Canada Small Business Financing Act—Annual Report 2011–2012

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Contents


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Minister's Message

Minister of Industry
Canadian Coat of arms
Ministre de l'Industrie
Ottawa, Canada K1A 0H5

I am pleased to present to Parliament the Canada Small Business Financing (CSBF) Program's 2011–12 annual report on the administration of the Canada Small Business Financing Act.

In 2011–12 the CSBF Program, working in partnership with lending institutions across the country, registered almost 7,200 loans worth more than $996.3 million made by these institutions to small businesses. Just under 58 percent of the loan values were made to small businesses that were in operation less than one year, fulfilling one of the CSBF Program's important roles by providing financing that otherwise would have been unavailable.

Lending institutions have welcomed and accepted the increase in the maximum loan amount to $500,000 that was introduced in April 2009. In 2011–12 loans in excess of $250,000 accounted for $384.8 million or 38.6 percent of the total value of loans registered.

In Economic Action Plan 2012, the government committed to promoting Canadian small businesses, which are an important source of employment across the country. The CSBF Program continues to play a vital role in this commitment.

Space to insert signature
Christian Paradis


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Highlights for 2011–12


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1. Overview of the Canada Small Business Financing Program

Since 1961, the CSBF Program and its predecessor, the Small Business Loans Program, have been contributing to the development of small businesses in Canada by complementing the availability of financing for their establishment, expansion, modernization and improvement. The program helps fill a gap in the availability of credit for small businesses having difficulty in accessing financing, particularly businesses at the start-up phase and in certain industry sectors. By sharing the burden of risk on loans, the Government of Canada and private sector lenders are able to increase the amount of financing extended to small businesses.

Basic Program Requirements

Loans under the CSBF Program are available for the financing of real property, equipment and leasehold improvements. The assets financed must be used to carry on business in Canada. The program facilitates loans made by lenders to small businesses of up to $500,000, of which a maximum of $350,000 can be used to finance the purchase of equipment and leasehold improvements. A loan registered under the program must satisfy certain requirements (see Section 2 "Program Requirements").

The Role of the Federal Government

Industry Canada administers the CSBF Program by registering loans, collecting fees and paying lenders eligible losses on defaulted loans. Industry Canada, however, does not approve the borrower loan applications and is not involved in the administration of the loans.

The Role of Lenders

Lenders, which include chartered banks, credit unions and caisses populaires, provide financing to small businesses in all provinces and territories. They are responsible for all credit decisions, approving the loans, disbursing the loan proceeds, registering the loans with the CSBF Program, administering the loans and, in the event of default, realizing on the security and the guarantees. Each lender has its own lending criteria subject to the requirements of the CSBF Program. Once the loan is approved, the borrower receives the loan funds from the lender, not the government.

How Lenders Are Reimbursed on Defaulted Loans

When a loan is in default, the lender must realize all security taken for the loan. Once this is completed, the lender submits its claim for loss to the CSBF Program together with all the necessary documentation to justify the claim. Following the review of the lender's information, the claim can be approved or adjusted, in which case the lender is paid 85 percent of its eligible loss, or the claim may be rejected if there is non-compliance with program requirements.

Incrementality

One of the CSBF Program's goals is incrementality, that is, to increase the availability of financing for small businesses. It extends financing that would have otherwise been unavailable or would have only been available under less favourable terms (e.g., higher interest rates, additional collateral requirements, etc.). Studies have determined that 80–85 percent of the loans made under the CSBF Program are financially incremental.

Businesses that have been in operation less than one year often have difficulty in accessing capital since they lack a credit history and the collateral needed to secure a loan. An indication that the program is achieving incrementality is that these businesses borrowed 57.5 percent of the total loan value in 2011–12.

Job Creation

In 2011–12, borrowers indicated on the loan registration forms that their CSBF Program loans generated a total of 16,712 new jobs (2.3 jobs per loan) for their businesses. These figures may not be actual job creations and caution is necessary in deriving conclusions from these estimates. However, small businesses that received loans under the CSBF Program experienced higher employment growth, created more jobs and retained more employees than those that did not use the CSBF Program (Comprehensive Review Report (2004–09) (Archived)).


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2. Program Requirements

The CSBF Program operates according to the following major requirements:

Small business eligibility:
The businesses must be for-profit, carried on in Canada and have annual gross revenues of $5 million or less. Farming businesses and charitable and religious institutions are not eligible.
Assets financed:
Loans under the CSBF Program must be used to finance the purchase or improvement of real property or equipment, the purchase of leasehold improvements or the financing of program registration fees.
Maximum financing amount:
A borrower cannot have more than $500,000 (of which a maximum of $350,000 can be used to finance the purchase or improvement of equipment or leasehold improvements) in total loans outstanding under the CSBF Program.
Percentage of assets financed:
The maximum amount of financing available is 90 percent of the eligible cost of the assets.
Maximum interest rate:
  • Floating rate: the lender's prime rate plus 3 percent (includes the 1.25-percent administration fee).
  • Fixed rate: the lender's single-family residential mortgage rate plus 3 percent (includes the 1.25-percent administration fee).
Length of term:
The maximum term for any loan is 10 years from the scheduled date of the first payment of principal and/or interest.
Fees paid by lenders:
  • A fee of 2 percent of the amount financed is paid at the time of registration. This fee can be included in the CSBF loan.
  • An annual administration fee of 1.25 percent is paid on outstanding loan amounts. This fee may be included as part of the interest rate charged on loans.
Loss-sharing ratio:
Eligible losses on loans are shared as follows: 85 percent government and 15 percent lender.
Cap on claims:
For each five-year period commencing the Government of Canada's obligation to an individual lender is to pay eligible claims (i.e., 85 percent of the eligible losses) on defaulted loans up to a maximum of the aggregate of:
  • 90 percent of the first $250,000 in loans registered; plus
  • 50 percent of the next $250,000; plus
  • 12 percent of all loans in excess of $500,000 for loans made on or after (10 percent for loans made before ).

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3. Program Loans and Claims Analysis

3.1 Lending Volumes

In 2011–12, lenders registered 7,196 loans worth $996.3 million under the CSBF Program, a decrease in the number (258 or 3.5 percent) and the value ($18.9 million or 1.9 percent) of loans from last year (see Figure 1A). The average loan size grew slightly by 1.7 percent to $138,453.

Since its inception in 1999, the CSBF Program has registered 135,984 loans worth $13.4 billion.

Figure 1A: Number and Value of CSBF Loans, 2002–12

Bar Chart: Number and Value of CSBF Loans, 2002–12 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 1A

This vertical bar graph compares the total number of loans and the total value in millions of dollars of Canada Small Business Financing loans from 2002–2003 to 2011–2012. The highest number of loans was during 2002–2003, which had 11,263 loans, followed by 11,142 loans in 2004–2005. For the years ranging from 2002–2003 to 2005–2006, the number of loans stayed around 11,000 loans. In 2006–2007, the total number of loans declined to 9,595 and steadily declined to 7,196 in 2011–2012. The value of loans was highest in 2005–2006 at 1.1 billion dollars. After that time, up until 2011–2012, the value of loans stayed about the same and ranged between just under 1 billion dollars to just over 1 billion dollars, with the lowest amount in 2008–2009 at 901.1 million dollars. In 2011–2012, the value of loans was 996.3 million dollars.

For more details, see the Appendix, Table 1.

3.2 Claim Volumes

In 2011–12, 1,373 claims were paid with a value of $67.1 million, an average of $48,869 per claim (see Figure 1B). The value of claims decreased approximately 12.1 percent from the previous year, primarily because lenders submitted fewer claims. On average, claims were processed within 17 working days once all the necessary documentation was received from the lender.

In addition, 134 claims were not paid due to non-compliance with program requirements. Seven appeals of claim decisions were received. Each appeal was assessed on the basis of any additional information or clarifications. Five of these appeals were rejected and two remained to be completed as at March 31, 2012.

Figure 1B: Number and Value of CSBF Claims,Footnote 1 2002–12

Bar chart Number and Value of CSBF Claims, 2002-12 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 1B

This vertical bar graph compares the total number of claims and the total value in millions of dollars of Canada Small Business Financing claims from 2002–2003 to 2011–2012. In 2002–2003, there were 1,409 claims paid, compared to 1,373 claims in 2011–2012. The total number of claims peaked in 2008–2009 with 1,955 claims, followed by the next highest in 2009–2010 with 1,933 claims. The value of claims in 2011–2012 was 67.1 million dollars. The value of claims in 2009–2010 was the highest at 109.5 million dollars, followed by 2008–2009, which was 101.5 million dollars.

For more details, see the Appendix, Table 1.

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3.3 Loans and Claims by Province and Territory

The CSBF Program is demand driven, and variations in its use reflect choices made by lenders and borrowers across Canada (see Figure 2). More than 63 percent of the loans under the CSBF Program were made in Quebec and Ontario, where the majority of Canadian small businesses operate. For 2011–12, the distribution of loans and claims is as follows:

The share of claim values by province and territory has remained fairly stable over the last two years.

Figure 2: Percent of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Province and Territory, 2011–12

Map of Canada: Percent of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Province and Territory, 2011–12 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 2

This map of Canada shows the percentage of the total value of Canada Small Business Financing loans and claims by province and territory for 2011–2012. The highest percentage of loans was seen in Quebec with 34.1 percent, followed by Ontario at 33.1 percent. The lowest percentage values for loans are in the north with Yukon, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories at zero percent. The east also saw low percentage values for loans with Prince Edward Island at 0.6 percent, followed by Newfoundland and Labrador at 0.7 percent, Nova Scotia at 2.4 percent and New Brunswick at 3.4 percent. Western Canada had Alberta with the highest percentage value for loans at 12.2 percent, followed by British Columbia at 6.3 percent, Saskatchewan at 4.1 percent and Manitoba at 3.0 percent.

The percentage of the total value of Canada Small Business Financing claims in 2011–2012 was highest in Ontario at 49.2 percent, followed by Quebec at 32.1 percent. The lowest percentage of claims was seen in the north with zero percent for Yukon and Nunavut and 0.1 percent for the Northwest Territories. The east also saw low percentage values for claims with Newfoundland and Labrador at 0.2 percent, followed by Prince Edward Island at 0.6 percent, Nova Scotia at 1.4 percent and New Brunswick at 3.3 percent. In the west, Alberta had the highest percentage value for claims at 5.2 percent, followed by British Columbia at 5.0 percent, Manitoba at 1.6 percent and Saskatchewan at 1.3 percent.

For more details, see the Appendix, Table 2.

3.4 Loans and Claims by Size of Loans

The maximum loan amount was increased from $250,000 to $500,000 on April 1, 2009. In 2011–12, loans in excess of $250,000 remained stable compared to 2010–11. There were 1,154 loans (16 percent) in excess of $250,000, with a value of $384.8 million or almost 38.6 percent (see Figure 3). Loans between $125,000 and $250,000 totalled 2,028 (28.2 percent) by number and were worth approximately $366.4 million (36.8 percent) by value.

Most of the claims resulted from loans made between $125,000 and $250,000: 647 of the 1,373 claims (47.1 percent) resulted in payments totalling $45.7 million (68.1 percent).

Loans with a value of more than $250,000 resulted in 38 claims (2.8 percent) paid for a total amount of $5.6 million (8.4 percent).

Figure 3: Percent of Total Value of Canada Small Business Financing Loans and Claims by Size of Loans, 2011–2012

Bar chart: Percent of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Size of Loans, 2011–12 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 3

This vertical bar graph compares the percentage of the total value of Canada Small Business Financing loans and claims by size of loans for 2011–2012. The percentage of the total value of loans for zero dollars to 125,000 dollars was 24.6 percent, for 125,001 dollars to 250,000 dollars was 36.8 percent, for 250,001 dollars to 375,000 dollars was 31.8 percent and for 375,001 dollars to 500,000 dollars was 6.8 percent. The percentage of the total value for claims for zero dollars to 125,000 dollars was 23.5 percent, for 125,001 dollars to 250,000 dollars was 68.1 percent, for 250,001 dollars to 375,000 dollars was 8.3 percent and for 375,001 dollars to 500,000 dollars was 0.1 percent.

For more details, see the Appendix, Table 3.

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3.5 Loans and Claims by Asset Type

In 2011–12, loans made to finance the purchase of equipment and leasehold improvements increased slightly while there was a decrease in real property loans. Figure 4 illustrates the value of loans and claims by the type of assets financed:

The average loan values for each asset type were as follows: equipment $104,362, leasehold improvements $164,129 and real property $226,680.

Figure 4: CSBF Loans and Claims by Asset Type, 2011–12

Illustration of 2 pie charts: CSBF Loans and Claims by Asset Type, 2011–2012
Description of Figure 4

This figure has two pie charts that break down Canada Small Business Financing loans and claims by asset type for 2011–2012. Canada Small Business Financing made 7,196 loans totalling 996.3 million dollars. Equipment made up 44.0 percent (438.6 million dollars and 4,203 loans) of Canada Small Business Financing loans, followed by leasehold improvements at 31.8 percent (316.9 million dollars and 1,931 loans) and real property at 24.2 percent (240.8 million dollars and 1,062 loans).

Canada Small Business Financing received 1,373 claims totalling 67.1 million dollars. Equipment made up 55.6 percent (37.3 million dollars and 846 claims), followed by leasehold improvements at 38.7 percent (26.0 million dollars and 455 claims) and real property at 5.7 percent (3.8 million dollars and 72 claims).

CSBF Loans by Asset Type, 2011–12
Loans Made Value
($M)
Number
Equipment 438.6 4,203
Leasehold Improvements 316.9 1,931
Real Property 240.8 1,062
Total 996.3 7,196
Pie Chart: CSBF Claims by Asset Type, 2011–12
Claims Paid Value
($M)
Number
Equipment 37.3 846
Leasehold Improvements 26.0 455
Real Property 3.8 72
Total 67.1 1,373

3.6 Loans and Claims by Industry Sector

Figure 5 shows the percentage of the total value of CSBF loans and claims by industry sector. According to the information provided by lenders, the top four main industry sectors receiving loans under the CSBF Program in 2011–12 were as follows:

The value of claims paid on loans related to these sectors was as follows:

In total, these four industry sectors accounted for 57.8 percent of the total value of loans and 70.2 percent of the total value of claims.

Figure 5: Percent of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Main Industry Sector, 2011–12

Illustration bar chart: Percent of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Main Industry Sector, 2011-12 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 5

This vertical bar graph compares the percentage of the total value of Canada Small Business Financing loans and claims by main industry sector for 2011–2012. For Canada Small Business Financing loans, accommodation and food services had the highest percentage of the total value at 29.4 percent, followed by retail trade at 15.5 percent, transportation and warehousing at 7.7 percent, and manufacturing at 5.2 percent.

For Canada Small Business Financing claims, accommodation and food services had the highest percentage of the total value at 40.3 percent, followed by retail trade at 18.9 percent, manufacturing at 8.3 percent, and transportation and warehousing at 2.7 percent.

For more details, see the Appendix, Table 4.

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3.7 Loans and Claims by Age of Business

Businesses that have been in operation less than one year have the most difficulty in obtaining financing. In 2011–12, the CSBF Program continued to help fill this need since these businesses received more than half of the value of all loans made, that is, $572.8 million or 57.5 percent (see Figure 6). They also accounted for $53.9 million or 80.4 percent of the claims paid during this same period. Relative to 2010–11, this is a 1.3-percent decrease in the value of loans and a 7.3-percent decrease in the value of claims.

Figure 6: CSBF Loans and Claims by Age of Business, 2011–12

Illustration of 2 pie charts: CSBF Loans and Claims by Age of Business, 2011–12 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 6

This figure has two pie charts that break down Canada Small Business Financing loans and claims by age of business for 2011–2012. Canada Small Business Financing made 7,196 loans totalling 996.3 million dollars. Businesses less than 1 year old made up the largest group for loans at 57.5 percent (572.8 million dollars and 3,696 loans), followed by businesses more than 3 years old at 31.0 percent (309.5 million dollars and 2,556 loans) and businesses 1 to 3 years old at 11.5 percent (114.1 million dollars and 944 loans).

Canada Small Business Financing received 1,373 claims totalling 67.1 million dollars. Businesses less than 1 year old made up the largest group for claims at 80.4 percent (53.9 million dollars and 1,033 claims), followed by businesses more than 3 years old at 12.0 percent (8.0 million dollars and 187 claims) and businesses 1 to 3 years old at 7.6 percent (5.1 million dollars and 153 claims).

CSBF Loans by Age of Business, 2011–12
Loans Made Value
($M)
Number
Less than 1 year 572.8 3,696
1 to 3 years 114.1 944
More than 3 years 309.5 2,556
TotalFootnote 2 996.3 7,196
CSBF Claims by Age of Business, 2011–12
Claims Paid Value
($M)
Number
Less than 1 year 53.9 1,033
1 to 3 years 5.1 153
More than 3 years 8.0 187
TotalFootnote 2 67.1 1,373

3.8 Loans and Claims by Business Size

The registration form submitted by lenders includes the borrower's estimate of the annual revenue of his or her small business. Small businesses with annual revenues of $1 million or less made up 73.9 percent of the value and 80.7 percent of the number of all loans made in 2011–12 (see Figure 7). Businesses with revenues between $1 million and $2 million accounted for the next largest percentage of the loans, 17.6 percent of the value and 13.5 percent of the number. The majority of the claims paid (76.6 percent) were for loans made to businesses with revenues of $1 million or less.

Figure 7: Percent of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Business Size,Footnote 3 2011–12

Illustration of a bar chart: Percent of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Business Size, 2011–12 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 7

This vertical bar graph compares the percentage of the total value of Canada Small Business Financing loans and claims by business size for 2011–2012 based on the borrower's revenue forecasts at the time of loan registration. Canada Small Business Financing loans to borrowers with revenue forecasts of zero to 1 million dollars were highest at 73.9 percent of the total value of loans, followed by borrowers with revenue forecasts of 1,000,001 dollars to 2 million dollars at 17.6 percent, borrowers with revenue forecasts of 2,000,001 dollars to 3 million dollars at 4.8 percent, borrowers with revenue forecasts of 3,000,001 dollars to 4 million dollars at 2.4 percent and borrowers with revenue forecasts of 4,000,001 dollars to 5 million dollars at 1.4 percent.

Canada Small Business Financing claims from borrowers with revenue forecasts of zero to 1 million dollars were highest at 76.6 percent of the total value of claims, followed by borrowers with revenue forecasts of 1,000,001 dollars to 2 million dollars at 19.2 percent, borrowers with revenue forecasts of 2,000,001 dollars to 3 million dollars at 2.7 percent, borrowers with revenue forecasts of 3,000,001 dollars to 4 million dollars at 0.7 percent and borrowers with revenue forecasts of 4,000,001 dollars to 5 million dollars at 0.7 percent.

Value of CSBF Loans by Business Size
Loans Made Value
($M)
Number
$0 to $1,000,000 736.3 5,805
$1,000,001 to $2,000,000 175.3 972
$2,000,001 to $3,000,000 47.3 245
$3,000,001 to $4,000,000 23.7 108
$4,000,001 to $5,000,000 13.6 66
TotalFootnote 4 996.3 7,196
Value of CSBF Claims by Business Size
Claims Paid Value
($M)
Number
$0 to $1,000,000 51.4 1,112
$1,000,001 to $2,000,000 12.9 207
$2,000,001 to $3,000,000 1.8 32
$3,000,001 to $4,000,000 0.5 13
$4,000,001 to $5,000,000 0.5 9
TotalFootnote 4 67.1 1,373

3.9 Loans and Claims by Type of Borrower

In 2011–12, as in the previous fiscal year, the breakdown of loans by type of borrower remained relatively stable: corporations received 91.2 percent of the total value of loans, partnerships 2.8 percent and sole proprietors 6.0 percent (see CSBF Loans and Claims—by Type of Borrower, 2011–12). The data for claims show a similar pattern: loans made to corporations resulted in 93.6 percent of the claims, partnerships 1.8 percent, and sole proprietors 4.6 percent.

Franchise businesses accounted for 21.0 percent of the total value of loans and 30.4 percent of the total value of claims, a 25.5-percent increase and a 12.3-percent increase respectively compared to 2010–11. The non-franchise businesses accounted for 79.0 percent of the total value of loans (a 7.2-percent decrease) and 69.6 percent of the value of claims (a 19.7-percent decrease).

CSBF Loans and Claims—by Type of Borrower, 2011–12
  Loans Claims
Number Value
($ Millions)
Percent
of Value
Number Value
($ Millions)
Percent
of Value
Corporation 6,160 908.9 91.2 1,220 62.8 93.6
Partnership 268 28.1 2.8 38 1.2 1.8
Sole Proprietorship 768 59.3 6.0 115 3.1 4.6
Total 7,196 996.3 100.0 1,373 67.1 100.0

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4. Program Liability

The Canada Small Business Financing Act establishes a liability ceiling (maximum liability) for each five-year lending period. The Government of Canada's maximum liability with respect to all loans registered under the program for each lending period is capped by the aggregate of the 90–50–12 percent (or 10 percent) formula for each lender as described in Section 2 "Program Requirements."

The Government of Canada is contingently liable for all outstanding loans in the event they were to default. The contingent liability is calculated as the lower of the maximum liability less claims paid to lenders and 85 percent of the outstanding loan balance amount.

The maximum and contingent liabilities as at for each of the five-year lending periods are summarized below:

Maximum and Contingent Liabilities for Each Five-Year Lending Period as at
Fiscal Years Maximum Liability
($ Millions)
Contingent Liability
($ Millions)
1999–2004 674.8 46.3
2004–09 645.5 221.1
2009–12 469.3 436.2

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5. Cost Recovery

The CSBF Program generates revenues by means of a 2-percent registration fee and a 1.25-percent annual administration fee on the loans. These fees offset the claims paid on loans. They do not cover the operating expenses of the program.

Below is a summary of the revenues and expenses as at , for each of the five-year lending periods:

Revenue and Expense Summary by Lending Period as at
Fiscal Years Revenues
($ Millions)
Expenses
($ Millions)
Cumulative Revenues and Expenses
($ Millions)
1999–2004 289.8 417.0 (127.1)
2004–09 257.7 425.4 (167.7)
2009–12 103.9 36.0 68.0

The Comprehensive Review Report (2004–09) (Archived) includes an analysis of the cost recovery and of the economic benefits delivered by the CSBF Program.


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6. Capital Leasing Pilot Project

Claims and administration fees received on registered leases are still being processed for the Capital Leasing Pilot Project (CLPP), which was discontinued on . In 2011–12, there were 30 claims paid, representing $1.2 million, and six claims not paid due to non-compliance with program requirements. For detailed information, see the Appendix, Table 5.

Since 2002, the CLPP has generated $6.5 million in revenues and paid almost $10.5 million in claims, resulting in a net cost of approximately $4.0 million as at . The contingent liability for the outstanding leases under the CLPP was calculated at $1.1 million as at the end of this reporting period.


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7. Future Directions

Proposed Regulatory Changes

In April 2010, a comprehensive review that examined the to lending period of the program was tabled in Parliament. While this internal review confirmed the importance, efficiency and effectiveness of the CSBF Program, it also highlighted areas for improvement. To help ensure the long-term viability of the program, the review committed to strengthening stakeholder relations and to developing a package of changes aimed at addressing stakeholder concerns and modernizing the CSBF Program.

In response to the review, a package of specific changes is being finalized, based on feedback from stakeholders. The changes are meant to improve the CSBF Program by:

Electronic Loan Registrations

Last year, the CSBF Program enabled lenders to submit loan registrations and fees electronically, which reduced the administrative and paperwork burden on participating lenders. The new processes are simpler, faster and less expensive, which is in line with the federal government's objective of providing quality services as efficiently and effectively as possible. The program will continue to work with lenders to roll out the application over the next year.

Program Awareness

In order to strengthen stakeholders relations, the program will continue in its efforts to expand awareness not only among borrowers but also among lenders who share the risk for the loans. In the last five years, the increase in the information requests received by the CSBF Program attests to the fact that the program has more of a presence in small business financing. During 2011–12:

To improve access to information, the CSBF Program's website was improved with a new home page, a tool box for lenders and a links page to other government agencies, Crown corporations and departments that assist small businesses.


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Appendix

Canada Small Business Financing Act – Tables 1 to 4

Note

Supplemental data tables for fiscal years 1999–2012 are available on the CSBF Program website and are accessible in Excel, PDF and HTML formats.

Table 1: Summary of Financial Activities per Fiscal Year—CSBF Program
Fiscal Year Loans Revenues Expenses Net Revenues
Less Expenses
($000)
Number Value
($000)
Average
($000)
FeesFootnote 1
($000)
Number
of Claims
Expenses
($000)
1999–2000 17,741 1,352,320.5 76.2 33,406.6 19 494.6 32,912.0
2000–01 14,442 1,159,048.0 80.3 43,134.5 307 14,769.0 28,365.5
2001–02 11,016 899,247.6 81.6 44,576.2 915 43,444.3 1,131.9
2002–03 11,263 951,167.1 84.5 48,433.2 1,409 68,791.3 (20,358.0)
2003–04 11,085 999,868.3 90.2 51,553.2 1,553 71,662.7 (20,109.5)
2004–05 11,142 1,041,063.0 93.4 53,820.7 1,620 76,460.1 (22,639.4)
2005–06 10,790 1,087,701.8 100.8 56,220.8 1,598 71,679.3 (15,458.5)
2006–07 9,595 1,024,535.6 106.8 55,769.9 1,681 80,289.4 (24,519.5)
2007–08 8,930 987,659.8 110.6 55,066.8 1,835 96,341.1 (41,274.3)
2008–09 7,796 901,115.2 115.6 52,895.2 1,955 101,509.4 (48,614.2)
2009–10 7,534 952,858.5 126.5 52,393.3 1,933 109,458.9 (57,065.6)
2010–11 7,454 1,015,177.4 136.2 51,733.9 1,475 76,318.3 (24,584.5)
2011–12 7,196 996,307.7 138.5 52,482.2 1,373 67,097.0 (14,614.8)
TotalFootnote 2 135,984 13,368,070.5 98.3 651,486.4 17,673 878,315.4 (226,828.9)

Return to Figure 1A

Return to Figure 1B


Table 2: Loans and Claims—by Province and Territory for 2011–12—CSBF Program
Province or Territory Loans Claims
Number Value
($000)
Percent
of Total
Value
Average
($000)
Number Value
($000)
Percent
of Total
Value
Average
($000)
Newfoundland and Labrador 64 7,427.4 0.7 116.8 15 128.2 0.2 8.5
Prince Edward Island 53 6,083.6 0.6 114.4 13 410.2 0.6 31.6
Nova Scotia 193 23,419.3 2.4 121.4 30 946.5 1.4 31.5
New Brunswick 274 34,027.9 3.4 124.1 51 2,218.4 3.3 43.5
Quebec 2,394 339,813.0 34.1 141.9 382 21,539.5 32.1 56.4
Ontario 2,179 330,244.0 33.1 151.6 657 33,020.1 49.2 50.3
Manitoba 267 29,944.9 3.0 112.2 33 1,105.4 1.6 33.5
Saskatchewan 372 41,072.6 4.1 110.4 22 857.4 1.3 39.0
Alberta 844 121,600.8 12.2 144.0 78 3,467.4 5.2 44.5
British Columbia 552 62,520.8 6.3 113.2 90 3,352.9 5.0 37.3
Yukon 1 58.5 0.0 58.5 1 6.5 0.0 6.5
Northwest Territories 2 94.9 0.0 47.5 1 44.5 0.1 44.5
Nunavut
TotalFootnote 3 7,196 996,307.7 100.0 138.5 1,373 67,097.0 100.0 48.9

Return to Figure 2


Table 3: Loans and Claims—by Size of Loans for 2011–12—CSBF Program
Size of Loans Loans Claims
Number Value
($000)
Percent of
Total Value
Average
($000)
Number Value
($000)
Percent
of Total
Value
Average
($000)
$0 to $125,000 4,014 245,080.6 24.6 61.1 688 15,754.6 23.5 22.9
$125,001 to $250,000 2,028 366,396.6 36.8 180.7 647 45,706.9 68.1 70.6
$250,001 to $375,000 1,004 317,170.8 31.8 315.9 37 5,544.3 8.3 149.8
$375,001 to $500,000 150 67,659.6 6.8 451.1 1 91.3 0.1 91.3
TotalFootnote 4 7,196 996,307.7 100.0 138.5 1,373 67,097.0 100.0 48.9

Return to Figure 3


Table 4: Loans and Claims–by Industry Sector for 2011–12–CSBF Program
Industry Sector Loans Claims
Number Value
($000)
Percent of
Total Value
Average
($000)
Number Value
($000)
Percent of
Total Value
Average
($000)
Accommodation and Food Services 1,629 292,503.3 29.4 179.6 423 27,029.2 40.3 63.9
Manufacturing 386 52,283.7 5.2 135.4 124 5,600.9 8.3 45.2
Other Services 634 77,251.9 7.8 121.8 151 6,322.2 9.4 41.9
Retail Trade 1,025 154,053.6 15.5 150.3 280 12,703.5 18.9 45.4
Transportation and Warehousing 893 76,872.1 7.7 86.1 87 1,812.5 2.7 20.8
Other Sectors 2,629 343,343.0 34.5 130.6 308 13,628.6 20.3 44.2
TotalFootnote 5 7,196 996,307.7 100.0 138.5 1,373 67,097.0 100.0 48.9

Return to Figure 5


Capital Leasing Pilot Project – Table 5

Table 5: Summary of Financial Activities per Fiscal Year—Capital Leasing Pilot Project
Fiscal Year Leases Revenues Expenses Net Revenues
Less Expenses
($000)
Number Value
($000)
Average
($000)
Fees Footnote 6
($000)
Number
of Claims
Expenses
($000)
2002–03 57 8,773.7 153.9 210.6 - - 210.6
2003–04 124 16,208.5 130.7 480.2 - - 480.2
2004–05 288 26,006.5 90.3 864.7 1 11.3 853.4
2005–06 441 37,977.7 86.1 1,351.3 17 503.7 847.6
2006–07 588 47,292.3 80.4 1,803.1 16 443.1 1,360.0
2007–08 - - - 831.0 36 688.9 142.1
2008–09 - - - 512.5 102 3,579.8 (3,067.3)
2009–10 - - - 266.2 64 2,473.7 (2,207.5)
2010–11 - - - 145.4 36 1,554.0 (1,408.6)
2011–12 - - - 47.0 30 1,212.3 (1,165.3)
Total Footnote 7 1,498 136,258.6 91.0 6,511.9 302 10,466.7 (3,954.8)

Return to "6. Capital Leasing Pilot Project"

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