018–19 Actual Spending)
Who was involved?
(2018–19 Actual Full-Time Equivalents)
$2,276,001,071 5,132

This Departmental Results Report provides an overview of ISED’s work in 2018–19 to foster a growing, competitive and knowledge-based Canadian economy. The results section of this report is structured around ISED’s Departmental Results Framework: its three core responsibilities and related 10 high-level departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence, as well as a fourth section related to internal services. Most of the departmental results and their associated performance indicators are closely linked with Canada’s Innovation and Skills Plan, which sets whole-of-government targets out to 2025 with a view to build on Canada's innovation strengths and identify gaps along the innovation continuum: from people and skills to exporting and scaling-up globally competitive companies. Although it is too early to say whether these results have been achieved, the report gives a snapshot of the progress ISED has made to date toward those objectives. Data on 2018–19 results for some indicators was not available at the time of publication, as there can be full-year time lags in the availability of data from external sources or some new programs have not yet reached the stage where results are measurable. ISED will incorporate additional results information in future parliamentary reports.

Supporting innovation and jobs

ISED continued work to advance Canada’s Innovation and Skills Plan. For 2018–19, this included continued delivery of key programs, such as the Innovation Superclusters Initiative, the Strategic Innovation Fund, CanCode, Connect to Innovate, the Accelerated Growth Service and initiatives such as the Prosperity and Growth Strategy for Northern Ontario. In 2018–19, through the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario (FedNor) and in partnership with regional development agencies (RDAs), ISED launched the Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI) program, a nationally coordinated, regionally tailored program designed to foster an entrepreneurial environment conducive to innovation, growth and competitiveness. ISED also worked with the RDAs to deliver the REGI Steel and Aluminum Initiative, launched on March 11, 2019, to provide targeted support to small and medium-sized steel and aluminum manufacturers and users. ISED also delivered initial steps under Canada’s first Intellectual Property (IP) strategy, including a call for proposals under the Patent Collective Pilot Project for a non-profit organization to work with small and medium-sized enterprises in a selected sector in order to help them leverage IP in their drive to grow to scale. In addition, amendments to the Patent Act, Trademarks Act and Copyright Act to prevent misuse of IP regimes and expedite dispute resolution were introduced and received Royal Assent in 2018.

Enhancing marketplace frameworks to support growth and foster competition

ISED pursued its efforts to enhance Canada’s marketplace frameworks and strengthen economic growth. ISED supported the negotiation and implementation of new trade agreements, notably the Canada-U.S.-Mexico Agreement negotiations by providing strategic advice to the Government of Canada on key areas such as intellectual property, digital trade, competition and the automotive sector. ISED also pursued its work on marketplace frameworks to promote greater competition in the telecommunications sector to give Canadians more choice and better prices. As well, ISED made spectrum available for wireless services with rules that support regional providers accessing spectrum and the provision of service across the country, including in rural areas. It held an auction of residual spectrum licences on May 15, 2018, and the auction of 600 MHz spectrum between March 12 and April 4, 2019. The Competition Bureau also launched a public consultation survey in October 2018 to investigate consumer habits in purchasing Internet services. This was part of a market study focused on the state of competition in the Canadian broadband sector. 

Advancing Canada’s Science Vision

In 2018–19, ISED worked towards the implementation of the Digital Research Infrastructure Strategy by completing a validation process and engaging with key provincial and territorial stakeholders. Released in early April 2019, the Strategy will help Canadian scientists and scholars have the digital tools they need to conduct world-leading research that supports innovation in Canada. In 2018–19, ISED also led a review of third party research organizations, holding consultations in the fall of 2018, which led to the Budget 2019 announcement of a Strategic Science Fund to launch in 2022–23. The Fund will be guided by the advice of an independent panel of experts to help promote research excellence. The Department also worked through the Canada Research Coordinating Committee (CRCC) and with federal granting agencies to develop a tri-agency Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan and Early Career Researcher Action Plan to promote fair access, equitable participation and evidence-based decision-making.

Creating opportunities for small business and entrepreneurs to grow and export

ISED continued its portfolio-wide approach under the Women Entrepreneurship Strategy (WES) to help women-owned and women-led businesses scale-up and reach export markets, including the approval of funding for more than 200 Women Entrepreneurship Fund projects across the country. In September 2018, ISED also launched the WES Ecosystem Fund to strengthen capacity within the ecosystem and close the gaps in service for women entrepreneurs. The fund received more than 300 applications, and more than 50 projects proposals were accepted. Through Innovative Solutions Canada, ISED is leading government-wide efforts to partner with Canadian entrepreneurs in the development of early stage, pre-commercial innovation. As of March 31, 2019, the program awarded amounts to 37 small businesses across Canada that won a novel challenges issued by a department or agency to meet their research and development needs and where there is currently no solution in the marketplace.

Seizing opportunities in the tourism sector

In 2018–19, ISED implemented Canada’s Tourism Vision, a whole-of-government approach to supporting growth in Canada’s tourism sector. As part of this work, ISED delivered the Canada-China Year of Tourism (CCYT) with events, marketing, and a Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) Tourism Trade Mission to China in June 2018. ISED also supported research, analysis, consultation, and engagement on tourism, including research with Destination Canada, the creation of the Advisory Council on Jobs and the Visitor Economy, and the Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie’s cross-country listening tour.

For more information on ISED’s plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

Results: what we achieved

Core Responsibilities

Core Responsibility title

People, Skills and Communities

Description

Support the creation, transfer and diffusion of knowledge to: ensure that Canadians, including underrepresented individuals are equipped with the skills and tools to participate in an innovative, high-growth economy; advance a culture of innovation where Canadians are motivated to address local, regional, national and/or global challenges; benefit from growth of the middle class across communities; have increased access to affordable broadband and mobile Internet, including in rural and remote regions; and are protected and informed consumers.

Results
Departmental Result: Canada has a highly skilled workforce that is equipped for jobs in an innovative and high-growth economy

In 2018–19, ISED continued to foster partnerships with industry, not-for-profits and academia, to develop and deliver programming to equip Canadians with the tools, skills and experience needed by employers to succeed in a growing and innovative economy. The CanCode program was launched in 2017–18 to give students from kindergarten to Grade 12, including those from traditionally underrepresented groups, the opportunity to learn digital skills such as coding and digital content development. In 2018–19, ISED completed the first two-year round of the $50-million program. As of March 31, 2019, the program supported a total of 21 not-for-profit organizations across Canada, including Indigenous-led organizations. In 2018–19, more than 1.6 million students participated in CanCode activities—reaching a total of 1.9 million students since CanCode’s launch, almost three times the program’s initial target of 500,000 students by 2019. CanCode also provided access to coding and digital skills training and tools to close to 82,000 teachers in 2018–19.

On March 26, 2019, ISED launched a call for proposals to implement the two-year extension announced in Budget 2019, which will provide CanCode an additional $60 million over two years starting in 2019–20. The Computers for Schools Intern (CFSI) program, formerly the Technical Work Experience Program, enhances the employability and marketability of youth through internships that help them develop the skills needed to participate actively in the digital economy. ISED implemented ongoing funding for CFSI in 2018–19, including new contribution agreements with 14 recipients, which harmonized two interdependent programs, the CFSI and the Computers for Schools programs, into one agreement. In 2018–19, 276 youth participants gained on-the-job experience through CFSI, including 16% of participants who identified as being female, 12% of the participants identified as Indigenous, 33% identified as being visible minority and 5% of the participants identified as having a disability.

ISED also supported Mitacs’ paid internship programs, further helping Canadian students get the skills they need for future jobs and that are in-demand by employers. This program supports collaborative opportunities where interns work directly with academia and industry. In 2018–19, ISED’s contributions through Mitacs supported a total of 9,072 work-integrated learning placements, exceeding the target of 8,190 placements by 11%, helping develop the next generation of talented leaders.

ISED continued to support the Digital Literacy Exchange, which provides digital skills training to underrepresented groups at highest risk of being left behind by the rapid pace of digital technology adoption. In the last quarter of 2018–19, ISED finalized contribution agreements for 36 projects that will make digital skills training available to underrepresented groups across Canada, including seniors, people with disabilities, newcomers to Canada, low-income Canadians, language minority groups and Indigenous peoples.

ISED’s Accessible Technology Program also co-funded innovative projects led by research institutes, private sector companies and not-for-profit organizations to develop innovative assistive and adaptive digital devices and technologies to help persons with disabilities participate fully in the digital economy. Since the launch of the program in December 2017, ISED has completed five calls for proposals resulting in final contribution agreements with 15 projects, with additional project approvals expected in spring 2019. As of March 31, 2019, one technology solution has been commercialized as a result of funding received under the Accessible Technology Program.

As part of the government’s effort to support Canadians in every region of the country as they develop the skills for the jobs of today and tomorrow, ISED’s FedNor launched the Prosperity and Growth Strategy for Northern Ontario in April 2018. The Strategy brings a collaborative approach with all existing federal and provincial programs and services to address the needs of Northern Ontario in three priority areas: supporting innovation, growing companies, and building stronger communities. Throughout 2018–19, FedNor worked with other regional development agencies to launch new programs under the Women Entrepreneurship Strategy and to support the Regional Economic Growth through Innovation program. FedNor also worked closely with Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada on the five-year Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot, testing new, community-driven approaches to address the diverse labour market needs of smaller communities and support regional economic development by spreading the benefits of economic immigration.

Departmental Result: Canadian communities are connected to and use digital infrastructure

Connected communities are crucial to a strong, healthy middle class and a growing Canadian economy. As of March 2019, Connect to Innovate funding had been announced for 174 projects in 11 provinces and territories to help bring high-speed Internet to rural and remote communities in Canada. Investments in broadband infrastructure are addressing digital divides and helping extend access to innovative services that improve education, health care, productivity and quality of life. To ensure all Canadians have access to affordable, high-speed Internet no matter where they live, the Department developed a plan for universal access. This included a statement in October 2018 by federal, provincial, and territorial ministers of innovation and economic development on a set of connectivity principles, and led to the launch of Canada’s Connectivity Strategy.    

Building on the success of Connect to Innovate

Since the launch of the Connect to Innovate program in December 2016, a total of $454 million in federal funding has been announced. Through more than 19,500 km of fibre optic cable projects are bringing new or improved high-speed Internet connectivity to more than 900 communities, including 190 Indigenous communities — more than tripling the initial target of 300 communities by 2021. Budget 2019 announced a top-up to the program, as part of new investments to deliver high-speed Internet to every Canadian home and business.

In 2018–19, ISED's Strategic Innovation Fund approved three projects to support next-generation satellite broadband terminals and hubs, as well as advanced satellite technology to track ships at sea and collect valuable data and images on Earth and in space. These projects include the deployment of stations in Canada's northern communities and innovations that could lead to other broadband solutions that will help improve the quality and reliability of Internet access and service to rural communities.

ISED contributed to the National Cyber Security Strategy and its aim to make the cyber systems Canadians rely on every day more secure and resilient through investments in an innovative and adaptive cyber ecosystem. Under the Strategy, the Department is responsible for developing and implementing a new program to enhance the cyber security of Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). ISED engaged and collaborated with program partners to publish baseline cyber security controls for SMEs in March 2019, and the cyber certification CyberSecure Canada program will launch as planned in 2019–20.

In November 2018, ISED launched the Connecting Families initiative (formerly known as the Affordable Access program) to help bridge the digital divide by ensuring more Canadian families can access home Internet. As of March 31, 2019, 14 Internet service providers were voluntarily participating in the program, exceeding the initial target of four providers and covering approximately 85 percent of the country’s wireline Internet footprint. The Department also sent 360,000 letters to invite eligible families to sign up to the initiative. As of March 31, 2019, 84,000 families had registered through the online portal, representing a 23-percent participation rate, and 17,731 families were receiving $10-per-month Internet.

In 2018–19, the Computers for Schools program delivered just over 58,000 refurbished computers to schools, libraries, not-for-profit organizations, Indigenous communities and eligible low income Canadians, providing greater access to the digital economy. ISED renewed its agreement with the program and implemented the ongoing funding announced in Budget 2018, and expanded the terms and conditions to include both the Computers for Schools Intern program and the Connecting Families initiative. In the last five months of 2018–19, following the completion of new contribution agreements with 14 recipients, affiliates of the Computers for Schools program refurbished almost 15,000 additional computers for the Connecting Families initiative.

Departmental Result: Canada's entrepreneurs represent all segments of Canadian society

ISED, through FedNor and regional development agencies (RDAs) (the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions, the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario and Western Economic Diversification Canada) worked to deliver the Women Entrepreneurship Strategy (WES). The goal of WES is to double the number of majority women-owned businesses by 2025 by increasing their access to financing, talent, networks and expertise.

As part of the Strategy, in September 2018, the WES Ecosystem Fund was launched to strengthen capacity and close gaps in service for women entrepreneurs. The fund received more than 300 applications, and more than 50 projects proposals were accepted. In October 2018, the Women Entrepreneurship Fund (WEF) was launched to help women-owned and led businesses grow and reach export markets. Over 3,000 applications were received. More than 210 WEF project proposals were accepted across Canada to receive an investment of up to $100,000 to support activities such as upgrades to processing facilities and equipment, the development of online presence and sales, and international marketing strategies in new markets.

In July 2018, ISED launched a competitive process to establish an independent, third-party-led Women Entrepreneurship Knowledge Hub to serve as a one-stop source of knowledge, data and best practices for women entrepreneurs. On December 3, 2018, ISED announced that Ryerson University had been selected to spearhead a consortium that includes nine regional hubs, and a network of more than 75 partners that will draw on the expertise of all participants to support the diversity of women entrepreneurs across Canada.  

ISED, through FedNor and in partnership with RDAs, launched the Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI) program on December 8, 2018. REGI is a nationally coordinated, regionally tailored program designed to foster an entrepreneurial environment conducive to innovation, growth and competitiveness. This program focuses on two key areas to support business needs: business scale-up and productivity; and creating, growing and nurturing inclusive regional innovation ecosystems.

ISED also worked with the RDAs to launch the REGI Steel and Aluminum Initiative for small and medium-sized steel and aluminum manufacturers and users. This initiative, launched on March 11, 2019, supports projects that enhance productivity, increase competitiveness and create more highly skilled jobs through the adoption of new and innovative technologies in order to help grow and modernize sectors heavily dependent on steel or aluminum. This will help Canadian, downstream, SME steel and aluminum users remain competitive as global market dynamics evolve.

In 2018–19, ISED continued supporting young entrepreneurs through Futurpreneur Canada, a national not-for-profit organization that helps young entrepreneurs by providing them with mentorship, learning resources and startup financing to help them bring their business ideas to life – and to market.

Results achieved
Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018–19
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
Canada has a highly skilled workforce that is equipped for jobs in an innovative and high-growth economy Percentage of professional, science and technology-related jobs in Canada's economy 40% December 31, 2025† 34% (2018) 34% (2017) 34% (2016)
Number of science, technology, engineering and mathematics graduates in Canada

175,000

(Note 1)

December 31, 2025

(Note 1)

Available in fall 2020 Available in fall 2019 121,791
(2016)
Number of Canadians that receive digital and coding skills training and development opportunities through ISED programs 500,000 December 31, 2019†

1.75 million

(Note 2)

281,403

(Note 2)

270

(Note 2)

Canadian communities are connected to and use digital infrastructure Percentage of population with access to ultrafast broadband 80%
(at 1 Gbps)
December 31, 2020† Available in winter 2019 100 Mbps: 84% (2017)
1Gbps: 50% (2017)
100 Mbps: 83% (2016)
1 Gbps: 40% (2016)
Percentage of households with an Internet connection (including across underserved individuals, such as low-income) 100% December 31, 2025† Available in winter 2019 89% (2017) 87.4% (2016)
Canada's entrepreneurs represent all segments of Canadian society Percentage of small and medium-sized enterprises that are majority-owned by women, Indigenous people, youth, visible minorities and persons with disabilities

Women:25%
Indigenous people: 1.6%
Youth : 17%
Visible minorities: 14%
Persons with disabilities: 0.6%

(Note 3)

December 31, 2025†

Data next available in 2021

(Statistics Canada survey conducted every three years)

Women: 15.6%
Indigenous people: 1.4%
Youth (under 40): 15.8%
Visible minorities: 12.2%
Persons with disabilities: 0.5%

(Note 2)

Not available

(Statistics Canada survey conducted every three years)

Number of small and medium-sized enterprises
supported by ISED programs, including
those that are majority-owned by women, Indigenous people, youth, visible minorities and persons with disabilities

TBD

(Note 5)

TBD

(Note 5)

For the Futurpreneur program only: 804
Specific groups: TBD

(Note 5)

Not available – new indicator Not available – new indicator

Table notes

† The date to achieve this target is linked to Canada’s Innovation and Skills Plan Charter.

Note 1: The target and date to achieve the target included in this report were established after the publication of ISED’s 2018–19 Departmental Plan (i.e., published in April 2019 in ISED’s 2019–20 Departmental Plan).

Note 2: Results for 2016–17 are for the Technical Work Experience Program (TWEP – now known as the Computers for Schools Intern (CFSI) Program) only. Starting in 2017–18, results also include CanCode, and starting in 2018–19, results also include Digital Skills for Youth and Digital Literacy Exchange Program. Results indicate the total number of participants across programs and may count certain participants more than once if the same individuals participated in more than one training opportunity.

Note 3: The targets included in this report were established after the publication of ISED’s 2018–19 Departmental Plan (i.e., published in April 2019 in ISED’s 2019–20 Departmental Plan).

Note 4: For the results on youth specifically, 1.7% of SMEs have primary decision makers younger than 30, and 14.1% have primary decision makers between 30 and 39 (Source: Survey on Financing and Growth of SMEs, 2017). The 2017–18 results presented in the table align with the Futurpreneur definition of youth, which is between 18 and 39.

Note 5: Targets for ISED programs will be set in a future Departmental Plan. The Futurpreneur program (targeted at youth aged 18 to 39) supported 804 SMEs in 2018–19, of which 358 are majority-owned by women and 38 are majority-owned by Indigenous people.

 Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities
available for use
2018–19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018–19
Difference (Actual spending
minus Planned spending)
468,424,828 468,424,828 492,829,273  280,092,604 (188,332,224)

The variance between 2018–19 Planned spending and 2018–19 Actual spending is primarily due to a reprofile of funds of the Connect to Innovate program from 2018–19 to 2019–20.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
144 171 27

The variance between 2018–19 Planned and 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents is primarily due to the ramp-up of new programs, notably the Accessible Technology Program, the Connecting Families initiative and the Digital Literacy Exchange.


Core Responsibility title

Science, Technology, Research and Commercialization

Description

Support and enable business–led investment and strategic collaborations for leading-edge technology development and commercialization; maintain and strengthen Canada's research excellence, including support for fundamental science, experimentation and exploration to address global challenges.

Results
Departmental Result: World-leading superclusters are grown in Canada

ISED has continued to support business-led innovation superclusters with great potential to energize the economy and become engines of growth. Under the Innovation Superclusters Initiative (ISI), Canada is building five superclusters—the Digital Technology Supercluster, Protein Supercluster, Advanced Manufacturing Supercluster, SCALE.AI Supercluster and the Ocean Supercluster—which are in the process of finalizing their governance documents, including their membership agreements. The ISI requires that every public dollar be matched with private contributions. This private sector commitment helps leverage strengths, address gaps and bring new players into the innovation ecosystem so the superclusters can work more strategically.

On March 5, 2019, the British Columbia-based Digital Technology Supercluster announced its first seven industry-led projects under the ISI. These projects aim to unlock the power of data to improve service delivery and efficiency in the natural resources, precision health and industrial sectors. The goal is to propel Canadian businesses forward as innovation leaders, preserve our forests and even save Canadian lives. Other superclusters passed similar milestones in spring 2019 with their first project announcements.

Departmental Result: Canadian businesses invest more in research and development

Applied research and development (R&D) and partnerships between businesses and research institutions transform fundamental science into commercial products and services. The Innovation Superclusters Initiative integrates a special focus on business expenditure on R&D (BERD), which will ultimately contribute to Canada’s innovation competitiveness.

ISED also continued to administer contributions to a number of third-party science and research organizations. This work helps Canada maintain its leadership role in fundamental research by supporting collaborative research between academia and industry, which may in turn help increase BERD. In 2018–19, as announced in Budget 2018, ISED renewed its contribution to the Centre for Drug Research and Development and began implementing renewals for Genome Canada and the Stem Cell Network. These agreements will support the translation of research discoveries into applications and commercialization, helping companies innovate and grow.

Departmental Result: Canada has world-leading research capacity

In 2018–19, ISED worked towards the implementation of a Digital Research Infrastructure (DRI) Strategy to provide Canadian scientists and scholars with the digital tools they need to conduct world-leading research that supports innovation in Canada. ISED completed a validation process in summer 2018, including engagement with provincial and territorial governments as well as other key stakeholders, and officially launched the Strategy in April 2019. The DRI Strategy establishes a new contribution program to fund one not-for-profit organization that will coordinate funding and strategic direction for national DRI activities related to advanced research computing, data management and research software. ISED announced the recipient in summer 2019, a new not-for-profit organization that will begin establishing its activities.

Digital Research Infrastructure: responding to immediate needs

ISED's engagement on the Digital Research Infrastructure (DRI) Strategy underscored the fact that shortages in existing advanced research computing (ARC) capacity, involving super computers that allow researchers to analyze massive amounts of data, are having a negative impact on Canada's researchers. As a one-time bridge measure, ISED held a call for proposals in March 2019 to invest in the immediate expansion of ARC infrastructure at up to five existing national ARC sites. Agreements will be negotiated over the course of 2019–20 for funding up to March 31, 2021. This transitional approach will ensure that researchers' access to advanced research computing and services is maintained during the transition period to the new DRI Strategy, which will support the development and implementation of a national vision for DRI to meet researchers' needs on an ongoing basis.

The Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund was launched in 2016 to modernize facilities and infrastructure that support research and commercialization, bringing tangible benefits to universities, colleges and their communities. In 2018–19, the fund continued to work with provincial and territorial governments on the 297 projects funded since its launch. As of March 31, 2019, more than 95 percent of the projects had been completed, and $1.72 billion had been disbursed to institutions.

ISED also completed a new contribution agreement with the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) to provide increased support, through the CFI Major Science Initiatives Fund, to national science facilities that make international-calibre research possible in Canada.

As a member of the Canada Research Coordinating Committee (CRCC), ISED participated in a range of initiatives to support greater harmonization, integration and coordination of science and research-related programs and policies. The committee’s work involves the three federal granting agencies (the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research) and the CFI. Notably, the CRCC held national consultations, engaging with and receiving input from more than 1,500 members of Canada’s post-secondary research community on how to shape transformative policies and programs to support research. Informed by these consultations, the CRCC developed tri-agency action plans to support early career researchers and promote equity, diversity and inclusion in Canadian research. It also engaged with Indigenous partners on the development of a strategic research plan to strengthen Indigenous research capacity. This complements work by the federal granting agencies to improve equity, diversity and inclusion, which has begun to yield results. For example, women made up 50 percent of nominations in the fall 2018 Canada Research Chairs competition — an all-time high. Nominations from candidates identifying as Indigenous peoples or members of a visible minority also increased.

In 2018–19, ISED led a review of third-party research organizations to support the development of a new approach to funding these organizations. The Department published a consultation paper, which proposed a principle-based framework to guide research organization funding, and held consultations with experts and stakeholders during fall 2018. This work led to the Budget 2019 announcement that a Strategic Science Fund would be created, starting in 2022–23. Under the Fund, the principle-based framework will be applied by an independent panel of experts, which will provide advice for allocating federal funding to third-party science and research organizations through competitive and transparent processes, helping protect and promote research excellence.

In addition, to inform the government’s efforts to strengthen the science and research ecosystem and stimulate innovation, ISED supported the establishment of the new Council on Science and Innovation, which was officially created on February 25, 2019, through an Order in Council. An anticipatory recruitment process was launched in January 2019, inviting applications for council chair and members, with appointments expected in 2019–20.

ISED also supported the Chief Science Advisor (CSA), who helps the federal government put evidence at the heart of its decision-making and published her first annual report on March 11, 2019. The CSA will continue to collaborate with the scientific communityand advisory organizations across the Government of Canada to strengthen federal science and science advice for Canada. As part of the Open Science section of Canada’s 2018–2020 National Action Plan on Open Government published in December 2018, the Office of the CSA committed to developing an open science roadmap to provide a plan for greater openness in federal science and research activities and support the Government’s commitment to make federal science, scientific data and scientists more accessible.

Results achieved
Departmental Results Performance Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018–19
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
World-leading superclusters are grown in Canada

(Note 1)

Number of new firms created (in targeted areas) TBD March 31, 2022 New program – N/A New program – N/A New program – N/A
Number of anchor firms (in targeted areas) TBD March 31, 2022 New program – N/A New program – N/A New program – N/A

Value of investments leveraged to develop clusters as a result of ISED program funding (per dollar invested)

1.2 dollars for each ISI dollar invested March 31, 2022 New program – N/A New program – N/A New program – N/A
Canadian businesses invest more in research and development Business Expenditure in Research and Development in dollars $30 billion December 31, 2025† 17.7 billion (2018 Preliminary) $18.7 billion (2017)

$18.7 billion (2016)

(Note 2)

Percentage of companies engaged in collaborations with higher education institutions

10.4%

(Note 3)
December 31, 2025† Not available
(occasional Statistics Canada survey)
3.2%
(2015-2017)
Not available
(occasional Statistics Canada survey)
Value of Business Expenditure in Research and Development by firms receiving ISED program funding (in dollars)

TBD

(Note 4)

TBD Not available – data strategy being developed Not available – data strategy being developed Not available – data strategy being developed
Canada has world leading-research capacity Canada's rank among Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development nations on the citation score of science research publications 10th December 31, 2025† Available in winter 2019 15th (2017) 16th (2016)
Number of co-authored publications between federal and non-federal scientists 2,479 2020 Available in winter 2019

2,370 (2017)

(Note 2)

2,522 (2016)

(Note 2)
Value of investments leveraged in science and research infrastructure as a result of ISED program funding (per dollar invested) $1.00 2018

$1.60

(Note 5)

 $1.50

(Note 5)

 $1.50

(Note 5)

Table notes

† The date to achieve this target is linked to Canada’s Innovation and Skills Plan Charter.

Note 1: The first seven industry-led projects of the Innovation Superclusters Initiative were announced in March 2019. Superclusters are finalizing governance documents, which include their membership agreement. The program will be able to establish a baseline, targets and report on results once the agreements are finalized and Superclusters complete their first member intake activities. Further, note that the date to achieve the target was subsequently changed to 2023 as part of the 2019–20 Departmental Plan process, to align with the program’s end date.

Note 2: Statistical revisions are carried out regularly in the data source for this indicator. Therefore, in this table, past years’ values may differ from those published in previous ISED reports (Departmental Plan, Departmental Results Report). 

Note 3: The results that were previously published for this indicator were based on a Statistics Canada survey that has been discontinued (Survey of Advanced Technology). The data provided for 2017–18 are based on a different, occasional, Statistics Canada survey (Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy 2017) which measures the percentage of firms that cooperate with higher education institutions on innovation activities. It covers, as a whole, years 2015 to 2017. The target for the indicator also required revisions using data from the new source as the baseline; the target has been revised to 6% in ISED’s 2019–20 Departmental Plan.

Note 4: Baseline data and a target will be available in 2020–21.

Note 5: The past results for this indicator apply only to the Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund. Other ISED programs will start using this indicator in future years and the target may then be revised.

 Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities
available for use
2018–19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018–19
Difference
(Actual spending minus
Planned spending)
1,270,754,540 1,270,754,540 1,295,115,356 882,662,747 (388,091,793)

The variance between 2018–19 Planned spending and 2018–19 Actual spending is primarily due to a reprofile of funds for the Innovation Superclusters Initiative and the Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund.

 Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19
Difference (Actual full-time equivalents
minus Planned full-time equivalents)
144 117 3

Core Responsibility title

Companies, Investment and Growth

Description

Provide support to help grow small, medium and large Canadian businesses into globally competitive, high-impact firms; ensure a fair and competitive marketplace ; promote the conditions that support competitive prices and product choices, including in the telecommunications sector; simplify government programming, promote efforts to reduce red tape for businesses, putting in place the right conditions for market-driven innovation and promoting inclusive growth and an economy that works for everyone; reduce barriers to the movement of goods, services, capital and labour; grow Canada’s tourism sector.

Results
Departmental Result: Canada becomes a global leader in clean technologies

ISED continued its efforts to protect the environment by supporting clean technology businesses through the Clean Growth Hub, which the Department co-leads with Natural Resources Canada. The Hub provides a whole-of-government focal point to support clean technology companies and projects, coordinate programs, and track results. It improves coordination among federal and provincial partners to streamline client services, identify gaps between clean technology programs and policies, and enhance information sharing in support of innovation and clean growth outcomes.

In 2018–19, the Hub’s team of experts from across government served more than 950 clients. By leveraging and coordinating the knowledge and expertise of more than 15 federal departments and agencies, the Hub helped these clean technology users and producers find and understand the programs and services best suited to their individual circumstances, and also helped answer questions regarding policy, regulatory and procurement issues.

The Clean Technology Data Strategy entered its third year in 2018–19, and ISED continued its collaboration with Natural Resources Canada and Statistics Canada to develop, refine and disseminate meaningful data about clean technology in Canada. Results from this work include Statistics Canada’s December 2018 release of the latest version of the Environmental and Clean Technology Products Economic Account, which is Canada’s main source of clean technology data. To better understand Canada’s trade in clean technology, ISED also worked with Statistics Canada and Natural Resources Canada to release the International Trade in Environmental and Clean Technology Products by Origin and Destination (2007 to 2017) report in February 2019.

In addition to these efforts, ISED disseminated and communicated clean technology data to stakeholders, the public and other government departments. This included hosting a meeting of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group on Clean Growth’s Communities of Interest, where participants shared clean technology data and analysis and discussed opportunities for collaboration among provinces, territories and stakeholders.

Departmental Result: Canadian companies are globally competitive and achieve high growth

ISED continued to support innovative Canadian businesses and help them achieve high growth by making strategic investments that encourage the development of new technologies and innovative Canadian products in targeted industries.

In particular, the Strategic Innovation Fund (SIF) continued to ensure Canada remains a top destination for businesses to invest, grow, and create jobs and prosperity for Canadians. In 2018–19, SIF announced 25 projects across all sectors of the Canadian economy, including food processing, pharmaceuticals, chemical, automotive, telecommunications, oil and gas, steel and aluminum, and aerospace. SIF also launched its first Stream 4 competition for National-Scale Initiatives at the Intersection of Data and Digital Capabilities in Health and Biosciences to invest in better health outcomes while creating and maintaining good middle-class jobs across the economy. Selected projects were announced in spring 2019.

In 2018–19, SIF also received new funding to bolster the competitiveness of Canadian steel and aluminum producers in response to additional tariffs imposed by the United States. As a result of three steel and aluminum agreements concluded in 2018–19, contributions from SIF will support more than 11,500 jobs across the country.

In collaboration with 10 other federal organizations, ISED continued to deliver the Accelerated Growth Service (AGS), which supports the international expansion of growth-oriented Canadian businesses by helping them access key government services, such as financing, exporting, innovation and business advice. In 2018–19, the AGS enrolled 165 high-potential firms, for a total of 515 firms since its launch in 2016. These clients received access to a dedicated advisor and a customized plan of potential government programs and services, to help them reach their full potential.

ISED hosted Canada’s Economic Strategy Tables, a new model for industry–government collaboration created to turn Canadian economic strengths into global advantages, in six key economic sectors with high-growth potential: advanced manufacturing, agri-food, clean technology, digital industries, health/bio-sciences and resources of the future. The Tables were made up of 90 chief executive officers from diverse backgrounds, and involved 34 Table meetings, 8 federal-provincial-territorial meetings and 67 engagement sessions with Canadians. These efforts culminated in reports released in September 2018.

Through Innovative Solutions Canada, ISED is leading government-wide efforts to partner with Canadian entrepreneurs to develop early stage, pre-commercial innovation and help them turn good ideas into tangible solutions. As of March 31, 2019, the program had released 42 novel challenges from 15 departments and agencies on needs where there is currently no solution in the marketplace, and issued 37 awards to small businesses across Canada. These public challenges include improving the design of film food packaging to reduce the plastic waste and the integration of health and vital signs with existing virtual and augmented reality headsets to catalyze the development of innovative health solutions. A key objective of the program is to encourage participation from businesses led by underrepresented groups. The program has attended or organized 274 engagement and outreach activities, including networking events focused on women-led and women-owned businesses, Indigenous business groups, as well as activities for youth-owned and LGBTQ+-owned businesses. Of the 728 small business applicants, 50 percent counted women in their ownership, 50 percent had visible minorities, 37 percent had youth, 9 percent had people with disabilities, and 7 percent had Indigenous people.

ISED continued to research and analyze trends in the aerospace, space, defence, and marine sectors, which are important contributors to the Canadian economy and of well-paying middle-class jobs. The Department assessed eight aerospace and space-related projects under SIF and completed various outreach activities to engage stakeholders in Canada, the United States and internationally. The State of Canada’s Defence Industry 2018report and the State of Canada's Aerospace Industry 2018 report were also published in May 2018 and June 2018, respectively. 

ISED continued to apply the Industrial and Technological Benefits (ITB) Policy to leverage the economic benefits of defence spending and create jobs and growth for Canadians. In 2018–19, 10 new projects were added to the ITB portfolio, generating a total of $894 million in new ITB obligations that will deliver long-term economic benefits to Canada. ISED also introduced a requirement for bidders to submit gender and diversity plans, describing how they will achieve gender balance and increase diversity within their corporate structures and broader supply chains in Canada. The Department continued administering the National Shipbuilding Strategy Value Proposition, with shipyards investing 0.5 percent of the value of large vessel contracts into projects that support the priority areas of human resources, technology, and industrial development, bringing economic benefits and jobs for Canadians.

ISED continues to ensure efficient use of spectrum resources for the benefit of all Canadians. In particular, ISED held an auction of residual spectrum licences on May 15, 2018, and the auction of 600 MHz spectrum between March 12, and April 4, 2019, which included rules to support regional providers accessing spectrum and the provision of service across the country, including in rural areas. In June 2018, the Department published a consultation on introducing mobile service in the 3500 MHz band and a second consultation on making millimetre wave spectrum available to support 5G. Further to this, ISED published a consultation in November 2018 on smaller service areas to encourage rural spectrum access.

Departmental Result: Canada is a location and destination of choice for investment, growth and tourism

In 2018–19, ISED implemented Canada’s Tourism Vision, a whole-of-government approach to increase the number of international tourists who come to Canada by seizing the global opportunity that tourism offers. Highlights of the first year of work were released in May 2018 with the one-year progress report. A key result for 2018–19 was the stabilization of Destination Canada’s annual funding at $95.5M, ensuring that Canada’s national marketer was well positioned to continue to raise Canada’s profile internationally.

The 2018 was also the Canada-China Year of Tourism (CCYT). The CCYT provided the government with a unique opportunity to market Canada as a destination of choice to Chinese travellers. The CCYT had multiple successes in 2018–19, including a Federal-Provincial-Territorial Tourism Trade Mission to Beijing, Hangzhou and Shanghai, China, in June 2018. The mission included more than 400 business meetings between Canadian stakeholders and Chinese tourism businesses, high-level meetings between Canadian ministers and Chinese executives and government officials, and the signing of seven memoranda of understanding to promote Canadian tourism products in the Chinese market. This includes one involving the Indigenous Tourism Association of Canada to increase the marketing of authentic Indigenous tourism experiences in Canada to visitors from China.

Work in 2018–19 also saw the completion of detailed research, analysis, consultation, and engagement on tourism in Canada. ISED and Destination Canada led research on the key challenges and opportunities for growth in the tourism sector. The report, Unlocking the potential of Canada’s visitor economy, was released in December 2018. Advice was also sought from key business owners, entrepreneurs, tourism operators and professionals through an Advisory Council on Jobs and the Visitor Economy, and feedback was received from Canadians across the country at roundtables that focused on access, promotion, labour, and cost. This work inspired the new Federal Tourism Growth Strategy, launched in May 2019.  

ISED continued its work to support an efficient marketplace that strengthens confidence in the Canadian economy and encourages investment. For example, through the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy, ISED implemented an enhanced directive on Counselling in Insolvency Matters. The new directive is intended to protect consumers, maintain the integrity of the insolvency system and reduce the risk of Canadian consumer debtors paying unnecessary fees for unregulated services. In 2018–19, the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy also established a registry of Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act counsellors for Licensed Insolvency Trustees. The registry is maintained on the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy’s website and supports transparency in the marketplace.

Recognizing the growing importance of trust in the digital economy, the Department conducted national consultations on Digital and Data Transformation in 2018-19 with the goal of better understanding how Canada can drive digital innovation, prepare Canadians for the future of work, and ensure they have trust and confidence in how their data is used. Canadians from coast to coast shared their insights and ideas on what Canada can do to harness the power of digital and data for the benefit of all. Canadians’ views were obtained from over 1,950 written responses received through the consultation web site, and over 30 roundtable discussions with businesses.

ISED provided advice and subject matter expertise on trade agreements to ensure preferential market access for Canadian firms. For example, to support the negotiations of the Canada-U.S.-Mexico Agreement (CUSMA), ISED provided strategic advice to the Government of Canada in several key areas, notably the automotive industry, digital trade, competition and intellectual property, and assisted in the development of the legislative and regulatory amendments required for CUSMA implementation. ISED also supported ongoing free trade agreement discussions and negotiations with regional blocs such as MERCOSUR and the Pacific Alliance, trade relations with China and other potential partners, and the exploration of priority market opportunities by sector.

Gender-based analysis and competition policy: Supporting international discussions

Internationally, the Competition Bureau helped set the stage for discussions on gender and competition policy. Having identified the need, new research was commissioned through the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The research was presented in November 2018 at the OECD Global Forum on Competition, to which the Bureau made a submission. Participants at the Forum explored how a gender lens might help deliver more objective competition policy by identifying additional relevant features of the market and of the behavior of consumers and businesses. The Bureau also facilitated a panel on gender and competition in March 2019 at the OECD Conference on Gender Equality in Business.

In 2018–19, the Competition Bureau (the Bureau) worked to ensure robust competition and trust among consumers in the digital economy, starting 36 cases and concluding 24. One such case involved a practice known as drip pricing, where online retailers gradually inflate a price with additional fees, taxes and surcharges during the purchasing process. This practice erodes Canadians’ trust that prices advertised online are the ones they will actually pay. In 2018, the Bureau reached an agreement with Discount Car & Truck Rental Ltd., which the Bureau found had engaged in drip pricing, including online, so that consumers were paying more than the advertised rental prices due to added mandatory fees. As part of the agreement, Discount was required to pay an administrative monetary penalty of $700,000.

In May 2018, the Bureau launched a market study to investigate consumer habits in purchasing Internet services. The study focused on the current state of competition in the Canadian broadband sector and recognized that increased competition in this sector could lead to improved affordability and choice for Canadians, as well as the development of leading-edge products and services. In October 2018, the Bureau launched a public consultation survey to learn about consumer Internet-purchasing habits and received more than 42,000 responses from Canadians, helping it identify the trends of greatest interest to Canadians.  Following a 2017 market study of innovation in the financial services industry, the Bureau published a progress report in 2018–19 to continue its encouragement of innovation-friendly approaches to regulation.

The Bureau also continued to pursue bid-rigging in the infrastructure sector to safeguard taxpayers’ money and protect government investments. On March 13, 2019, the Bureau and the Public Prosecution Service of Canada reached a settlement with Genivar (now WSP Canada) and the firm was ordered to pay $4 million for its participation in a bid-rigging scheme for municipal infrastructure contracts in Quebec. As part of another settlement obtained in the same year, Dessau, a Quebec-based engineering firm, was ordered to pay a $1.9 million settlement for its participation in the same scheme.

To help Canadians identify, avoid and report deceptive marketing practices, the Bureau released 13 consumer and business alerts in 2018–19, including scam warnings during Black Friday and Cyber Monday. The consumer and business alerts were shared 311,000 times on social media. In collaboration with partners including the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre and the Canada Revenue Agency, the Bureau launched its 15th edition of Fraud Prevention Month in March 2019. Fraud Prevention Month content generated approximately 57 million potential impressions through traditional and social media channels.

On April 26, 2018, ISED launched the Intellectual Property (IP) Strategy, a comprehensive strategy to help Canadian businesses, creators, entrepreneurs and innovators understand, protect and access IP. In 2018–19, ISED supported the implementation of a number of the strategy’s key initiatives. This included issuing a call for proposals in February 2019 to seek a not-for-profit corporation to operate and shape the design of the Patent Collective Pilot Program. Launched in spring 2019, this program will help SMEs in a selected sector to better leverage IP to grow to scale and will provide the government with insight to better support SMEs. ISED received 21 submissions from applicants interested in operating the collective. Funding from the IP Legal Clinics program was provided to support collaboration, the sharing of best clinical practices, and resource development among Canadian law schools.

ISED also developed a demonstration model of the IP Marketplace, incorporating the feedback received during stakeholder consultations. The IP Marketplace will serve as a one-stop online listing of public sector-owned IP available for licensing or sale. Its aim is to improve entrepreneurs' access to IP owned by the public sector and encourage research collaboration opportunities.

Indigenous peoples and intellectual property

ISED launched the Indigenous IP Program on April 26, 2019, to support Indigenous participation in national and international dialogue on IP, and to discuss how IP interacts with traditional knowledge and cultural expression. ISED also took steps to provide greater opportunities for Indigenous peoples to build their capacity and advocate for their interests in discussions about protecting Indigenous knowledge and cultural expression. These included completing multi-year grants with Indigenous organizations, co-hosting an information-sharing workshop and launching a web portal for Indigenous peoples and IP.

The Department supported several legislative amendments to IP laws in Bill C-86 to prevent misuse of the regime and expedite dispute resolution. These changes will help drive innovation by clarifying acceptable behaviours and removing loopholes that allow individuals or organizations to use IP in bad faith for their own gain. They also streamlined the framework in which the Copyright Board of Canada operates to improve the timeliness, predictability and clarity of its proceedings. Finally, new legislation was introduced to create the College of Patent Agents and Trademark Agents. The College is an independent body that will be responsible for the regulation of patent and trademark agents, ensuring that Canadians receive quality advice from IP professionals, and that professional and ethical standards are maintained.

The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) expanded its IP awareness and education program in 2018–19 to better meet the needs of SMEs in key growth sectors and underrepresented groups, and to assist them in their understanding and acquisition of IP. In support of that goal, CIPO also established 45 new partnerships and collaborations with federal government departments, provincial governments, businesses, intermediaries and academia. CIPO’s IP Academy offered a selection of free, publicly accessible seminars and training on IP, reaching more than 5,000 people in 2018–19 through more than 400 one-on-one sessions and 65 training sessions to intermediaries such as incubators, accelerators, technology transfer offices, and other federal departments and provincial governments.

In December 2018, CIPO launched the IP Hub to increase Canadians' understanding of the benefits of IP. The IP Hub is an ever-growing digital platform featuring more than 300 links to encourage the intellectual property community to exchange useful tools and resources from around the world, and to connect businesses and innovators in the innovation ecosystem with partners and services in the marketplace. By offering this streamlined access to IP information from a network of services, the IP Hub is helping innovators and businesses navigate through the four stages of an IP journey: learning about IP, creating it, protecting it and growing one’s business.

The 2017-18 evaluation of CIPO’s Patent Services noted that there was low awareness among Canadian SMEs of the benefits of IP and of the services provided by CIPO, and that more outreach activities were required. CIPO’s IP Awareness and Education program is helping to increase awareness of IP and making improvements in this regard.

In 2018–19, the applied research and development of the Communications Research Centre (CRC) continued to focus on supporting sustainable spectrum management decision-making to ensure Canadians have timely, reliable access to spectrum for their wireless needs. For example, through its Grand Challenges projects, the CRC used high-performance cloud computing and engineered surfaces to demonstrate that millimetre waves were viable for mobile communication purposes. This will help enable 5G communications, particularly in dense urban environments, to support smart cities, the Internet of Things and other future uses. In addition, through two ISED-sponsored Innovative Solutions Canada challenges, the CRC has engaged with Canadian companies to help commercialize engineered surfaces that will enable 5G communications. The results of the CRC’s research have been made publicly available to contribute to the growth of Canada’s wireless telecommunications knowledge and expertise.

Departmental Result: Canadian innovators have simplified access to tools and support

In 2018–19, the Department continued work to simplify access to tools for businesses and Canadians and improve service offerings. By streamlining online processes and simplifying interactions between businesses and governments, ISED is helping businesses find the services that will allow them to grow, compete and prosper.

In particular, ISED integrated new features into the Innovation Canada platform to better support business by streamlining the interaction between Innovation Advisors, the digital platform and businesses. ISED also implemented a dedicated team responsible for maintaining the accuracy and quality of program information. With a single-window approach and a simple, story-based user interface, the Innovation Canada platform can match businesses with the most fitting programs and services in less than three minutes.

In addition, ISED consolidated the Canada Business Network under the Innovation Canada platform. This change was announced in Budget 2018 as part of the reform and streamlining of business innovation programs to create a suite of programs that is easier to navigate.

ISED continued to encourage the use of the Canada Small Business Financing Program’s online loan and registration fee application and direct deposit payment initiative. The program makes it easier for small businesses to get loans from financial institutions by sharing the risk with lenders and by simplifying the process. As of March 31, 2019, a total of 96 percent of loans and registration fees and 100 percent of claims and refund payments were processed electronically, exceeding the initial target of 90 percent. In 2018–19, more than 6,000 loans (5 percent more than in the previous year) worth $1.32 billion (a 14-percent increase over the previous year) were registered with the program.  The loans facilitated by the Program support the establishment, expansion and improvement of small businesses across Canada.

Through Corporations Canada, ISED continued its collaboration with provinces and territories to digitally connect Canada’s business registries. A beta version of the Canada’s business registries online search service was launched in June 2018, providing open access to information on more than 90 percent of business corporations in Canada, well above the initial target of 80 percent. This also enabled provinces to streamline extra-provincial registration and reporting through data exchanges between registries in 2020. The initiative has advanced to allow at least four provinces to offer streamlined services in 2020.

BizPaL, the ISED-led multi-jurisdictional partnership among federal, provincial, territorial and municipal governments, continued to facilitate access for entrepreneurs and business owners to the permits and licences they need to start and grow their businesses. In 2018–19, BizPaL welcomed 30 new municipal partners and undertook research to support future onboarding of First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities. All provinces and territories are participating in BizPaL, with a total of over 1,000 municipalities and four First Nations communities offering the service, making it available to approximately 80 percent of the Canadian population. With the goal of improving its digital services, BizPaL also began work on a new user web interface with improved search result relevancy and accessibility, and created a foundation for making BizPaL transactional and allowing businesses to find, pay, renew and receive permits and licences. The service will continue to contribute to reducing the paperwork burden on small businesses.

Results achieved
Departmental Results Performance Indicators* Target Date to achieve target 2018–19
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
Canada becomes a global leader in clean technologies Value of Canada's exports of clean technologies (in dollars) $15 billion (Note 1) December 31, 2025† Available in winter 2019 $9.0 billion (2017) (Note 1) $8.1 billion (2016) (Note 1)
Clean technology employment in Canada (in numbers) 190,000 (Note 2) December 31, 2025 Available in winter 2019 183,265 (2017) (Note 1) 181,978 (2016) (Note 1)
Value of investments leveraged in clean technologies as a result of ISED program funding (per dollar invested) $2.00 (Note 2) March 31, 2019 $2.60 (as of March 31, 2019) (Note 3) $2.80 (as of March 31, 2018) (Note 3) $2.80 (as of March 31, 2017) (Note 3)
Canadian companies are globally competitive and achieve high growth Number of high-growth firms 28,000 (Note 4) December 31, 2025† Not available at the time of publication Not available at the time of publication Not available at the time of publication
Value of Canada's goods and services exports (in dollars) $820 billion (Note 1) December 31, 2025† $706 billion (2018) $664 billion (2017) $631 billion (2016) (Note 1)
Revenue growth rate of firms supported by ISED programs TBD (Note 5) TBD Not available – data strategy being developed (Note 5) Not available – data strategy being developed Not available – data strategy being developed
Canada is a location and destination of choice for investment, growth and tourism Total Business Investment in Canada (in dollars) $260 billion December 31, 2025† $222 billion (2018) $217 billion (2017) $212 billion (2016)
Spending by international visitors to Canada (in dollars) $25 billion December 31, 2021 $22.2 billion (2017) $21.5 billion (2017) $20.0 billion (2016) (Note 1)
Number of international overnight visitors to Canada 25,973,134 December 31, 2021 21,133,000 (2018) 20,883,000 (2017) 19,971,000 (2016)
Turn-around times for patent applications filed in Canada, with a request for examination 34.6 months March 31, 2019 32.0 months 33.6 months 36.7 months
Canadian innovators have simplified access to tools and support Canada's ranking on the World Bank's Ease of Doing Business Index 10th December 31, 2025 22nd (2018) 18th (2017) 22nd (2016)
Percentage of ISED priority services that meet published service standards 90% December 31, 2019 Not available at the time of publication 66% 92%

Table notes

† The date to achieve this target is linked to Canada’s Innovation and Skills Plan Charter.

Note 1: Statistical revisions are carried out regularly in the data source for this indicator. Therefore, in this table, past years’ values may differ from those published in previous ISED reports (Departmental Plan, Departmental Results Report). The target is also subject to adjustments, to align with the statistical revisions. For the most recent information, please consult the following website “Tracking progress and results: The Innovation and Skills Plan”.

Note 2: The target and date to achieve the target included in this report were established after the publication of ISED’s 2018–19 Departmental Plan (i.e., published in April 2019 in ISED’s 2019–20 Departmental Plan).

Note 3: The target and results data for this indicator apply only to Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC). This target and result are cumulative since the beginning of the program in 2001.

Note 4: This target will be revised in the 2020–21 Departmental Plan to reflect changes in Statistics Canada’s methodology.

Note 5: Baseline data and a target will be available in 2020–21.

Note 6: ISED's list of priority services is revised annually, along with the Management Accountability Framework methodology, and this indicator is therefore subject to fluctuating results, making year-over-year comparisons challenging.

 Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities
available for use
2018–19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018–19
Difference
(Actual spending minus
Planned spending)
999,165,583 999,165,583 1,282,706,538 929,710,535 (69,455,048)
 Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents
minus Planned full-time
equivalents)
3,303 3,301 (2)

Financial, human resources and performance information for the ISED’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: 

Results
 Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities
available for use
2018–19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018–19
Difference
(Actual spending minus
Planned spending)
166,536,487 166,536,487 187,017,747 183,535,185 16,998,698

The variance between 2018–19 Planned spending and 2018–19 Actual spending is primarily due to additional funding spent for various department-wide information technology projects and workplace modernization initiatives.

 Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents
minus Planned full-time equivalents)
1,428 1,543 115

In 2018–19, ISED continued to implement strategies under the three main themes of the Innovation 2020 agenda: creating an agile workforce, practising sound stewardship and operating as one. Late in the year, ISED began significant engagement with employees to move beyond these themes in support of the newest iteration of the Blueprint 2020 public service renewal framework, Beyond2020.Through pulse surveys, discussion tables and design jams, employees across the Department were encouraged to participate in the development of ISED’s vision to be more agile and purpose-driven, equipped and capable, and inclusive and healthy.

Creating an agile workforce

ISED instilled a culture of continuous learning by developing new talent management (TM) tools such as the ISED TM Tool and the My Team Profile. These tools help support talent conversations between managers and employees to determine possible developmental activities aligned with organizational needs. ISED also created a new team to build on the Lean expertise gathered from multiple reviews of human resources processes. The Service Design team will help ensure the Department continues to improve the experience for managers and employees through better processes and reduced processing time. Further, in support of increased access to employment opportunities for veterans, ISED participated in an interdepartmental working group led by Veterans Affairs Canada and promoted the hiring of veterans within the Department.

Proud to be one of Canada's Top 100 Employers and Best Diversity Employers

ISED's support for career development was among the elements highlighted in its recognition among Canada's Top 100 Employers (2019) . The Department was particularly recognized for having developed a number of in-house and online training programs as well as short-term experience programs for its employees allowing them to grow and thrive as professionals. Additionally, the Department encourages its employees to maintain a healthy work-life balance through a variety of alternative work arrangements, including flexible hours, telecommuting, and shortened and compressed workweek options. In addition, ISED's commitment to diversity and inclusion contributed to its selection as one of Canada's Best Diversity Employers (2019).

Practising sound stewardship

ISED continued to implement initiatives in support of a respectful, healthy and inclusive workplace. This included the launch of an internal harassment prevention and resolution portal to provide resources and tools for employees and managers to deal with situations of potential harassment. ISED also continued to execute its mental health strategy through the launch of an e-learning tool and the creation of an Ombudsman for Mental Health and Employee Well-Being who operates independently within the Department.

With the creation of the Canadian Innovation Centre for Mental Health, ISED supported and coordinated wellness and mental health events across the government. Since its opening in May 2018, the Centre delivered more than 300 events across Canada, both onsite and through WebEx online conferences, reaching more than 8,000 public servants. For example, the Centre facilitated consultations on Public Service Employee Survey results, offered suicide alertness training and offered presentations on taking action against gender-based violence.

In an effort to promote a diverse and inclusive workforce, ISED launched mandatory training on unconscious bias for all ISED employees and executives, and promoted hiring through diversity initiatives such as LiveWorkPlay, the Federal Internship for Newcomers program and Indigenous Student Employment Opportunity program. ISED also hosted its second annual Inclusion Symposium on November 8, 2018, where more than 240 public service employees participated in person or online to learn about creating a workplace of inclusion by design, including through a Minister Panel discussion on how to apply a diversity and inclusion lens to programs, policies, and activities.

Finally, ISED enhanced employer branding and outreach by increasing its online presence, piloting innovation recruitment tools and practices, and developing new student recruitment partnerships with university and post-secondary institutions. In 2018–19, ISED’s Human Resources Branch completed 769 student transactions, up from 610 in 2017–18.

Operating as one

ISED enhanced its interoperability and information-sharing processes in support of the federal government’s digital transformation objectives. The Department continued to implement the Open Government Directive by releasing ISED datasets on the Open Government Portal. As of May 1, 2019, ISED has 52 datasets posted on the portal, in addition to regular releases of proactive disclosure information. ISED completed an internal data inventory exercise in 2018–19.

In March 2019, ISED completed its transition to the GCDOCS file management system and continues to support frameworks to ensure employees can efficiently and readily access the information they need to do their jobs. ISED also implemented its Digital Office, a department-wide initiative to equip employees with the right productivity and communication tools to do their jobs in a way that supports greater mobility, collaboration and paper reduction.

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph

Departmental spending trend graph (the long description is located below the image)
Description of graph
Departmental spending trend
Fiscal year 2016–17 2017–18 2018–19 2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Statutory 210,024,214 155,481,757 159,064,841 111,850,392 177,026,671 162,578,573
Voted 1,876,889,571 2,200,456,525 2,116,936,230 2,702,620,999 2,168,179,687 2,101,980,049
Total 2,086,913,785 2,355,938,282 2,276,001,071 2,814,471,391 2,345,206,358 2,264,558,622
Budgetary performance summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and Internal Services 2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending nding
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities available for use
2018–19
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016–17
Actual spending (authorities used)
People, Skills and Communities (1)  468,424,828  468,424,828  453,557,392  279,038,357  492,829,273  280,092,604  246,923,115  260,337,245
Science, Technology, Research and Commercialization (2)   1,270,754,540  1,270,754,540  935,768,418  887,786,163  1,295,115,356  882,662,747  1,105,279,517  1,007,068,828
Companies, Investment and Growth (3)  999,165,583  999,165,583 1,262,721,251  1,021,969,830  1,282,706,538  929,710,535  822,745,924  665,413,943
Subtotal 2,738,344,951 2,738,344,951 2,652,047,061 2,188,794,350 3,070,651,167 2,092,465,886 2,174,948,556 1,932,820,016
Internal Services (4)   166,536,487  166,536,487  162,424,330  156,412,008  187,017,747  183,535,185  180,989,726  154,093,769
Total  2,904,881,438  2,904,881,438 2,814,471,391  2,345,206,358  3,257,668,914 2,276,001,071  2,355,938,282  2,086,913,785

Note: Figures for 2016–17 and 2017–18 are estimates based on the percentages established in the crosswalk between the Program Alignment Architecture for 2017–18 and the Departmental Results Framework Footnote. The figures are presented for illustrative purposes only.

  1. The variance between 2018–19 Planned spending and 2018–19 Actual spending is primarily due to a reprofile of funds of the Connect to Innovate program from 2018-19 to 2019–20.
  2. The variance between 2018–19 Planned spending and 2018–19 Actual spending is primarily due to a reprofile of funds for the Innovation Superclusters Initiative and the Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund.
  3. The variance between 2018–19 Planned spending and 2018–19 Actual spending is primarily due to additional funding spent for various department-wide information technology projects and workplace modernization initiatives.

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (full‑time equivalents)

Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2016–17
Actual full time
equivalents
2017–18
Actual full time
equivalents
2018–19
Planned full time
equivalents
2018–19
Actual full time
equivalents
2019–20
Planned full time
equivalents
2020–21
Planned full time
equivalents
People, Skills and Communities 142 150 144 171 186 185
Science, Technology, Research and Commercialization 90 106 114 117 110 110
Companies, Investment and Growth 3,159 3,192 3,303 3,301 3,395 3,440
Subtotal 3,391 3,448 3,561 3,589 3,691 3,735
Internal Services 1,410 1,462 1,428 1,543 1,604 1,604
Total 4,801 4,910 4,989 5,132 5,295 5,339

Note: Figures for 2016–17 and 2017–18 are estimates based on the percentages established in the crosswalk between the Program Alignment Architecture for 2017–18 and the Departmental Results Framework Footnote. The figures are presented for illustrative purposes only.

  1. The variance between 2018–19 Planned and 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents is primarily due to the ramp-up of new programs, notably the Accessible Technology Program, the Connecting Families initiative and the Digital Literacy Exchange.

Expenditures by vote

For information on ISED’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the  Public Accounts of Canada 2018–2019.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of ISED’s spending with the Government of Canada’s spending and activities is available in the GC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

ISED’s financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019, are available on the departmental website.

Financial statements highlights

The financial results are shaped by the Department’s programs and internal services that aim to help make Canada a world-leading centre for innovation, to help create better jobs, to strengthen and grow the middle class and to provide better opportunities for all Canadians.

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information 2018–19
Planned results
2018–19
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
Difference
(2018–19 Actual results
minus 2018–19 Planned results)
Difference
(2018–19 Actual results
minus 2017–18 Actual results)
Total expenses 3,057,368,736 2,330,786,710 2,450,494,699 (726,582,026) (119,707,989)
Total revenues 273,027,231 234,481,444 223,712,577 (38,545,787) 10,768,867
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 2,784,341,505 2,096,305,266 2,226,782,122 (688,036,239) (130,476,856)

* As per the 2018–19 Future-Oriented Statement of Operations.

Planned Results

The $726.6 million variance between the 2018–19 Planned Results and the 2018–19 Actual total expenses is primarily due to reprofiles for existing Grants and Contribution (G&C) programs; in particular, Innovation Superclusters, Connect to Innovate, and the Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund (PSI-SIF), as well as the winding down of the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI).

Expenses

Expenses by type
Expenses by type
Description of graph
Expenses by Type
Transfer Payments Salaries and Employee Benefits Other Operating Expenditures
65% 25% 10%

Total expenses were $2.3 billion in 2018–19, a decrease of $119.7 million from 2017–18. This decrease is mainly attributable to lower spending for transfer payment programs such as the PSI-SIF and SADI that were partially offset by increases in year-over-year spending for the Strategic Innovation Fund, Canadian Foundation for Innovation, and the Connect to Innovate program.

Revenues

Gross Revenues by Type
Gross Revenues by Type
Description of graph
Gross Revenues by Type
Radio Spectrum Licenses earned on behalf of Government Sales of services Other revenues
74% 24% 2%

Total gross revenues were $1.4 billion in 2018–19, a decrease of $90.9 million compared to 2017–18, while net revenues of $234.5 million in 2018–19 increased by $10.8 million compared to the previous fiscal year. A decrease in deferred revenue from spectrum auctions, which represent the majority of gross reported revenue in the Departmental Financial Statements, accounts for the majority of the variance and is due to the end of the licence term for Advanced Wireless Services (AWS) spectrum auctioned in 2008. Revenues from radio and spectrum licences are reported as revenues earned on behalf of the Government, as they are deposited in the Government’s Consolidated Revenue Fund.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information 2018–19 2017–18 Difference
(2018–19 minus 2017–18)
Total net liabilities 1,210,482,532 907,364,535 303,117,997
Total net financial assets 733,878,249 424,606,106 309,272,143
Departmental net debt 476,604,283 482,758,429 (6,154,146)
Total non‑financial assets 155,444,160 146,450,975 8,993,185
Departmental net financial position (321,160,123) (336,307,454) 15,147,331

Liabilities

Gross Liabilities by Type
Gross Liabilities by Type
Description of graph
Gross Liabilities by Type
Deferred Revenue Accounts payable and accrued liabilities Allowance for loan guarantees Other Liabilities
85% 10% 3% 2%

Total gross liabilities were $7.7 billion for 2018–19, a decrease of $447.3 million year-over-year, while net liabilities were $1.2 billion, an increase of $303.1 million compared to 2017–18. The decrease in gross liabilities is mainly attributable to a reduction in deferred revenues related to the recognition of revenues from spectrum auctions. An increase in accounts payable, primarily for G&C programs, partially offset this decrease.

Assets

Gross Assets by Type
Gross Assets by Type
Description of graph
Gross Assets by Type
Due from CRF Loans Receivable held on behalf of Government Tangible Capital Assets Other
33% 58% 7% 2%

Total gross financial assets amounted to $2 billion for 2018–19, an increase of $133.7 million from 2017–18, while net financial assets were $733.9 million, an increase of $309.3 million year-over-year. The increase in gross financial assets is primarily due to larger outstanding payments for G&C programs at year-end captured in the Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund, which was partially offset by the repayment of loans.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development:
The Honourable Navdeep Bains, P.C., M.P.

Minister of Science and Sports
The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, P.C., M.P.

Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie
The Honourable Mélanie Joly, P.C., M.P.

Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion
The Honourable Mary Ng, P.C., M.P.

Institutional head:
Simon Kennedy

Ministerial portfolio:
Innovation, Science and Economic Development

Enabling instrument:
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada's founding legislation is the Department of Industry Act, S.C. 1995, c.1.

Year of incorporation:
1892

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

“Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on ISED’s website.

For more information on the department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Ministers’ mandate letter.

Operating context and key risks

Information on operating context and key risks is available on ISED's website.

Reporting framework

ISED's Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2018–19 are shown below:

ISED's Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2018–19
Core Responsibilities People, Skills and Communities Science, Technology, Research and Commercialization Companies, Investment and Growth
Departmental Results and Result Indicators

Canada has a highly skilled workforce that is equipped for jobs in an innovative and high-growth economy

  • Percentage of professional, science and technology related jobs in Canada's economy
  • Number of STEM graduates in Canada
  • Number of Canadians that are equipped with digital and coding skills training and development opportunities through ISED programs

Canadian communities are connected to and use digital infrastructure

  • Percentage of population with access to ultrafast broadband
  • Percentage of households with an Internet connection (including across underserved individuals, such as low-income)

Canada's entrepreneurs represent all segments of Canadian society

  • Percentage of SMEs that are majority-owned by women, Indigenous people, youth, visible minorities and persons with disabilities.
  • Number of SMEs supported by ISED programs, including those that are majority-owned by women, Indigenous people, youth, visible minorities and persons with disabilities

World-leading superclusters are grown in Canada

  • Number of new firms created (including in targeted areas)
  • Number of anchor firms (in targeted areas)
  • Value of investments leveraged to develop clusters as a result of ISED program funding (per dollar invested)

Canadian businesses invest more in research and development (R&D)

  • Business Expenditure in Research and Development (BERD) in dollars
  • Percentage of companies engaged in collaborations with higher education institutions
  • Value of BERD by firms receiving ISED program funding (in dollars)

Canada has world leading-research capacity

  • Canada's rank among OECD nations on the citation score of science research publications
  • Number of co-authored publications between federal and non-federal scientists
  • Value of investments leveraged in science and research infrastructure as a result of ISED program funding (per dollar invested)

Canada becomes a global leader in clean technologies

  • Value of Canada's exports of clean technologies (in dollars)
  • Clean technology employment in Canada (in numbers)
  • Value of investments leveraged in clean technologies as a result of ISED program funding (per dollar invested)

Canadian companies are globally competitive and achieve high growth

  • Number of high-growth firms
  • Value of Canada's goods and services exports (in dollars)
  • Revenue growth rate of firms supported by ISED programs

Canada is a location and destination of choice for investment, growth and tourism

  • Total Business Investment in Canada (in dollars)
  • Spending by international visitors to Canada (in dollars)
  • Number of international overnight visitors to Canada
  • Turn-around times for patent applications filed in Canada, with a request for examination

Canadian innovators have simplified access to tools and support

  • Canada's ranking on the World Bank's Ease of Doing Business Index
  • Percentage of ISED's priority services that meet published service standards
Programs
  1. Talent Development
  2. Entrepreneurship Policy
  3. Bridging Digital Divides
  4. Economic Development in Northern Ontario
  5. Consumer Affairs
  1. Higher Education Sector Science and Research
  2. Horizontal Science, Research and Technology Policy
  3. Innovation Superclusters Initiative
  4. Support to External Advisors
  1. Innovation in Business
  2. Support and Financing for Small Business
  3. Business Policy and Analysis
  4. Economic Outcomes from Procurement
  5. Digital Service
  6. Spectrum and Telecommunications
  7. Clean Technology and Clean Growth
  8. Communication Technologies, Research and Innovation
  9. Business Conditions Policy
  10. Insolvency
  11. Intellectual Property
  12. Competition Law Enforcement and Promotion
  13. Federal Incorporation
  14. Investment Review
  15. Trade Measurement
  16. Tourism Policy

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to ISED's Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on ISED's website.

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Corporate Management Sector
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada
235 Queen Street
2nd Floor, East Tower
Ottawa ON K1A 0H5

Email: ic.info-info.ic@canada.ca
Fax: 613-954-2340

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (Plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
Any change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by Program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
The department's Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (Rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.
full-time-equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+)
An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people. The "plus" acknowledges that GBA goes beyond sex and gender differences to consider multiple identity factors that intersect to make people who they are (such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability).
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2018–19 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government;  A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiatives (initiative horizontale)
An initiative in which two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (by Cabinet, a central agency, etc.) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.
Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats)
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
Performance indicator (Indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
Performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

plans (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
Priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Departmental Results.
program (programme)
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
results (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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