Jobs and innovation: Tracking progress and results

From Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada

Helping Canadians to succeed in the new economy

Innovation translates into more jobs, more business opportunities, a cleaner environment and higher living standards for Canadians.

The government has developed the Innovation and Skills Plan to grow the economy, create middle-class jobs, and provide Canadians with the skills they need to succeed. Our plan is about investing in:

People and skills

Develop the most skilled, talented, creative and diverse workforce in the world.

An entrepreneurial and highly skilled workforce

Increase the share of science and technology-related jobs to 40 percent by 2025

Increase the number of professional, science and tech-related jobs in the Canadian economy as share of total employment to 40% by 2025.

Why this is a target:

Canadians need the skills required for the jobs of tomorrow and Canadian businesses need a highly-trained and skilled workforce to be competitive in the new global economy.

How we are getting there:

Progress so far:

graph of progress bar showing 30% in 2011, 34% in 2016 and a target of 40% in 2025

View data on: An entrepreneurial and highly skilled workforce 

An entrepreneurial and highly skilled workforce (continued)

Increase coding and other digital skills training available to students across Canada's K-12 school system by 2025, reaching 500,000 students by 2019.

Why this is a target:

Canadians need to be digitally adept and prepared for high-quality jobs in the digital economy.

How we are getting there:

Progress so far:

View data on: An entrepreneurial and highly skilled workforce (continued) 

A workforce that represents all segments of Canadian society

Double the number of SMEs that are majority owned by women

Double number of small to medium enterprises (SMEs) majority-owned by women to 340,000 by 2025.

Why this is a target:

All Canadians have the potential to be innovators and entrepreneurs and need equal access to opportunities to realize their ambitions.

How we are getting there:

Progress so far:

graph showing that 129,000 SMEs are majority-owned by women in 2004, 173,000 SMEs in 2014 with the goal to grow to 340,000 SMEs that are majority-owned by women by 2025

View data on: A workforce that represents all segments of Canadian society 

Enable a connected and digitally-engaged society

Bridge the digital divide by increasing household Internet use to 100 percent by 2025

Bridge the digital divide by increasing household Internet use to 100% by 2025 and ensuring 80% of Canadians have access to ultrafast broadband at 1 Gbps by 2020.

Why this is a target:

Access to high speed and modern digital infrastructure, and the ability to use digital services, are necessary for Canadians to fully participate and succeed in today's digital economy.

How we are getting there:

Progress so far:

Graph showing 50% of Canada with internet access, 85% access by 2014, 87% by 2015 and the goal of 100% connectivity by 2025

View data on: Enabling a connected and digitally-engaged society 

Attracting and retaining the best and the brightest talent

Increase the number of new permanent resident admissions in Canada to 340,000 by 2020

Increase the number of new permanent resident admissions in Canada to 340,000 by 2020, including 195,800 economic class admissions.

Why this is a target:

Encouraging the best and the brightest international talent to pursue their careers in Canada, ensures that Canada has the skilled workforce to compete and innovate in the global marketplace.

How we are getting there:

Progress so far:

Graph showing progression of new permanent resident admissions in Canada from 250,000 in 2001, to 272,000 in 2015 to 296,000 in 2016 with the goal of 340,000 in 2025

View data on: Attracting and retaining the best and the brightest talent 

Research, technology and commercialization

Develop and adopt world-leading innovations and promote science excellence globally.

Support global growth through industry-led innovation

Grow up to 5 world-leading superclusters in Canada by 2025.

Why this is a target:

Superclusters are areas of high business activity. They grow the economy, create quality jobs and attract further investments by driving the commercialization of research and building value-chain connections.

How we are getting there:

Progress so far:

View data on: Support global growth through industry-led innovation 

Support global growth through industry-led innovation (continued)

Expenditures in R&D to reach $30B by 2025, keeping pace with OECD average as a percentage of GDP

Increase Canadian business expenditures in research and development (R&D) to $30 billion by 2025, keeping pace with OECD average as a percentage of GDP.

Why this is a target:

When businesses invest in research and development they increase their demand for skilled workers and provide Canadians the opportunity to gain new skills and access high-quality jobs.

How we are getting there:

Progress so far:

Progress bar showing 5.2% of companies engaged in collaborations with higher education institutions growing from in 2014 to target of 10% by 2025

View data on: Support global growth through industry-led innovation (continued) 

Strong and productive research & development collaborations

Double the percentage of companies collaborating with higher education research institutions by 2025

Double the percentage of companies engaged in collaborations with higher education institutions by 2025.

Why this is a target:

Connecting people, ideas and resources is more likely to lead to productive, world leading clusters and support innovation along the value chain.

How we are getting there:

Progress so far:

research and development expenditures by Canadian businesses growing from $15 billion in 2001 to $17.9 billion in 2016 with a goal of $30 billion by 2025

View data on: Strong and productive R&D collaborations 

Competitiveness in a digital world

Increase investment in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) as a percentage of GDP to 3 percent by 2025, making Canada competitive with international leaders

Increase investment in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) as a percentage of GDP to 3% by 2025, making Canada competitive with international leaders.

Why this is a target:

Technology adoption significantly impacts Canada's capacity for innovation and ability to be a world leader of industry, particularly in an economy that is increasingly digital.

How we are getting there:

Progress so far:

Progress bar indicating 1.97% of Canadian GDP consisting of ICT growing to 2.14% by 2015 with a goal of 3% by 2025

View data on: Competitiveness in a digital world 

World-class and impactful fundamental research and science to support evidence-based decision making

Increase Canada's ranking for Average Relative Citation (ARC) in natural sciences, engineering, and life sciences to reach the top 10 of OECD countries by 2025

Increase Canada's ranking for Average Relative Citation (ARC) in natural sciences, engineering, and life sciences to the top 10 of OECD countries by 2025.

Why this is a target:

Strengthening Canada's research institutions grows the skills needed for innovation and scientific discovery and has a positive ripple effect across the economy.

How we are getting there:

Progress so far:

Timeline showing Canada's ranking as 10th in 2003, as 17th in 2015 and with the target of being ranked 10th again by 2025

View data on: World-class and impactful fundamental research and science to support evidence-based decision making 

Investment, scale-up and clean growth

Stimulating new investments helps Canadian businesses to grow and compete globally.

Scaling-up firms

Double the number of new high growth companies in Canada

Double the number of high-growth firms in Canada from 14,000 to 28,000 by 2025

Why this is a target:

High growth firms are the most likely to innovate, sell globally and invest in people creating more and better paying jobs.

How we are getting there:

Progress so far:

Progress bar showing 11,500 high growth companies in Canada in 2011; 14,000 high growth companies in 2014 and a goal of 28,000 high growth companies by 2025

View data on: Scaling-up firms 

Growing exports

Increase Canada's exports by 30 percent by 2025

Grow the value of Canada's goods and services exports by 30% by 2025.

Why this is a target:

Helping Canadian companies access global markets catapults their growth and supports more jobs.

How we are getting there:

Progress so far:

Progress bar showing $483 billion in goods and services being exported growing to $628.5 billion in 2016 and the target growth of $817 billion by 2025

View data on: Growing exports 

Global investment

Double R&D investment by foreign controlled global firms in Canada to $11.8 billion by 2025

Double research and development (R&D) investment by foreign controlled global firms in Canada to $11.8 billion by 2025.

Why this is a target:

Investment by multinational firms in Canadian research & development signals confidence in Canada's R&D capabilities, encouraging further investment and strengthening Canada's connection to global markets.

How we are getting there:

Progress so far:

Progress bar of R&D in Canada by foreign firms at $5.9 billion in 2013 and growing to $12 billion by 2025

View data on: Global investment 

Tourism

Increase the number of international overnight visits to Canada by 30 per cent by 2021

Increase the number of international overnight visits to Canada by 30% by 2021.

Why this is a target:

Tourism is Canada's most important service export. It represents 2% of Canada's GDP, builds people-to-people connections, supports cultural exchange, expands trade opportunities and encourages foreign investment.

How we are getting there:

Progress so far:

Progress bar of 16 million overnight international visits to Canada in 2013, 18 million visits in 2015, 20 million in 2016 and growing to goal of 23.4 million by 2021

View data on: Tourism 

Clean growth

Double Canada's exports of clean technologies by 2025

Double the value of Canada's exports of clean technologies by 2025.

Why this is a target:

Canada supplies clean technologies to the world, generating growth in firms, the development of in-demand skill sets and more quality jobs for Canadians.

How we are getting there:

Progress so far:

View data on: Clean growth 

Program simplification

Streamline and simplify program delivery in order to better support Canadian innovators.

Program simplification

Program simplification.

Why this is a target:

Ensuring that the Government of Canada's business innovation programs offer the best support to Canadian innovators means that more Canadian businesses have access to the resources they need to help grow the economy and create more jobs.

How we are getting there:

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