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Patent 2809959 Summary

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(12) Patent Application: (11) CA 2809959
(54) English Title: BITUMEN SEPARATION PROCESS AND APPARATUS FOR PROBLEM ORES
(54) French Title: PROCEDE DE SEPARATION DU BITUME ET APPAREIL POUR LES MINERAIS PROBLEMATIQUES
Status: Dead
Bibliographic Data
(51) International Patent Classification (IPC):
  • B03B 9/02 (2006.01)
  • B03D 1/00 (2006.01)
  • C10G 1/04 (2006.01)
(72) Inventors :
  • SIY, ROBERT (Canada)
  • CLEMINSON, RON (Canada)
  • LONG, JUN (Canada)
  • VANDENBERGHE, JESSICA (Canada)
  • HILSCHER, BRENT (Canada)
  • REID, KEVIN (Canada)
  • TRAN, TOM (Canada)
(73) Owners :
  • SYNCRUDE CANADA LTD. (Canada)
(71) Applicants :
  • SYNCRUDE CANADA LTD. (Canada)
(74) Agent: BENNETT JONES LLP
(74) Associate agent:
(45) Issued:
(22) Filed Date: 2013-03-19
(41) Open to Public Inspection: 2013-09-20
Examination requested: 2013-03-19
Availability of licence: N/A
(25) Language of filing: English

Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT): No

(30) Application Priority Data:
Application No. Country/Territory Date
61/613,091 United States of America 2012-03-20

Abstracts

English Abstract


A process for separating from an oil sand slurry solids and bitumen is
provided,
comprising introducing the oil sand slurry into a separation zone comprising
an upper
zone and a lower zone; intercepting a settling path of the solids in the
separation zone by
bringing the solids into contact with at least one intercepting surface to
direct the solids to
the lower zone; and producing a reduced solids upper zone to allow the bitumen
to rise
through the upper zone with reduced hindrance from the solids.

Claims

Note: Claims are shown in the official language in which they were submitted.


WE CLAIM:
1. A process for separating solids and bitumen present in an oil sand slurry,
comprising:
(a) introducing the oil sand slurry into a separation zone comprising an upper

zone and a lower zone;
(b) intercepting a settling path of the solids in the separation zone by
bringing the
solids into contact with at least one intercepting surface to direct the
solids to
the lower zone; and
(c) producing a reduced solids upper zone to allow the bitumen to rise through
the
upper zone with reduced hindrance from the solids.
2. The process as claimed in claim 1, whereby the separation zone is present
in a
bitumen separation vessel and the at least one intercepting surface is at
least one
inclined plate.
3. The process as claimed in claim 2, further comprising at least two inclined
plates
which form an inclined plate assembly.
4. The process as claimed in claim 1, wherein the oil sand slurry is
introduced into the
separation zone so that the solids contact the at least one intercepting
surface at or
near the center of the at least one intercepting surface.
5. The process as claimed in claim 3, wherein the at least two inclined plates
are
substantially parallel to each other.
6. The process as claimed in claim 3, wherein the at least two inclined plates
are angled
downwardly and to one side.
7. The process as claimed in claim 3, wherein the at least two inclined plates
are angled
downwardly and towards the center of the separation zone,
12

8. An apparatus for separating from an oil sand slurry solids and bitumen,
comprising:
(a) a vessel having a separation zone, the separation zone further comprising
an
upper zone and a lower zone;
(b) a feed well for feeding the oil sand slurry into the separation zone; and
(c) at least one separation element having an intercepting surface positioned
in
the separation zone in a vertically downward orientation;
whereby the solids present in the oil sand slurry are caused by gravity to
settle along
the at least one separation element to the lower zone and the bitumen is
caused by a
decrease in specific gravity due to the settling of the solids to flow
upwardly to the
upper zone.
9. The apparatus as claimed in claim 8, wherein the at least one separation
element is at
least one inclined plate.
10. The apparatus as claimed in claim 9, further comprising at least two
inclined plates
which form an inclined plate assembly.
11. The apparatus as claimed in claim 10, wherein the at least two inclined
plates are
substantially parallel to one another.
12. The process as claimed in claim 10, wherein the at least two inclined
plates are angled
downwardly and to one side.
13. The process as claimed in claim 10, wherein the at least two inclined
plates are angled
downwardly and towards the center of the separation zone.
14. A process for extracting bitumen from problem oil sand ores having low
bitumen
content and/or high fines content, comprising:
(a) mixing the problem oil sand ore with heated water to produce an oil sand
slurry;
13

(b) conditioning the oil sand slurry for a period of time sufficient to
substantially
disperse oil sand lumps and promote the release and coalescence of bitumen
flecks from the sand grains;
(c) introducing the conditioned oil sand slurry into a separation zone
comprising
an upper zone and a lower zone;
(d) intercepting a settling path of the solids in the separation zone by
bringing the
solids into contact with at least one intercepting surface to direct the
solids to
the lower zone; and
(e) producing a reduced solids upper zone to allow the bitumen to rise through
the
upper zone with reduced hindrance from the solids.
15. The process as claimed in claim 14, whereby the separation zone is present
in a
bitumen separation vessel and the at least one intercepting surface is at
least one
inclined plate.
16. The process as claimed in claim 15, further comprising at least two
inclined plates
which form an inclined plate assembly.
17. The process as claimed in claim 14, wherein the oil sand slurry is
introduced into the
separation zone so that the solids contact the at least one intercepting
surface at or
near the center of the at least one intercepting surface.
18. The process as claimed in claim 16, wherein the at least two inclined
plates are
substantially parallel to each other.
19. The process as claimed in claim 16, wherein the at least two inclined
plates are angled
downwardly and to one side.
20. The process as claimed in claim 16, wherein the at least two inclined
plates are angled
downwardly and towards the center of the separation zone.
14

Description

Note: Descriptions are shown in the official language in which they were submitted.


CA 02809959 2013-03-19
BITUMEN SEPARATION PROCESS AND APPARATUS FOR PROBLEM ORES
FIELD OF THE INVENTION
The present invention relates to an apparatus and a process for improving
bitumen
recovery from problem oil sand ores such as those that have higher fines
content and/or
lower bitumen grade. More particularly, conditioned oil sand slurry prepared
from
problems ores is introduced into a bitumen separation vessel having at least
one
intercepting surface.
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
Existing water-based oil sand extraction flowsheets are practically limited to
processing ores that are relatively high in bitumen content and low in fines
content, and,
preferably, of estuarine facies. However, there exists an abundance of
"problem ores"
that cannot be processed in existing extraction plants unless a high
proportion of high-
grade good processing ores are blended into these ore feeds. "Problem ores"
(also
referred to as "poor ores") refers to those oil sand ores having high fines
content or low
bitumen content or both. Generally, poor ores will have less than 8 or 9 wt%
bitumen
content. An example of a "problem ore" or "poor ore" would be an ore
comprising 6.1
wt% bitumen, 7.0 wt% water, 86.9 wt% solids, wherein 43.0 wt% of the solids
are fines,
<44 [1.m. Hence, it is necessary to plan well ahead prior to the opening of a
new mine to
ensure that sufficient amount of good ores will be available for blending.
Ore blending criteria include limiting the fines content (<44 1.tm) in the ore
feed
and the solids d50 to some specified maximum levels to prevent processability
and
pipeline sanding issues, thereby limiting the maximum proportion of problem
ores in the
blends. By way of example and without being limiting, it may be desirable to
limit the
fines content to a maximum of about 28-30% and the solid d50 to about 250-300
vm.
Thus, the proportion of problem ores in blends may be limited to about 30% in
many
cases.
However, blending criteria are not always possible to meet and are simply
missed
at times during day-to-day operations. Furthermore, ore blending activities
significantly
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increase operation cost, energy usage and reduce production capacity. The
challenge is
to widen the processability window for an extraction plant to be able to
handle greater
types of ore feed and, as such, reduce the need for ore blending and reduce
the impact of
blending upset when same occurs.
A prior patent application of the present applicant, US 2011/0127198,
describes
treating conditioned oil sand slurry in a de-sander circuit prior to
introducing it into a
bitumen separation vessel to improve bitumen recovery/froth quality for
problem ores.
However, there are significant costs involved in implementing and maintaining
such a de-
sander circuit as well as added complexity to the process flowsheet and
operation.
Hence, there is still a need for additional/alternative technology to remove
solids from
conditioned slurry to improve the processability of problem ores without added
process
and operation complexity and significant costs increased.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
The current application is directed to a process and apparatus for separating
from
a conditioned oil sand slurry solids and bitumen. The present invention is
particularly
useful with, but not limited to, problem ores, for example, ores having high
amounts of
fine solids, which fine solids may interfere in bitumen separation, froth
treatment, and
tailings management. By enhancing the removal of solids in a separation zone,
the
bitumen droplets are allowed to float up more readily through the separation
zone due to
the reduction in physical hindrance from the solids.
More particularly, in one aspect, a process for separating from an oil sand
slurry
solids and bitumen is provided, comprising:
= introducing the oil sand slurry into a separation zone comprising at
least an upper
zone and a lower zone;
= intercepting a settling path of the solids in the separation zone by
bringing the
solids into contact with at least one intercepting surface to direct the
solids to the
lower zone; and
2
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= producing a reduced solids upper zone to allow the bitumen to rise
through the
upper zone with reduced hindrance from the solids.
In one embodiment, the separation zone is present in a bitumen separation
vessel
and the at least one intercepting surface is at least one inclined plate. The
configuration
of the at least one inclined plate can be selected from a variety of
configurations, some of
which are described in more detail below.
In another aspect, an apparatus for separating from an oil sand slurry solids
and
bitumen is provided, comprising:
= a vessel having a separation zone, the separation zone further comprising
at least
an upper zone and a lower zone;
= a feed well for feeding the oil sand slurry into the separation zone; and
= at least one separation element having an intercepting surface positioned
in the
separation zone in a vertically downward orientation;
whereby the solids are cause by gravity to settle along the at least one
separation element
to the lower zone and the bitumen is caused by a decrease in specific gravity
due to the
settling of the solids to flow upwardly to the upper zone.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
Referring to the drawings wherein like reference numerals indicate similar
parts
throughout the several views, several aspects of the present invention are
illustrated by
way of example, and not by way of limitation, in detail in the figures,
wherein:
FIG. 1 is a schematic of an embodiment of the present invention showing a
process line useful in processing oil sand and extracting bitumen therefrom
which
includes a bitumen separation vessel of the present invention.
FIG. 2 is a tear away view of one embodiment of a bitumen separation vessel
useful in the present invention.
3
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FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional of one of the inclined plate assemblies of FIG. 2.
FIG. 4 is a tear away view of another embodiment of a bitumen separation
vessel
useful in the present invention.
FIG. 5 is a tear away view of another embodiment of a bitumen separation
vessel
useful in the present invention.
FIG. 6 is a tear away view of another embodiment of a bitumen separation
vessel
useful in the present invention.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
The detailed description set forth below in connection with the appended
drawing
is intended as a description of various embodiments of the present invention
and is not
intended to represent the only embodiments contemplated by the inventor. The
detailed
description includes specific details for the purpose of providing a
comprehensive
understanding of the present invention. However, it will be apparent to those
skilled in
the art that the present invention may be practiced without these specific
details.
FIG. 1 is a schematic of an embodiment of the process of the present invention
useful in obtaining bitumen from problem oil sand ores. Oil sand 10 is mined
from an oil
sand rich area such as the Athabasca Region of Alberta and mixed with heated
water 12
in a slurry preparation unit, which unit is shown here generally as element
15. As shown
in FIG. 1, slurry preparation unit 15 may comprise tumbler 16, screening
device 18 and
pump box 22; however, it is understood that any slurry preparation unit known
in the art
can be used. In addition to the oil sand 10 and water 12, optionally, caustic
(NaOH) 14 is
also added to tumbler 16 to aid in conditioning the oil sand slurry.
The oil sand slurry is then screened through screen portion 18, where
additional
water may be added to clean the rejects (e.g., oversized rocks) prior to
delivering the
rejects to rejects pile 20. The screened oil sand slurry is collected in a
vessel such as
pump box 22 where the oil sand slurry is then pumped through a hydrotransport
pipeline
24, which pipeline 24 is of a adequate length to ensure sufficient
conditioning of the oil
4
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sand slurry, e.g., thorough digestion/ablation/dispersion of the larger oil
sand lumps,
coalescence of released bitumen flecks and aeration of the coalesced bitumen
droplets.
The conditioned oil sand slurry 25 is then fed to bitumen separation vessel
34,
= which bitumen separation vessel 34 operates under somewhat more quiescent
conditions
to allow the bitumen droplets to rise to the top of the vessel and form
bitumen froth,
which froth over flows to the launder 36 and is collected for further froth
treatment.
Tailings 40 are either discarded or further treated for additional bitumen
recovery.
FIG. 2 illustrates an embodiment of a gravity separation vessel 134 useful in
separating bitumen and solids from an oil sand/water slurry. Oil sand/water
slurry (which
has typically been conditioned by hydrotransport through pipelines) is
introduced into the
gravity separation vessel 134 and, under quiescent conditions; the bitumen
froth separates
from the water and solids. Typically, the gravity separation vessel 134 is
operated as a
continuous process so that diluted slurry is continuously being introduced
into the gravity
separation vessel 134 while end products, such as bitumen froth, a tailings
stream, etc. are
also being continuously removed.
The gravity separation vessel 134 has a separation chamber (also referred to
herein as a separation zone) 154. Typically, the separation chamber 154 will
have a
generally cylindrical upper portion (upper zone) 156 and a generally conical
bottom
portion (lower zone) 158. In this illustration, the bottom of cone 158 further
comprises
solids outlet 159. The upper zone 156 can have an open top and a feedwell 152
provided
in the upper portion through which the diluted slurry enters the gravity
separation vessel
134 via a tangential pipe 150 at the upper zone 156 of the separation chamber
154.
The separation chamber or separation zone 154 further comprises at least one
inclined plate assembly 160, which inclined plate assembly 160 can be seen in
more
detail in FIG. 3. In this embodiment, a plurality of inclined plates
assemblies 160 are
illustrated, each inclined plate assembly 160 comprising a plurality of
inclined plates 161
each of which are angled downwardly towards the center of the separation
chamber 154.
The inclined plate assemblies 160 are secured to the walls of the gravity
separation vessel
134 by means of fastening bars 162.
5
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The feedwell 152 further comprises a plurality of smaller pipes 153 and each
pipe
153 has a feed distributor 170 so that the slurry feed is directed towards the
center portion
of the plurality of inclined plate assemblies 160 and can be substantially
evenly
distributed to each inclined plate 161 of each inclined plate assembly 160 for
more
effective use of surfaces. Thus, the inclined plate assemblies 160 are
arranged so that
when the diluted slurry is introduced into the separation chamber 154, the
solids in the
slurry will contact the individual inclined plates 161 inside the inclined
plate assemblies
For this and other subsequent inclined plate assemblies where there can be
significant
surface settling area not being occupied by the assemblies, it may be
advantageous, but
not essential, to feed a portion of the diluted slurry to the gravity
separation vessel 134
while the rest of the diluted slurry is fed to the inclined plate assemblies
160. This added
optional feed arrangement will make use of all available settling areas and at
the same
time help in reducing the flux to the inclined plate assemblies for further
improvement in
overall performance.
FIG. 3 shows the inclined plate assembly 160 of FIG. 2 having a plurality of
individual inclined plates 161, each plate 161 being at an angle of about 55
and
substantially, but not necessarily, parallel to one another. Slurry is
continuously fed at
about 0.3 m/sec towards the center 162 of the inclined plate assembly 160. The
fine sand
present in the slurry having a particle size of about 100 tim to about 200 p.m
(together
with the larger sand particles) will be directed downwardly by the interfering
surfaces of
the inclined plates 161, thereby allowing the fine sand to more rapidly move
to the lower
zone 158 of the separation zone 154. In turn, due to the rapid reduction in
solids
(including the fine sand) in this area, this gives the more slow floating
bitumen droplets
more of an opportunity to move upward, to coalesce and float to the upper zone
156.
Furthermore, the silts, generally having an average particle size of about 44
p.m to about
100 m and which have a certain tendency to move upwardly, will instead
contact the
interfering surfaces of the inclined plates 161 and thereby may also be
directed
downwardly towards the lower zone 158. Thus, the bitumen droplets will be
encouraged
to coalesce between the plates 161 in a relatively free floating bitumen
recovery zone.
Another key advantage of the inclined plate assembly is that the assembly can
be design
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to significantly reduce the Reynolds numbers (in some cases, from turbulent to
laminar
regime) which further enhance the bitumen ¨ solids separation.
Hence, a froth layer results which contains a more significant portion of
bitumen
= and lesser portions of water and solids, even when poor ore is used. The
tailings layer
which collects at the bottom of the gravity separation vessel will now contain
a majority
of sand and silt. The bitumen froth layer in the gravity separation vessel 134
can be
recovered and routed for further treatment, such as de-aeration, addition of a
diluent
(such as naphtha or paraffin) to form diluted bitumen, etc., so that the
recovered bitumen
can be further upgraded to a petroleum product. The tailings layer containing
sand and
other solids that have settled out of the liquid in the gravity separation
vessel can be
removed as a tailings stream, such as through bottom outlet 159. The tailings
stream can
either be discarded or further treated to remove additional bitumen that may
still be
present in the tailings stream.
FIG. 4 shows another embodiment of a gravity separation vessel 434 of the
present invention. In this embodiment, separation vessel 434 has a separation
chamber
(separation zone) 454, having a generally cylindrical upper portion (upper
zone) 456 and
a generally conical bottom portion (lower zone) 458. The upper zone 456 can
have an
open top and a feedwell 452 provided in the upper portion through which the
diluted
slurry enters the gravity separation vessel 434 via a tangential pipe 450 at
the upper zone
456 of the separation chamber 454.
The separation chamber or separation zone 454 further comprises at least one
inclined plate assembly 460, which inclined plate assembly 460 is arranged in
a cone
configuration. In this embodiment, a plurality of cone-shaped inclined plates
461 are
illustrated, each plate being larger than the next plate to give a "nested
cone" overall
configuration to the inclined plate assembly 160. Once again, each assembly
460
comprising a plurality of inclined plates 461, each of which is angled
downwardly
towards the center of the separation chamber. The inclined plate assembly 460
is secured
to the walls of the gravity separation vessel 434 by means of fastening bars
462.
7
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In the "nested cone" embodiment, the feedwell 452 further comprises a
plurality
of smaller pipes 453 and each pipe 453 has a feed distributor 470 so that the
slurry feed is
directed towards the center portion of the plurality of inclined plates 461 of
inclined plate
assembly 460. Thus, the inclined plate assembly 460 is arranged so that when
the diluted
slurry is introduced into the separation chamber 454, the solids in the slurry
will contact
the individual inclined plates 461 which make up the inclined plate assembly.
FIG. 5 shows another embodiment of a gravity separation vessel 534 of the
present invention. In this embodiment, separation vessel 534 has a separation
chamber
(separation zone) 554, having a generally cylindrical upper portion (upper
zone) 556 and
a generally conical bottom portion (lower zone) 558. The upper zone 556 can
have an
open top and a feedwell 552 provided in the upper portion through which the
diluted
slurry enters the gravity separation vessel 534 via a tangential pipe 550 at
the upper zone
556 of the separation chamber 554.
The separation chamber or separation zone 554 further comprises at least one
inclined plate assembly 560, which inclined plate assembly 560 comprising a
plurality of
inclined plates 561, each of which is angled downwardly towards the center of
the
separation chamber. The inclined plate assemblies 560 are secured to the walls
of the
gravity separation vessel 534 by means of fastening bars 562.
In this embodiment, the feedwell 552 further comprises a deflector plate 555
so
that the slurry feed is deflected towards the center portion of the plurality
of inclined
plate assemblies 560. Thus, the inclined plate assemblies 560 are arranged so
that when
the diluted slurry is introduced into the separation chamber 554, the solids
in the slurry
will contact the individual inclined plates inside the inclined plate
assemblies. Figure 5
incorporates more inclined plate assemblies inside the separation chamber than
that
shown in Figure 2.
FIG. 6 shows another embodiment of a gravity separation vessel 634 of the
present invention. In this embodiment, separation vessel 634 has a separation
chamber
(separation zone) 654, having a generally cylindrical upper portion (upper
zone) 656 and
a generally conical bottom portion (lower zone) 658. In this illustration, the
bottom of
8
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cone 658 has a tailings outlet 660. The upper zone 656 can have an open top
and a
feedwell 652 provided in the upper portion through which the diluted slurry
enters the
gravity separation vessel 634 via a tangential pipe 650 at the upper zone 656
of the
separation chamber 654.
The separation chamber or separation zone 654 further comprises at least one
inclined plate assembly 660, which inclined plate assembly 660 is in a
circular
configuration. In this embodiment, inclined plates assembly 660 comprises a
plurality of
inclined plates 661, each of which is angled downwardly and to one side so as
to form an
essentially circular inclined plate assembly 660. The inclined plate assembly
660 is
secured to the walls of the gravity separation vessel 634 by means of
fastening bars 662.
In this embodiment, the bottom portion of feedwell 652, while concealed may be

similar to the feedwell as shown in FIG. 5 so that the slurry feed is directed
towards the
center portion of the inclined plate assembly 660. Thus, the inclined plate
assembly 660
is arranged so that when the diluted slurry is introduced into the separation
chamber 654,
the solids in the slurry will contact the individual inclined plates 661
inside the inclined
plate assemblies.
Example 1
A set of tests were conducted using an oil sand ore comprising 8.7 wt% bitumen

and 28 wt% in fines solids with three different types of inclined plate
assemblies (Types
A, B & C) in a separation vessel to test each assemblies effect on overall
extraction
performance.
Their test performances are compared to that of the base case
performances, where the separation vessel was operated without any inclined
plate
assembly. The oil sand ore used is generally considered to be a "poor" ore
sample, due to
the relatively low amount of bitumen and relatively high amount of fines (<44
inn). The
test results are summarized in Table I below.
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Table 1
Inclined Plate Assembly None A B None A
Oil Sand Grade, % Bitumen 8.7 8.7 8.7 8.7 8.7
8.7
Oil Sand Fines, >44 um ¨28 ¨28 ¨28 ¨28 ¨28
¨28
NaOH to Oil Sand, wt% 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.010
Target Flooded Slurry Density, g/cc 1.45 1.45 1.45 1.45
1.45 1.45
Rejects Free Overall Recover, % 13.3 38.9 83.1 37.0
55.5 70.1
PSV Froth % Bitumen 56.1 60.4 36.7 42.5
42.7 44.2
PSV Froth % Solids 17.1 17.9 18.6 22.4
21.7 20.4
The results in Table 1 clearly show a significant improvement in overall
extraction
recoveries when inclined plate assemblies (Types A, B or C) were introduced
inside the
separation vessel, as compared to the two base cases that were operated
without any
assembly at both 0.010 wt% and 0.033 wt% of NaOH additions. Without being
bound to
theory, it is believed that the use of inclined plate assemblies increased the
solids settling
area, reduced travel distance for bitumen and solids particles for better
separation, and
reduced turbulence, some or all of which may improve the separation
performance of the
separation vessel.
It is expected that even greater perfoimance improvement may be achievable for
a
commercial scale primary separation vessel (PSV), as there will likely be more
room and
length available to design a more effective assembly of plates inside the PSV.
In one
embodiment, the commercial vessel may also incorporate a flow split control
that
optimizes overflow relative to underflow to maximize bitumen to solids
separation. By
way of example, and not intending to be limited, one may reduce the underflow
discharge
area relative to the overflow flow area. Furthermore, the one or more inclined
plate
assemblies can be arranged to ensure minimum turbulence flow inside the
inclined plate
assemblies.
From the foregoing description, one skilled in the art can easily ascertain
the
essential characteristics of this invention, and without departing from the
spirit and scope
thereof, can make various changes and modifications of the invention to adapt
it to
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various usages and conditions. Thus, the present invention is not intended to
be limited to
the embodiments shown herein, but is to be accorded the full scope consistent
with the
claims, wherein reference to an element in the singular, such as by use of the
article "a"
or "an" is not intended to mean one and only one" unless specifically so
stated, but
rather "one or more". All structural and functional equivalents to the
elements of the
various embodiments described throughout the disclosure that are known or
later come to
be known to those of ordinary skill in the art are intended to be encompassed
by the
elements of the claims. Moreover, nothing disclosed herein is intended to be
dedicated to
the public regardless of whether such disclosure is explicitly recited in the
claims.
11
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Administrative Status

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Administrative Status

Title Date
Forecasted Issue Date Unavailable
(22) Filed 2013-03-19
Examination Requested 2013-03-19
(41) Open to Public Inspection 2013-09-20
Dead Application 2015-11-09

Abandonment History

Abandonment Date Reason Reinstatement Date
2014-11-07 R30(2) - Failure to Respond

Payment History

Fee Type Anniversary Year Due Date Amount Paid Paid Date
Request for Examination $800.00 2013-03-19
Registration of a document - section 124 $100.00 2013-03-19
Application Fee $400.00 2013-03-19
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 2 2015-03-19 $100.00 2014-12-08
Owners on Record

Note: Records showing the ownership history in alphabetical order.

Current Owners on Record
SYNCRUDE CANADA LTD.
Past Owners on Record
None
Past Owners that do not appear in the "Owners on Record" listing will appear in other documentation within the application.
Documents

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Document
Description 
Date
(yyyy-mm-dd) 
Number of pages   Size of Image (KB) 
Abstract 2013-03-19 1 13
Description 2013-03-19 11 522
Claims 2013-03-19 3 108
Cover Page 2013-09-30 1 30
Drawings 2013-03-19 6 367
Assignment 2013-03-19 13 373
Prosecution-Amendment 2014-05-07 3 117