Michel Emery-2018 Prime Minister's Awards for Teaching Excellence

Certificate of Excellence Recipient, F. H. Collins Secondary School, Whitehorse, Yukon

Transcription – Michel Emery-2018 Prime Minister's Awards for Teaching Excellence

[Black screen fades up to close-up of man in interview setting, against a mottled background. Music playing.]

[Caption: Michel Emery, F. H. Collins Secondary School]

[Michel speaking in interview setting alternates with voice over accompanied by still photos, as follows: Michel and a woman speaking with students in front of banners about a family in 20th century Europe; and Michel with a young boy pointing to words on a tablet screen, both wearing headphones.]

Michel Emery: Students learn a lot more quickly, and learning is enhanced, when students are engaged with the resources that they are using; when they’re motivated by the lessons that we’re teaching, they’re inspired by the environments that we provide and are excited to be there to learn. Students are so connected these days. We need to leverage technology to make learning real for them, to be … to kind of take a step in their world.

[Michel speaking in interview setting alternates with voice over accompanied by still photos, as follows: students in school resource centre, with computers and racks of videos and books visible; and an overhead shot of a group of students sitting at a round table working on a drawing activity.]

Michel Emery: The perfect space that would contribute to student learning, I feel it’s really important to give options to students. I think it would be like looking at a home. I think it would be like a blend of a living room, a kitchen, a library—places where students could relax, students can collaborate, do research. A bit of a mix between a Starbucks and a Chapters. You know, places where you come in and you feel comfortable and you feel there’s all these resources around you and that learning could just blossom from there.

[Michel speaking in interview setting alternates with voice over accompanied by still photos, as follows: girl crouching down, tablet in hand, with quadcopter and other objects on floor in front of her; and two pairs of students sitting, wearing headphones and looking at computers.]

Michel Emery: Technology provides new opportunities and reduces barriers. We can manufacture now in schools. We can use 3D printers to create products and solutions to problems of today. We can use laser cutters and we can code robots. So, technology does reduce our barriers. It enables our students to connect with a global audience. I think it’s a really exciting time for education.

[Michel speaking in interview setting alternates with voice over accompanied by still photos, as follows: exterior shot of school in winter, taken from above; Michel in resource centre holding tablet with several students wearing virtual reality goggles; and row of students at laptops.]

Michel Emery: Technology enables us to solve problems in our communities. In the North, in the Yukon, we’re quite a ways from different cities. We don’t have as many opportunities as students down south have, so using virtual reality, you could provide different learning opportunities and expand our students’ horizons. Now with technology such as VR and 360 photography, students are able to contribute and share their world, their communities and their experiences with the world.’

[Michel speaking in interview setting cuts to voice over accompanied by video of Michel showing recipients how to simulate virtual reality with a cardboard viewer and a tablet. Cuts back to interview setting to conclude.]

Michel Emery: My piece of advice for new teachers is, be curious, be bold, and see every child you come across as this opportunity to make a difference in their lives. Stop and say ‘hi’ and be interested in them, and have fun, of course.

[Fade to black.]

[Cut to white screen, with the Government of Canada FIP followed by the Canada Wordmark.]

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