Archived — Canada Small Business Financing Act—Annual Report 2012–13

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The Canada Small Business Financing (CSBF) Program aims to increase the availability of financing to small businesses by extending financing that would not otherwise be available to them or would be available only under less attractive conditions. It is a national program operating in all provinces and territories. Financial institutions can make term loans of up to $500,000 to small businesses to purchase or improve real property or equipment or make leasehold improvements. The Government of Canada pays lenders 85 percent of the eligible losses incurred on defaulted loans.

This publication is also available online in HTML at www.ic.gc.ca/csbfp.

This publication is available upon request in accessible formats (Braille, large print, etc.). Contact:

Small Business Financing Directorate
Small Business Branch
1-866-959-1699 (toll-free in Canada)

Permission to Reproduce
Except as otherwise specifically noted, the information in this publication may be reproduced, in part or in whole and by any means, without charge or further permission from Industry Canada, provided that due diligence is exercised in ensuring the accuracy of the information reproduced; that Industry Canada is identified as the source institution; and that the reproduction is not represented as an official version of the information reproduced, nor as having been made in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of, Industry Canada.

For permission to reproduce the information in this publication for commercial redistribution, please contact:

Industry Canada Web Services Centre
Telephone (toll-free in Canada): 1-800-328-6189
Telephone (Ottawa): 613-954-5031
Fax: 613-954-2340
TTY (for hearing-impaired): 1-866-694-8389
Business hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) Email: ic.info-info.ic@canada.ca

Cat. No. Iu185-1/2013E-PDF ISSN 1928-1471

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Industry, 2014.

Aussi offert en français sous le titre Loi sur le financement des petites entreprises du Canada : Rapport annuel 2012-2013

Contents


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Minister's Message

I am pleased to table before Parliament the Canada Small Business Financing (CSBF) Program's 2012–13 annual report on the administration of the Canada Small Business Financing Act.

The CSBF Program plays an important role in supporting small and start-up businesses by increasing the availability of financing for the establishment, expansion and modernization of small businesses in Canada.

In 2012–13, small businesses in Canada received 6,201 loans under the CSBF Program valued at $910.2 million. Of this amount, over half went to start-up companies and small businesses that had been in operation for less than one year. The CSBF Program continues to help small businesses and entrepreneurs obtain financing that they would otherwise have difficulty accessing.

Our government remains committed to helping small businesses and recognizes that they are key drivers of economic growth and crucial to Canada's long-term prosperity.

Sincerely,

The Honourable James Moore, P.C., M.P.


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Highlights of 2012–13

Loans Made

Small business borrowers received 6,201 loans with a value of $910.2 million. The average loan size was $146,778.

Age of Businesses

Businesses in operation less than one year borrowed approximately 58 percent ($530.3 million) of the total loan value.

Industry Sector

Accommodation and food services continues to be the largest industry sector among borrowers, increasing its share of the total loan value to 33 percent ($300.3 million).

Business Size

Businesses with less than $1.0 million in revenues accounted for almost 73 percent ($668.5 million) of the value of all loans registered.

Size of Loans

Loans in excess of $250,000 accounted for about 41 percent ($374.0 million) of the total value of loans registered.

type of Borrower

Corporations were the preferred business structure, accounting for 92 percent ($838.5 million) of the total loan value.

Claims Paid

The amount of claims paid to lenders—$51.1 million on 901 claims—continued to decline and averaged $56,719 per claim.


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1.0 Overview of the Canada Small Business Financing Program

Industry Canada administers the Canada Small Business Financing (CSBF) Program, which helps small businesses that are having difficulty accessing financing. The Government of Canada and private sector lenders share the burden of risk on loans to increase the amount of financing extended to small businesses. The basic elements of the program are explained below.

The Role of Industry Canada

Industry Canada registers loans, collects fees and pays lenders eligible losses on defaulted loans. It does not approve the loan applications and is not involved in the administration of the loans.

The Role of Lenders

Lenders (chartered banks, credit unions and caisses populaires) provide CSBF Program financing to small businesses in all provinces and territories. They are responsible for all credit decisions, approving the loans, disbursing the loan proceeds, submitting loans for registration with the CSBF Program, administering the loans and, in the event of default, realizing on the security and the guarantees. Each lender has its own lending criteria subject to the requirements of the CSBF Program. Once the loan is approved, the borrower receives the funds from the lender, not the government.

Incrementality

The CSBF Program strives to increase the availability of financing for small businesses by extending financing that would not otherwise be available to them or would only be available under less favourable terms (higher interest rates, additional collateral requirements, etc.). This is the principle of incrementality. Studies conducted for the 2004–09 comprehensive review showed that 80 to 85 percent of the loans made under the CSBF Program are financially incremental. The 2012–13 reporting period also indicates this, with businesses in operation less than one year borrowing 58.3 percent of the total loan value.

Program Requirements

The CSBF Program operates according to the following major requirements.

Small business eligibility:
Borrowers must have a for-profit business that operates in Canada and has annual gross revenues of $5 million or less. Farming businesses and charitable and religious institutions are not eligible.
Assets financed:
Loans under the CSBF Program must be used to finance the purchase or improvement of real property or equipment, make leasehold improvements or pay the program registration fees. The maximum amount of financing available is 90 percent of the eligible cost of the assets.
Maximum financing amount:
A borrower can finance up to $500,000 (of which the maximum of $350,000 can be used to finance the purchase or improvement of equipment or make leasehold improvements). These limitations apply to a borrower’s total loans outstanding under the CSBF Program.
Maximum interest rate:
  • Floating rate: the lender’s prime rate plus 3 percent (includes the 1.25-percent administration fee).
  • Fixed rate: the lender’s single-family residential mortgage rate plus 3 percent (includes the 1.25-percent administration fee).
Length of term:
The maximum term for any loan is 10 years from the scheduled date of the first payment of principal and/or interest.
Fees paid by lenders:
  • A fee of 2 percent of the amount financed is paid at the time of registration. This fee can be included in the CSBF loan.
  • An annual administration fee of 1.25 percent is paid on outstanding loan amounts. This fee may be included as part of the interest rate charged on loans.
Claims by lenders and loss-sharing ratio:
When a loan is in default, the lender must realize all security taken for the loan. The lender then submits a claim for loss to the CSBF Program together with all the necessary documentation to justify the claim. Once the lender’s information is reviewed, a claim may be approved, adjusted or rejected if there is non-compliance with program requirements. Eligible losses on loans are shared as follows: 85 percent government and 15 percent lender.
Cap on claims:
For each five-year period commencing , the Government of Canada’s obligation to an individual lender is to pay eligible claims (i.e., 85 percent of the eligible losses) on defaulted loans up to a maximum of the aggregate of
  • 90 percent of the first $250,000 in loans registered
  • plus 50 percent of the next $250,000
  • plus 12 percent of all loans in excess of $500,000 for loans made on or after (10 percent for loans made before )

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2.0 Program Loans and Claims Analysis

2.1 Lending Volumes

In 2012–13, there were 6,201 loans registered worth $910.2 million. This represents a decrease of 940, or 13.2 percent, in the number of loans and $68.1 million, or 7.0 percent, in the value of loans
(see Figure 1A).

The average loan size was $146,778, a growth of 7.1 percent. Since the 2009 change in the maximum loan amount from $250,000 to $500,000, the average loan size has increased by $31,189 or 27.0 percent.

Since 1999, the CSBF Program has registered 142,130 loans, providing small businesses with financing worth $14.3 billion.

The CSBF Program enables lenders to submit loan registrations and fees electronically, which reduces the administrative and paperwork burden on participating lenders. As of , approximately 60 percent of the loan registrations and 14 percent of the fees were processed electronically.

Figure 1A: Number and Value of CSBF Loans, 2004–13

Bar Chart. Figure 1A: Number and Value of CSBF Loans, 2004–13 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 1A
Figure 1A: Number and Value of CSBF Loans, 2004–13
Fiscal Year Total Value of Loans ($ millions) Total Loans
2004–05 1,041 11,142
2005–06 1,088 10,790
2006–07 1,025 9,595
2007–08 988 8,930
2008–09 901 7,796
2009–10 953 7,534
2010–11 1,015 7,454
2011–12 978 7,141
2012–13 910 6,201

For more details, see Table 1 in the Appendix.

2.2 Claim Volumes

In 2012–13, the CSBF Program paid 901 claims with a value of $51.1 million to lenders, an average of $56,719 per claim (see Figure 1B). Compared to 2011–12, this represents a decrease of 428, or
32.2 percent, in the number of claims and $15.0 million, or 22.7 percent, in the value of claims. On average, claims were processed within 20 working days once the lender provided all the necessary documentation.

In addition, 103 claims were not paid due to non-compliance with program requirements. Appeals of claim decisions were assessed based on additional information or clarifications provided by lenders. Of the nine appeals received in 2012–13, six were rejected, two were accepted resulting in claim payments and one remained to be completed as at March 31, 2013.

Figure 1B: Number and Value of CSBF Claims,Footnote 1 2004–13

Bar Chart. Figure 1B: Number and Value of CSBF Claims, 2004–13 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 1B
Figure 1B: Number and Value of CSBF Claims, 2004–13
Fiscal Year Total Value of Claims ($ millions) Total Claims
2004–05 76.5 1,620
2005–06 71.7 1,598
2006–07 80.3 1,681
2007–08 96.3 1,835
2008–09 101.5 1,955
2009–10 109.5 1,933
2010–11 76.3 1,475
2011–12 66.2 1,329
2012–13 51.1 901

For more details, see Table 1 in the Appendix.

Even though the Capital Leasing Pilot Project (CLPP) was discontinued on March 31, 2007, eight claims were received on registered leases. The payments on these claims amounted to $166,885. Six claims were not paid due to non-compliance with program requirements. For detailed information on all financial activities of the CLPP since 2002–03, see Table 2 in the Appendix.

2.3 Loans and Claims by Province and Territory

The provincial and territorial distribution of loans made by lenders and claims paid is shown in Figure 2 below. Ontario and Quebec accounted for more than 64 percent of the loans under the CSBF Program while the Western (including the territories) and Atlantic provinces registered more than 27 percent and 8 percent of the loans respectively. The distribution of loans for 2012–13 is as follows:

The majority of the claims were from Quebec and Ontario, amounting to $41.6 million (81.4 percent of the total value). The share of claim values by province and territory has remained fairly stable over the last two years.

Figure 2: Percentage of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Province and Territory, 2012–13

Map of Canada. Figure 2: Percentage of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Province and Territory, 2012–13 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 2
Figure 2: Percentage of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Province and Territory, 2012–13
Province / Territory Loans Claims
Newfoundland and Labrador 0.7% 0.1%
Nova Scotia 2.0% 1.9%
Prince Edward Island 0.6% 0.1%
New Brunswick 3.6% 2.2%
Quebec 32.9% 33.8%
Ontario 34.9% 47.6%
Manitoba 3.1% 0.8%
Saskatchewan 4.2% 0.6%
Alberta 11.8% 7.3%
British Columbia 6.2% 5.6%
Nunavut 0.0% 0.0%
Northwest Territories 0.0% 0.0%
Yukon 0.1% 0.0%

For more details, see Table 3 in the Appendix.

2.4 Loans and Claims by Size of Loans

In April 2009, the maximum loan size under the CSBF Program was increased from $250,000 to $500,000. Since then, large value loans have continued to increase such that 1,118 loans in excess of $250,000 (18.0 percent of the total number of loans) were made in 2012–13, representing $374.0 million (41.1 percent of the total value of loans). Loans of less than $250,000, however, still represented the majority of the lending and claims paid in 2012–13:

Figure 3: Percentage of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Size of Loans, 2012–13

Bar Chart. Figure 3: Percentage of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Size of Loans, 2012–13 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 3
Figure 3: Percentage of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Size of Loans, 2012–13
Size of Loans Percentage of Total Value Percentage of Total Claims
$0 to $125,000 21.9 24.0
$125,001 to $250,000 37.0 54.4
$250,001 to $375,000 34.3 20.5
$375,001 to $500,000 6.8 1.1

For more details, see Table 4 in the Appendix.

2.5 Loans and Claims by Asset type

Figure 4 illustrates the value of loans and claims by the type of asset financed in 2012–13:

Compared to 2011–12, the value of leasehold improvement loans increased by 2.9 percent while the value of equipment and real property loans decreased by 11.5 percent and 11.7 percent respectively.

The average loan value for each asset type was as follows: equipment, $110,319; leasehold improvements, $174,660; and real property, $227,602. The average loans in these categories have increased steadily since the maximum loan amount was raised to $500,000 in 2009–10.

Figure 4: CSBF Loans and Claims by Asset type, 2012–13

Figure 4a: Loans made

Pie Charts. Figure 4: CSBF Loans and Claims by Asset type, 2012–13 (the long descriptions are located below the image)
Description of Figure 4
CSBF Loans by Asset type, 2012–13
Asset type Percentage of Loans
Equipment 41.8
Leasehold Improvements 35.2
Real Property 23.0
CSBF Claims by Asset type, 2012–13
Asset type Percentage of Loans
Equipment 53.4
Leasehold Improvements 37.7
Real Property 8.9
CSBF Loans by Asset type, 2012–13
Loans Made Value ($ millions) Number
Equipment 380.1 3,445
Leasehold Improvements 320.5 1,835
Real Property 209.6 921
Total 910.2 6,201
CSBF Claims by Asset type, 2012–13
Claims Paid Value ($ millions) Number
Equipment 27.3 510
Leasehold Improvements 19.3 319
Real Property 4.6 72
TotalFootnote 2 51.1 901

2.6 Loans and Claims by Industry Sector

In 2012–13, the majority of loans made under the CSBF Program went to small businesses in these four main industry sectors:

For each of these sectors, the value of claims paid on loans was as follows:

These four industry sectors together accounted for 60.5 percent of the total value of loans and 68.7 percent of the total value of claims.

Figure 5: Percentage of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Main Industry Sector, 2012–13

Bar Chart. Figure 5: Percentage of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Main Industry Sector, 2012–13 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 5
Figure 5: Percentage of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Main Industry Sector, 2012–13
Industry Sector Loans  Claims
Accommodation and Food Services 33.0% 38.1%
Retail Trade 15.4% 18.8%
Transportation and Warehousing 7.4% 2.5%
Manufacturing 4.7% 9.3%

2.7 Loans and Claims by Age of Business

In 2012–13, the CSBF Program continued to help businesses that have been in operation less than one year because they have the most difficulty in obtaining financing. These businesses received more than $530.3 million or 58.3 percent of the value of all loans made (see Figure 6). They also accounted for $38.8 million in claims or 76.0 percent of the total claims paid during this same period. The businesses that have been in operation for more than three years had 30.0 percent of the total value of loans; however, they accounted for only 12.2 percent of the total value of claims. This is stable relative to last year.

Figure 6: CSBF Loans and Claims by Age of Business, 2012–13

Pie Charts. Figure 6: CSBF Loans and Claims by Age of Business, 2012–13 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 6
CSBF Loans by Age of Business, 2012–13
Age of Business Percentage of Loans
Less than 1 year 58.3
1 to 3 years 11.8
More than 3 years 30.0
CSBF Claims by Age of Business, 2012–13
Age of Business Percentage of Claims
Less than 1 year 76.0
1 to 3 years 11.8
More than 3 years 12.2
CSBF Loans by Age of Business, 2012–13
Loans Made Value ($ millions) Number
Less than 1 year 530.3 3,237
1 to 3 years 107.0 818
More than 3 years 272.8 2,146
TotalFootnote 3 910.2 6,201
CSBF Claims by Age of Business, 2012–13
Claims Paid Value ($ millions) Number
Less than 1 year 38.8 659
1 to 3 years 6.1 106
More than 3 years 6.2 136
Total 51.1 901

2.8 Loans and Claims by Business Size

Businesses that have annual gross revenues of $5 million or less are eligible for loan financing under the CSBF Program. In 2012–13, the vast majority of loans were made to small businesses with annual revenues of less than $1 million: 73.5 percent of the value and 80.0 percent of the number of all loans (see Figure 7). These businesses also accounted for the majority of the claims paid: 79.1 percent of the value and 84.7 percent of the number of claims. Overall, businesses with annual gross revenues of less than $2 million accounted for 91.1 percent of the total loan values.

Figure 7: Percentage of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Business Size,Footnote 4 2012–13

Bar Chart. Figure 7: Percentage of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Business Size, 2012–13 (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure 7
Percentage of Total Value of CSBF Loans and Claims by Business Size, 2012–13
Business Size (annual gross revenue) Loans Claims
$0 to $1,000,000 73.5% 79.1%
$1,000,001 to $2,000,000 17.7% 12.9%
$2,000,001 to $5,000,000 8.9% 7.9%
CSBF Loans by Business Size, 2012–13
Loans Made Value ($ millions) Number
$0 to $1,000,000 668.5 4,961
$1,000,001 to $2,000,000 161.0 836
$2,000,001 to $5,000,000 80.6 404
TotalFootnote 5 910.2 6,201
CSBF Claims by Business Size, 2012–13
Claims Paid Value ($ millions) Number
$0 to $1,000,000 40.4 763
$1,000,001 to $2,000,000 6.6 99
$2,000,001 to $5,000,000 4.1 39
Total 51.1 901

2.9 Loans and Claims by type of Borrower

In 2012–13, the breakdown of loans by type of borrower remained relatively stable compared to 2011–12: corporations received about 92.0 percent of the total value of loans and partnerships and sole proprietors almost 8.0 percent (see Loans and Claims by type of Borrower, 2012–13). The claims data are somewhat similar: 94.3 percent of the claims were from corporations and 5.7 percent were from partnerships and sole proprietors.

Non-franchise businesses accounted for the vast majority of the loans and claims: 74.8 percent of the total value of loans and 71.5 percent of the total value of claims. Franchise businesses received 25.2 percent of the total value of loans and 28.5 percent of the total value of claims. There was a significant difference in the average loan size made to franchises and non-franchises: $192,738 and $135,863 respectively.

Loans and Claims by type of Borrower, 2012–13
Type of Borrower Loans Claims
Number Value
($ millions)
Percentage of Value Number Value
($ millions)
Percentage of Value
Corporation 5,406 838.5 92.1 807 48.2 94.3
Partnership 179 21.3 2.3 20 0.5 1.0
Sole Proprietorship 616 50.3 5.5 74 2.4 4.7
Total 6,201 910.2 100.0 901 51.1 100.0

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3.0 Program Liability

Under the Canada Small Business Financing Act, the Government of Canada's liability ceiling (maximum liability) for all loans registered within each five-year lending period is capped by the aggregate of the 90–50–12 percent (or 90–50–10 percent) formula for each lender as described in Section 1, "Overview of the Canada Small Business Financing Program."

The Government of Canada is contingently liable for all outstanding loans in the event that they were to default. The contingent liability is calculated as the lower of the maximum liability less claims already paid to lenders and 85 percent of the outstanding loan balance amount.

Below is a summary of the maximum and contingent liabilities as at , for each of the five-year lending periods:

Summary of Maximum and Contingent Liabilitiesfor Each Five-Year Lending Period
as at
Fiscal Years Maximum Liability ($ millions) Contingent Liability ($ millions)
1999–2004 674.7 24.4
2004–09 642.6 186.6
2009–13 580.4 509.1

The contingent liability calculated for the outstanding leases under the Capital Leasing Pilot Project was $0.2 million as at the end of this reporting period.


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4.0 Cost Recovery

Revenues for the CSBF Program are generated from a 2-percent registration fee and a 1.25-percent annual administration fee on the loans. These fees are collected to help offset the cost of claims paid on loans, but do not aim to cover the operating expenses of the program.

Below is a summary of the revenues and expenses as at , for each of the five-year lending periods:

Summary of Revenues and Expenses for Each Five-Year Lending Period as at
Fiscal Years Revenues
($ millions)
Expenses
($ millions)
Cumulative Revenues and Expenses
($ millions)
1999–2004 290.2 418.2 (128.0)
2004–09 261.0 436.3 (175.3)
2009–13 151.4 74.0 77.4

The most recent analysis of the CSBF Program’s economic benefits and cost recovery is contained in Section 5.2 and Section 5.3, respectively, of the Comprehensive Review Report (2004–09) (Archived).

The Capital Leasing Pilot Project has generated $6.5 million in revenues and paid $10.6 million in claims since its inception in 2002, resulting in a net cost of approximately $4.1 million as at .


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5.0 Program Awareness

In 2012–13, the CSBF Program pursued marketing efforts, aimed at both borrowers and lenders, to have more of a presence in small business financing. During this reporting year, a wide range of outreach activities were conducted throughout Canada to increase awareness of the program among small businesses, lenders and business support organizations. As well, more than 49,000 copies of the program’s pamphlet, Lending a hand to your business, were distributed to small businesses, lenders and business support organizations.

In 2012–13, small businesses and lenders made 5,219 telephone, email and letter inquiries through the CSBF Program’s info line and website. The program’s website received 245,485 visits, making it one of Industry Canada’s most visited sites.


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6.0 Future Directions

Regulatory Changes

The last Comprehensive Review of the CSBFP confirmed the ongoing need for the program, particularly for start-ups and small and medium-sized enterprises operating in higher risk sectors. However, it also highlighted areas for improvement and committed to addressing stakeholder concerns through the modernization of the program.

In response, the department developed a package of regulatory amendments that seek to:

The regulatory amendments are anticipated to come into force on .

Electronic Loan Registrations

The CSBF Program will continue with its endeavours to assist more lenders in taking advantage of the program’s online loan registration application to submit loans and registration fees electronically.

Program Awareness

The CSBF Program will maintain its efforts to increase the understanding of the program’s benefits and requirements among lenders, borrowers, associations, chambers of commerce and other federal/provincial government departments.

Comprehensive Review

In 2013–14, the CSBF Program will begin preparing for the comprehensive review of the to lending period. The review is mandated by the Canada Small Business Financing Act, and a report must be completed and tabled in Parliament by . The purpose of the review is to monitor and assess the operational and financial performance of the program.


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Appendix

Canada Small Business Financing Act—Tables 1 to 5

Note

Supplemental data tables for fiscal years 1999–2013 are available on the CSBF Program website in Excel, PDF and HTML formats.

Table 1: Summary of Financial Activities per Fiscal Year—CSBF Program
Fiscal Year Loans Revenues

FeesFootnote 6 ($000)
Expenses Net Revenues Less Expenses ($000)
Number Value ($000) Average Size ($000) Number of Claims Expenses ($000)
1999–2000 17,741 1,352,320.5 76.2 33,406.6 19 494.6 32,912.0
2000–01 14,442 1,159,048.0 80.3 43,134.5 307 14,769.0 28,365.5
2001–02 11,016 899,247.6 81.6 44,576.2 915 43,444.3 1,131.9
2002–03 11,263 951,159.1 84.4 48,433.2 1,409 68,791.3 (20,358.0)
2003–04 11,085 999,868.3 90.2 51,553.2 1,553 71,662.7 (20,109.5)
2004–05 11,142 1,041,063.0 93.4 53,820.7 1,620 76,460.1 (22,639.4)
2005–06 10,790 1,087,701.8 100.8 56,220.8 1,598 71,679.3 (15,458.5)
2006–07 9,595 1,024,535.6 106.8 55,769.9 1,681 80,289.4 (24,519.5)
2007–08 8,930 987,662.6 110.6 55,066.8 1,835 96,341.1 (41,274.3)
2008–09 7,796 901,115.2 115.6 52,895.2 1,955 101,509.4 (48,614.2)
2009–10 7,534 952,858.5 126.5 52,393.3 1,933 109,458.9 (57,065.6)
2010–11 7,454 1,015,064.2 136.2 51,732.2 1,475 76,318.3 (24,586.1)
2011–12 7,141 978,287.8 137.0 53,117.1 1,329 66,152.5 (13,035.4)
2012–13 6,201 910,158.3 146.8 50,487.2 901 51,103.9 (616.7)
TotalFootnote 7 142,130 14,260,090.6 100.3 702,606.9 18,574 928,474.7 (225,867.8)

Return to Figure 1a

Return to Figure 1b

Table 2: Summary of Financial Activities per Fiscal Year—Capital Leasing Pilot Project
Fiscal Year Leases Revenues
FeesFootnote 8 ($000)
Expenses Net Revenues Less Expenses ($000)
Number Value ($000) Average ($000) Number of Claims Expenses ($000)
2002–03 57 8,773.7 153.9 210.6 210.6
2003–04 124 16,208.5 130.7 480.2 480.2
2004–05 288 26,006.5 90.3 864.7 1 11.3 853.4
2005–06 441 37,977.7 86.1 1,351.3 17 503.7 847.6
2006–07 588 47,292.3 80.4 1,803.1 16 443.1 1,360.0
2007–08 831.0 36 688.9 142.1
2008–09 512.5 102 3,579.8 (3,067.3)
2009–10 266.2 64 2,473.7 (2,207.5)
2010–11 145.4 36 1,554.0 (1,408.6)
2011–12 48.7 29 1,188.0 (1,139.2)
2012–13 2.9 8 166.9 (163.9)
TotalFootnote 9 1,498 136,258.6 91.0 6,516.6 309 10,609.3 (4,092.7)
Table 3: Loans and Claims by Province and Territory for 2012–13—CSBF Program
Province or Territory Loans Claims
Number Value ($000) Percentage of Total Value Average ($000) Number Value ($000) Percentage of Total Value Average ($000)
Newfoundland and Labrador 62 6,731.9 0.7 108.5 3 30.9 0.1 10.3
Prince Edward Island 48 5,435.2 0.6 114.3 4 56.4 0.1 14.1
Nova Scotia 152 18,454.0 2.0 121.4 29 965.3 1.9 33.3
New Brunswick 252 32,716.2 3.6 129.7 28 1,141.3 2.2 40.8
Quebec 2,040 299,467.6 32.9 146.8 312 17,253.9 33.8 55.3
Ontario 1,946 317,457.1 34.9 163.1 387 24,325.1 47.6 62.9
Manitoba 233 27,805.3 3.1 119.6 16 426.2 0.8 26.6
Saskatchewan 308 38,007.8 4.2 123.4 12 282.2 0.6 23.5
Alberta 676 106,988.7 11.8 158.3 54 3,744.2 7.3 69.3
British Columbia 479 56,298.1 6.2 117.6 56 2,878.5 5.6 51.4
Yukon 2 462.0 0.1 231.0
Northwest Territories 3 334.5 0.0 107.9
Nunavut
Total Footnote 10 6,201 910,158.3 100.0 146.8 901 51,103.9 100.0 56.7

Return to Figure 2

Table 4: Loans and Claims by Size of Loans for 2012–13—CSBF Program
Size of Loans Loans Claims
Number Value ($000) Percentage of Total Value Average ($000) Number Value ($000) Percentage of Total Value Average ($000)
$0 to $125,000 3,223 199,753.0 21.9 62.0 459 12,263.2 24.0 26.7
$125,001 to $250,000 1,861 336,391.4 37.0 180.8 372 27,789.5 54.4 74.7
$250,001 to $375,000 979 312,120.7 34.3 318.9 67 10,467.0 20.5 156.2
$375,001 to $500,000 139 61,893.3 6.8 446.8 3 584.2 1.1 194.7
TotalFootnote 11 6,201 910,158.3 100.0 146.8 901 51,103.9 100.0 56.7

Return to Figure 3

Table 5: Loans and Claims by Industry Sector for 2012–13—CSBF Program
Industry Sector Loans Claims
Number Value ($000) Percentage of Total Value Average ($000) Number Value ($000) Percentage of Total Value Average ($000)
Accommodation and Food Services 1,546 300,277.9 33.0 194.2 284 19,467.6 38.1 68.5
Manufacturing 284 43,208.1 4.7 152.0 89 4,773.4 9.3 53.6
Other Services 683 84,803.7 9.3 124.1 56 2,767.3 5.4 49.4
Retail Trade 888 140,410.7 15.4 158.1 180 9,600.6 18.8 53.3
Transportation and Warehousing 747 67,458.2 7.4 90.3 50 1,267.3 2.5 25.3
Other Sectors 2,052 273,999.7 30.1 133.5 242 13,227.6 25.9 54.7
TotalFootnote 12 6,201 910,158.3 100.0 146.8 901 51,103.9 100.0 56.7

Return to Figure 5

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