State of the Canadian Aerospace Industry 2019

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Features of 2019 Report

ISED and the AIAC have partnered to provide evidence-based, relevant, quality and timely analysis to both industry and government decision makers

For the State of Canada’s Aerospace Industry 2019 Report:

  • Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) developed detailed economic models, statistics and analysisFootnote * based on Statistics Canada and global private independent research organizations’ data
  • Analysis reflected the latest Statistics Canada revisions of economic impact multipliers, including the measurement of jobs and gross domestic product (GDP) impact from the Canadian aerospace industry, its value chain, and associated consumer spending
  • The Aerospace Industries Association of Canada (AIAC) consulted and validated research findings with its network on business drivers, issues and trends
  • ISED and the AIAC jointly published the latest statistics
Footnote **

See Annex A1 and A2 for aerospace industry definitions and economic impact methodology principles, respectively

Return to footnote * referrer 

indicators icon Economic indicators

The Canadian aerospace industry contributed over $25B in GDP and 213,000 jobs to the Canadian economyFootnote* in 2018

  • The aerospace industry ($31 billion in revenuesFootnote ***) and its value chain contributed over $20 billion in GDP and 160,000 jobs to the Canadian economyFootnote * (direct and indirect)
  • Consumer spending by associated employees contributed an additional $5 billion to GDP and supported 53,000 jobs (induced)

Figure 1: Contribution to GDP and employment, 2018

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Description of figure 1
Contribution to GDP and employment, 2018
  Contribution to GDP 2018 Contribution to employment 2018
Aerospace industryFootnote ** $13.1B  89,500 jobs  
Canadian suppliers to the aerospace industry $7.2B 70,700 jobs 
Consumer spending by associated employees  $5.2B 53,000 jobs  
Footnote *

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is the total unduplicated value of the goods and services produced in an industry, country or region during a given period. Jobs refer to full-time equivalent employees. Economic impact indicators include the aerospace industry (direct economic impact from enterprises for which aerospace is the main activity), suppliers to the aerospace industry (indirect economic impact from enterprises for which aerospace is not the main activity), and consumer spending by associated employees (induced economic impact). See Annex B1 and B3 for detailed aerospace industry GDP and employment contributions to the Canadian economy by year (2014-2018)

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Footnote **

Direct economic impact from enterprises for which aerospace is the main activity

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Footnote ***

See Annex B2 for comparative analysis of aerospace and average manufacturing backlog

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Source: ISED’s economic model estimates (GDP in 2012 chained dollars) based on the latest Statistics Canada National Input-Output Multipliers (2015), adjusted using 2018 employment, 2019

ecosystem icon Aerospace industry ecosystem

The Canadian aerospace industry ecosystem is interlinked with the defence and space industries

  • The aerospace and space systems manufacturing industries in Canada were civil oriented
  • More than a quarter of aerospace MRO revenues were related to defence
  • Beyond space systems manufacturing, the space sector encompassed many downstream service industriesFootnote ***

Figure 2: Share of GDP by Canadian aerospace industry segmentFootnote *, 2018

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Description of figure 2
Share of GDP by Canadian aerospace industry segment 2018
Aerospace manufacturing 69%
Aerospace MROFootnote ** 31%

Note: graph depicts approximate relative scale of the aerospace, defence and space sectors

Footnote *

See Annex A1 and A2 for aerospace industry definitions and methodology principles, respectively.

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Footnote **

MRO is maintenance, repair, and overhaul

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Footnote ***

Downstream space sector activities include applications such as satellite operations, value-added applications, and space-based broadcasting

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Source: ISED’s economic model estimates based on latest revised data from Statistics Canada, the Canada Revenue Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, and enterprise-level observations, 2019; Canadian Defence, Aerospace and Marine Industries Survey, 2016

The job impactFootnote * to the Canadian economy was relatively stable between 2014 and 2018

  • Canada has followed the OECD’s aerospace manufacturing employment trend over the past 5 years
  • STEM employment was 2X higher in aerospace manufacturing than the manufacturing average

Figure 3: Canadian aerospace industry: Contribution to employmentFootnote * Jobs, 2014-2018

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Aerospace employment share by region 2017
Year Contribution to employment
2014 215K
2015 212K
2016 208K
2017 204K
2018 213K
Footnote *

Includes direct, indirect, and induced jobs

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Source: ISED’s economic model estimates (GDP in 2012 chained dollars) based on the latest Statistics Canada National Input-Output Multipliers (2015), adjusted using 2018 employment, 2019; Labour Force Survey (LFS) custom tabulation (2018), 2019; OECD Structural Analysis Database, 2019

The Canadian aerospace industry is national

  • Most manufacturing activity took place in Central Canada, while the Western and Atlantic regions captured over 50% of MRO activities

Figure 4: Aerospace employment share by region, 2018

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Aerospace employment share by region 2018
  Quebec  Ontario Western Canada  Atlantic Canada
Manufacturing  51% 30% 14% 5%
MRO 23% 25% 41% 11%

See Annex B3 for detailed aerospace industry GDP and employment contributions to the Canadian economy by year (2014-2018)
Source: ISED’s economic model estimates based on latest revised data from Statistics Canada, the Canada Revenue Agency, and enterprise-level observations, 2019

Aerospace industry icon Global value chain and exports

Canadian aerospace manufacturing firms export to over 190 countries across 6 continents

  • 93% of aerospace manufacturing firms were exporters, 44% higher than the manufacturing average
  • Aerospace manufacturing firms were 38% more trade diverseFootnote ** than the manufacturing average
  • Aerospace manufacturing firms were 29% more export intensiveFootnote *** than the manufacturing average

Figure 5: Canadian aerospace manufacturing export marketsFootnote *: 2018

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Canadian aerospace manufacturing export marketsFootnote ***: 2018
Top 20 export markets Other export markets
United States Sweden Hungary Slovenia Mauritania Wallis & Futuna Islands
Switzerland Israel Lithuania Georgia New Caledonia St. Pierre & Miquelon
France Turkey Greenland Jordan Iraq Vanuatu
Germany Malta Nigeria Bolivia St. Vincent & the Grenadines Turks & Caicos 
Latvia Ethiopia Ireland Bulgaria Guinea St. Lucia
China Czech Republic Cayman Islands Costa Rica Tunisia Guam
United Kingdom Denmark Saudi Arabia Ghana British Indian Ocean Terr. Namibia
Mexico Portugal Greece Chad Nicaragua Montserrat
Singapore Norway Croatia Uzbekistan Zambia Swaziland
South Korea Austria Peru Cameroon Cyprus Tajikistan
Spain Hong Kong South Sudan Cuba Barbados Albania
Italy Russia Finland Niger Kyrgyzstan Mozambique
United Arab Emirates Pakistan Trinidad & Tobago Jamaica Honduras Comoros
Australia Argentina Morocco Belize El Salvador Iran
Japan Tanzania Uganda Bahrain Paraguay CAR
Brazil New Zealand Curacao Angola Venezuela Congo
Poland South Africa Panama Cook Islands Senegal Moldova
India Belgium Yemen Estonia Gabon Suriname
Philippines Vietnam Somalia Madagascar Azerbaijan Laos
Netherlands Algeria Nepal Slovakia Mauritius Faroe Islands
Chile Oman Serbia Zimbabwe Cambodia
Indonesia Ukraine Dominican Republic Aruba Malawi
Romania Botswana Congo Belarus Turkmenistan
Colombia Antigua & Barbuda Mali Myanmar Virgin Islands
Qatar French Polynesia Sri Lanka Bosnia & Herzegovina Falkland Islands
Kenya Uruguay Brunei Darussalam Burkina Faso Armenia
Fiji Luxembourg Bahamas Equatorial Guinea Eritrea
Taiwan Macau Dominica Mongolia Montenegro
Thailand Seychelles Guatemala East Timor Rwanda
Afghanistan Kazakhstan U.S. Minor Outlying Is. Sudan Liberia
Malaysia Ecuador Anguilla Macedonia Haiti
Papua New Guinea Egypt Kuwait Sint Maarten Gambia
Iceland Guyana Cape Verde St. Kitts & Nevis Grenada
Bangladesh Libya Togo Cote d’Ivoire
Maldives Djibouti Lebanon Solomon Islands
Footnote *

Countries shaded in red imported Canadian aerospace goods in 2018; See Annex A4 for export market rankings

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Footnote **

Trade diversity is measured as a share exports destined for non-US markets

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Footnote ***

Export intensity is measured as a share of sales

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Source: Global Trade Atlas (2018), 2019; Trade Data Online (2018), 2019; Statistics Canada Table 16-10-0047-01 (2018), 2019, Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS) Tables 33-10-0150-01, 33-10-0173-01 (2017), 2019

Over 60% of Canadian aerospace product exports were supply chain related

  • Aerospace supply chain exports rose by 33% between 2014 and 2018

Figure 6: Aerospace exports by product category by value, 2018

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Aerospace exports by product category by value, 2018
Final products 38%
Simulators 5%
Airplanes, rotorcraft, and spacecraft 33%
Aerospace supply chain components  63%
AeroenginesFootnote * 58%
Avionics  15%
Landing gearFootnote * 10%
Other parts  17%
Footnote *

Aeroengines and landing gear include their respective systems and components

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Source: Global Trade Atlas (2018), 2019; Statistics Canada Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS) Table 33-10-0150-01 (2017), 2019

Canada ranked in the top 3 globally in the production of civil simulators, turboprop and helicopter engines, business jets, and regional aircraft

  • Canada is the only country that rankedFootnote * in the top 5 in all civil flight simulator, engine, and aircraft sub-segments

Figure 7: Global aerospace rankings by segment and sub-segment

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Overall RankFootnote *

1. Civil flight simulators

  • #1 - Civil flight simulators

3. Civil engine

  • #1 - Turboprop engines
  • #1 - Helicopter engines
  • #4 - Turbofan engines

4. Civil aircraft

  • #2 - Business jets
  • #3 - Regional aircraft
  • #4 - Large jets
  • #4 - Helicopters
  • #4 - General aviationFootnote ** production
Footnote *

Rankings based on final production value

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Footnote **

General Aviation: includes all aircraft not used in either commuter services or airline service (excluding business jets and rotorcraft)

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Source: Frost & Sullivan, Commercial Flight Training and Simulation Market (2016); Teal Group (2018), 2019; Forecast International (2018), 2019

Aerospace industry icon Innovation and skills

Aerospace was the number one R&D playerFootnote * among all Canadian manufacturing industries

  • In 2018, the Canadian aerospace manufacturing industry:
    • Invested $1.4 billion in R&D, contributing close to a quarter of total manufacturing R&D in Canada
    • Achieved over 5X higher R&D intensityFootnote ** than the manufacturing average

Figure 8: Manufacturing industry R&D intensityFootnote **: 2018

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Manufacturing industry R&D intensityFootnote **: 2018
Aerospace Manufacturing 16%
Manufacturing Average 3%
Footnote *

In terms of value of R&D activity

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Footnote **

R&D intensity is calculated using the ratio of R&D to GDP

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Source: Statistics Canada Tables 27-10-0333-01 and 36-10-0434-01 (2018), 2019

Significantly more aerospace manufacturing firms cooperated on innovation activitiesFootnote * with academia and government than the manufacturing average

  • Over 70% of aerospace manufacturing firms cooperated on innovation activities with academic partners
  • Aerospace manufacturing firms also cooperated with partners across the public and private sectors

Figure 9: Cooperation on innovation activitiesFootnote *: By share of firms, 2017

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Cooperation on innovation activitiesFootnote *: By share of firms, 2017
  Academia Government
Aerospace Manufacturing 73% 39%
Manufacturing Average 21% 17%
Footnote *

Innovation activities includes good or service innovation, process innovation, marketing innovation, and organizational innovation

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Source: Statistics Canada Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS) Table 27-10-0178-01 (2017), 2019

Advanced and emerging technologyFootnote * use in the Canadian aerospace manufacturing industry

Analysis of advanced and emerging technologyFootnote * use based on newly released data from the ISED-sponsored Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy from Statistics Canada

Top 5 advanced technologies used in aerospace manufacturing

RankFootnote **

Subcategory

1

Advanced manufacturing

2

Design and information control technologies

3

Business intelligence technologies

4

Material handling, supply chain or logistics technologies

5

Cybersecurity

Top 5 emerging technologies used in aerospace manufacturing

RankFootnote **

Subcategory

1

Internet of Things (IoT) systems

2

Artificial intelligence (AI)

3

Geomatics or geospatial technologies

4

Nanotechnology

5

Biotechnology

Footnote *

See Annex A3 for advanced and emerging technology subcategory definitions

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Footnote *

Rank is defined as the percentage of aerospace manufacturing firms using each technology subcategory

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Source: Statistics Canada Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS) Table 27-10-0178-01 (2017), 2019

Aerospace manufacturing firms used advanced technologiesFootnote * nearly 50% more than the manufacturing average

  • Small and medium sized (SMEFootnote **) aerospace manufacturers used advanced technologies 33% more compared to the SME manufacturing average

Figure 10: Share of firms using advanced technologies, Top 3 subcategories, 2017

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Share of firms using advanced technologies
Top 3 subcategories, 2017
  Advanced manufacturing Design technologies Business intelligence technologies
Aerospace Manufacturing 58% 44% 26%
Manufacturing Average 36% 25% 18%
Footnote *

Advanced technologies are new technologies that perform a new function or improve some function significantly better than commonly used technologies in the industry. They include advanced manufacturing, design technologies, business intelligence technologies (cloud-based computing systems and big data analytics tools), material handling, supply chain or logistics technologies, security or advanced authentication systems, and clean technologies. See Annex A3 for advanced and emerging technology subcategory definitions

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Footnote **

SMEs are defined as firms with less than 250 employees

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Source: Statistics Canada Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS) Table 27-10-0367-01 (2017), 2019

Aerospace manufacturing firms used advanced technologiesFootnote * 2X more than the manufacturing average

  • Small and medium sized (SMEFootnote **) aerospace manufacturers used emerging technologies 80% more compared to the SME manufacturing average

Figure 11: Share of firms using emerging technologies, Top 3 subcategories, 2017

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Share of firms using emerging technologies
Top 3 subcategories, 2017
  Internet of Things (IoT) systems Artificial intelligence (AI) Geomatics or geospatial technologies
Aerospace Manufacturing 14% 11% 5%
Manufacturing Average 11% 3% 2%
Footnote *

Emerging technologies include Internet of Things (IoT) systems, artificial intelligence, geomatics or geospatial technologies, nanotechnology, and biotechnology. See Annex A3 for advanced and emerging technology subcategory definitions

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Footnote **

SMEs are defined as firms with less than 250 employees

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Source: Statistics Canada Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS) Table 27-10-0367-01 (2017), 2019

Key Findings

The Canadian aerospace industry is:

Aerospace industry icon Annexes

Annex A1 – Definitions of the Canadian aerospace manufacturing and MRO service industries

Annex A2 – Economic impact methodology principles

Annex A3 – Definitions of advanced and emerging technology subcategories

Annex A4 – Ranking of Canadian aerospace export markets

Annex A1 – Definitions of the Canadian aerospace manufacturing and MRO service industries

Aerospace manufacturing industry

Main activities:

  • Aircraft assemblies, subassemblies and parts
  • Aircraft engines and engine parts
  • Aircraft fuselage, wing, tail and similar assemblies
  • Tail and wing assemblies and parts (empennage)
  • Flight simulators
  • Developing and producing prototypes for aerospace products
  • Space systems
  • Telecommunication satellites and components
  • Avionics
  • Helicopters, propellers and parts

Aerospace MRO service industryFootnote *

Main activities:

  • Aircraft heavy maintenance, servicing and repairing
  • Aircraft engines maintenance, servicing and repairing
  • Aircraft components and other systems maintenance, servicing and repairing
  • Aircraft line maintenance (aircraft servicing at airports – excluding sales of fuel revenues)
  • Aircraft ferrying services
  • Aircraft inspection services
  • Aircraft testing services
  • Aircraft upholstery repair
Footnote *

Excludes MRO activity performed by manufacturers and airlines

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Annex A2 – Economic impact methodology principles

Footnote *

Inclusion of key firms in space manufacturing, avionics manufacturing, flight simulator manufacturing and MRO service providers.

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Footnote **

GDP better represents activity that actually occurs within Canada in contrast to revenues that include foreign content as well as R&D, employment and revenues from outside of Canada (even if it was performed by a Canadian firm).

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Footnote ***

Economic model estimations are not comparable to older estimates in previously published reports as Statistics Canada’s Input-Output multipliers were updated in April 2019.

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Annex A3 – Definitions of advanced technology subcategories and definitions of emerging technology subcategories

Advanced technology

Processing or fabrication technologies (advanced manufacturing)

Include flexible manufacturing cells (FMC) or flexible manufacturing systems (FMS), lasers used in materials processing (including surface modification), robots with sensing or vision systems, robots without sensing or vision systems, 4-9 axis computer numerically controlled (CNC) machinery, additive manufacturing including rapid prototyping for plastics and 3D printing for plastics, additive manufacturing including rapid prototyping for metals and 3D printing for metals, additive manufacturing including rapid prototyping for materials other than plastics and metals and 3D printing other than plastics and metals, automated machinery for sorting, transporting or assembling parts, plasma sputtering, micro-manufacturing (e.g., micro-machining or micro-molding) or micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS).

Design and information control technologies

Include virtual product development or modelling software including computer-aided design (CAD), computer aided engineering (CAE), computer aided manufacturing (CAM), virtual manufacturing, enterprise resource planning (ERP), manufacturing execution system (MES), software integration of quality results with planning and control softwares, manufacturing resource planning (MRP II), inter-company computer networks including extranet and electronic data interchange (EDI), wireless communications for production, sensor network and integration, computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM), automated systems for inspection (e.g., vision-based, laser-based, X-ray, high-definition (HD) camera or sensor-based) or unmanned aerial system (e.g., drone).

Business intelligence technologies

Include executive dashboards for analytics or decision-making, advanced technologies that are owned, leased or licensed, used as a service (e.g., cloud computing) or acquired through partnership. Executive dashboards for analytics or decision-making, software for large-scale data processing (e.g., Hadoop), live stream processing technology or real-time monitoring, software as a service (SaaS) (e.g., cloud computing - software) or infrastructure as a service (IaaS) (e.g., cloud computing - hardware).

Material handling, supply chain or logistics technologies

Include customer relationship management (CRM) software, software for demand forecasting or demand planning, transportation management system, warehouse management system (WMS), supply chain collaboration and visibility systems, automated storage (AS) and retrieval system (RS), part identification for automation (e.g., bar or QR coding) or radio frequency identification (RFID).

Security or advanced authentication systems (cybersecurity)

For example: software tokens, hardware tokens, smartphone tokens, cryptographic keys, biometrics (fingerprints, or other), multifactor authentication.

Source: Statistics Canada 2017 Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS) – Reporting Guide

Emerging technology

Internet of Things (IoT) systems

IoT refers to an ecosystem in which applications and services are driven by data collected from devices that sense and interface with the physical world. IoT application domains span all major economic sectors: health, education, agriculture, transportation, manufacturing, electric grids, and more.

Artificial intelligence

Computer systems able to perform tasks normally requiring human intelligence or able to learn without being explicitly programmed; for example: systems that can learn tasks through repetition (machine learning), identify patterns in big sets of data, recognize visuals and speech, and make decisions.

Geomatics or geospatial technologies

Geomatics is the science and technology of gathering, analyzing, interpreting, distributing and using geographic information. Geomatics encompasses a broad range of disciplines that can come together to create a detailed but comprehensible picture of the physical world and where each individual fits. The disciplines include surveying, mapping, remote sensing, geographic information systems, and global positioning systems.

Geospatial technologies refer to hardware and software systems that relate and display data of geographic, spatial or location nature. The technology helps to increase the speed of data interpretation and analysis for geomatics research.

Nanotechnology

Nanotechnology is the manufacturing of devices and products from molecular or nano-scale components with extraordinary properties. One nanometer (1 nm) is one billionth of a metre (.000000001 m), three to four atoms wide. Examples of nanotechnology: nanoparticles, nanomaterials, nanocoatings, nanostructures, nanosystems, nanophotonics, nanoelectronics, nanomedicine, nanobiotechnology.

Biotechnology

Biotechnology is the application of science and engineering in the direct or indirect use of living organisms in their natural or modified forms, in an innovative manner, when producing goods and services or improving existing processes. For the purpose of this survey, exclude fermentation for the production of beer, bread, cheese or yogurt.

Source: Statistics Canada 2017 Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS) – Reporting Guide; OECD (2016), The Internet of Things: Seizing the Benefits and Addressing the Challenges

Annex A4 – Ranking of Canadian aerospace export markets (2018)

1

United States

34

Argentina

67

Finland

100

Cameroon

133

Nicaragua

166

Guam

2

Switzerland

35

Tanzania

68

Trinidad & Tobago

101

Cuba

134

Zambia

167

Namibia

3

France

36

New Zealand

69

Morocco

102

Niger

135

Cyprus

168

Montserrat

4

Germany

37

South Africa

70

Uganda

103

Jamaica

136

Barbados

169

Swaziland

5

Latvia

38

Belgium

71

Curacao

104

Belize

137

Kyrgyzstan

170

Tajikistan

6

China

39

Vietnam

72

Panama

105

Bahrain

138

Honduras

171

Albania

7

United Kingdom

40

Algeria

73

Yemen

106

Angola

139

El Salvador

172

Mozambique

8

Mexico

41

Chile

74

Somalia

107

Cook Islands

140

Paraguay

173

Comoros

9

Singapore

42

Indonesia

75

Nepal

108

Estonia

141

Venezuela

174

Iran

10

South Korea

43

Romania

76

Oman

109

Madagascar

142

Senegal

175

Central African Republic

11

Spain

44

Colombia

77

Ukraine

110

Slovakia

143

Gabon

176

Congo Dem. Rep.

12

Italy

45

Qatar

78

Botswana

111

Serbia

144

Azerbaijan

177

Moldova

13

United Arab Emirates

46

Kenya

79

Antigua & Barbuda

112

Dominican Republic

145

Mauritius

178

Suriname

14

Australia

47

Fiji

80

French Polynesia

113

Congo

146

Zimbabwe

179

Laos

15

Japan

48

Taiwan

81

Uruguay

114

Mali

147

Aruba

180

Faroe Islands

16

Brazil

49

Thailand

82

Luxembourg

115

Sri Lanka

148

Belarus

181

Cambodia

17

Poland

50

Afghanistan

83

Macau

116

Brunei Darussalam

149

Myanmar

182

Malawi

18

India

51

Malaysia

84

Seychelles

117

Bahamas

150

Bosnia & Herzegovina

183

Turkmenistan

19

Philippines

52

Papua New Guinea

85

Kazakhstan

118

Dominica

151

Burkina Faso

184

Virgin Islands (British)

20

Netherlands

53

Iceland

86

Ecuador

119

Guatemala

152

Equatorial Guinea

185

Falkland Islands

21

Sweden

54

Bangladesh

87

Egypt

120

U.S. Minor Outlying Is.

153

Mongolia

186

Armenia

22

Israel

55

Maldives

88

Guyana

121

Anguilla

154

East Timor

187

Eritrea

23

Turkey

56

Hungary

89

Libya

122

Kuwait

155

Sudan

188

Montenegro

24

Malta

57

Lithuania

90

Djibouti

123

Cape Verde

156

Macedonia

189

Rwanda

25

Ethiopia

58

Greenland

91

Slovenia

124

Togo

157

Sint Maarten

190

Liberia

26

Czech Republic

59

Nigeria

92

Georgia

125

Lebanon

158

St. Kitts & Nevis

191

Haiti

27

Denmark

60

Ireland

93

Jordan

126

Mauritania

159

Cote d’Ivoire

192

Gambia

28

Portugal

61

Cayman Islands

94

Bolivia

127

New Caledonia

160

Solomon Islands

193

Grenada

29

Norway

62

Saudi Arabia

95

Bulgaria

128

Iraq

161

Wallis & Futuna Islands

30

Austria

63

Greece

96

Costa Rica

129

St. Vincent & the Grenadines

162

St. Pierre & Miquelon

31

Hong Kong

64

Croatia

97

Ghana

130

Guinea

163

Vanuatu

32

Russia

65

Peru

98

Chad

131

Tunisia

164

Turks & Caicos Islands

33

Pakistan

66

South Sudan

99

Uzbekistan

132

British Indian Ocean Terr.

165

St. Lucia

Source: Global Trade Atlas (2018), 2019

Annex B

Annex B1 – Economic impact indicators (2018)

Annex B2 – Industrial indicators (2018)

Annex B3 – Industrial indicators (2014-2018)

Annex B1 Economic impact indicators (2018)Footnote *

Impact on Canadian GDP ($ millions)
  Aerospace industry Canadian suppliers to aerospace industry Consumer spending by associated employees TotalFootnote **
Aerospace manufacturing

9,077

4,046

3,171

16,295

Aerospace MRO

4,012

3,183

2,041

9,236

Aerospace total

13,089

7,230

5,212

25,530

Impact on Canadian employment (jobs)
  Aerospace industry Canadian suppliers to aerospace industry Consumer spending by associated employees TotalFootnote **
Aerospace manufacturing

56,707

40,088

34,508

131,302

Aerospace MRO

32,756

30,645

18,505

81,907

Aerospace total

89,463

70,733

53,013

213,209

Footnote *

National Input-Output Multipliers (2015) adjusted to 2018 GDP (in 2012 chained dollars) and employment

Return to footnote * referrer 

Footnote **

Includes the aerospace industry (direct economic impact from enterprises for which aerospace is the main activity), suppliers to the aerospace industry (indirect economic impact from enterprises for which aerospace is not the main activity), and consumer spending by associated employees (induced economic impact)

Return to footnote ** referrer 

Note: Due to rounding, numbers presented may not add up precisely to the totals provided

Source: ISED’s economic model estimates based on latest revised data from Statistics Canada, the Canada Revenue Agency, and enterprise-level observations, 2019

Annex B2 – Industrial indicators (2018)Footnote *

  Aerospace manufacturing Aerospace MRO Aerospace industry total
GDP ($ millions) 9,077 4,012 13,089
Employment (jobs) 56,707 32,756 89,463
Revenues ($ millions) 23,559 8,016 31,576
R&DFootnote ** ($ millions) 1,421 43 1,464
Exports ($ millions) 16,704 N/AFootnote *** 16,704
  Average Monthly BacklogFootnote ****

Aerospace manufacturing

29.8 months

Average manufacturing

2.5 months

Footnote *

National Input-Output Multipliers (2015) adjusted to 2018 GDP (in 2012 chained dollars) and employment. Revenues and R&D are in current annual dollars

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Footnote **

Several aspects of the Statistics Canada Annual Survey of Research and Development in Canadian Industry have been redesigned since 2016, including concepts, methodology, the collection method and the data processing system. The concepts and definitions employed in the collection and dissemination of R&D data are provided in the Frascati Manual 2015: Guidelines for Collecting and Reporting Data on Research and Experimental Development (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), 2015). According to this definition: "R&D comprises creative and systematic work undertaken in order to increase the stock of knowledge – including knowledge of humankind, culture and society – and to devise new applications of available knowledge"

Return to footnote ** referrer 

Footnote ***

Export figures are sourced from Trade Data Online (2018), 2019. Export data for aerospace MRO is not available

Return to footnote *** referrer 

Footnote ****

Average ratio of backlog (finished goods, work in process, unfilled orders) to sales

Return to footnote **** referrer 

Note: Due to rounding, numbers presented may not add up precisely to the totals provided

Source: ISED’s economic model estimates based on latest revised data from Statistics Canada, the Canada Revenue Agency, and enterprise-level observations, 2019; Statistics Canada Table 16-10-0118-01, (April 2019 Release), 2019

Annex B3 – Industrial indicators (2014-2018)Footnote *

  Industry 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 % Change
2017-2018
% Change
2014-2018

GDP
($ millions)

Aerospace manufacturing

9,810

9,267

8,956

8,613

9,077

5.39%

-7.48%

Aerospace MRO

3,293

3,660

3,809

4,025

4,012

-0.33%

21.81%

Aerospace total

13,104

12,927

12,766

12,638

13,089

3.56%

-0.12%

Aerospace contribution to Canadian economyFootnote **

25,193

25,061

24,848

24,728

25,530

3.24%

1.34%

Employment (jobs)

Aerospace manufacturing

60,074

57,583

55,663

53,588

56,707

5.82%

-5.60%

Aerospace MRO

30,243

31,314

31,458

31,998

32,756

2.37%

8.31%

Aerospace total

90,316

88,897

87,121

85,586

89,463

4.53%

-0.94%

Aerospace contribution to Canadian economyFootnote **

214,720

211,632

207,545

204,091

213,209

4.47%

-0.70%

Revenues
($ millions)

Aerospace manufacturing

20,806

22,497

20,083

21,151

23,559

11.38%

13.23%

Aerospace MRO

7,401

7,663

7,699

7,831

8,016

2.37%

8.31%

Aerospace total

28,208

30,161

27,782

28,982

31,576

8.95%

11.94%

R&DFootnote ***
($ millions)
Aerospace total 1,914 1,868 1,703 1,786 1,464 -18.06% -23.50%
Footnote *

National Input-Output Multipliers (2015) adjusted to 2018 GDP (in 2012 chained dollars) and employment. Revenues and R&D are in current annual dollars

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Footnote **

Includes aerospace industry (direct economic impact from enterprises for which aerospace is the main activity), suppliers to the aerospace industry (indirect economic impact from enterprises for which aerospace is not the main activity), and consumer spending by associated employees (induced economic impact)

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Footnote ***

Several aspects of the Statistics Canada Annual Survey of Research and Development in Canadian Industry have been redesigned in 2016, including concepts, methodology, the collection method and the data processing system. The concepts and definitions employed in the collection and dissemination of R&D data are provided in the Frascati Manual 2015: Guidelines for Collecting and Reporting Data on Research and Experimental Development (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), 2015). According to this definition: "R&D comprises creative and systematic work undertaken in order to increase the stock of knowledge – including knowledge of humankind, culture and society – and to devise new applications of available knowledge”

Return to footnote *** referrer 

Note: Due to rounding, numbers presented may not add up precisely to the totals provided

Source:ISED’s economic model estimates based on latest revised data from Statistics Canada, the Canada Revenue Agency, and enterprise-level observations, 2019

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