Lee Martin-2018 Prime Minister's Awards for Teaching Excellence in STEM

Certificate of Excellence in STEM Recipient, Central French Immersion Public School, Grimsby, Ontario

Transcription – Lee Martin-2018 Prime Minister's Awards for Teaching Excellence in STEM

[Caption: Lee Martin, Central Public School]

[Lee speaking in the interview setting alternates with voice over accompanied by still photos, as follows: Lee and group of students dressed in full Jedi regalia; and a group of young children at a table with multi-coloured alligator clips making circuits.]

Lee Martin: I think one of the main factors that contributes to student learning is creating authentic learning tasks for them. And, when you’re a teacher that believes that students can achieve anything, then you start to create learning experiences for them where they’re at the centre of it and that they’re driving the learning. When it’s authentic to them, then they create an emotional connection to it, and that’s something you’re not going to get in a textbook.

[Lee speaking in interview setting alternates with voice over accompanied by video of Lee dressed as Daredevil Educator speaking into a mic in front of a screen, addressing fellow recipients, and still photos, as follows: Lee speaking to a group of children in his classroom standing in a circle holding hands; children mixing a red batter in a bowl; and Lee crouching down surrounded by a large group of children in outdoor clothes and wearing nametags.]

Lee Martin: I think one of the things that we do too often as teachers is build the space before the students come into it. If the space is then designed to support them… We need to allow them to be in that space and then build it organically around their needs. I also think it’s important to view your classroom like a home. When you view it like a home and you treat it like a home, then you start treating your kids like family. And, when you treat your kids like family, there’s nothing that they won’t do for you as far as taking risks and making mistakes; it really improves their investment in their learning.

[Lee speaking in interview setting alternates with voice over accompanied by still photos, as follows: two boys making a circuit with red wires and a laptop; a young girl smiling in front of a computer monitor; and two girls looking at a laptop screen.]

Lee Martin: I think technology positively impacts the learning process because it empowers our kids to explore the world, to make connections. Being able to connect with other groups around the world, I’ve seen my students develop an empathy. They’re able to see the challenges that people around the world face, and when we do that, they’re then able to use the technology to formulate positive and sometimes wonderfully creative ways of solving … or helping those people that are in need. We have a makerspace in our class and our students have developed this maker mindset where, if there’s a problem, ‘we can solve it. We can do anything.’ It’s so incredible how they say those things, so they taught themselves, with my support and some parents, how to sew reading buddies that they then are taking up to different groups of kids to empower them for a love of reading.

[Lee speaking in interview setting, cuts to video, with voice over, of Lee speaking to fellow recipients and then back to the interview setting.]

Lee Martin: My biggest piece of advice for pre-service teachers was the same advice that I got when I first started teaching, and it’s if you ask yourself, ‘How does this best support kids? Is this what is best for kids?’ And, if that’s your ‘why,’ if that’s what drives everything that you do each day, then it’s always going to have a positive impact on your students; it’s always going to have a positive impact on your learning; and it’s going to create a classroom where the kids are beating down the door just to learn each day.

[Fade to black.]

[Cut to white screen, with the Government of Canada FIP followed by the Canada Wordmark.]

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